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This page is dedicated to My Grandson Brandon.

(Branstein)

***IN STOCK***
 HOLOGRAPHIC

UNIVERSE

by Chuck Missler

DVD

PRICE R 159.00

 

 

 

 

This DVD includes notes in PDF format and M4A files.


This briefing pack contains 2 hours of teachings

Available in the following formats

Session 1

• Epistemology 101: How do we “know”?

– Scientific Myths of the Past

– Scientific Myths of the Present

• The Macrocosm: The Plasma Universe: Gravitational Presumption?

• The Microcosm: The Planck Wall

• The Metacosm: Fracture of Hyperspace?

Session 2


• The Holographic Model: David Bohm

• GEO 600 “Noise”

• The Black Hole Paradox

– String Theorists examine the elephant

• A Holographic Universe:

– Distances are synthetic (virtual) images

– A Geocentric Cosmology?

– Some Scriptural Perspective(s)

 

 

“One can’t believe impossible things,”

Alice laughed.

“I daresay you haven’t had much practice,”

said the Queen.

“When I was your age, I always did it for

half-an-hour a day.

Why, sometimes I’ve believed as many

as six impossible things before breakfast.”

Through the Looking Glass

Lewis Carroll (Charles Lutwidge Dodgson)
 

DVD:

1 Disc
2 M4A Files
Color, Fullscreen 16:9, Dolby Digital 2.0 stereo, Region  This DVD will be viewable in other countries WITH the proper DVD player and television set.)
 

M4A File Video

Can be burned to disc and played on MP4 compatible DVD players.
Playable on iPod, iPhone, iPod Touch
Playable on any MP4 player
1 PDF Notes File
2 MP3 Files


 

 

 

 

 

   

Featured Briefing

A Holographic Universe?

by Dr. Chuck Missler

Are we actually living in a holographic universe? Are the distant galaxies only a virtual illusion? In a hologram, distances are synthetic! How does this impact our concepts of time and space?

There seems to be growing evidence to suggest that our world and everything in it may be only ghostly images, projections from a level of reality so beyond our own that the real reality is literally beyond both space and time.1

The Cosmos As a Super-Hologram?

An initiating architect of this astonishing idea was one of the world’s most eminent thinkers: University of London physicist David Bohm, a protégé of Einstein’s and one of the world’s most respected quantum physicists. Bohm’s work in plasma physics in the 1950s is considered a landmark. Earlier, at the Lawrence Radiation Laboratory, he noticed that in plasmas (ionized gases) the particles stopped behaving as individuals and started behaving as if they were part of a larger and interconnected whole. Moving to Princeton University in 1947, there, too, he continued his work in the behavior of oceans of ionized particles, noting their highly organized overall effects and their behavior, as if they knew what each of the untold trillions of individual particles was doing.

One of the implications of Bohm’s view has to do with the nature of location. Bohm’s interpretation of quantum physics indicated that at the subquantum level location ceased to exist. All points in space become equal to all other points in space, and it was meaningless to speak of anything as being separate from anything else. Physicists call this property “nonlocality”. The web of subatomic particles that compose our physical universe—the very fabric of “reality” itself—possesses what appears to be an undeniable “holographic” property. Paul Davis of the University of Newcastle upon Tyne, England, observed that since all particles are continually interacting and separating, “the nonlocal aspects of quantum systems is therefore a general property of nature.”2

The Nature of Reality

One of Bohm’s most startling suggestions was that the tangible reality of our everyday lives is really a kind of illusion, like a holographic image. Underlying it is a deeper order of existence, a vast and more primary level of reality that gives birth to all the objects and appearances of our physical world in much the same way that a piece of holographic film gives birth to a hologram. Bohm calls this deeper level of reality the implicate (“enfolded”) order and he refers to our level of existence the explicate (unfolded) order.3 This view is not inconsistent with the Biblical presentation of the physical (“explicate”) world as being subordinate to the spiritual (“implicate”) world as the superior reality.4

The Search for Gravity Waves

Gravitational waves are extremely small ripples in the structure of spacetime caused by astrophysical events like supernovae or coalescing massive binaries (neutron stars, black holes). They had been predicted by Albert Einstein in 1916, but not yet directly observed.

GEO 600 is a gravitational wave detector located near Sarstedt, Germany, which seeks to detect gravitational waves by means of a laser interferometer of 600 meter arms’ length. This instrument, and its sister interferometric detectors, are some of the most sensitive gravitational wave detectors ever designed. They are designed to detect relative changes in distance of the order of 10-21, about the size of a single atom compared to the distance from the Earth to the Sun! Construction on the project began in 1995.

Mystery Noise

On January 15, 2009, it was reported in New Scientist that some yet unidentified noise that was present in the GEO 600 detector measurements might be because the instrument is sensitive to extremely small quantum fluctuations of space-time affecting the positions of parts of the detector. This claim was made by Craig Hogan, a scientist from Fermilab, on the basis of his theory of how such fluctuations should occur motivated by the holographic principle.5 Apparently, the gravitational wave detector in Hannover may have detected evidence for a holographic Universe!

Gravitational Wave Observatories Join Forces

A number of major projects will now pool their data to analyze it, jointly boosting their chances of spotting a faint signal that might otherwise be hidden by detector noise. Using lasers, they measure the length between mirrored test masses hung inside tunnels at right angles to each other. Gravitational waves decrease the distance between the masses in one tunnel and increase it in the other by a tiny, but detectable amount. Combining the data will also make it possible to triangulate to find the source of any gravitational waves detected. These include: Laser Interferometer Gravitational Observatory based in Hanford, Washington and Livingston, Louisiana; Virgo Observatory, Pisa Italy; and, of course, the GEO 600 Observatory near Hanover, Germany.

The most ambitious of them is the Laser Interferometer Space Antenna (LISA), a joint mission between NASA and the European Space Agency to develop and operate a space-based gravitational wave detector sensitive at frequencies between 0.03 mHz and 0.1 Hz. LISA seeks to detect gravitational-wave induced strains in space-time by measuring changes of the separation between fiducial masses in three spacecraft 5 million kilometers apart.

Cosmic Implications

Are we actually living in a holographic universe? Are the distant galaxies only a virtual illusion? In a hologram, distances are synthetic! How does this impact our concepts of time and space?

It gets even worse: Could our universe be geocentric? The implications are too staggering to embrace. The holographic paradigm is still a developing concept and riddled with controversies. For decades, science has chosen to ignore evidences that do not fit their standard theories. However, the volume of evidence has now reached the point that denial is no longer a viable option.

Clearly, 20th-century science has discovered that our “macrocosm”—studies of largeness—is finite, not infinite. Our universe is finite and had a beginning, and that’s what has led to the “big bang” speculations. We also realize that gravity is dramatically eclipsed by electromagnetic considerations when dealing with galaxies, etc. The plasma physicists have been trying to tell astronomers that for decades but no one was listening.

What is even more shocking has been the discoveries in the “microcosm”—studies of smallness—that run up against the “Planck Wall” of the non-location of subatomic particles, and the many strange paradoxes of quantum physics. We now discover that we are in a virtual reality that is a digital, simulated environment. The bizarre realization that the “constants” of physics are changing indicates that our “reality” is “but a shadow of a larger reality,”6 and that’s what the Bible has maintained all along!7

The Bible is, of course, unique in that it has always presented a universe of more than three dimensions,8 and revealed a Creator that is transcendent over His creation. It is the only “holy book” that demonstrates these contemporary insights. It’s time for us to spend more time with the handbook that the Creator has handed to us. It is the ultimate adventure, indeed!

For background information on the Holographic Universe, see our briefing series, The Beyond Collection, available on DVD and other formats, in the Christmas catalog insert in this issue.


Notes

  1. We explore the limitations of the Macrocosm, the Microcosm, and the super-embracing “Metacosm” in our Beyond Series.
  2. Paul Davis, Superforce, Simon & Schuster, New York, 1948, p.48.
  3. This is reminiscent of the Red King’s dream in Through the Looking Glass, in which Alice finds herself in deep metaphysical waters when the Tweedle brothers defend the view that all material objects, including ourselves, are only “sorts of things” in the mind of God.
  4. 2 Corinthians 4:18.
  5. Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory (Fermilab), located just outside Batavia, Illinois, near Chicago, is a US Department of Energy national laboratory specializing in high-energy particle physics. (Craig Hogan was then put in charge…)
  6. Scientific American, June 2005, “The Inconstancy of Constants”.
  7. Hebrews 11:3; John 1:1-3; et al.
  8. Ephesians 3:18. Nachmonides, writing in the 13th century, concluded, from his studies of the Genesis texts, that our universe has ten dimensions, of which only four are directly “knowable”.
 
 

The Physics of Immortality

DVD


by Dr. Chuck Missler

Price R 249.00

 

 

The Physics of Immortality

 This is an intensive review of what the Apostle Paul calls the most important chapter in the Bible: 1 Corinthians 15. Without it, “we are of all men most miserable.”
Did Jesus really rise from the dead? How do we know? Do we really believe it?
What kind of body did He have? Why did they have trouble recognizing Him?
How do we now know that we live within a digital virtual environment which is but “a shadow of a larger reality”? What are the implications of that “larger reality”? What is the relationship between “the twinkling of an eye” and Planck’s Constant for time (1043 seconds)?
Do you have your passport for the transit that’s coming? Are you really ready?
Join Dr. Chuck Missler in the Executive Briefing Room of the River Lodge, New Zealand, as he examines the physics of immortality.
This briefing pack contains 2 hours of teachings
Available in the following formats:
 DVD:
•1 Disc
•2 MP3 Files
•1 PDF Notes File
 

Published on Jan 28, 2015

Chuck Missler had the opportunity to sit discuss Zero Point Energy (ZPE) with Barry Setterfield 
 

Space News from SpaceDaily.com

 

 

Space News From SpaceDaily.Com

 

 

Russia schedules first Proton rocket launch since crash

 
‎30 ‎July ‎2015, ‏‎10:20:42 AMGo to full article
Moscow (AFP) July 29, 2015
Russia on Wednesday set a date for the first Proton rocket launch since an engine failure in May saw a Mexican satellite destroyed. Authorities said a Proton-M rocket would blast off from the Baikonur launch site in Kazakhstan on August 28 carrying a British Inmarsat-5F3 commercial communications satellite. A similar rocket bearing a Mexican satellite fell back to earth on May 16 after
 

NASA Mars Orbiter Preparing for Mars Lander's 2016 Arrival

 
‎30 ‎July ‎2015, ‏‎10:20:42 AMGo to full article
Pasadena CA (JPL) Jul 30, 2015
With its biggest orbit maneuver since 2006, NASA's Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter (MRO) will prepare this week for the arrival of NASA's next Mars lander, InSight, next year. A planned 77-second firing of six intermediate-size thrusters on July 29 will adjust the orbit timing of the veteran spacecraft so it will be in position to receive radio transmissions from InSight as the newcomer descen
 

China's supercomputer to support world's largest radio telescope

 
‎30 ‎July ‎2015, ‏‎10:20:42 AMGo to full article
Tianjin (XNA) Jul 30, 2015
Supercomputer Skyeye-1, capable of a quadrillion computing operations per second, will support space exploration by the world's largest radio telescope based in southwest China's Guizhou Province. Assembly of the telescope, with a dish the size of 30 football fields and located deep in the mountains of Guizhou, has got underway, according to Dawning Information Industry Co., which particip
 

New Names and Insights at Ceres

 
‎30 ‎July ‎2015, ‏‎10:20:42 AMGo to full article
Pasadena CA (JPL) Jul 30, 2015
Colorful new maps of Ceres, based on data from NASA's Dawn spacecraft, showcase a diverse topography, with height differences between crater bottoms and mountain peaks as great as 9 miles (15 kilometers). Scientists continue to analyze the latest data from Dawn as the spacecraft makes its way to its third mapping orbit. "The craters we find on Ceres, in terms of their depth and diameter, a
 

A new litmus test for chaos?

 
‎30 ‎July ‎2015, ‏‎10:20:42 AMGo to full article
Washington DC (SPX) Jul 30, 2015
Does the flap of a butterfly's wings in Brazil set off a tornado in Texas? This intriguing question - the title of a talk given by MIT meteorologist Edward Lorenz at a 1972 meeting - has come to embody the popular conception of a chaotic system, one in which a small difference in initial conditions will cascade toward a vastly different outcome in the future. Mathematically, extreme sensit
 

Missouri researcher bakes asteroids to find water

 
‎30 ‎July ‎2015, ‏‎10:20:42 AMGo to full article
Rolla, MO (SPX) Jul 30, 2015
A Missouri University of Science and Technology researcher is cooking up something new in the lab - baking meteorites to learn how to produce water and other easily evaporated compounds from asteroids. Dr. Leslie Gertsch, an associate professor of geological engineering at Missouri S and T, hopes to find a sustainable way for near-Earth objects (NEOs) like asteroids and comets to produce c
 

United Launch Alliance Launches WGS-7

 
‎30 ‎July ‎2015, ‏‎10:20:42 AMGo to full article
Cape Canaveral AFS FL (SPX) Jul 23, 2015
A United Launch Alliance (ULA) Delta IV rocket has launched the seventh Wideband Global SATCOM (WGS) communications satellite for the U.S. Air Force at 8:07 p.m. EDT July 23 from Space Launch Complex-37. This is ULA's seventh launch in 2015 and the second successful ULA launch in just eight days. The launch marks ULA's 98th successful one-at-a-time launch since the company was formed in December
 

Aerojet Rocketdyne Wideband Global SATCOM Launch

 
‎30 ‎July ‎2015, ‏‎10:20:42 AMGo to full article
Sacramento CA (SPX) Jul 28, 2015
Aerojet Rocketdyne (AJRD) played a major role in successfully launching and placing the seventh Wideband Global SATCOM (WGS-7) spacecraft into orbit for the U.S. military. The mission lifted off from Launch Complex 37 at Cape Canaveral Air Force Station in Florida aboard a United Launch Alliance (ULA) Delta IV medium rocket. Aerojet Rocketdyne propulsion included an RS-68A booster engine,
 

Skynet 5A satellite starts move eastwards

 
‎30 ‎July ‎2015, ‏‎10:20:42 AMGo to full article
Stevenage UK (SPX) Jul 28, 2015
Airbus Defence and Space has announced that the planned 67,000 km move of the Skynet 5A satellite over the Asia Pacific region is on track. The move from 6 degrees East to 94.8 degrees East will expand Airbus Defence and Space's capability to provide protected and secure military satcom services to allied governments in the Asia-Pacific region. The satellite will be on station at its new locatio
 

Airbus Defence and Space UK delivers Sentinel-5 Precursor for testing

 
‎30 ‎July ‎2015, ‏‎10:20:42 AMGo to full article
Stevenage UK (SPX) Jul 28, 2015
The Sentinel-5 Precursor platform and the TROPOMI instrument have been integrated together to form the satellite which will be leaving the UK for testing. Airbus Defence and Space, the world's second largest space company, will deliver the spacecraft to Intespace in Toulouse, France, for final system level testing. The spacecraft is scheduled to be launched in April 2016 by a Eurokot rocke
 

Chinese military technologies increasingly employed in civil sector

 
‎30 ‎July ‎2015, ‏‎10:20:42 AMGo to full article
Beijing (XNA) Jul 28, 2015
Around 1,000 civil products adopted with military technologies are displayed at an exhibition showcasing China's achievements in the integration of military-civilian development. At the exhibition of China's civil products with military technologies, the model of "the 981 drilling platform" is attracting many visitors. The actual drilling platform, the first of its kind independently desig
 

Small oxygen jump helped enable early animals take first breaths

 
‎30 ‎July ‎2015, ‏‎10:20:42 AMGo to full article
Blacksburg, VA (SPX) Jul 28, 2015
If oxygen was a driver of the early evolution of animals, only a slight bump in oxygen levels facilitated it, according to a multi-institutional research team that includes a Virginia Tech geoscientist. The discovery, published Wednesday in the journal Nature, calls into question the long held theory that a dramatic change in oxygen levels might have been responsible for the appearance of
 

Object recognition for robots

 
‎30 ‎July ‎2015, ‏‎10:20:42 AMGo to full article
Boston MA (SPX) Jul 28, 2015
John Leonard's group in the MIT Department of Mechanical Engineering specializes in SLAM, or simultaneous localization and mapping, the technique whereby mobile autonomous robots map their environments and determine their locations. Last week, at the Robotics Science and Systems conference, members of Leonard's group presented a new paper demonstrating how SLAM can be used to improve objec
 

Insights into catalytic converters

 
‎30 ‎July ‎2015, ‏‎10:20:42 AMGo to full article
Karlsruher, Germany (SPX) Jul 28, 2015
Modern catalytic converters for the treatment of exhaust gases in vehicles with a combustion engine have largely contributed to reducing of pollutant emissions. By oxidation or reduction, i.e. the donation or acceptance of electrons, the catalysts convert combustion pollutants, such as carbon monoxide, nitrogen oxides and hydrocarbons, into carbon dioxide, water, and nitrogen. Increasingly
 

Ultra-thin hollow nanocages could reduce platinum use in fuel cells

 
‎30 ‎July ‎2015, ‏‎10:20:42 AMGo to full article
Atlanta, GA (SPX) Jul 28, 2015
A new fabrication technique that produces platinum hollow nanocages with ultra-thin walls could dramatically reduce the amount of the costly metal needed to provide catalytic activity in such applications as fuel cells. The technique uses a solution-based method for producing atomic-scale layers of platinum to create hollow, porous structures that can generate catalytic activity both insid

 

 
 

Kepler Mission Discovers Bigger, Older Cousin to Earth

 
‎24 ‎July ‎2015, ‏‎01:35:19 AMGo to full article
Pasadena CA (JPL) Jul 24, 2015
NASA's Kepler mission has confirmed the first near-Earth-size planet in the "habitable zone" around a sun-like star. This discovery and the introduction of 11 other new small habitable-zone candidate planets mark another milestone in the journey to finding another "Earth." The newly discovered Kepler-452b is the smallest planet to date discovered orbiting in the habitable zone - the area a
 

Could 'Windbots' Someday Explore the Skies of Jupiter?

 
‎24 ‎July ‎2015, ‏‎01:35:19 AMGo to full article
Pasadena CA (JPL) Jul 24, 2015
Among designers of robotic probes to explore the planets, there is certainly no shortage of clever ideas. There are concepts for robots that are propelled by waves in the sea. There are ideas for tumbleweed bots driven by wind, rolling across Antarctica or Mars. Recently a team of engineers at NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory in Pasadena, California, wondered if a probe could be buoyant in the c
 

Bleach a possible key to life on earth

 
‎24 ‎July ‎2015, ‏‎01:35:19 AMGo to full article
Canberra, Australia (SPX) Jul 24, 2015
Hydrogen peroxide - commonly used as hair bleach - may have provided the energy source for the development of life on Earth, two applied mathematicians have found. The heat from ancient geothermal vents may have triggered the varying acidity that was vital for early life to form and spread throughout the oceans. "The energy in hydrogen peroxide could have powered the living world before ce
 

Russia Extends Life of International Space Station Until 2024

 
‎24 ‎July ‎2015, ‏‎01:35:19 AMGo to full article
Moscow (Sputnik) Jul 24, 2015
The Russian government has agreed to prolong life of the International Space Station (ISS) until 2024, the head of Russia's space agency Roscosmos Igor Komarov said. "The government has approved our joint proposal [of partner countries] on the extension of ISS life until 2024," Komarov said early on Thursday, adding that political disagreements between the partner states have not affected
 

ALMA witnesses assembly of galaxies in the early universe

 
‎24 ‎July ‎2015, ‏‎01:35:19 AMGo to full article
Munich, Germany (SPX) Jul 24, 2015
When the first galaxies started to form a few hundred million years after the Big Bang, the Universe was full of a fog of hydrogen gas. But as more and more brilliant sources - both stars and quasars powered by huge black holes - started to shine they cleared away the mist and made the Universe transparent to ultraviolet light [1]. Astronomers call this the epoch of reionisation, but littl
 

Deja-vu, new theory says dark matter acts like well-known particle

 
‎24 ‎July ‎2015, ‏‎01:35:19 AMGo to full article
Tokyo, Japan (SPX) Jul 24, 2015
A new theory says dark matter acts remarkably similar to subatomic particles known to science since the 1930s. We owe a lot to dark matter - it is the thing keeping galaxies, stars, our solar system, and our bodies intact. Yet no one has been able to observe it, and it has often been regarded as a totally new exotic form of matter, such as a particle moving in extra dimensions of space or its qu
 

Curiosity Rover Inspects Unusual Bedrock

 
‎24 ‎July ‎2015, ‏‎01:35:19 AMGo to full article
Pasadena CA (JPL) Jul 24, 2015
Approaching the third anniversary of its landing on Mars, NASA's Curiosity Mars rover has found a target unlike anything it has studied before - bedrock with surprisingly high levels of silica. Silica is a rock-forming compound containing silicon and oxygen, commonly found on Earth as quartz. This area lies just downhill from a geological contact zone the rover has been studying near "Mari
 

India Earned Over $100Mln Launching Foreign Satellites

 
‎24 ‎July ‎2015, ‏‎01:35:19 AMGo to full article
New Delhi (Sputnik) Jul 24, 2015
The Indian Space Research Organization (ISRO) is promoting its Polar Satellite Launch Vehicle (PSLV), a launch system initially developed to allow India to achieve its domestic space goals. To date, 45 satellites from 19 countries have been successfully launched via PSLVs under commercial arrangements. The total income earned through launching of these foreign satellites amounts to some $1
 

NASA Could Return Humans to the Moon by 2021

 
‎24 ‎July ‎2015, ‏‎01:35:19 AMGo to full article
Washington DC (Sputnik) Jul 24, 2015
Humans could return to the Moon in the next decade, and for "approximately 90% less than the previously estimated $100 billion," according to a new study by NextGen Space. NASA can cut the cost of establishing a human presence on the Moon by utilizing existing partnerships with commercial service providers like SpaceX and Boeing, said Charles Miller, NexGen president and the study's lead a
 

Seeing triple: New 3-D model could solve supernova mystery

 
‎24 ‎July ‎2015, ‏‎01:35:19 AMGo to full article
East Lansing MI (SPX) Jul 24, 2015
Giant stars die a violent death. After a life of several million years, they collapse into themselves and then explode in what is known as a supernova. How these stars explode remains a mystery. However, recent work led by Michigan State University may bring some answers to this astronomical question. In a paper published in the Astrophysical Journal Letters, the team details how it develo
 

Making Space Technology Cutting Edge AND Affordable

 
‎24 ‎July ‎2015, ‏‎01:35:19 AMGo to full article
Bethesda MD (SPX) Jul 22, 2015
The current budgetary climate has forced a change in how the DoD handles space acquisition. As highlighted in this recent National Defense magazine article, programs in the past were often plagued by billions in cost overruns and up to a decade delay in a system's full operational capability. And the overruns were likely underestimated since the costs of operating ground systems were often
 

SBIRS GEO-3 Satellite Delivered

 
‎24 ‎July ‎2015, ‏‎01:35:19 AMGo to full article
Los Angeles AFB CA (SPX) Jul 22, 2015
The U.S. Air Force Space and Missile Systems Center announced the delivery of the third Space Based Infrared System Geosynchronous Earth Orbit satellite into storage at the Lockheed Martin facility in Sunnyvale, Calif. "This delivery represents a major milestone for the SBIRS program." said Lt. Gen. Samuel Greaves, commander of the Space and Missile Systems Center and Program Executive Off
 

The Friendly Unmanned Skies

 
‎24 ‎July ‎2015, ‏‎01:35:19 AMGo to full article
Bethesda MD (SPX) Jul 22, 2015
The use of unmanned aircraft systems (UAS) is rising rapidly worldwide. Long known only for their military applications, UAS are increasingly being deployed by civilian governments for use in scientific research, climate change research, and humanitarian relief operations. As detailed in a recent article from Northern Sky Research, the number of UAS dedicated to civilian applications is ex
 

50 SW Completes DMSP Flight 13 Rupture Review

 
‎24 ‎July ‎2015, ‏‎01:35:19 AMGo to full article
Schriever AFB CO (SPX) Jul 22, 2015
Officials from the 50th Space Wing have completed their operations review of the Defense Meteorological Satellite Program Flight 13 that was permanently shut down Feb. 3, 2015, precipitating a debris-causing event. The review determined there were no actions that could have been taken to prevent the incident. The mission is operated by the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration on behal
 

Vesta's Potassium-to-Thorium Ratio Reveals Hot Origins

 
‎24 ‎July ‎2015, ‏‎01:35:19 AMGo to full article
Tucson AZ (SPX) Jul 24, 2015
Studies of materials on the surface of Vesta offer new evidence that the giant asteroid is the source of howardite, eucrite and diogenite (HED) basaltic meteorites, supporting current models of solar system evolution and terrestrial planet formation, a new paper by Planetary Science Institute researcher Tom Prettyman says. Prettyman, a senior scientist at the Planetary Science Institute, a

 

 

Robot lab Philae 'silent', says concerned ground control

 
‎20 ‎July ‎2015, ‏‎09:02:26 AMGo to full article
Paris (AFP) July 20, 2015
Europe's robot lab Philae has fallen "silent" on the surface of a comet zipping towards the Sun, said ground controllers Monday who fear it may have shifted out of radio contact. "The lander could have moved," the German Aerospace Center (DLR) said in a statement, adding: "even a slight change in its position could mean that its antennas are now obstructed". "It is also possible that one
 

Mysterious icy plains glimpsed on Pluto's surface

 
‎20 ‎July ‎2015, ‏‎09:02:26 AMGo to full article
Miami (AFP) July 17, 2015
Smooth, icy plains have been spotted on the surface of Pluto, in the latest images released Friday from a NASA spacecraft that flew by the dwarf planet this week. The plains are located north of Pluto's icy mountains, in the center-left of the heart shape that NASA has named "Tombaugh Regio," or the Tombaugh Region after Clyde Tombaugh, who discovered Pluto in 1930. The area is lined wit

 

 

 

Old astronomic riddle on the way to be solved

 
‎17 ‎July ‎2015, ‏‎09:14:29 AMGo to full article
Basel, Switzerland (SPX) Jul 16, 2015
Scientists at the University of Basel were able to identify for the first time a molecule responsible for the absorption of starlight in space: the positively charged Buckminsterfullerene, or so-called football molecule. Their results have been published in the current issue of Nature. Almost 100 years ago, astronomers discovered that the spectrum of star light arrived on earth with dark g
 

NASA Sets Sights on Robot-Built Moon Colony

 
‎17 ‎July ‎2015, ‏‎09:14:29 AMGo to full article
Washington DC (SPX) Jul 17, 2015
It may not be quite Earth-like enough to be habitable, but the Moon is our closest planetary body, and that proximity would make it ideal for an extraplanetary base of operations. NASA is now seriously considering that option, and may send robots to terraform a crater on the lunar South Pole. In a crowded presidential field during the 2012 US elections, former House Speaker Newt Gingrich c
 

Sun's activity controls Greenland temperatures

 
‎17 ‎July ‎2015, ‏‎09:14:29 AMGo to full article
Washington DC (SPX) Jul 17, 2015
The sun's activity could be affecting a key ocean circulation mechanism that plays an important role in regulating Greenland's climate, according to a new study. The phenomenon could be partially responsible for cool temperatures the island experienced in the late 20th century and potentially lead to increased melting of the Greenland ice sheet in the coming decades, the new research suggests.
 

Paranal and La Palma sites compete for massive gamma ray telescope array

 
‎17 ‎July ‎2015, ‏‎09:14:29 AMGo to full article
Zeuthen, Germany (SPX) Jul 17, 2015
On 15 and 16 July 2015, the Cherenkov Telescope Array (CTA) Resource Board decided to enter into detailed contract negotiations for hosting CTA on the European Southern Observatory (ESO) Paranal grounds in Chile and at the Instituto de Astrofisica de Canarias (IAC), Roque de los Muchachos Observatory in La Palma, Spain. The Board, composed of representatives of ministries and funding agenc
 

Planetary Resources' First Spacecraft Successfully Deployed

 
‎17 ‎July ‎2015, ‏‎09:14:29 AMGo to full article
Redmond WA (SPX) Jul 17, 2015
Planetary Resources has announced that its Arkyd 3 Reflight (A3R) spacecraft deployed successfully from the International Space Station's (ISS) Kibo airlock and has begun its 90-day mission. The demonstration vehicle will validate several core technologies including the avionics, control systems and software, which the company will incorporate into future spacecraft that will venture into the So
 

Supporting Arianespace's mission cadence: A new fueling facility is ready

 
‎17 ‎July ‎2015, ‏‎09:14:29 AMGo to full article
Paris (SPX) Jul 17, 2015
Arianespace's new Fregat Fueling Facility (FCube) is the latest addition to the Spaceport's launcher and satellite processing resources, further supporting the company's sustained mission rates with its launch vehicle family from French Guiana. Located within the Spaceport's ELS launch complex for Arianespace's medium-lift Soyuz vehicle, the FCube was created to fuel the launcher's Fregat
 

Ariane 5 orbits Star One C4 and MSG-4 on Arianespace's sixth flight in 2015

 
‎17 ‎July ‎2015, ‏‎09:14:29 AMGo to full article
Paris (SPX) Jul 17, 2015
Arianespace's marked the halfway point in its fast-paced 2015 operational schedule today with the 66th consecutive successful Ariane 5 launch, which deployed two satellites into geostationary transfer orbits for very diverse roles. Ariane 5 Flight VA224 lifted off at the beginning of its launch window at 6:42 p.m. local time from the Spaceport's ELA-3 launch complex in French Guiana, carry
 

ARIEL mission to reveal 'Brave New Worlds' among exoplanets

 
‎17 ‎July ‎2015, ‏‎09:14:29 AMGo to full article
London, UK (SPX) Jul 17, 2015
An ambitious European mission is being planned to answer fundamental questions about how planetary systems form and evolve. ARIEL will investigate the atmospheres of several hundreds planets orbiting distant stars. It is one of three candidate missions selected last month by the European Space Agency (ESA) for its next medium class science mission, due for launch in 2026. The ARIEL mission
 

ISS astronauts dodge flying Russian space debris

 
‎17 ‎July ‎2015, ‏‎09:14:29 AMGo to full article
Miami (AFP) July 16, 2015
Three astronauts living at the International Space Station were forced to scramble to safety after what NASA described as a "close pass" by flying Russian space debris on Thursday. The men decamped into the Soyuz spacecraft, which is attached to the orbiting station, while the chunk of an old Russian weather satellite sped by at 8:01 am (1201 GMT), the US space agency said. "The crew of
 

Polymer mold makes perfect silicon nanostructures

 
‎17 ‎July ‎2015, ‏‎09:14:29 AMGo to full article
Ithaca NY (SPX) Jul 14, 2015
Using molds to shape things is as old as humanity. In the Bronze Age, the copper-tin alloy was melted and cast into weapons in ceramic molds. Today, injection and extrusion molding shape hot liquids into everything from car parts to toys. For this to work, the mold needs to be stable while the hot liquid material hardens into shape. In a breakthrough for nanoscience, Cornell polymer engine
 

Advanced composites may borrow designs from deep-sea shrimp

 
‎17 ‎July ‎2015, ‏‎09:14:29 AMGo to full article
West Lafayette IN (SPX) Jul 15, 2015
New research is revealing details about how the exoskeleton of a certain type of deep-sea shrimp allows the animal to survive scalding hot waters in hydrothermal vents thousands of feet under water. "A biological species surviving in that kind of extreme environment is a big deal," said Vikas Tomar, an associate professor in Purdue University's School of Aeronautics and Astronautics. "And
 

Nonmagnetic elements form unique magnet

 
‎17 ‎July ‎2015, ‏‎09:14:29 AMGo to full article
Houston TX (SPX) Jul 15, 2015
Titanium and gold are usually not magnetic and cannot be magnets - unless you combine them just so. Scientists at Rice University did so and discovered what is a first of its kind: an itinerant antiferromagnetic metal - TiAu - made from nonmagnetic constituent elements. The research by the lab of Rice physicist Emilia Morosan has already been cited as a textbook example of how magnetism ar
 

Nanoscale light-emitting device has big profile

 
‎17 ‎July ‎2015, ‏‎09:14:29 AMGo to full article
Madison WI (SPX) Jul 14, 2015
University of Wisconsin-Madison engineers have created a nanoscale device that can emit light as powerfully as an object 10,000 times its size. It's an advance that could have huge implications for everything from photography to solar power. In a paper published July 10 in the journal Physical Review Letters, Zongfu Yu, an assistant professor of electrical and computer engineering, and his
 

Researcher devises method to untangle, analyze 'controlled chaos'

 
‎17 ‎July ‎2015, ‏‎09:14:29 AMGo to full article
Bloomington IN (SPX) Jul 14, 2015
A researcher at Indiana University has developed a new mathematical framework to more effectively analyze "controlled chaos," or how interactions among highly complex systems affect their operation and vulnerability. The new method could potentially be used to improve the resilience of complex critical systems, such as air traffic control networks and power grids, or slow the spread of threats a
 

Clay sheets stack to form proton conductors

 
‎17 ‎July ‎2015, ‏‎09:14:29 AMGo to full article
Evanston IL (SPX) Jul 14, 2015
Northwestern Engineering professor Jiaxing Huang has developed a cheaper, more stable proton-conducting system. To find the key ingredient, he had to look no further than his own backyard. "We used a clay that you can buy at a gardening store," said Huang, associate professor of materials science and engineering at Northwestern University's McCormick School of Engineering. "I like to call
 
 

Houston, We Have Geology

 
‎11 ‎July ‎2015, ‏‎08:19:04 AMGo to full article
Laurel MD (SPX) Jul 11, 2015
It began as a point of light. Then, it evolved into a fuzzy orb. Now - in its latest portrait from NASA's New Horizons spacecraft - Pluto is being revealed as an intriguing new world with distinct surface features, including an immense dark band known as the "whale." As the newest black and white image from New Horizons' Long Range Reconnaissance Imager (LORRI) appeared on the screen befor
 

India Launches EO Constellation for UK-China Project

 
‎11 ‎July ‎2015, ‏‎08:19:04 AMGo to full article
New Delhi, India (Sputnik) Jul 11, 2015
India haslaunched five UK satellites, Indian Space Research Organization (ISRO) said Friday. The launch took place at 9:58 p.m. local time (16:28 GMT) from the Satish Dhawan Space Center, Sriharikota in Andhra Pradesh. The rocket reached orbit 20 minutes after launch. "The Polar Satellite Launch Vehicle (PSLV), in its thirtieth flight (PSLV-C28), launched three identical DMC3 optical earth
 

Solving the gravitational N-body problem in general relativity

 
‎11 ‎July ‎2015, ‏‎08:19:04 AMGo to full article
New York NY (SPX) Jul 10, 2015
Recent experiments have successfully tested Einstein's general theory of relativity in a variety of ways and to remarkable precision. These experiments included spacecraft Doppler tracking, planetary radar ranging, lunar and satellite laser ranging, as well as a number of dedicated gravitational experiments in space and many ground based efforts. How can computational models keep up with the eve
 

Biggest explosions in the universe powered by strongest magnets

 
‎11 ‎July ‎2015, ‏‎08:19:04 AMGo to full article
Munich, Germany (SPX) Jul 10, 2015
Gamma-ray bursts are one of the outcomes associated with the biggest explosions to have taken place since the Big Bang. They are detected by orbiting telescopes that are sensitive to this type of high-energy radiation, which cannot penetrate the Earth's atmosphere, and then observed at longer wavelengths by other telescopes both in space and on the ground. GRBs usually only last a few seco
 

A black hole under the gravitational lens

 
‎11 ‎July ‎2015, ‏‎08:19:04 AMGo to full article
Munich, Germany (SPX) Jul 10, 2015
Turbulent processes take place close to supermassive black holes, which lurk in the centres of nearly all galaxies. They swallow up matter flowing in from the outside while at the same time producing so-called gas jets which shoot out into space in two opposite directions. Researchers at the Max Planck Institute for Physics in Munich and the University of Geneva have now succeeded in local
 

The dark side of galactic radio jets

 
‎11 ‎July ‎2015, ‏‎08:19:04 AMGo to full article
Llandudno, UK (SPX) Jul 10, 2015
Cosmic microwave radiation points to invisible 'dark matter', marking the spot where jets of material travel at near light speed, according to an international team of astronomers. Lead author Rupert Allison of Oxford University presented their results yesterday (6 July) at the National Astronomy Meeting in Venue Cymru, Llandudno, Wales. Currently, no one knows for sure what dark matter is
 

Russia to launch space based missile warning system

 
‎11 ‎July ‎2015, ‏‎08:19:04 AMGo to full article
Moscow (Sputnik) Jul 10, 2015
Russia will have a space-based missile approach warning system up and running by 2020, Deputy Prime Minister Dmitry Rogozin announced on Wednesday. "This task will be completed by 2020, including by bringing back our orbital fleet of missile warning satellites," Rogozin told members of the Federation Council upper house of the Russian parliament. "We also hope that once with the bill
 

Clouds? Where we're going, we won't see clouds!

 
‎11 ‎July ‎2015, ‏‎08:19:04 AMGo to full article
Llandudno, UK (SPX) Jul 10, 2015
Edinburgh astronomers have combined the new Oculus Rift virtual reality headset with Stellarium planetarium software to produce an exciting and immersive way to explore the sky. The system was demonstrated live at the National Astronomy Meeting at Venue Cymru in Llandudno, Wales, but soon will be available as a shared group experience to anyone who has a headset and an Internet connection. The t
 

Astronomers teach a machine how to 'see'

 
‎11 ‎July ‎2015, ‏‎08:19:04 AMGo to full article
Llandudno, UK (SPX) Jul 10, 2015
A team of astronomers and computer scientists at the University of Hertfordshire have taught a machine to 'see' astronomical images. The technique, which uses a form of artificial intelligence called unsupervised machine learning, allows galaxies to be automatically classified at high speed, something previously done by thousands of human volunteers in projects like Galaxy Zoo. Masters stu
 

Super-bright supernova with extreme burst of gamma radiation

 
‎11 ‎July ‎2015, ‏‎08:19:04 AMGo to full article
Copenhagen, Denmark (SPX) Jul 10, 2015
Astronomers from the Niels Bohr Institute have observed a super-bright supernova association with a very unusual long lasting gamma-ray burst. Gamma-ray bursts are in rare cases observed in connection with supernovae, which are the deaths of massive stars and they usually only last a few minutes, but the new burst lasted more than half an hour. The supernova itself was extremely bright - m
 

Export revenue to help Russian space industry cut expenditures

 
‎11 ‎July ‎2015, ‏‎08:19:04 AMGo to full article
Moscow (Sputnik) Jul 10, 2015
Export revenue will help the Russian space industry ease its budget expenditures on modernization, Roscosmos head Igor Komarov said Tuesday. "One of the state corporation's goals that was set by the government was the decrease of budget expenditures by increasing export potential of space production. We are now working on export that will allow us to decrease budget expenditures in reformi
 

A five star, doubly-eclipsing star system

 
‎11 ‎July ‎2015, ‏‎08:19:04 AMGo to full article
Llandudno, UK (SPX) Jul 10, 2015
Astronomers at the Open University have discovered the first quintuple star system containing two eclipsing binary stars. Details of the five star system, the first of its kind to be found, will be presented by Marcus Lohr of the Open University in a talk on Wednesday 8 July at the National Astronomy Meeting at Venue Cymru, Llandudno, Wales. Scientists think that about a third of stars are
 

Omnidirectional free space wireless charging developed

 
‎11 ‎July ‎2015, ‏‎08:19:04 AMGo to full article
Daejeon, South Korea (SPX) Jul 10, 2015
Mobile devices, such as smartphones and laptops, have become indispensable portable items in modern life, but one big challenge remains to fully enjoying these devices: keeping their batteries charged. A group of researchers at KAIST has developed a wireless-power transfer (WPT) technology that allows mobile devices to be charged at any location and in any direction, even if the devices ar
 

B-52 bombers demo long reach of U.S. air power

 
‎11 ‎July ‎2015, ‏‎08:19:04 AMGo to full article
Offutt Afb, Neb. (UPI) Jul 10, 2015
The long reach of U.S. air power has been demonstrated by two U.S. Air Force B-52 bombers that conducted a non-stop mission to Australia. The bombers, from Barksdale Air Force Base in Louisiana, flew non-stop to Australia, coordinated with Royal Australian Army forces, and conducted a conventional bomb drop before returning to the United States, the Air Force said. The total time
 

Does the solar magnetic field show a North-South divide?

 
‎11 ‎July ‎2015, ‏‎08:19:04 AMGo to full article
Llandudno, UK (SPX) Jul 10, 2015
A study of jets travelling through the Sun's corona at speeds between 200-500 kilometres per second has shown that the fast-moving columns of plasma are deflected much more strongly by the Sun's magnetic field in the northern hemisphere than in the southern hemisphere. A north-south asymmetry would have profound implications on our understanding of the solar dynamo that generates the Sun's

 

 
 

Pluto Flyby Begins

 
‎09 ‎July ‎2015, ‏‎04:27:33 AMGo to full article
Laurel MD (SPX) Jul 09, 2015
After a more than nine-year, three-billion-mile journey to Pluto, it's showtime for NASA's New Horizons spacecraft, as the flyby sequence of science observations is officially underway. In the early morning hours of July 8, mission scientists received this new view of Pluto-the most detailed yet returned by the Long Range Reconnaissance Imager (LORRI) aboard New Horizons. The image w
 

Bricks to build an Earth found in every planetary system

 
‎09 ‎July ‎2015, ‏‎04:27:33 AMGo to full article
Llandudno, UK (SPX) Jul 09, 2015
Earth-like planets orbiting other stars in the Milky Way are three times more likely to have the same type of minerals as Earth than astronomers had previously thought. In fact, conditions for making the building blocks of Earth-like rocks are ubiquitous throughout the Milky Way. The results of a new study of the chemical evolution of our galaxy are being presented by Prof Brad Gibson, of the Un
 

New Map of Pluto

 
‎09 ‎July ‎2015, ‏‎04:27:33 AMGo to full article
Laurel MD (SPX) Jul 09, 2015
This is the latest map of Pluto created from images taken from June 27 to July 3 by the Long Range Reconnaissance Imager (LORRI) on New Horizons, combined with lower-resolution color data from the spacecraft's Ralph instrument. The center of the map corresponds to the side of Pluto that will be seen close-up during New Horizons' July 14 fly by. This map gives mission scientists an importan
 

Neptune's badly behaved magnetic field

 
‎09 ‎July ‎2015, ‏‎04:27:33 AMGo to full article
Llandudno, UK (SPX) Jul 09, 2015
Combining 26-year old data with supercomputer simulations, a team of scientists at Imperial College London have modelled Neptune's magnetic field in detail for the first time. The researchers find that the furthest planet from the Sun has a badly behaved magnetic field, but one that may help us understand the risks from 'space weather' around Earth. Lars Mejnertsen, of Imperial College London, p
 

With One Year to Jupiter, NASA's Juno Team Prepares

 
‎09 ‎July ‎2015, ‏‎04:27:33 AMGo to full article
Pasadena CA (JPL) Jul 09, 2015
With just one year remaining in a five-year trek to Jupiter, the team of NASA's Juno mission is hard at work preparing for the spacecraft's expedition to the solar system's largest planet. The mission aims to reveal the story of Jupiter's formation and details of its interior structure. Data from Juno will provide insights about our solar system's beginnings, and what we learn from the mission w
 

India to launch its heaviest commercial mission to date

 
‎09 ‎July ‎2015, ‏‎04:27:33 AMGo to full article
Sriharikota, India (Sputnik) Jul 09, 2015
The Indian Space Research Organisation (ISRO) is set to undertake its heaviest commercial mission to date, launching five British satellites on July 10. The ISRO and its commercial arm Antrix will use the Polar Satellite Launch Vehicle (PSLV) to put into orbit five British satellites from the spaceport of Sriharikota. ISRO chief Dr K Radhakrishnan said in a statement that scientists have c
 

Eyeing up Earth-like planets with the James Webb Space Telescope

 
‎09 ‎July ‎2015, ‏‎04:27:33 AMGo to full article
Llandudno, UK (SPX) Jul 09, 2015
Almost 2000 exoplanets have been discovered to date, ranging from rocky Earth-like planets to hot-Jupiters, and orbiting every type of star. But how many of these distant worlds are habitable? Today's technology means that we currently have very little information about what exoplanets are like beyond their presence, size and distance from star. With the launch of the James Webb Space Tele
 

Opportunity Rover's 7th Mars Winter to Include New Study Area

 
‎09 ‎July ‎2015, ‏‎04:27:33 AMGo to full article
Pasadena CA (JPL) Jul 09, 2015
Operators of NASA's Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity plan to drive the rover into a valley this month where Opportunity will be active through the long-lived rover's seventh Martian winter, examining outcrops that contain clay minerals. Opportunity resumed driving on June 27 after about three weeks of reduced activity around Mars solar conjuntion, when the sun's position between Earth an
 

NASA selects leading-edge concepts for continued study

 
‎09 ‎July ‎2015, ‏‎04:27:33 AMGo to full article
Pasadena CA (JPL) Jul 09, 2015
NASA has selected seven technology proposals for continued study under Phase II of the agency's Innovative Advanced Concepts (NIAC) Program, including one from NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, California. The selections are based on the potential to transform future aerospace missions, introduce new capabilities or significantly improve current approaches to building and operating aer
 

Estimating Earth's last pole reversal using radiometric dating

 
‎09 ‎July ‎2015, ‏‎04:27:33 AMGo to full article
Tokyo, Japan (SPX) Jul 08, 2015
The Earth's magnetic field periodically reverses such that the north magnetic pole becomes the south magnetic pole. The latest reversal is called by geologists the Matuyama-Brunhes boundary (MBB), and occurred approximately 780,000 years ago. The MBB is extremely important for calibrating the ages of rocks and the timing of events that occurred in the geological past; however, the exact ag
 

Searing Sun Seen in X-rays

 
‎09 ‎July ‎2015, ‏‎04:27:33 AMGo to full article
Pasadena CA (JPL) Jul 09, 2015
X-rays light up the surface of our sun in a bouquet of colors in this new image containing data from NASA's Nuclear Spectroscopic Telescope Array, or NuSTAR. The high-energy X-rays seen by NuSTAR are shown in blue, while green represents lower-energy X-rays from the X-ray Telescope instrument on the Hinode spacecraft, named after the Japanese word for sunrise. The yellow and green colors show ul
 

China Builds Top Secret Midget Submarine

 
‎09 ‎July ‎2015, ‏‎04:27:33 AMGo to full article
Beijing (XNA) Jul 09, 2015
Satellite imagery from October 2014 shows what appears to be a new midget submarine at China's Wuchang shipyard. The space snapshots captured by DigitalGlobe show the vessel berthed at the shipyard pier used for fitting out submarines. The midget submarine had left the pontoon by late November and by mid-January 2015, another submarine, probably a Type 041 Yuan-class boat, occupied the pier.
 

Engineers break power and distance barriers for fiber optic comms

 
‎09 ‎July ‎2015, ‏‎04:27:33 AMGo to full article
San Diego CA (SPX) Jul 09, 2015
Electrical engineers have broken key barriers that limit the distance information can travel in fiber optic cables and still be accurately deciphered by a receiver. Photonics researchers at the University of California, San Diego have increased the maximum power - and therefore distance - at which optical signals can be sent through optical fibers. This advance has the potential to incre
 

Single-catalyst water splitter produces clean-burning hydrogen 24/7

 
‎09 ‎July ‎2015, ‏‎04:27:33 AMGo to full article
Stanford CA (SPX) Jul 09, 2015
Stanford University scientists have invented a low-cost water splitter that uses a single catalyst to produce both hydrogen and oxygen gas 24 hours a day, seven days a week. The device, described in a study published in Nature Communications, could provide a renewable source of clean-burning hydrogen fuel for transportation and industry. 'We have developed a low-voltage, single-catalyst wa
 

Distributed technique for power 'scheduling' advances smart grid concept

 
‎09 ‎July ‎2015, ‏‎04:27:33 AMGo to full article
Raleigh NC (SPX) Jul 09, 2015
Researchers from North Carolina State University have developed a new technique for "scheduling" energy in electric grids that moves away from centralized management by tapping into the distributed computing power of energy devices. The approach advances the smart grid concept by coordinating the energy being produced and stored by both conventional and renewable sources. Currently, power
 

Russia launches Soyuz Progress with supplies for ISS

 
‎03 ‎July ‎2015, ‏‎04:44:49 AMGo to full article
Baikonur, Kazakhstan (SPX) Jul 03, 2015
The Soyuz-U carrier rocket with the Russian Progress-M28M cargo spacecraft has been launched from the Baikonur Space Center in Kazakhstan and is headed for the International Space Station (ISS), the Russian Mission Control outside Moscow said. "The estimated time of the transport cargo vessel's separation from the third stage of the launch vehicle and its entering the set orbit is July 3 08:
 

Global Positioning System: A Generation of Service to the World

 
‎03 ‎July ‎2015, ‏‎04:44:49 AMGo to full article
Peterson AFB CO (SPX) Jul 03, 2015
Twenty years ago, the United States Air Force announced the Global Positioning System had achieved Full Operational Capability. As of July 17, 1995, a total of 24 satellites were on orbit, providing global 24-hour coverage. In the two-decades since, GPS has been woven into nearly every aspect of human activity, from military operations to sports. At the time "FOC" was announced, GPS had al
 

Engineers help NASA fine-tune new Space Launch System

 
‎03 ‎July ‎2015, ‏‎04:44:49 AMGo to full article
Athens GA (SPX) Jul 03, 2015
Researchers at the University of Georgia College of Engineering are helping NASA determine if a key rocket component can withstand the rigors of the next generation of space flight. The parts in question-bellows expansion joints-serve several functions in rocket propulsion systems, perhaps most critically as connectors between fuel and oxidizer lines and the rocket's engines. While bellows
 

More Fidelity for SpaceX In-Flight Abort Reduces Risk

 
‎03 ‎July ‎2015, ‏‎04:44:49 AMGo to full article
Kennedy Space Center FL (SPX) Jul 03, 2015
Following the successful pad abort test in May, SpaceX began developing a plan that would move its in-flight abort test to provide higher fidelity data and reduce risk to future crews launched to the International Space Station in the Crew Dragon spacecraft. NASA and SpaceX agreed to consider this proposed change prior to the mishap of SpaceX's seventh commercial resupply services mission.
 

Siberia Home to New Russian Space Monitoring Complex

 
‎03 ‎July ‎2015, ‏‎04:44:49 AMGo to full article
Moscow (Sputnik) Jul 03, 2015
The Russian Space Monitoring System will comprise a network of more than a dozen specialized complexes by 2018; the first will appear in Siberia's Altai and Primorye regions. The Russian Space Monitoring System has been tested efficiently, as told by the commander of Space Forces and Aerospace Defense of the Russian Federation, Major-General Oleg Maidanovich. Earlier, it was reported
 

New Horizons 'Speeds Up' on Final Approach to Pluto

 
‎03 ‎July ‎2015, ‏‎04:44:49 AMGo to full article
Laurel MD (SPX) Jul 03, 2015
With just two weeks to go before its historic July 14 flight past Pluto, NASA's New Horizons spacecraft tapped the accelerator late last night and tweaked its path toward the Pluto system. The 23-second thruster burst was the third and final planned targeting maneuver of New Horizons' approach phase to Pluto; it was also the smallest of the nine course corrections since New Horizons launched in
 

NASA Met Unprecedented Challenges Sending Spacecraft to Pluto

 
‎03 ‎July ‎2015, ‏‎04:44:49 AMGo to full article
Kennedy Space Center FL (SPX) Jul 03, 2015
NASA's New Horizons mission presented challenges like no other, but its goal also was unprecedented. The spacecraft will soon begin a study of the farthest reaches of the solar system. It was an historic journey of over 3.6 billion miles that began at the agency's Florida spaceport. Plans call for New Horizons to send the first-ever, close-up images and scientific observations of distant P
 

Twin Space Institutes to perform a biomedical research study

 
‎03 ‎July ‎2015, ‏‎04:44:49 AMGo to full article
Houston TX (SPX) Jul 03, 2015
The National Space Biomedical Research Institute (NSBRI) has announced that a pathfinder study is underway in Cologne, Germany to investigate the effects of simulated spaceflight conditions on brain physiology. NSBRI has deployed a team of American neurologists and scientists to conduct a pilot demonstration experiment at :envihab, a newly-built specialized facility of the German Aerospace
 

Rocket Lab Announces World's First Commercial Launch Site

 
‎03 ‎July ‎2015, ‏‎04:44:49 AMGo to full article
Los Angeles CA (SPX) Jul 03, 2015
Today Rocket Lab announced it will be the first commercial company to build and operate an orbital launch site. The company plans to build the launch site on Kaitorete Spit in the Canterbury region of New Zealand's South Island, which will be used to launch Rocket Lab's Electron launch vehicle designed to deliver small satellites to Low Earth Orbit. "Creating and operating our own launch s
 

US Army orders 19 more Gray Eagle Drones despite problems

 
‎03 ‎July ‎2015, ‏‎04:44:49 AMGo to full article
Washington (Sputnik) Jun 28, 2015
The General Atomics MQ-1C Gray Eagle is commonly described as a medium-altitude, long-endurance drone developed by GAAS for the US Army as an upgrade of its MQ-1 drone. "Work will be performed in Poway, California, with an estimated completion date of Sept.[ember] 30, 2018," the statement read on Tuesday. According to publicly released information, the Gray Eagle has a top speed of 1
 

Fourth MUOS arrives in Florida for August launch

 
‎03 ‎July ‎2015, ‏‎04:44:49 AMGo to full article
Cape Canaveral, Fla. (UPI) Jun 29, 2015
The U.S. Navy and Lockheed Martin delivered Sunday the fourth Mobile User Objective System satellite to the Cape Canaveral Air Force Station for launch in August. The new Mobile User Objective System satellite, or MUOS, is a part of a network of orbiting satellites from Lockheed Martin and relay ground stations for secure communications for mobile military forces, providing seamless con
 

Russia to Develop System to Block Satellite Signals, Shut Down Missiles

 
‎03 ‎July ‎2015, ‏‎04:44:49 AMGo to full article
Moscow (Sputnik) Jul 01, 2015
Russian engineers are working on a new signal suppression system that could block cruise missiles and communication of satellites, said Yuri Maevskiy, the Deputy Director of Radio-Electronic Technologies Concern. The new high-tech system will shut down cruise missiles and other high-precision weaponry, as well as jam the signals of foreign military satellites, Meavskiy said. The syst
 

Secret Russian Hypersonic Nuke Glider Can Pierce Any Missile Defense

 
‎03 ‎July ‎2015, ‏‎04:44:49 AMGo to full article
Moscow (Sputnik) Jul 01, 2015
Extremely maneuverable, ultra-fast and elusive, the hypersonic Yu-71 can break through any missile defense system, military experts said. Russia has reportedly carried out four tests already. Russia is test-launching a new hypersonic attack aircraft that can carry nuclear warheads and penetrate missile defense systems, US media said citing a report by Jane's Information Group. The developm
 

Nanowires could be the LEDs of the future

 
‎03 ‎July ‎2015, ‏‎04:44:49 AMGo to full article
Copenhagen, Denmark (SPX) Jun 28, 2015
The latest research from the Niels Bohr Institute shows that LEDs made from nanowires will use less energy and provide better light. The researchers studied nanowires using X-ray microscopy and with this method they can pinpoint exactly how the nanowire should be designed to give the best properties. The results are published in the scientific journal, ACS Nano. Nanowires are very small -
 

With 300 kilometers per second to new electronics

 
‎03 ‎July ‎2015, ‏‎04:44:49 AMGo to full article
Dresden, Germany (SPX) Jun 28, 2015
It may be significantly easier to design electronic components in future. Scientists at the Max Planck Institute for Chemical Physics of Solids have discovered that the electrical resistance of a compound of niobium and phosphorus increases enormously when the material is exposed to a magnetic field. This giant magnetoresistance, which is responsible for the large storage capacity of modern hard
 

Europe launches next phase of hi-tech Earth satellites

 
‎23 ‎June ‎2015, ‏‎04:58:31 AMGo to full article
Kourou (AFP) June 23, 2015
The European Space Agency (ESA) has launched the second phase of a 4.3-billion-euro ($4.91-billion) programme to deploy new-generation satellites to monitor environmental damage and aid disaster relief operations, officials said early Monday. Sentinel-2A was hoisted by a lightweight Vega rocket from ESA's base in Kourou, French Guiana, overnight Monday-Tuesday, launch operator Arianespace sa
 

Russia eyes Kazakh cosmonaut as space tourist

 
‎23 ‎June ‎2015, ‏‎04:58:31 AMGo to full article
Moscow (AFP) June 22, 2015
Russia on Monday proposed sending a Kazakh cosmonaut to the International Space Station in place of a space tourist in September after a Japanese candidate formally dropped out. Satoshi Takamatsu, a Japanese businessman, was gearing up to go to space after signing a contract to undergo training but said Monday that he was not ready for the launch expected in early September. "The Russian
 

Russia to Build New Generation Space Surveillance Systems

 
‎23 ‎June ‎2015, ‏‎04:58:31 AMGo to full article
Moscow (Sputnik) Jun 22, 2015
Russian Defense Ministry will construct more than ten complexes of new-generation space surveillance systems, increasing the precision of space observation, the ministry said in a press release Thursday. This would "considerably increase the information capabilities of Russian space surveillance, expand the range of controlled orbits and reduce the minimum size of space objects detected by
 

Study suggests active volcanism on Venus

 
‎23 ‎June ‎2015, ‏‎04:58:31 AMGo to full article
Providence RI (SPX) Jun 22, 2015
An international team of scientists has found some of the best evidence yet that Venus, Earth's nearest neighbor, is volcanically active. In combing through data from the European Space Agency's Venus Express mission, the scientists found transient spikes in temperature at several spots on the planet's surface. The hotspots, which were found to flash and fade over the course of just a few days,
 

Roscosmos to Launch More Satellites, Set up Imaging Center

 
‎23 ‎June ‎2015, ‏‎04:58:31 AMGo to full article
Moscow (Sputnik) Jun 22, 2015
The Russian Federal Space Agency Roscosmos plans to expand its fleet of satellites for taking images of the Earth, as part of a project to create a new center for global imaging, which aims to become a major player in Earth remote sensing services. The existing Research Center for Earth Operative Monitoring, part of the Russian Space Systems holding, will become the core of the new structu
 

From ESA: more than 300 new companies

 
‎23 ‎June ‎2015, ‏‎04:58:31 AMGo to full article
Paris (ESA) Jun 22, 2015
ESA's business incubators hit a milestone this month: they have now fostered 300 start-up companies - and more are joining all the time. Thanks to innovations from the many Business Incubation Centres (BICs) start-ups, leading-edge applications that spring from space are spreading throughout Europe. "Technologies from Europe's space programmes have turned out to be great problem-solvers he
 

Satellites enable coral reef science leap from Darwin to online

 
‎23 ‎June ‎2015, ‏‎04:58:31 AMGo to full article
Greenbelt MD (SPX) Jun 22, 2015
With Earth-observing satellite data, scientists can now monitor the health of coral reefs, even in the most remote regions scattered around the globe where it is otherwise difficult to see changes. Satellites fill a void by providing a more complete view of remote reefs. The information is monitored globally through Coral Reef Watch, an online tool that provides near real-time and long-ter
 

Astronomers create array of Earth-like planet models

 
‎23 ‎June ‎2015, ‏‎04:58:31 AMGo to full article
Ithaca NY (SPX) Jun 22, 2015
To sort out the biological intricacies of Earth-like planets, astronomers have developed computer models that examine how ultraviolet radiation from other planets' nearby suns may affect those worlds, according to new research published June 10 in Astrophysical Journal. "Depending on the intensity, ultraviolet radiation can be both useful and harmful to the origin of life," says Lisa Kalte
 

All Systems Go for NASA's Mission to Jupiter Moon Europa

 
‎23 ‎June ‎2015, ‏‎04:58:31 AMGo to full article
Pasadena CA (JPL) Jun 22, 2015
Beyond Earth, Jupiter's moon Europa is considered one of the most promising places in the solar system to search for signs of present-day life, and a new NASA mission to explore this potential is moving forward from concept review to development. NASA's mission concept - to conduct a detailed survey of Europa and investigate its habitability - has successfully completed its first major rev
 

International Spacecraft Carrying NASA's Aquarius Instrument Ends Operations

 
‎23 ‎June ‎2015, ‏‎04:58:31 AMGo to full article
Pasadena CA (JPL) Jun 22, 2015
An international Earth-observing mission launched in 2011 to study the salinity of the ocean surface ended June 8 when an essential part of the power and attitude control system for the SAC-D spacecraft, which carries NASA's Aquarius instrument, stopped operating. The Aquarius instrument successfully achieved its science objectives and completed its primary three-year mission in November 2014.
 

Lockheed, Raytheon, Bombardier team for JSTARS contract bid

 
‎23 ‎June ‎2015, ‏‎04:58:31 AMGo to full article
Palmdale, Calif. (UPI) Jun 17, 2015
Lockheed Martin has announced it is teaming with Raytheon and Bombardier for the U.S. Air Force's JSTARS Recapitalization program contract. Under the teaming, Lockheed Martin will serve as the lead systems integrator for the program, while Raytheon will bring to the team their experience with ground surveillance, intelligence, surveillance and reconnaissance systems, mission systems int
 

Variations in oxygen levels shaped Earth's climate over eons

 
‎23 ‎June ‎2015, ‏‎04:58:31 AMGo to full article
Ann Arbor MI (SPX) Jun 17, 2015
Variations in the amount of oxygen in Earth's atmosphere significantly altered global climate throughout the planet's history. Efforts to reconstruct past climates must include this previously overlooked factor, a new University of Michigan-led study concludes. Oxygen currently comprises about 21 percent of Earth's atmosphere by volume but has varied between 10 percent and 35 percent over the pa
 

MIPT physicists develop ultrasensitive nanomechanical biosensor

 
‎23 ‎June ‎2015, ‏‎04:58:31 AMGo to full article
Moscow, Russia (SPX) Jun 16, 2015
Two young researchers working at the MIPT Laboratory of Nanooptics and Plasmonics, Dmitry Fedyanin and Yury Stebunov, have developed an ultracompact highly sensitive nanomechanical sensor for analyzing the chemical composition of substances and detecting biological objects, such as viral disease markers, which appear when the immune system responds to incurable or hard-to-cure diseases, includin
 

Ultrafast heat conduction can manipulate nanoscale magnets

 
‎23 ‎June ‎2015, ‏‎04:58:31 AMGo to full article
Urbana IL (SPX) Jun 16, 2015
Researchers at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign have uncovered physical mechanisms allowing the manipulation of magnetic information with heat. These new phenomena rely on the transport of thermal energy, in contrast to the conventional application of magnetic fields, providing a new, and highly desirable way to manipulate magnetization at the nanoscale. "In our study, we mak
 

Oculus out to let people touch virtual worlds

 
‎23 ‎June ‎2015, ‏‎04:58:31 AMGo to full article
Los Angeles (AFP) June 18, 2015
Behind closed doors on the show floor of the world's premier video game show, Facebook-owned Oculus was letting people touch virtual worlds. Oculus provided a select few with an early peek at how it is trying to tackle the challenge of letting people intuitively interact with faux objects in fantasy realms. Prototype Oculus Touch Half Moon controllers that can be gripped as easily as cla
 

 

 
 

 

 
 

News About Time And Space

 

 

Treasure hunting in archive data reveals clues about black holes' diet

 
‎29 ‎July ‎2015, ‏‎01:27:38 PMGo to full article
Garching, Germany (SPX) Jul 28, 2015 - Using archival data from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey, as well as from the XMM-Newton and Chandra X-ray telescopes, a team of astronomers at the Max Planck Institute for Extraterrestrial Physics have discovered a gigantic black hole, which is probably destroying and devouring a big star in its vicinity. With a mass of 100 million times more than our Sun, this is the largest black hole caught in this act so far.

The results of this study are published in this month's issue of the Monthly Notices of the Royal Astronomical Society. Andrea Merloni and members of his team from the Max-Planck Institute for Extraterrestrial Physics (MPE) in Garching, near Munich, were exploring the huge archive of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) in preparation for a future X-ray satellite mission.

The SDSS has been observing a large fraction of the night sky with its optical telescope; in addition, spectra have been taken of distant galaxies and black holes. For a variety of reasons, some objects got the spectra taken more than once. And when the team was looking at one of the objects with multiple spectra, they were struck by an extraordinary change in one of the objects under study, with the catalogue number SDSS J0159+0033.

"Usually distant galaxies do not change significantly over an astronomer's lifetime, i.e. on a timescale of years or decades," explains Andrea Merloni, "but this one showed a dramatic variation of its spectrum, as if the central black hole had switched on and off."

This happened between 1998 and 2005, but nobody had noticed the odd behaviour of this galaxy until late last year, when two groups of scientists preparing the next (fourth) generation of SDSS surveys independently stumbled across these data [1].

Luckily enough, the two flagship X-ray observatories, the ESA-led XMM-Newton and the NASA-led Chandra took snapshots of the same area of the sky close in time to the peak of the flare, and again about ten years later. This gave the astronomers unique information about the high-energy emission that reveals how material is processed in the immediate vicinity of the central black hole.

Gigantic black holes are at home in the nuclei of large galaxies all around us. Most astronomers believe that they grew to the enormous sizes that we can observe today by feeding mostly on interstellar gas from its surroundings, which is unable to escape its gravitational pull. Such a process takes place over a very long time (tens to hundreds of millions of years), and is capable to turn a small black hole created in the explosion of a heavy star into the super-heavyweight monsters that lurk at the centre of galaxies.

However, galaxies also contain a huge number of stars. Some unlucky ones may happen to pass too close to the central black hole, where they are destroyed and eventually swallowed by the black hole.

If this is compact enough, the strong, tidal gravitational forces tear the star apart in a spectacular way. Subsequently bits and pieces swirl into the black hole and thus produce huge flares of radiation that can be as luminous as all the rest of the stars in the host galaxy for a period of a few months to a year. These rare events are called Tidal Disruption Flares (TDF).

Merloni and his collaborators quite quickly realised that "their" flare [2] matched almost perfectly all the expectations of this model. Moreover, because of the serendipitous nature of the discovery, they realised that this was an even more peculiar system than those which had been found through active searches until now [3]. With an estimated mass of 100 million solar masses, this is the biggest black hole caught in the act of star-tearing so far.

However, the sheer size of the system is not the only intriguing aspect of this particular flare; it is also the first one for which scientists can assume with some degree of certainty that the black hole was on a more standard "gas diet" very recently (a few tens of thousands of years). This is an important clue on which sort of food black holes mostly live on.

"Louis Pasteur said: 'Chance favours the prepared mind' - but in our case, nobody was really prepared," marvels Merloni. "We could have discovered this unique object already ten years ago, but people did not know where to look. It is quite common in astronomy that progress in our understanding of the cosmos is helped by serendipitous discoveries. And now we have a better idea of how to find more such events, and future instruments will greatly expand our reach."

In less than two years' time a new powerful X-ray telescope eROSITA, which is currently being built at MPE, will be put into orbit on the Russian-German SRG satellite. It will scan the entire sky with the right cadence and sensitivity needed to discover hundreds of new tidal disruption flares. Also, big optical telescopes are being designed and built with the goal of monitoring the variable sky, and will greatly contribute to solving the mystery of the black hole eating habits. Astronomers will have to be prepared to catch these dramatic last acts of a star's life. But however prepared they'll be, the sky will be full of new surprises.

Notes:
1. The other group, who independently discovered the strange light curve of this object was Stephanie LaMassa (Yale) and her collaborators. They were the fastest to alert the community about this object, but did not explore the stellar disruption interpretation for this event.

2. The current study is published in the May issue of the journal Monthly Notices of the Royal Astronomical Society (see also reference in right column).

3. Tidal Disruption Flares are very rare, about one every few tens of thousands of year for any galaxy. In addition, because they do not last very long, they are very hard to find. Only about twenty of them have been studied so far, but with the advent of larger telescopes designed to survey large areas of the sky in a short time, more and more dedicated searches are being carried out, and the pace of discovery is rapidly increasing.

 

 

Deja-vu, new theory says dark matter acts like well-known particle

 
‎29 ‎July ‎2015, ‏‎01:27:38 PMGo to full article
Tokyo, Japan (SPX) Jul 24, 2015 - A new theory says dark matter acts remarkably similar to subatomic particles known to science since the 1930s. We owe a lot to dark matter - it is the thing keeping galaxies, stars, our solar system, and our bodies intact. Yet no one has been able to observe it, and it has often been regarded as a totally new exotic form of matter, such as a particle moving in extra dimensions of space or its quantum version, super-symmetry.

Now an international group of researchers has proposed a theory that dark matter is very similar to pions, which are responsible for binding atomic nuclei together. Their findings appear in the latest Physical Review Letters, published on July 10.

"We have seen this kind of particle before. It has the same properties - same type of mass, the same type of interactions, in the same type of theory of strong interactions that gave forth the ordinary pions. It is incredibly exciting that we may finally understand why we came to exist," says Hitoshi Murayama, Professor of Physics at the University of California, Berkeley, and Director of the Kavli Institute for the Physics and Mathematics of the Universe at the University of Tokyo.

The new theory predicts dark matter is likely to interact with itself within galaxies or clusters of galaxies, possibly modifying the predicted mass distributions.

"It can resolve outstanding discrepancies between data and computer simulations," says Eric Kuflik, a postdoctoral researcher at Cornell University. University of California, Berkeley postdoctoral researcher Yonit Hochberg adds, "The key differences in these properties between this new class of dark matter theories and previous ideas have profound implications on how dark matter can be discovered in upcoming experimental searches."

The next step will be to put this theory to the test using experiments such as the Large Hadron Collider and the new SuperKEK-B, and a proposed experiment SHiP.

Journal: Physical Review Letters, 115, 021301 (2015); Title: Model for Thermal Relic Dark Matter of Strongly Interacting Massive Particles Authors: Yonit Hochberg (1,2), Eric Kuflik; (3), Hitoshi Murayama (1,2,4), Tomer Volansky (5), and Jay G. Wacker (6,7)

 

 

 
 

After 85-year search, massless particle with promise for next-generation electronics found

 
‎23 ‎July ‎2015, ‏‎07:05:02 AMGo to full article
Princeton NJ (SPX) Jul 20, 2015 - An international team led by Princeton University scientists has discovered Weyl fermions, an elusive massless particle theorized 85 years ago. The particle could give rise to faster and more efficient electronics because of its unusual ability to behave as matter and antimatter inside a crystal, according to new research.

The researchers report in the journal Science July 16 the first observation of Weyl fermions, which, if applied to next-generation electronics, could allow for a nearly free and efficient flow of electricity in electronics, and thus greater power, especially for computers, the researchers suggest.

Proposed by the mathematician and physicist Hermann Weyl in 1929, Weyl fermions have been long sought by scientists because they have been regarded as possible building blocks of other subatomic particles, and are even more basic than the ubiquitous, negative-charge carrying electron (when electrons are moving inside a crystal).

Their basic nature means that Weyl fermions could provide a much more stable and efficient transport of particles than electrons, which are the principle particle behind modern electronics. Unlike electrons, Weyl fermions are massless and possess a high degree of mobility; the particle's spin is both in the same direction as its motion -- which is known as being right-handed -- and in the opposite direction in which it moves, or left-handed.

"The physics of the Weyl fermion are so strange, there could be many things that arise from this particle that we're just not capable of imagining now," said corresponding author M. Zahid Hasan, a Princeton professor of physics who led the research team.

The researchers' find differs from the other particle discoveries in that the Weyl fermion can be reproduced and potentially applied, Hasan said. Typically, particles such as the famous Higgs boson are detected in the fleeting aftermath of particle collisions, he said.

The Weyl fermion, however, was discovered inside a synthetic metallic crystal called tantalum arsenide that the Princeton researchers designed in collaboration with researchers at the Collaborative Innovation Center of Quantum Matter in Beijing and at National Taiwan University.

The Weyl fermion possesses two characteristics that could make its discovery a boon for future electronics, including the development of the highly prized field of efficient quantum computing, Hasan explained.

For a physicist, the Weyl fermions are most notable for behaving like a composite of monopole- and antimonopole-like particles when inside a crystal, Hasan said. This means that Weyl particles that have opposite magnetic-like charges can nonetheless move independently of one another with a high degree of mobility.

The researchers also found that Weyl fermions can be used to create massless electrons that move very quickly with no backscattering, wherein electrons are lost when they collide with an obstruction. In electronics, backscattering hinders efficiency and generates heat. Weyl electrons simply move through and around roadblocks, Hasan said.

"It's like they have their own GPS and steer themselves without scattering," Hasan said. "They will move and move only in one direction since they are either right-handed or left-handed and never come to an end because they just tunnel through. These are very fast electrons that behave like unidirectional light beams and can be used for new types of quantum computing."

Prior to the Science paper, Hasan and his co-authors published a report in the journal Nature Communications in June that theorized that Weyl fermions could exist in a tantalum arsenide crystal.

Guided by that paper, the researchers used the Princeton Institute for the Science and Technology of Materials (PRISM) and Laboratory for Topological Quantum Matter and Spectroscopy in Princeton's Jadwin Hall to research and simulate dozens of crystal structures before seizing upon the asymmetrical tantalum arsenide crystal, which has a differently shaped top and bottom.

The crystals were then loaded into a two-story device known as a scanning tunneling spectromicroscope that is cooled to near absolute zero and suspended from the ceiling to prevent even atom-sized vibrations. The spectromicroscope determined if the crystal matched the theoretical specifications for hosting a Weyl fermion. "It told us if the crystal was the house of the particle," Hasan said.

The Princeton team took the crystals passing the spectromicroscope test to the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory in California to be tested with high-energy accelerator-based photon beams. Once fired through the crystal, the beams' shape, size and direction indicated the presence of the long-elusive Weyl fermion.

First author Su-Yang Xu, a postdoctoral research associate in Princeton's Department of Physics, said that the work was unique for encompassing theory and experimentalism.

"The nature of this research and how it emerged is really different and more exciting than most of other work we have done before," Xu said.

"Usually, theorists tell us that some compound might show some new or interesting properties, then we as experimentalists grow that sample and perform experiments to test the prediction. In this case, we came up with the theoretical prediction ourselves and then performed the experiments. This makes the final success even more exciting and satisfying than before."

In pursuing the elusive particle, the researchers had to pull from a number of disciplines, as well as just have faith in their quest and scientific instincts, Xu said.

"Solving this problem involved physics theory, chemistry, material science and, most importantly, intuition," he said. "This work really shows why research is so fascinating, because it involved both rational, logical thinking, and also sparks and inspiration."

Weyl, who worked at the Institute for Advanced Study, suggested his fermion as an alternative to the theory of relativity proposed by his colleague Albert Einstein.

Although that application never panned out, the characteristics of his theoretical particle intrigued physicists for nearly a century, Hasan said. Actually observing the particle was a trying process -- one ambitious experiment proposed colliding high-energy neutrinos to test if the Weyl fermion was produced in the aftermath, he said.

The hunt for the Weyl fermion began in the earliest days of quantum theory when physicists first realized that their equations implied the existence of antimatter counterparts to commonly known particles such as electrons, Hasan said.

"People figured that although Weyl's theory was not applicable to relativity or neutrinos, it is the most basic form of fermion and had all other kinds of weird and beautiful properties that could be useful," he said.

"After more than 80 years, we found that this fermion was already there, waiting. It is the most basic building block of all electrons," he said. "It is exciting that we could finally make it come out following Weyl's 1929 theoretical recipe."

Ashvin Vishwanath, a professor of physics at the University of California-Berkeley who was not involved in the study, commented, "Professor Hasan's experiments report the observation of both the unusual properties in the bulk of the crystal as well as the exotic surface states that were theoretically predicted. While it is early to say what practical implications this discovery might have, it is worth noting that Weyl materials are direct 3-D electronic analogs of graphene, which is being seriously studied for potential applications."

 

 

Bristol researchers revisit two-ball bounce problem

 
‎23 ‎July ‎2015, ‏‎07:05:02 AMGo to full article
Bristol, England (UPI) Jul 14, 2015 - As any high-schooler will attest, there is no shortage of ways to demonstrate the frustrating complexities of physics. But one problem stands out as a favorite for showcasing physics' counterintuities -- the two-ball bounce problem.

The problem is demonstrated by dropping a smaller ball and larger ball together, the smaller ball positioned directly on top of the larger ball. The result -- using a tennis ball and basketball, for example -- is a smaller ball bouncing unexpectedly high, three or four times the height from which it was dropped.

Researchers at the University of Bristol recently revisited the classic classroom demonstration and located flaws in the traditional explanation.

Textbooks explain the phenomenon as a demonstration of two basic physic premises, Newton's law of restitution and the the law of conservation of momentum. It turns out, the explanation is based on a flawed reality.

The high bounce is the product of human error, as demonstrators aren't able to drop the balls simultaneously. Inevitably, the smaller ball is dropped a brief moment later, and it is this gap that enables the high bounce.

When Bristol researchers revisited the phenomenon using the preciseness of computers and the keen eye of a high-speed camera, they found the closer the balls are together when dropped, the less impressive the bounce.

That traditional explanation assumes two separate but simultaneous collisions -- the basketball bounces of the floor, the tennis ball bounces off the rebounding basketball. But unless the two balls are dropped with a sizable gap between them, the basketball is still in contact with the ground when the tennis ball hits -- the order of collisions is actually reversed.

What researchers determined, was that the basketball acts like a trampoline. Upon impact, the basketball's compression excites an elastic wave that catapults the tennis ball back into the air. The effect is weakened as the gap between the two dropped balls narrows.

"Understanding how spherical bodies behave when they collide has important implications when modelling 'granular materials', such as sand, as these are can be treated as a collection of lots of tiny spheres," Yani Berdeni, a PhD student in Bristol's engineering department, explained in a press release.

Berdeni and his colleagues published their findings in the Proceedings of the Royal Society A.

 

 

Weyl points: Wanted for 86 years

 
‎23 ‎July ‎2015, ‏‎07:05:02 AMGo to full article
Boston MA (SPX) Jul 20, 2015 - Weyl points, the 3D analogues of the structures that make graphene exceptional, were theoretically predicted in 1929. Today, an international team of Physicists from MIT and Zhejiang University, found them in photonic crystals, opening a new dimension in photonics.

In 1928 the English physicist Paul Dirac discovered a crucial equation in particle physics and quantum mechanics, now known as Dirac equation, which describes relativistic wave-particles. Very fast electrons were solutions to the Dirac equation. Moreover, the equation predicted the existence of anti-electrons, or positrons: particles with the same mass as electrons but having opposite charge.

True to Dirac's prediction, positrons were discovered four years later, in 1932, by the American physicist Carl Anderson. In 1929 Hermann Weyl, a German-born mathematician, found another solution to the Dirac equation, this time massless [1].

A year later, the Austrian-born theoretical physicist Wolfgang Pauli postulated the existence of the neutrino, which was then thought to be massless, and it was assumed to be the sought-after solution to the Dirac equation found by Weyl. Neutrinos had not been detected yet in nature, but the case seemed to be closed.

It would be decades before American physicists Frederick Reines and Clyde Cowan finally discovered neutrinos in 1957, and numerous experiments shortly thereafter indicated that neutrinos could have mass. In 1998, the Super-Kamiokande (a neutrino observatory located in Japan) Collaboration announced what had now been speculated for years: neutrinos have non-zero mass. This discovery opened a new question: what then was the zero-mass solution found by Weyl?

Dr. Ling Lu (MIT), Dr. Zhiyu Wang (Zhejiang University, China), Dr. Dexin Ye (Zhejiang University), Prof. Lixin Ran (Zhejiang University), Prof. Liang Fu (MIT), Prof. John D. Joannopoulos (MIT), and Prof. Marin Soljaci? (MIT) found the answer.

Ling Lu, first author of the paper published in Science, is very enthusiastic: "Weyl points do actually exist in nature! We built a double-gyroid photonic crystal with broken parity symmetry. The light that passes through the crystal shows the signature of Weyl points in reciprocal space: two linear dispersion bands touching at isolated points."

Weyl points, the solutions to the massless Dirac equation, were not found in particle experiments. The research team had to build a tailored material to observe them. The double-gyroid photonic crystal is itself a work of art. Gyroids indeed can be found in nature, in systems as different as butterfly wings and ketchup [2,3].

However, the research group wanted a double-gyroid with a very specific broken symmetry, first proposed in a theoretical work by the same group[4]. In order to fabricate this structure, with parts that are interlocking and with ad hoc defects (such as symmetry-breaking air holes), Lu and collaborators had to drill, machine, and stack slabs of ceramic-filled plastics.

Once the sample was ready, it was time to observe if it behaved as expected, by shining light through it and analyzing the outgoing signal. Physicists analyze these experiments in what is called reciprocal space, or momentum space.

"The discovery of Weyl points is not only the smoking gun to a scientific mystery," comments MIT Professor Marin Soljaci, "it paves the way to absolutely new photonic phenomena and applications. Think of the graphene revolution: graphene is a 2D structure, and its electronic properties are, to a substantial extent, a consequence of the existence of linear degeneracy points (known as Dirac points) in its momentum space. Materials containing Weyl points do the same in 3D. They literally add one degree of freedom, one dimension."

The discovery of graphene and its unique electronic properties was lauded with the 2010 Nobel Prize in physics, yet graphene's Dirac points are not stable to perturbations. On the other hand, the structures introduced by Lu et al. are very stable to perturbations, offering a new tool to control how light is confined, how it bounces, and how it radiates.

This discovery opens a new intriguing field in basic physics. The potential applications are equally promising. Examples include the possibility to build angularly selective 3D materials and more powerful single-frequency lasers.

 

 

Old astronomic riddle on the way to be solved

 
‎23 ‎July ‎2015, ‏‎07:05:02 AMGo to full article
Basel, Switzerland (SPX) Jul 16, 2015 - Scientists at the University of Basel were able to identify for the first time a molecule responsible for the absorption of starlight in space: the positively charged Buckminsterfullerene, or so-called football molecule. Their results have been published in the current issue of Nature.

Almost 100 years ago, astronomers discovered that the spectrum of star light arrived on earth with dark gaps, so-called interstellar bands. Ever since, researchers have been trying to find out which type of matter in space absorbs the light and is responsible for these "diffuse interstellar bands" (DIB) of which over 400 are known today.

Football molecule and interstellar clouds
Astronomers have been suspecting for a while that big complex molecules and gaseous ions based on carbon could be absorbing the starlight. The Buckminsterfullerene is such a molecule: a structure made up of 60 carbon atoms shaped like a football that was first discovered in the mid-1980s.

After this discovery, the questions arose if it was possible that the football molecule was in fact responsible for the DIB. The research team led by Prof. John P. Maier from the Department of Chemistry at the University of Basel has been studying the electronic absorption of the ionized Buckminsterfullerene since 1993.

In fact, the spectrum measured in the lab did show absorption features at two wavelengths that were near two DIB that had been discovered by astronomers the following year.

Conditions similar to outer space
In order to unequivocally prove that these molecules absorb starlight and thus produce the DIB, a gas phase spectrum of the ion was needed. The Basel researchers now succeeded at this: "This is the very first unequivocal identification of such a molecule in the interstellar clouds", says Professor John P. Maier. "We have achieved a breakthrough in solving the old riddle of the diffuse interstellar bands."

In order to obtain the spectrum in the laboratory using a diode laser, several thousand ionized Fullerenes were confined in a radiofrequency trap and cooled down by collisions with high density helium to very low temperatures of around 6 degree Kelvin - conditions very similar to outer space.

The absorptions measured in the laboratory coincide exactly with the astronomical data, and have comparable bandwidths and relative intensities. This identifies for the first time two DIB and proves that ionized Buckminsterfullerene (C60+) is present at the gas-phase in space. "This is remarkable, considering the complexity of this molecular ion and the presence of high-energy radiation in such an environment", says Maier.

 

 

Drawing a line between quantum and classical world

 
‎23 ‎July ‎2015, ‏‎07:05:02 AMGo to full article
Rochester NY (SPX) Jul 22, 2015 - Quantum theory is one of the great achievements of 20th century science, yet physicists have struggled to find a clear boundary between our everyday world and what Albert Einstein called the "spooky" features of the quantum world, including cats that could be both alive and dead, and photons that can communicate with each other across space instantaneously.

For the past 60 years, the best guide to that boundary has been a theorem called Bell's Inequality, but now a new paper shows that Bell's Inequality is not the guidepost it was believed to be, which means that as the world of quantum computing brings quantum strangeness closer to our daily lives, we understand the frontiers of that world less well than scientists have thought.

In the new paper, published in the July 20 edition of Optica, University of Rochester researchers show that a classical beam of light that would be expected to obey Bell's Inequality can fail this test in the lab, if the beam is properly prepared to have a particular feature: entanglement.

Not only does Bell's test not serve to define the boundary, the new findings don't push the boundary deeper into the quantum realm but do just the opposite. They show that some features of the real world must share a key ingredient of the quantum domain. This key ingredient is called entanglement, exactly the feature of quantum physics that Einstein labeled as spooky.

According to Joseph Eberly, professor of physics and one of the paper's authors, it now appears that Bell's test only distinguishes those systems that are entangled from those that are not. It does not distinguish whether they are "classical" or quantum. In the forthcoming paper the Rochester researchers explain how entanglement can be found in something as ordinary as a beam of light.

Eberly explained that "it takes two to tangle."

For example, think about two hands clapping regularly. What you can be sure of is that when the right hand is moving to the right, the left hand is moving to the left, and vice versa.

But if you were asked to guess without listening or looking whether at some moment the right hand was moving to the right, or maybe to the left, you wouldn't know. But you would still know that whatever the right hand was doing at that time, the left hand would be doing the opposite. The ability to know for sure about a common property without knowing anything for sure about an individual property is the essence of perfect entanglement.

Eberly added that many think of entanglement as a quantum feature because "Schrodinger coined the term 'entanglement' to refer to his famous cat scenario." But their experiment shows that some features of the "real" world must share a key ingredient of Schrodinger's Cat domain: entanglement.

The existence of classical entanglement was pointed out in 1980, but Eberly explained that it didn't seem a very interesting concept, so it wasn't fully explored. As opposed to quantum entanglement, classical entanglement happens within one system. The effect is all local: there is no action at a distance, none of the "spookiness."

With this result, Eberly and his colleagues have shown experimentally "that the border is not where it's usually thought to be, and moreover that Bell's Inequalities should no longer be used to define the boundary."

Eberly's co-authors are Xiao-Feng Qian, Bethany Little and Professor John C. Howell.

 

 

The quantum physics of artificial light harvesting

 
‎23 ‎July ‎2015, ‏‎07:05:02 AMGo to full article
Vienna, Austria (SPX) Jul 14, 2015 - Plants and bacteria make use of sunlight with remarkably high efficiency: nine out of ten absorbed light particles are being put to use in an ordinary bacterium.

For years, it has been a pressing question of modern research whether or not effects from quantum physics are responsible for this outstanding performance of natural light harvesters.

A team of European research groups, a collaboration between universities in Vienna, Ulm, Cartagena, Prague, Berlin and Lund, have examined these quantum effects in an artificial model system.

It was shown that the hotly debated quantum phenomena can be understood as a delicate interplay between vibrations and electrons of the involved molecules. The resulting theoretical model explains the experiments perfectly. The article was published in Nature Communications.

The studied artificial light harvester is a supramolecule, consisting of hundreds of thousands of light absorbing molecules, arranged in close proximity to one another and in an orderly fashion.

Such architecture puts these systems in between noisy living cells and strictly organized quantum experiments at low temperatures: supramolecules are still governed by the same quantum effects as natural photosynthetic systems, but without the noisy background that makes their investigation so difficult in biological systems.

The research team employed polarized light to isolate the desired quantum-dynamical effects. Studying such ordered systems does not only further our understanding of natural photosynthesis, it also helps us to appreciate the physical mechanisms necessary for energy-efficient, cheaper, more flexible and lighter photovoltaic cells.

 

 

Revealed: Positronium's behavior in particle billiards

 
‎23 ‎July ‎2015, ‏‎07:05:02 AMGo to full article
London, UK (SPX) Jul 15, 2015 - Collision physics can be like a game of billiards. Yet in the microscopic world, the outcome of the game is hard to predict. Fire a particle at a group of other particles, and they may scatter, combine or break apart, according to probability distributions governed by quantum mechanics. These processes can tell us about fundamental properties of matter and, if antimatter projectiles are used, also about matter-antimatter interactions.

Scientists at UCL have finally answered one of the basic questions that has remained outstanding until now: if, in a collision with matter, a positron - the antimatter counterpart of electrons - captures an electron, in which directions are the two likely to travel, and with what probability?

All matter particles - electrons, protons, neutrons - have an antimatter counterpart. Antiparticles have very similar properties to particles, but the opposite electrical charge.

Although they are eventually annihilated when they come into contact with matter, antiparticles can briefly interact with particles to form very short-lived matter-antimatter hybrids, atoms in which one of the component particles has been replaced with an antiparticle. Of these, positronium - one electron and one positron in orbit around each other - is the most studied.

"Positrons and positronium are important for our understanding of the physical universe," says Professor Gaetana Laricchia (UCL Physics and Astronomy), who led the study. "They are also useful for applications such as probing the properties of materials, as well as for medical diagnostics. Yet there is much that we still do not know about their interactions with ordinary matter."

In the study, funded by the Engineering and Physical Sciences Research Council (EPSRC) and published in the journal Physical Review Letters, Professor Laricchia and colleagues used UCL's Positronium Beam - a facility unique in the world - to investigate the behaviour of the positronium as it is created, and have finally been able to compare with theoretical predictions which have been developed over the past 40 years.

The Positronium Beam works by producing a beam of positrons from a radioactive source, passing it through a chamber full of hydrogen, where the positrons bind to electrons to form positronium. The resulting beam of positronium is then usually used to bombard other targets placed downstream. In this study, though, the team examined the formation of the positronium atoms themselves - much like using a microscope to study the way light passes through lenses.

"From the collision, the positronium atoms may emerge forward, sideways or backwards. The absolute proportions had never been measured," says Professor Laricchia. "We sought to analyse this because it tells you important information about how positrons collide in gases, how positronium behaves once it has formed and because it is a very sensitive test of theoretical models."

As well as the hydrogen gas that is usually used in the Positronium Beam, the team also measured the emission of positronium created when hydrogen was replaced with argon, helium and carbon dioxide. They found that in the case of helium and hydrogen, the emission of positronium was broadly in line with a small subset of theories; for argon, the behaviour seems similar to that created in hydrogen and helium and quite different from theoretical predictions. For CO2, there is no prediction to test, and this experiment provides the first data of any kind.

In all four cases, there was a strong preference for the positronium to be emitted in the forward direction, particularly when the positrons were hitting the gas at high speed.

The team hope to carry out further investigations of positronium formation, particularly at lower energies which should provide even better calibration for the theoretical models.

 

 

The ins and outs of QCD

 
‎15 ‎July ‎2015, ‏‎08:32:29 AMGo to full article
Oak Ridge TN (SPX) Jul 09, 2015 - Quarks and antiquarks are the teeny, tiny building blocks with which all matter is built, binding together to form protons and neutrons in a process explained by quantum chromodynamics (QCD).

According to QCD, quarks possess one of three charges that allow them to pair in various combinations, such as mesons--elementary particles composed of one quark and its corresponding antiquark. Force carrier particles, known as gluons, hold the quarks together by exchanging and mediating the strong forc e, one of the four fundamental forces. This structure is the foundation of all matter in the universe, but much is still unknown about why QCD works the way it does.

Currently, scientists are searching for the existence of mesons that don't fit the traditional patterns. If a meson is found to weigh more than expected, something else must be going on. After all, one plus one can't equal three. Scientists call these hypothetical particles exotic mesons and believe that gluons play an important role in their structure. Their existence has long been theorized, but exotic mesons have not yet been observed in the laboratory or predicted with precision from first principles.

Robert Edwards, a researcher and senior staff member at the US Department of Energy's (DOE's) Jefferson Laboratory (JLab), hopes to change that. Edwards is the principal investigator for a group at the Oak Ridge Leadership Computing Facility (OLCF), a DOE Office of Science User Facility located at Oak Ridge National Laboratory. His team has been using the OLCF's Jaguar and Titan supercomputers for several years to map out different combinations of particles.

Last year, they were awarded an Advanced Scientific Computing Research (ASCR) Leadership Computing Challenge (ALCC) allocation to run lattice quantum chromodynamics (LQCD) calculations that can accurately analyze the interactions between quarks and gluons in a vacuum across both space and time.

Climbing a hill
"A way to think of this is like knocking a billiard ball across a hilly area to get from point A to point B. We repeat these calculations over several different instances of these hilly areas," Edwards said, noting that the hillsides represent fluctuations in the gluon field. "These are the different configurations of gluon fields, and those snapshots are what we generated in previous INCITE allocations running on Jaguar and Titan."

The team's ALCC project focused on running quarks through the gluon field and analyzing how their position in space-time is affected by the different configurations.

Because of the unique properties of QCD, the team can't take advantage of classical mathematical methods.

"There are no other choices but to try to solve everything numerically. You write down the theory for the standard model of particle physics and say, 'OK, that's what we're going to put in the computer.' So they put space-time on the computer," said Jack Wells, Director of Science at the OLCF. "The idea is, here's space and time represented as a lattice, or grid, of points. In the limit that the grid size is large and the lattice spacing is small, we'll get the right answer."

LQCD calculations use statistical sampling in much the same way that pollsters predict who will win an election. You don't have to survey every single person. You just have to have a large enough sample size to have confidence. The larger the sample, the better it reflects reality.

Increasing the size of these snapshots has been the group's focus over the past few years. As a result, the lattices on which the gluons are represented mathematically have become very large. The team has finished its work on lattice sizes up to 403 - 256. That is 40 sites in each of the three space dimensions and 256 sites in the time direction for a total of 16 million sites.

The researchers hope that this greater level of realism will allow them to be the first to predict exotic mesons from first principles. Their research will give greater insight into how quarks and gluons bind to form such states and increase our understanding of the fundamental strong force.

Edwards' ALCC project wrapped up on June 30 with all proposed computational tasks achieved; the project used 350 million hours on Titan, the largest annual project usage of OLCF resources to date.

Enter JLab
An additional goal of the group has to been to give theoretical underpinnings to GlueX, a $50 million nuclear physics photon detector in JLab's new Hall D.

Edwards said the GlueX detector will try to answer two fundamental questions experimentally. "One, do these [exotic] mesons even exist? That's just a basic question. And two, how would you actually find them experimentally? For that, you need to know how they decay, because they only exist for a short period of time."

It has been difficult for researchers to observe these particles experimentally because they can't observe the individual pieces--quarks, antiquarks, and gluons--by themselves. Unlike the other fundamental forces, such as gravity, the strong force only increases with distance. If you try to pull elementary particles apart, the fields holding them together eventually snap, and another quark and antiquark pair is produced out of the vacuum.

Because of this phenomenon, known as confinement, scientists have to look at the makeup of mesons and other elementary particles in a roundabout way. In an electron accelerator, photons are shot into a proton target. Edwards likens it to "thwacking a bell" that starts ringing and sending off vibrations, or resonances. When that resonance decays, it breaks down into other particles that are picked up by detectors like GlueX. The nuclear physicists at JLab then try to reverse engineer these particles to determine what was in the initial state.

Edwards' team hopes to help better calibrate these physical experiments by determining the energy spectrum of exotic resonances as well as by predicting what the properties of these exotic mesons might be so JLab researchers have a better idea of where to look for them.

"I don't like to use the 'B' word often," Edwards said, "but this ALCC allocation has allowed a breakthrough advance for us. Now, the race is on. GlueX is starting to take measurements and goes into full production in the fall."

Dudek, J. J., R. G. Edwards, and C. E. Thomas. "Energy Dependence of the ? Resonance in pp Elastic Scattering from Lattice QCD." Physical Review D 87 (2013): 034505.; Dudek, J. J., R. G. Edwards, C. E. Thomas, and D. J. Wilson. "Resonances in Coupled pK-?K Scattering from Quantum Chromodynamics." Physical Review Letters 113 (2014): 182001.; Wilson, D. J., J. J. Dudek, R. G. Edwards, and C. E. Thomas. "Resonances in Coupled pK,?K Scattering from Lattice QCD." Physical Review D 91 (2015): 054008.

 

 

NASA's Swift reveals a black hole bull's-eye

 
‎15 ‎July ‎2015, ‏‎08:32:29 AMGo to full article
Greenbelt MD (SPX) Jul 10, 2015 - What looks like a shooting target is actually an image of nested rings of X-ray light centered on an erupting black hole. On June 15, NASA's Swift satellite detected the start of a new outburst from V404 Cygni, where a black hole and a sun-like star orbit each other. Since then, astronomers around the world have been monitoring the ongoing light show.

On June 30, a team led by Andrew Beardmore at the University of Leicester, U.K., imaged the system using the X-ray Telescope aboard Swift, revealing a series concentric rings extending about one-third the apparent size of a full moon. A movie made by combining additional observations acquired on July 2 and 4 shows the expansion and gradual fading of the rings.

Astronomers say the rings result from an "echo" of X-ray light. The black hole's flares emit X-rays in all directions. Dust layers reflect some of these X-rays back to us, but the light travels a longer distance and reaches us slightly later than light traveling a more direct path. The time delay creates the light echo, forming rings that expand with time.

Detailed analysis of the expanding rings shows that they all originate from a large flare that occurred on June 26 at 1:40 p.m. EDT. There are multiple rings because there are multiple reflecting dust layers between 4,000 and 7,000 light-years away from us. Regular monitoring of the rings and how they change as the eruption continues will allow astronomers to better understand their nature.

"The flexible planning of Swift observations has given us the best dust-scattered X-ray ring images ever seen," Beardmore said. "With these observations we can make a detailed study of the normally invisible interstellar dust in the direction of this black hole."

V404 Cygni is located about 8,000 light-years away. Every couple of decades the black hole fires up in an outburst of high-energy light. Its previous eruption ended in 1989.

The investigating team includes scientists from the Universities of Leicester, Southampton, and Oxford in the U.K., the University of Alberta in Canada, and the European Space Agency in Spain.

Swift was launched in November 2004 and is managed by NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center in Greenbelt, Maryland. Goddard operates the spacecraft in collaboration with Penn State University in University Park, Pennsylvania, the Los Alamos National Laboratory in New Mexico and Orbital Sciences Corp. in Dulles, Virginia. International collaborators are located in the United Kingdom and Italy. The mission includes contributions from Germany and Japan.

 

 

Distant Black Hole Wave Twists Like Giant Whip

 
‎15 ‎July ‎2015, ‏‎08:32:29 AMGo to full article
Pasadena CA (JPL) Jul 10, 2015 - Fast-moving magnetic waves emanating from a distant supermassive black hole undulate like a whip whose handle is being shaken by a giant hand, according to a new study using data from the National Radio Astronomy Observatory's Very Long Baseline Array. Scientists used this instrument to explore the galaxy/black hole system known as BL Lacertae (BL Lac) in high resolution.

"The waves are excited by a shaking motion of the jet at its base," said David Meier, a now-retired astrophysicist from NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory and the California Institute of Technology, both in Pasadena.

The team's findings, detailed in the April 10 issue of The Astrophysical Journal, mark the first time so-called Alfven (pronounced Alf-vain) waves have been identified in a black hole system.

Alfven waves are generated when magnetic field lines, such as those coming from the sun or a disk around a black hole, interact with charged particles, or ions, and become twisted or coiled into a helical shape. In the case of BL Lac, the ions are in the form of particle jets that are flung from opposite sides of the black hole at near light speed.

"Imagine running a water hose through a slinky that has been stretched taut," said first author Marshall Cohen, an astronomer at Caltech. "A sideways disturbance at one end of the slinky will create a wave that travels to the other end, and if the slinky sways to and fro, the hose running through its center has no choice but to move with it."

A similar thing is happening in BL Lac, Cohen said. The Alfven waves are analogous to the propagating sideways motions of the slinky, and as the waves propagate along the magnetic field lines, they can cause the field lines - and the particle jets encompassed by the field lines - to move as well.

It's common for black hole particle jets to bend - and some even swing back and forth. But those movements typically take place on timescales of thousands or millions of years. "What we see is happening on a timescale of weeks," Cohen said. "We're taking pictures once a month, and the position of the waves is different each month."

"By analyzing these waves, we are able to determine the internal properties of the jet, and this will help us ultimately understand how jets are produced by black holes," said Meier.

Interestingly, from the vantage of astronomers on Earth, the Alfven waves emanating from BL Lac appear to be traveling about five times faster than the speed of light, but it's only an optical illusion. The illusion is difficult to visualize but has to do with the fact that the waves are traveling slightly off our line of sight at nearly the speed of light. At these high speeds, time slows down, which can throw off the perception of how fast the waves are actually moving.

Other Caltech authors on the paper include Talvikki Hovatta, a former Caltech postdoctoral scholar. Scientists from the University of Cologne and the Max Planck Institute for Radioastronomy in Germany; the Isaac Newton Institute of Chile; Aalto University in Finland; the Astro Space Center of Lebedev Physical Institute, the Pulkovo Observatory, and the Crimean Astrophysical Observatory in Russia; Purdue University in Indiana and Denison University in Granville, Ohio.

 

 

Syracuse physicists confirm existence of rare pentaquarks discovery

 
‎15 ‎July ‎2015, ‏‎08:32:29 AMGo to full article
Syracuse NY (SPX) Jul 15, 2015 - Physicists in Syracuse University's College of Arts and Sciences have confirmed the existence of two rare pentaquark states. Their discovery, which has taken place at the CERN Large Hadron Collider (LHC) in Geneva, Switzerland, is said to have major implications for the study of the structure of matter.

It also puts to rest a 51-year-old mystery, in which American physicist Murray Gell-Mann famously posited the existence of fundamental subatomic constituents called quarks, which form particles such as protons. In 1964, he said that, in addition to a constituent with three quarks, there could be one with four quarks and an anti-quark, known as a "pentaquark." Until now, the search for pentaquarks has been fruitless.

"The statistical evidence of these new pentatquark states is beyond question," says Sheldon Stone, Distinguished Professor of Physics, who helped engineer the discovery. "Although some positive evidence was reported around 10 years ago, those results have been thoroughly debunked. Since then, the LHCb [Large Hadron Collider beauty] collaboration has been particularly deliberate in its study."

In addition to Stone, the research team includes other physicists with ties to Syracuse: Tomasz Skwarnicki, professor of physics; Nathan Jurik G'16, a Ph.D. student; and Liming Zhang, a former University research associate who is now an associate professor at Tsinghua University in Beijing, China.

Liming, in fact, is presenting the findings at a LHCb workshop on Wednesday, July 22, at CERN.

Stone credits Gell-Mann, a Nobel Prize-winning scientist who spent much of his career at Caltech, for postulating the existence of quarks, which are fractionally charged objects that make up matter.

"He predicted that strongly interacting particles [hadrons] are formed from quark-antiquark pairs [mesons] or from three quarks [baryons]," Stone says. "This classification scheme, which has grown to encompass hadrons with four and five quarks, underscores the Standard Model, which explains the physical make-up of the Universe."

Stone says that, while his team's discovery is remarkable, it still begs many questions. One of them is the issue of how quarks bind together. The traditional answer has been a residual nuclear force, approximately 10 million times stronger than the chemical binding in atoms.

But not all bindings are created equal, Skwarnicki says. "Quarks may be tightly bound or loosely bound in a meson-baryon molecule," he explains. "The color-neutral meson and baryon feel a residual strong force [that is] similar to the one binding nucleons to form nuclei."

Adds Stone: "The theory of strong interactions is the only strongly coupled theory we have. It is particularly important for us to understand, as it not only describes normal matter, but also serves as a precursor for future theories."

The discovery is the latest in a string of successes for Syracuse's Department of Physics, which made international Syracuse physicists confirm existence of rare pentaquarks discoverys last year, when Skwarnicki helped prove the existence of a meson named Z(4430), with two quarks and two antiquarks.

Much of this cutting-edge work occurs at CERN, where Stone oversees more than a dozen Syracuse researchers. CERN houses four multinational experiments, each with its own detector for collecting data from the LHC particle accelerator.

 

 

Researcher devises method to untangle, analyze 'controlled chaos'

 
‎15 ‎July ‎2015, ‏‎08:32:29 AMGo to full article
Bloomington IN (SPX) Jul 14, 2015 - A researcher at Indiana University has developed a new mathematical framework to more effectively analyze "controlled chaos," or how interactions among highly complex systems affect their operation and vulnerability. The new method could potentially be used to improve the resilience of complex critical systems, such as air traffic control networks and power grids, or slow the spread of threats across large networks, such as disease outbreaks.

"By providing reliable results in a rapid manner, these equations allow for the creation of algorithms that optimize the resilience of real interdependent networks," said the study's author, Filippo Radicchi, whose work appears in the journal Nature Physics. "They may also be helpful in designing complex systems that are more robust, or more easily recoverable," he added.

Radicchi is an assistant professor in the School of Informatics and Computing and a member of the Center for Complex Networks and Systems Research. His equations work by providing a new method to "untangle" multiple complex systems; pulling apart each network, or "graph," for individual analysis; and then reconstructing an overall picture.

A "graph" describes the myriad points and connection lines that comprise a complex network. In an air transportation network, for example, an airport might represent a single point; an airplane's flight path, the connections between points.

"In the real world, networks do not exist in isolation; they are always interacting with other networks," Radicchi said. "By unraveling multiple graphs, we're able to analyze each in isolation, providing a more complete picture of their interdependence and interaction."

The key to the equations' power is twofold. First, they are not dependent on the use of large-scale simulations, which are costly and time-consuming to run. Secondly, they are able to quickly and accurately measure "percolation" in a system, a term that describes the amount of disruption caused by small breakdowns in a large system.

"If you're traveling between cities by plane and 10 percent of the airports worldwide suddenly stop operating for some reason, percolation theory can help us calculate how many airports you can still use to reach your target city," Radicchi said.

A smooth percolation transition, as revealed though the equations, indicates that a system will stop functioning gradually as the number of local failures rise. An abrupt percolation transition reveals a system more likely to stop functioning suddenly after reaching a certain number of local failures.

"At that point," Radicchi said, "a system will exhibit 'catastrophic behavior,' from which it is very difficult to recover."

For an infamous example of an unstable infrastructure, Radicchi points to a massive blackout in his native country of Italy in 2003, in which the entire nation's power grid failed within a matter of minutes. The problem was traced back to control of the nation's power generators, which was dependent upon a telecommunications network that itself could not properly function without electricity.

"When the power went out, telecommunications routers also failed, causing further chaos and knocking out the Internet communications network too," he said. "These are the sorts of situations we need to be able to detect before they occur, not after it's too late."

In terms of infrastructure, Radicchi said the same methods used to detect vulnerabilities in a transportation network could also help create plans to reduce construction costs or shorten commute times. Or they could be applied to better understand other complex systems that remain surprisingly resistant to breakdown, such as the human body, the brain and social networks.

"We may be able to further optimize these systems too," he added. "For example, enhancing the spread of new knowledge and ideas."

 

 

Law governing anomalous heat conduction revealed

 
‎15 ‎July ‎2015, ‏‎08:32:29 AMGo to full article
Shanghai, China (SPX) Jul 15, 2015 - How heat travels, matters. Yet, there is still no consensus on the exact physical mechanism that causes anomalous heat conduction - despite the existence of previous numerical simulation, theoretical predictions and experimental observations.

Now, a team based in Asia has demonstrated that electron transport depends on temperature. It follows a scaling governed by a power law - and not the exponential scaling previously envisaged. These findings were recently published in EPJ B by Yunyun Li Tongji University, Shanghai, China, and colleagues in Singapore.

Heat conduction depends on the internal energy transferred by microscopic diffusion and collisions of particles, such as electrons, within a given body. Anomalous heat conduction can be best studied in a particular kind of model: one that accounts for the thermal transport in a one-dimensional (1D) lattice. In this study, the chosen 1D model is dubbed the coupled rotator lattice model.

The specificities of the chosen model is that it conserves heat conductions - that is heat transport and heat diffusion - as well as momentum diffusion. Under these conditions, the expectation is that the heat conduction would be anomalous. But in reality, numerical simulations have previously demonstrated that the model exhibits normal heat conduction.

For physicists, these results don't intuitively match the fact the heat is diffusing in a way that preserves its momentum. To complement their approach, they also drew a comparison with a single kicked rotator.

The authors systematically investigated how heat conductivity changes with temperature in the selected 1D model. This approach led them to the thesis that heat conductivity correlates with a power law, instead of an exponential scaling as previously predicted. Further, this phenomenon occurs without a transition temperature above which the heat conduction is normal and below which it is anomalous.

 

 

Clay sheets stack to form proton conductors

 
‎15 ‎July ‎2015, ‏‎08:32:29 AMGo to full article
Evanston IL (SPX) Jul 14, 2015 - Northwestern Engineering professor Jiaxing Huang has developed a cheaper, more stable proton-conducting system. To find the key ingredient, he had to look no further than his own backyard.

"We used a clay that you can buy at a gardening store," said Huang, associate professor of materials science and engineering at Northwestern University's McCormick School of Engineering. "I like to call it a 'down-to-earth' material."

When a proton is transported, it generates an electrical current that plays a key role in both nature and technology. Engineers are particularly interested in harnessing proton conduction for catalysis, electrochemical sensors and reactors, and harvesting energy. In fuel cells, for example, a proton must be transported across a membrane in order to reach a cathode, completing the conversion of chemical energy into electricity.

In cells, protons can be transported through nanopores formed by membrane proteins. Engineers have been trying to mimic this by creating artificial proton nanochannels. For the past 20 years, they have used nanolithography to create nanochannels in silicon, glass, and other materials to enhance ionic transport and conductivity. Those nanochannels do result in higher conductivity, but there are two major problems: nanolithography is complex and expensive, and the final material is difficult to produce on a large scale.

"Many types of nanochannels have been demonstrated on a substrate," Huang said. "But it has been difficult to produce them in large quantities, say, a substrate filled with nanochannels."

Huang's new solution capitalizes on clay's natural properties. When two-dimensional sheets of the clay, called vermiculite, are exfoliated in water, they carry negative charges, attracting positively charged protons. After the sheets dry, they self-assemble into paper-like films. The near 1-nanometer spacing between the layers serves as the nanochannels that can concentrate protons for conduction.

Supported by the Office of Naval Research and Northwestern's Materials Research Science and Engineering Center, Huang's research is described in a paper published in Nature Communications. Other authors of the paper include former visiting student Jiao-Jing Shao, former postdoctoral scholar Kalyan Raidonga, and graduate student Andrew Koltonow. Shao and Raidongo have completed their training at Northwestern and are now professors in China and India, respectively.

Compared to graphene-based sheets and other two-dimensional materials, clay layers have significant advantages for constructing ion conducting devices and materials. Clay is readily available and can be exfoliated in water by ionic exchange, which is much more benign than the chemical exfoliation needed for graphene and other materials. It also has extraordinary chemical and thermal stability, capable of withstanding temperatures higher than 500 degrees Celsius.

"Clay has extraordinary thermal stability," Huang said. "We want to create a proton conducting system that can sustain very high temperatures because some of the best proton-conducting materials out there can't do that."

The simplicity of the material processing techniques required to produce such 2-D nanochannels makes it easy to scale up. Therefore, instead of resulting in a small number of channels, over 30 percent of the volume of Huang's clay membrane is made of proton-conducting nanochannels.

Huang calls his clay membrane a new example of "bulk nanostructured materials," which refers to a macroscopic form of materials with structural units at nanometer scale. Bulk nanostructure materials are of great interest, partially because they have new properties that are untenable to their nanostructured units.

In this case, the individual clay sheets do not have proton-conducting properties. They need to assemble face-to-face to generate the final bulk form of material, in which all of the sheets collectively support the proton-conducting properties.

"We're studying nanomaterials beyond the individual nanostructured unit," he said. "This is a bulk material that can be readily seen, manipulated, and used."

 

 

New method of quantum entanglement packs vastly more data in a photon

 
‎15 ‎July ‎2015, ‏‎08:32:29 AMGo to full article
Los Angeles CA (SPX) Jul 10, 2015 - A team of researchers led by UCLA electrical engineers has demonstrated a new way to harness light particles, or photons, that are connected to each other and act in unison no matter how far apart they are - a phenomenon known as quantum entanglement. In previous studies, photons have typically been entangled by one dimension of their quantum properties - usually the direction of their polarization.

In the new study, researchers demonstrated that they could slice up and entangle each photon pair into multiple dimensions using quantum properties such as the photons' energy and spin. This method, called hyperentanglement, allows each photon pair to carry much more data than was possible with previous methods.

Quantum entanglement could allow users to send data through a network and know immediately whether that data had made it to its destination without being intercepted or altered. With hyperentanglement, users could send much denser packets of information using the same networks.

The research, published in Nature Photonics, was led by Zhenda Xie, a research scientist in the lab of Chee Wei Wong, a UCLA associate professor of electrical engineering who was the research project's principal investigator. Researchers from MIT, Columbia University, the University of Maryland and the National Institute of Standards and Technology were also part of the team.

Albert Einstein famously described quantum entanglement as "spooky action at a distance" because it seems so improbable that what happens to one particle in an entangled pair also happens instantly to the other particle, even over great distances. The phenomenon exceeds the speed of light.

In the new study, researchers sent hyperentangled photons in a shape known as a biphoton frequency comb, essentially breaking up entangled photons into smaller parts.

In secure data transfer, photons sent over fiber optic networks can be encrypted through entanglement. With each dimension of entanglement, the amount of information carried on a photon pair is doubled, so a photon pair entangled by five dimensions can carry 32 times as much data as a pair entangled by only one. The result greatly extends from wavelength multiplexing, the method for carrying many videos over a single optical fiber.

"We show that an optical frequency comb can be generated at single photon level," Xie said. "Essentially, we're leveraging wavelength division multiplexing concepts at the quantum level."

Potential applications for the research include secure communication and information processing, in particular for high-capacity data transfer with minimal error. This could be useful for medical servers, government data communications, financial markets and military communication channels, as well as quantum cloud communications and distributed quantum computing.

"We are fortunate to verify a decades-old theoretical prediction by Professor Jeff Shapiro of MIT, that quantum entanglement can be observed in a comb-like state," Wong said. "With the help of state-of-the-art high-speed single photon detectors at NIST and support from Dr. Franco Wong, Dr. Xie was able to verify the high-dimensional and multi-degrees-of-freedom entanglement of photons. These observations demonstrate a new fundamentally secure approach for dense information processing and communications."

Co-authors on the paper are Sajan Shrestha, XinAn Xu and Junlin Liang, prior students and postdoctoral scientists at Columbia with Wong; Tian Zhong, professors Jeffrey Shapiro and Franco N.C. Wong of MIT; Yan-Xiao Gong of Southeast University in Nanjing, China; and Joshua Bienfang and Alessandro Restelli, affiliated with both the University of Maryland and the NIST.

 

 

Clues to inner atomic life from subtle light-emission shifts

 
‎15 ‎July ‎2015, ‏‎08:32:29 AMGo to full article
New York NY (SPX) Jul 10, 2015 - Atoms absorb and emit light of various wavelengths. Physicists have long known that there are some tiny changes, or shifts, in the light that gets absorbed or emitted, due to the properties of the atomic nucleus. Now, a team of scientists has elucidated the so-called hyperfine structure of cadmium atoms.

Relying on a method called laser spectroscopy, they have measured variations in the energy transition within cadmium atom - Cd in the periodic table. They studied a chain of isotopes with an odd number of neutrons ranging from 59 in 107Cd to 75 in 123Cd.

From these high-precision measurements, they were able to identify the physical cause of the shift within the nucleus. These findings by Nadja Frommgen from the Johannes Gutenberg University Mainz, in Germany, and international colleagues have now been published in EPJ D.

Two main factors influence the cadmium atom's hyperfine structure. First, electrons orbiting the nucleus create a magnetic field resulting in a force affecting the nucleus, and splitting its absorption and emission line into a number of finer lines. Second, there are influences from the way the charge is distributed within the nucleus - a quantity known as the nuclear electric quadrupole moment, which only appears for non-spherical distributions. Some nuclei are shaped like a rugby ball, a frisbee or even a pear.

A peculiar outcome of this study of Cd's hyperfine structure was the observation of a very regular anomaly in the magnetic distribution inside the nucleus - previously observed only in mercury - pointing to a possible general feature of nuclei.

The nuclear properties identified from such precision measurement have both theoretical and practical implications in astrophysics, nuclear and plasma physics. They are also important for detection methods such as atomic, chemical and solid-state spectroscopy, as well as nuclear magnetic resonance.

Nadja Frommgen, D. L. Balabanski, M. L. Bissell, J. Biero'n, K. Blaum, B. Cheal, K. Flanagan, S. Fritzsche, C. Geppert, M. Hammen, M. Kowalska, K. Kreim, A. Krieger, R. Neugart, G. Neyens, M. M. Rajabali, W. Nortershauser, J. Papuga, and D. T. Yordanov (2015), Collinear laser spectroscopy of atomic cadmium, Eur. Phys. J. D 69: 164, DOI 10.1140/epjd/e2015-60219-0

 

 

X-rays and electrons join forces to map catalytic reactions in real-time

 
‎09 ‎July ‎2015, ‏‎09:39:00 AMGo to full article
Upton, NY (SPX) Jul 09, 2015 - A new technique pioneered at the U.S. Department of Energy's Brookhaven National Laboratory reveals atomic-scale changes during catalytic reactions in real time and under real operating conditions. A team of scientists used a newly developed reaction chamber to combine x-ray absorption spectroscopy and electron microscopy for an unprecedented portrait of a common chemical reaction.

The results demonstrate a powerful operando technique--from the Latin for "in working condition"--that may revolutionize research on catalysts, batteries, fuel cells, and other major energy technologies.

"We tracked the dynamic transformations of a working catalyst, including single atoms and larger structures, during an active reaction at room temperature," said study coauthor and Brookhaven Lab scientist Eric Stach. "This gives us unparalleled insight into nanoparticle structure and would be impossible to achieve without combining two complementary operando techniques."

The results were published online in the journal Nature Communications.

To prove the efficacy of this new mosquito-sized reaction chamber--called a micro-reactor--the scientists tracked the performance of a platinum catalyst during the conversion of ethylene to ethane, a model reaction relevant to many industrial synthesis processes. They conducted x-ray studies at the National Synchrotron Light Source (NSLS) and electron microscopy at the Center for Functional Nanomaterials (CFN), both DOE Office of Science User Facilities.

"The size, shape, and distribution of catalysts affect their efficiency and durability," said study coauthor Ralph Nuzzo of the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign. "Now that we can track those parameters throughout the reaction sequence, we can better determine the ideal design of future catalysts--especially those that drive energy-efficient reactions without using expensive and rare materials like platinum."

Hidden behind the curtain
In transmission electron microscopy (TEM), a focused electron beam passes through the sample and captures images of the nanoparticles within. This is usually performed in a pristine environment--often an inactive, low-pressure vacuum--but the micro-reactor allowed the TEM to operate in the presence of an atmosphere of reactive gases.

"With TEM, we take high-resolution pictures of the particles to directly see their size and distribution," said Stach, who leads CFN's Electron Microscopy Group. "But with the micro-reactor, some signals were too small to detect. Particles smaller than a single nanometer were hidden behind what we call the resolution curtain of the technique."

Another technique was needed to peer behind the curtain and reveal the full reaction story: x-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS).

In XAS, a beam of x-rays bombards the catalyst sample and deposits energy as it passes through the micro-reactor. The sample then emits secondary x-rays, which are measured to identify its chemical composition--in this instance, the distribution of platinum particles.

"The XAS and TEM data, analyzed together, let us calculate the numbers and average sizes of not one, but several different types of catalysts," said coauthor and Yeshiva University scientist Anatoly Frenkel, who led the x-ray experiments. "Running the tests in an operando condition lets us track broad changes over time, and only the combination of techniques could reveal all catalytic particles."

Versatile micro-reactor
The new micro-reactor was specifically designed and built to work seamlessly with both synchrotron x-rays and electron microscopes.

"Everything was exquisitely controlled at both NSLS and CFN, including precise measurements of the progress of the catalytic reaction," Frenkel said. "For the first time, the operando approach was used to correlate data obtained by different techniques at the same stages of the reaction."

A relatively straightforward mathematical approach allowed them to deduce the total number of ultra-small particles missing in the TEM data.

"We took the full XAS data, which incorporates particles of all sizes, and removed the TEM results covering particles larger than one nanometer--the remainder fills in that crucial sub-nanometer gap in our knowledge of catalyst size and distribution during each step of the reaction," Frenkel said.

Added Stach, "In the past, scientists would look at data before and after the reaction under model conditions, especially with TEM, and make educated guesses. Now we can make definitive statements."

Brighter, faster experiments
The collaboration has already extended this operando micro-reactor approach to incorporate two additional techniques--infrared and Raman spectroscopy--and plans to introduce other complex and complementary x-ray and electron probe techniques over time.

NSLS ended its 32-year experimental run in the fall of 2014, but its successor--the just-opened National Synchrotron Light Source II (NSLS-II)--is 10,000 times brighter and promises to rapidly advance operando science.

"Each round of data collection took six hours at NSLS, but will take just minutes at NSLS-II," Stach said. "Through Laboratory Directed Research and Development funding, we will be part of the initial experiments at the Submicron Resolution X-ray (SRX) Spectroscopy beamline this summer, dramatically increasing the time resolution of the experiments and letting us track changes in a more dynamic fashion. And that's just one of the NSLS-II beamlines where we plan to deploy this technique."

The ethylene to ethane reaction happens at room temperature, but other new micro-reactors can operate at up to 800 degrees Celsius--more than hot enough for most catalytic reactions-- and will increase the versatility and applicability of the approach.

In the near future, this same micro-reactor approach will be used to explore other crucial energy frontiers, including batteries and fuel cells.

"We are seeing the emergence of a very powerful and versatile technique that leverages both NSLS-II and the CFN," said Stach, who was recently named Special Assistant for Operando Experimentation for Brookhaven's Energy Sciences Directorate. "This approach complements the many facilities being developed at Brookhaven Lab for operando energy research. Our goal is to be world leaders in operando science."

 

 

Freezing single atoms to absolute zero with microwaves brings quantum technology closer

 
‎09 ‎July ‎2015, ‏‎09:39:00 AMGo to full article
Sussex UK (SPX) Jul 07, 2015 - Physicists at the University of Sussex have found a way of using everyday technology found in kitchen microwaves and mobile telephones to bring quantum physics closer to helping solve enormous scientific problems that the most powerful of today's supercomputers cannot even begin to embark upon.

A team led by Professor Winfried Hensinger has frozen single charged atoms to within a millionth of a degree of absolute zero (minus 273.15 C) with the help of microwave radiation. This technique will simplify the construction of 'quantum technology devices' including powerful quantum sensors, ultra-fast quantum computers, and ultra-stable quantum clocks. Quantum technologies make use of highly strange and counterintuitive phenomena predicted by the theory of quantum physics.

The report "Ground-state cooling of a trapped ion using long-wavelength radiation" was published in Physical Review Letters this week: Here

"The use of long-wavelength radiation instead of laser technology to cool ions can tremendously simplify the construction of practical quantum technology devices enabling us to build real devices much faster," said Professor Hensinger.

Once quantum technology is harnessed into practical devices it has the potential to completely change everyday life again - just as computers have already done. Quantum technologies may one day revolutionise our understanding of science answering open questions of biology and solving the origin of the universe and other puzzles as well as allowing for a revolution in sensing, time keeping and communications.

"By taking advantage of simple well developed technology we have be able to create a remarkably robust and simple method, which is expected to provide a stepping stone for this technology to be integrated into a breadth of different quantum technologies spanning from quantum computers to highly sensitive quantum sensors," said Professor Hensinger.

Freezing atoms puts them into the lowest possible energy and is a step towards harnessing the strange effects of quantum physics, which allow objects to exist in different states at the same time.

"Besides finding an easy way to create atoms with zero-point energy, we have also managed to put the atom into a highly counter intuitive state: where it is both moving and not moving at the same time," said Professor Hensinger.

'Ground-state cooling of a trapped ion using long-wavelength radiation ', by S. Weidt, J. Randall, S. C. Webster, E. D. Standing, A. Rodriguez, A. E. Webb, B. Lekitsch, W. K. Hensinger, is published in Physical Review Letters [Phys. Rev. Lett. 115, 013002 (2015)].

 

 

Why do puddles stop spreading?

 
‎09 ‎July ‎2015, ‏‎09:39:00 AMGo to full article
Boston MA (SPX) Jul 09, 2015 - When you spill a bit of water onto a tabletop, the puddle spreads - and then stops, leaving a well-defined area of water with a sharp boundary. There's just one problem: The formulas scientists use to describe such a fluid flow say that the water should just keep spreading endlessly. Everyone knows that's not the case - but why?

This mystery has now been solved by researchers at MIT - and while this phenomenon might seem trivial, the finding's ramifications could be significant: Understanding such flowing fluids is essential for processes from the lubrication of gears and machinery to the potential sequestration of carbon dioxide emissions in porous underground formations.

The new findings are reported in the journal Physical Review Letters in a paper by Ruben Juanes, an associate professor of civil and environmental engineering, graduate student Amir Pahlavan, research associate Luis Cueto-Felgueroso, and mechanical engineering professor Gareth McKinley.

"The classic thin-film model describes the spreading of a liquid film, but it doesn't predict it stopping," Pahlavan says. It turns out that the problem is one of scale, he says: It's only at the molecular level that the forces responsible for stopping the flow begin to show up. And even though these forces are minuscule, their effect changes how the liquid behaves in a way that is obvious at a much larger scale.

"Within a macroscopic view of this problem, there's nothing that stops the puddle from spreading. There's something missing here," Pahlavan says.

Classical descriptions of spreading have a number of inconsistencies: For example, they require an infinite force to get a puddle to start spreading. But close to a puddle's edge, "the liquid-solid and liquid-air interfaces start feeling each other," Pahlavan says. "These are the missing intermolecular forces in the macroscopic description." Properly accounting for these forces resolves the previous paradoxes, he says.

"What's striking here," Pahlavan adds, is that "what's actually stopping the puddle is forces that only act at the nanoscale." This illustrates very nicely how nanoscale physics affect our daily experiences, he says.

Whether someone's spilled milk stops on the tabletop or makes a mess all over the floor may seem like an issue of little importance, except to the person who might get soaked, or have to mop up the spill. But the principles involved affect a host of other situations where the ability to calculate how a fluid will behave can have important consequences.

For example, understanding these effects can be essential to figuring out how much oil is needed to keep a gear train from running dry, or how much drilling "mud" is needed to keep an oil rig working smoothly. Both processes involve flows of thin films of liquid.

Many more complex flows of fluids also come down to the same underlying principles, Juanes says - for example, carbon sequestration, the process of removing carbon dioxide from fossil-fuel emissions and injecting it into underground formations, such as porous rock. Understanding how the injected fluid will spread through pores in rock, perhaps displacing water, is essential in predicting how stable such injections may be.

"You start with something very simple, like the spread of a puddle, but you get at something very fundamental about intermolecular forces," Juanes says. "The same process, the same physics, will be at play in many complex flows."

Another area where the new findings could be important is in the design of microchips. As their features get smaller and smaller, controlling the buildup of heat has become a major engineering issue; some new system use liquids to dissipate that heat. Understanding how such cooling fluids will flow and spread across the chip could be important for designing such systems, Pahlavan says.

This initial analysis dealt only with perfectly smooth surfaces. In pursuing the research, Juanes says, a next step will be to extend the analysis to include fluid flows over rough surfaces - which more closely approximate the conditions, for example, of fluids in underground porous formations. "This work puts us in a position to be able to better describe multiphase flows in complex geometries like rough fractures and porous media."

 
 
 

 

 

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Why do scientists now believe we live in a 10-dimensional universe?

Has physics finally reached the very boundaries of reality?

There seems to be evidence to suggest that our world and everything in it are only ghostly images; projections from a level of reality so beyond our own that the real reality is literally beyond both space and time. The main architect of this astonishing idea is one of the world's most eminent thinkers- physicist David Bohm, a protege of Einstein's. Earlier, he noticed that, in plasmas, particles stopped behaving like individuals and started behaving as if they were part of a larger and inter connected whole. He continued his work in the behavior of oceans of these particles, noting their behaving as if they know what each on the untold trillions of individual particles were doing.

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Genetics Research Confirms Biblical Timeline

Exciting research from the summer of 2012 described DNA variation in the protein coding regions of the human genome linked to population growth. One of the investigation's conclusions was that the human genome began to rapidly diversify not more than 5,000 years ago.1,2 This observation closely agrees with a biblical timeline of post-flood human diversification. Yet another study, this one published in the journal Nature, accessed even more extensive data and unintentionally confirmed the recent human history described in Genesis.3

Differences in human DNA can be characterized across populations and ethnic groups using a variety of techniques. One of the most informative genetic technologies in this regard is the analysis of rare DNA variation in the protein coding regions of the genome. Variability in these regions is less frequent than the more numerous genetic differences that occur in the non-coding regulatory regions. Researchers can statistically combine this information with demographic data derived from population growth across the world to generate time scales related to human genetic diversification.4

What makes this type of research unique is that evolutionary scientists typically incorporate hypothetical deep time scales taken from the authority of paleontologists or other similar deep-time scenarios to calibrate models of genetic change over time. Demographics-based studies using observed world population dynamics do not rely on this bias and are therefore more accurate and realistic.

In a 2012 Science report, geneticists analyzed DNA sequences of 15,585 protein-coding gene regions in the human genome for 1,351 European Americans and 1,088 African Americans for rare DNA variation.1,2 This new study accessed rare coding variation in 15,336 genes from over 6,500 humans—almost three times the amount of data compared to the first study.3 A separate group of researchers performed the new study.

The Nature results convey a second spectacular confirmation of the amazingly biblical conclusions from the first study. These scientists confirmed that the human genome began to rapidly diversify not more than 5,000 years ago. In addition, they found significant levels of  variation to be associated with degradation of the human genome, not forward evolutionary progress. This fits closely with research performed by Cornell University geneticist John Sanford who demonstrated through biologically realistic population genetic modeling that genomes actually devolve over time in a process called genetic entropy.5

According to the Bible, the pre-flood world population was reduced to Noah's three sons and their wives, creating a genetic bottleneck from which all humans descended. Immediately following the global flood event, we would expect to see a rapid diversification continuing up to the present. According to Scripture, this began not more than 5,000 years ago. We would also expect the human genome to devolve or degrade as it accumulates irreversible genetic errors over time. Now, two secular research papers confirm these biblical predictions.

References

  1. Tomkins, J. 2012. Human DNA Variation Linked to Biblical Event Timeline. Creation Science Update. Posted on icr.org July 23, 2012, accessed December 31, 2012.
  2. Tennessen, J. et al. 2012. Evolution and Functional Impact of Rare Coding Variation from Deep Sequencing of Human Exomes. Science. 337 (6090): 64-69.
  3. Fu, W, et al. Analysis of 6,515 exomes reveals the recent origin of most human protein-coding variants. Nature. Published online before print, July 13, 2012.
  4. Keinan, A and A. Clark. 2012. Recent Explosive Human Population Growth Has Resulted in an Excess of Rare Genetic Variants. Science. 336 (6082): 740-743.
  5. Sanford, J. C. 2008. Genetic Entropy and the Mystery of the Genome, 3rd ed. Waterloo, NY: FMS Publications.

* Dr. Tomkins is a Research Associate and received his Ph.D. in Genetics from Clemson University.

 

 

Scientists Describe Job's 'Springs of the Sea'

 
‎23 ‎July ‎2015, ‏‎10:00:00 AMGo to full article

Modern machines provide our generation with knowledge entirely unknown in yesteryear. Which of our great grandparents saw footage of water rising through hydrothermal vents on the deep sea floor? New research into water circulating from the ocean, into seafloor crustal rocks, and back into the ocean echoes one of the questions God asked Job thousands of years ago.

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Bacteria Metabolisms Are Like Computer Circuit Boards

 
‎20 ‎July ‎2015, ‏‎10:00:00 AMGo to full article

Bacteria sometimes face a rough life. At about a tenth the size of most plant and animal cells, they have no layer of skin to protect them. Environments can change quickly and if microbes don't have the right tools to adapt, they won't last long. Bioengineers modeled three interdependent aspects of a metabolic system that bacteria use to thrive in ever-changing environments, revealing an underlying array of interrelated parts that they described as "underappreciated."

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New Horizons, Pluto, and the Age of the Solar System

 
‎14 ‎July ‎2015, ‏‎10:00:00 AMGo to full article

Today, more than nine years after its launch, the New Horizons spacecraft is scheduled to make its closest approach to the dwarf planet Pluto. This will make New Horizons the first space probe to examine Pluto and its moons up close during this historic flyby. A NASA press release states, "A close-up look at these worlds from a spacecraft promises to tell an incredible story about the origins and outskirts of our solar system." But what is the real story?

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Discovery: Volcanoes on Venus

 
‎13 ‎July ‎2015, ‏‎10:00:00 AMGo to full article

The tortured surface of Venus appears to have been formed through recent geologic processes, and its rocks contain no record of deep time. What if Venus were young rather than 4.5 billion years old? It would explain quite a bit, including a brand-new discovery made by scientists peering through its dense atmosphere.

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Solving the Missing Tropical Dinosaurs Mystery?

 
‎09 ‎July ‎2015, ‏‎10:00:00 AMGo to full article

One of the unsolved mysteries of secular science is why so few dinosaurs are found in rocks from supposed tropical regions, especially the Triassic system rocks. Jessica Whiteside of the University of Southampton, UK and her colleagues from eight other institutions have proposed a solution to this enigma.

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Carbon-14 Found in Dinosaur Fossils

 
‎06 ‎July ‎2015, ‏‎10:00:00 AMGo to full article

New science directly challenges the millions-of-years dogma scattered throughout the blockbuster movie Jurassic World. The spring 2015 edition of the Creation Research Society Quarterly (CRSQ) is a special issue that focuses on the investigation of dinosaur proteins inside fossil bones. The last article in the issue presents never-before-seen carbon dates for 14 different fossils, including dinosaurs. Because radiocarbon decays relatively quickly, fossils that are even 100,000 years old should have virtually no radiocarbon left in them. But they do.

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Bronze-Age DNA Confirms Babel Dispersion

 
‎26 ‎June ‎2015, ‏‎10:00:00 AMGo to full article

Scientists used new techniques to sequence 101 ancient human genomes believed to be from Bronze-Age populations in Europe. Their findings indicate a massive migratory influx of genetic diversity just a few thousand years ago. This data also coincides with known language diversification patterns, providing strong evidence for the dispersion of people groups at the Tower of Babel.

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Can Iron Preserve Fossil Proteins for Eons?

 
‎23 ‎June ‎2015, ‏‎10:00:00 AMGo to full article

News reports around the world tell of red-blood-cell-like and collagen-like structures found in 75 million year-old dinosaur bones long stored in the British Museum. This news coincides with the release of the film Jurassic World, in which fictional scientists resurrect dinosaurs using dino DNA that "iron chelators" somehow preserved for millions of years. Though the movie is fiction, it does refer to a real study involving blood and bone. However, a closer look at the relevant chemistry shows that the iron-as-preservative story may be just as fictional as Jurassic World.

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Britain's 'Oldest' Sauropod and a Jurassic World

 
‎18 ‎June ‎2015, ‏‎10:00:00 AMGo to full article

Crumbling seaside cliffs at Whitby in northern England continuously reveal new fossils. Most of them are remains of small plants and animals, but researchers from the University of Manchester described a much larger fossil: a giant vertebra from a sauropod's tail. How long ago was the rare bone buried?

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Does National Geographic Promote Atheism?

 
‎16 ‎June ‎2015, ‏‎10:00:00 AMGo to full article

National Geographic interviewed atheist Jerry Coyne. The subject was not science, but Coyne's personal beliefs. Will Nat Geo provide the same platform for a researcher who believes that God, rather than nature, created all things?

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Colorful Dinosaur Eggs Challenge Deep Time

 
‎11 ‎June ‎2015, ‏‎10:00:00 AMGo to full article

German scientists revealed that some Chinese dinosaur eggs probably looked similar to the dark blue-green hue of modern emu eggs. If the dinosaur’s original pigment molecules revealed the egg’s color, then a significant question emerges. Can pigments really stay colorful for 66 million years?

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Dog Fossil Study Shows Wobbly Dating Practice

 
‎08 ‎June ‎2015, ‏‎10:00:00 AMGo to full article

DNA research identified a Siberian fossil as an ancient dog bone. But its radiocarbon date doesn't match the accepted evolutionary story for dog origins. The ease with which scientists revised the date of dog divergence from wolf-like ancestry shows that secular dating practices may be much more subjective than their proponents would care to admit.

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Dinosaur Thighbone Found in Marine Rock

 
‎04 ‎June ‎2015, ‏‎10:00:00 AMGo to full article

Researchers have excavated a portion of a theropod dinosaur thighbone from beachfront marine rock north of Seattle. How did a land animal's leg bone get buried in marine rock?

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Why Do Animals Use Sexual Reproduction?

 
‎28 ‎May ‎2015, ‏‎10:00:00 AMGo to full article

Biologists from the U.K. conducted a 10-year-long experiment on common flour beetles to help understand why insects keep on using sexual reproduction despite its inefficiencies. Though they interpreted the results as supporting evolution, a key observation on the immutability of reproductive systems calls that into question.

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Remembering Mount St. Helens 35 Years Later

 
‎26 ‎May ‎2015, ‏‎10:00:00 AMGo to full article


 


A landslide on the northern side of Mount St. Helens in Washington state on May 18, 1980 uncorked a violent volcanic eruption of ash, vapor, molten material and pulverized rock. The effects of this one of the most scrupulously documented volcanos in history have reshaped the way geologists think about certain landforms.

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What Mean These Stones

 
‎22 ‎May ‎2015, ‏‎10:00:00 AMGo to full article

The poet George Santayana once said, “Those who cannot learn from history are doomed to repeat it.” In the life of every nation, there are “memories” that must be preserved if that nation is to retain an awareness of its unique role among the nations of the world—indeed, among the long list of nations throughout history.

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New Fossil Dubbed 'Platypus Dinosaur'

 
‎19 ‎May ‎2015, ‏‎10:00:00 AMGo to full article

It has a bill like a duck, leg spurs like a rooster, lays eggs like a reptile, but has fur like a mammal. Yet all these features elegantly integrate to form the body of a modern platypus. If God created the platypus, then why couldn't He create other creatures that seem to have borrowed parts from other familiar forms? He may have done just that when he made Chilesaurus.

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Clever Construction in Rorqual Whales

 
‎14 ‎May ‎2015, ‏‎10:00:00 AMGo to full article

A few years ago, scientists discovered a unique sensory organ in the jaw of a rorqual whale—the world's largest creature. Rorqual whales, which include the blue whale and fin whale, feed by ballooning out folds of tissue that bag gobs of krill from fertile ocean waters. Some of those researchers recently described the unique bungee-cord-like nerve fibers that illustrate clever and intentional design.

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Still Searching for Geology's Holy Grail

 
‎11 ‎May ‎2015, ‏‎10:00:00 AMGo to full article

The origin of the continental crust continues to baffle secular geologists who often refer to this mystery as the "holy grail of geology." Earth's plates are composed of two distinctly different types of crust: oceanic and continental. Explaining the reason for the unique crust and plates on Earth has been the subject of on-going research and debate for decades. Two recent articles attempt to shed light on the mystery of the continents.

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A Cosmic 'Supervoid' vs. the Big Bang

 
‎07 ‎May ‎2015, ‏‎10:00:00 AMGo to full article

In a new paper, scientists have announced the discovery of an enormous region of lower-than-average galaxy density about three billion light-years from Earth. This "supervoid," the largest single structure ever discovered at 1.8 billion light-years across, is newsworthy in its own right. However, it also has implications for the Big Bang model of the universe's origin.

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Scientific Suicide

 
‎04 ‎May ‎2015, ‏‎10:00:00 AMGo to full article

The recent cover of New Scientist magazine reads "Belief: They drive everything we do. But our beliefs are built on…nothing." This is an amazing statement by a magazine, supposedly dedicated to science, in that it presents its readers with a philosophical conundrum. How can scientists, who must depend on a strict belief in logic and order, make such a statement?

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Three-Dimensional DNA Code Defies Evolution

 
‎27 ‎April ‎2015, ‏‎10:00:00 AMGo to full article

Scientists have long been baffled as to what actually tells proteins called transcription factors (TFs) where to bind in the genome to turn genes off and on. However, new research incorporating the three-dimensional shape of DNA has revealed an incredibly complex system of interacting biochemical codes.

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Mosasaur Babies: Aren't They Cute?

 
‎20 ‎April ‎2015, ‏‎10:00:00 AMGo to full article

We often hear claims that birds are similar to dinosaurs, but birds and mosasaurs? Mosasaurs were swimming reptiles. How can they be confused with birds? A recent study published in Palaeontology by Yale University's Daniel Field and his colleagues clears up some of this confusion and in the end, illustrates a mosasaur lifecycle of marvelous design.

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No Salamander Evolution Evidence, Past or Present

 
‎16 ‎April ‎2015, ‏‎10:00:00 AMGo to full article

Scientists in Portugal unearthed a "super salamander" which, although "weird compared to anything today," is still very much a salamander. The fossilized bones of the six-foot animal were discovered on a hillside dig "chock-full" of bones and declared to originate from the "Upper Triassic" period, some 200 million years ago according to evolutionary dating. But creationists see this as yet another discovery of a created animal that grew to large dimensions in the fertile world before the Flood, and was subsequently buried during the Flood itself.

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Myths Dressed as Science

 
‎13 ‎April ‎2015, ‏‎10:00:00 AMGo to full article

A recent MSN article claims a fossilized hominid called "Little Foot" found near Johannesburg, South Africa, is approximately 3.67 million years old, as does a similar report in ScienceNews. Both articles provide insufficient detail to make an intelligent evaluation of the method used to arrive at the stated conclusion, and as such that conclusion must be regarded as suspect.

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Saturn's Enceladus Looks Younger than Ever

 
‎09 ‎April ‎2015, ‏‎10:00:00 AMGo to full article

The more we learn about Enceladus, the younger it looks. Stated another way, the more that our space probes discover about this fascinating little moon that inhabits Saturn's tenuous E ring, the more challenging it becomes for conventional origins to explain. A new discovery adds to the list of young-looking Enceladus features.

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Another Horizontal Gene Transfer Fairy Tale

 
‎06 ‎April ‎2015, ‏‎10:00:00 AMGo to full article

As the genomes of many new creatures rapidly fill the public DNA sequence databases, the problems for the grand evolutionary story are becoming overwhelming. One issue is the fact that different creatures have unique sets of genes specific to their kind with no apparent evolutionary history. To explain this glaring problem, evolutionists have resorted to the myth of pervasive horizontal gene transfer.

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Dinosaur Moth: An Evolutionary Enigma

 
‎30 ‎March ‎2015, ‏‎10:00:00 AMGo to full article

Scientists discovered an Australian "dinosaur" moth that, if the evolutionary story is to be believed, has undergone virtually no evolution for at least forty million years. They named it Enigmatinea glatzella. The name is quite descriptive, as Enigmatinea means "enigma moth" in Latin. But why is this moth an enigma to evolutionary scientists?

 


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Twins Provide Peek Into Mankind's Origin

 
‎26 ‎March ‎2015, ‏‎10:00:00 AMGo to full article

Lucy and Maria Aylmer are 18-year-old twins from the United Kingdom. They were born on the same day from the same mother, yet one has light skin and hair, and the other has dark skin and dark, curlier hair. Their unique story illustrates how human-trait variations found around the world could have arisen suddenly in Noah's offspring.

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Heads, Evolution Wins--Tails, Creation Loses?

 
‎23 ‎March ‎2015, ‏‎10:00:00 AMGo to full article

Wouldn't two billion years of mutations and changing environments inevitably produce some effects in an organism? After all, in only a quarter of that supposed time, evolutionary processes are said to have transformed fish into people. Mutations supposedly occur nonstop, but the authors of a new paper now say that creature stasis proves evolution.

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Spiders Have Always Been Spiders

 
‎19 ‎March ‎2015, ‏‎10:00:00 AMGo to full article

A University of California Berkley graduate student has discovered two beautiful new species of peacock spiders in southeast Queensland, Australia. The student, Madeline Girard, named the two colorful creatures "Sparklemuffin" and "Skeletorus," both of the genus Maratus. Are these splendid specimens highly evolved species or have spiders always been spiders?

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Live Webcasts March 18 and 22!

 
‎16 ‎March ‎2015, ‏‎10:00:00 AMGo to full article


 


Get a front-row seat to “Science Confirms Biblical Creation” and “Your Origins Matter” in the comfort of your own home as ICR astrophysicist Dr. Jason Lisle shares biblical and scientific truths. Go to ICR.org/webcast at 7:00 p.m. PDT on Wednesday, March 18, and 9:00 or 10:30 a.m. PDT on Sunday, March 22, to view these engaging presentations.

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Cancer Research Inadvertently Refutes Evolution

 
‎12 ‎March ‎2015, ‏‎10:00:00 AMGo to full article

How did nature supposedly transform a single-cell organism into all the varieties of land-walking animals in our world today? Textbook explanations invoke natural selection of beneficial mutations across unimaginable time, with a bit of help from “junk DNA” and heaps of serendipitous chance. Though it was not intended as a test of evolution, a new cancer research discovery jeopardizes these unfounded evolutionary assumptions.

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Lids, Lashes, and Lunar Rovers

 
‎09 ‎March ‎2015, ‏‎10:00:00 AMGo to full article

A recent discovery indicates our eyelashes must measure at just the right length to function properly. Scientists at the Georgia Institute of Technology studied 22 mammal lash lengths and reported that, from giraffes to hedgehogs, lash length was of "optimum" length—about one-third of the width of the given mammal's eye.

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Manganese Nodule Discovery Points to Genesis Flood

 
‎05 ‎March ‎2015, ‏‎10:00:00 AMGo to full article

Scientists recently discovered a large batch of manganese nodules on the floor of the Atlantic Ocean. These metallic pellets provide strong evidence that most seafloor sediments were deposited rapidly, not slowly and gradually over millions of years. Are these nodules evidence of the Genesis Flood?

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RNA Editing: Biocomplexity Hits a New High

 
‎02 ‎March ‎2015, ‏‎10:00:00 AMGo to full article

When the workings of the genome were first being discovered, the central evolutionary dogma of molecular biology claimed that genetic information passes consistently from DNA to RNA to proteins. Now we know that RNA messages can be altered by a variety of mechanisms, and a new study in squid genetics has vaulted one of these processes—called RNA editing—to an unprecedented level of biocomplexity.

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Secular Study: No Big Bang?

 
‎23 ‎February ‎2015, ‏‎10:00:00 AMGo to full article

Christians who believe the universe began billions of years ago often point to the Big Bang model to try and verify a creation-like beginning. But a new origin of the universe model offers an "everlasting universe" and dismisses the whole idea of a Big Bang. Why would scientists even think to challenge a long-held concept like the Big Bang unless they saw some deal-breaking weaknesses in it?

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Honey Bee Orphan Genes Sting Evolution

 
‎19 ‎February ‎2015, ‏‎10:00:00 AMGo to full article

A key type of rogue genetic data called orphan genes has just been reported in honey bees. Orphan genes conflict with ideas about genome evolution, and they are directly linked with the evolutionary enigma of phenotypic novelty, unique traits specific to a single type of creature.

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Out of Babel--Not Africa

 
‎16 ‎February ‎2015, ‏‎10:00:00 AMGo to full article

Newly published research combining genetic, language, and demographic data challenges the idea of a single lineage of languages and human populations evolving out of Africa. Instead, the data supports the idea that multiple people groups have independent origins—a condition one would predict if the confusion of languages at the Tower of Babel happened as described in the Bible.

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Big Bang Evidence Retracted

 
‎12 ‎February ‎2015, ‏‎10:00:00 AMGo to full article

In March 2014, the BICEP2 radio astronomy team announced purported direct evidence of cosmic inflation, an important part of the modern Big Bang model for the universe’s creation. This announcement was front-page news all over the world. However, these scientists recently submitted a paper for publication that effectively retracts their breakthrough claim, acknowledging that their earlier results were spurious. They admitted their “evidence” was actually an artifact of dust within our own galaxy.

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Snakes Have Always Been Snakes

 
‎09 ‎February ‎2015, ‏‎10:00:00 AMGo to full article

It's an old story. An animal or plant is discovered in sedimentary rocks by paleontologists and it pushes the organism's origin further back by many millions of years. This time snakes are the subject of a recent, unexpected discovery that pushes their first appearance back an additional 65 million years.

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A New Antibiotic?

 
‎05 ‎February ‎2015, ‏‎10:00:00 AMGo to full article

Antibiotics serve as some of the most effective tools modern medicine has to offer. These amazing chemicals save many lives by targeting specific and essential processes in pathogenic bacteria—but antibiotics are losing their magic touch. Their failure to beat back new strains of antibiotic-resistant germs motivates researchers to design or discover new antibiotics. Scientists now reveal reasons why their new discovery brings hope to those hunting for better germ killers.

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The frilled shark . . . is still a shark

 
‎02 ‎February ‎2015, ‏‎10:00:00 AMGo to full article

On January 21, 2015 the news broke—an Australian fisherman hooked a "living fossil." Called the frilled (or frill) shark, this creature was thought to be 80 million years old. It looks mighty frightening, but is it truly "prehistoric" and somehow linked to shark evolution?

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Encore Presentation of Patterns of Evidence: Exodus

 
‎26 ‎January ‎2015, ‏‎10:00:00 AMGo to full article

The Exodus is one of the best-known narratives in the Bible. It details the Israelites' escape from Egypt after centuries of slavery, Moses' rise to leadership, the devastating plagues on Egypt, and the miraculous Red Sea crossing. Yet many archaeologists and historians insist there is no evidence that the biblical Exodus ever occurred. This debate is the subject of the award-winning documentary Patterns of Evidence: Exodus that has an encore presentation this Thursday.

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2014 Most Notable News: Evolutionary Icons Toppled

 
‎22 ‎January ‎2015, ‏‎10:00:00 AMGo to full article

The big-picture story of evolution tells that, over millions of years, natural processes produced millions of species from one or a few primitive progenitors. Did this really happen, or did God create separate distinct "kinds" of creatures about 6,000 years ago like Genesis 1 clearly describes?

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The Hubble 'Pillars of Creation' Revisited

 
‎19 ‎January ‎2015, ‏‎10:00:00 AMGo to full article

In 1995 the Hubble Telescope photographed spectacular columns of gas, illuminated by nearby stars, in a section of the Eagle Nebula. The enormous columns of gas in this famous photo have been nicknamed "pillars of creation" since secular scientists insist that new stars are being "born" within them.

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2014 Most Notable News: Recent Creation

 
‎15 ‎January ‎2015, ‏‎10:00:00 AMGo to full article

In the year 2014, at least a half dozen fascinating observations confirmed the recent creation of our world and universe. For example, researchers took a closer look at Saturn's moon Enceladus, finding that it has more than just the single known geyser spewing icy material into space—it has 101 active geysers.

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2014 Most Notable News: Creation Is a Hot Topic

 
‎12 ‎January ‎2015, ‏‎10:00:00 AMGo to full article

Every generation of believers must settle for itself the core questions of ultimate origins. Where did everything come from? Can God's account of beginnings in Genesis be trusted as actual history? The year 2014 illustrated that this generation is still interested in answers.

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2014 Most Notable News: Fossils Resemble Living Relatives

 
‎08 ‎January ‎2015, ‏‎10:00:00 AMGo to full article

Every year, a few fortunate paleontologists discover fossils that closely resemble living creatures, and 2014 was no exception. In fact, it was a banner year for finding modern-looking fossils in what secular scientist believe to be very old rocks.

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2014 Most Notable News: Big Bang Fizzle

 
‎05 ‎January ‎2015, ‏‎10:00:00 AMGo to full article

We might learn an important lesson from a bit of embarrassment Big Bang supporters suffered in 2014. In March, mainstream media outlets announced that the BICEP2 radio astronomy telescope team discovered indirect remains of the Big Bang's supposed inflationary period. Headlines identified their astronomical observations as "smoking gun" evidence for the Big Bang itself, but it didn't take long at all for this smoke to clear.

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Study: Comets Did Not Supply Earth's Water

 
‎29 ‎December ‎2014, ‏‎10:00:00 AMGo to full article

Slightly different versions of water's constituent elements, hydrogen and oxygen, are relatively common in the universe. But how did Earth's version of water get here? European Space Agency astronomers have been looking for clues using their Rosetta spacecraft to inspect Comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko.

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Facts Bite into Bird Tooth Story

 
‎25 ‎December ‎2014, ‏‎10:00:00 AMGo to full article

Fossils clearly show that some birds used to have small teeth, but most birds today do not have teeth. When and how did this change happen? A new study in the journal Science makes a few unfounded conclusions.

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Birds Inspire Flight Sensor Inventions

 
‎22 ‎December ‎2014, ‏‎10:00:00 AMGo to full article

The Wright brothers studied wing structures of seabirds before building their first airplane, and the first helicopter is said to have been inspired by dragonfly flight. Today, inventors continue this tradition, focusing on bio-inspired flight sensors. A series of telling admissions in a recent summary of state-of-the-art research leave no doubt about the origins of flight-ready sensors.

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Amazing Ant Beetle Same Today as Yesterday

 
‎18 ‎December ‎2014, ‏‎10:00:00 AMGo to full article

If ancient history according to Scripture is true, then what should we expect to find in animal fossils? Surely excellent body designs would top the list, closely followed by a lack of "transitional forms." A newly discovered specialized beetle inside Indian amber provides another peek into the past and an opportunity to test these Bible-based expectations.

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Unlocking the Origins of Snake Venom

 
‎15 ‎December ‎2014, ‏‎10:00:00 AMGo to full article

The origin of snake venom has been a long-time mystery to both creationists and evolutionists. Interestingly, new research confirms that the same genes that encode snake venom proteins are active in many other tissues.

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How Different was 'Java' from 'Modern' Man?

 
‎11 ‎December ‎2014, ‏‎10:00:00 AMGo to full article

Interest in human origins persists generation after generation, and researchers continue to uncover and interpret clues. The latest set comes from a reinvestigation of clam shells dug up in the 1890s on the Indonesian island of Java. Someone skillfully drilled and engraved those shells. Who was it?

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550 Million Years of Non-Evolution?

 
‎08 ‎December ‎2014, ‏‎10:00:00 AMGo to full article

A strange, new, mushroom-shaped species discovered alive on the deep seafloor off the southeastern coast of Australia may be a record-breaking living fossil. It's not a jellyfish, sea squirt, or sponge. What is it?

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Ghost Lineage Spawns Evolution Ghost Story

 
‎04 ‎December ‎2014, ‏‎10:00:00 AMGo to full article

Fossils seem to tell amazing stories about ancient animal life, but close inspection reveals that these stories differ from each other not because of different fossils, but because of different interpretations. Do the remarkable circumstances surrounding a newly discovered fossil arthropod tell two stories or just one?

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Thanksgiving in Heaven

 
‎27 ‎November ‎2014, ‏‎10:00:00 AMGo to full article

"We give You thanks, O Lord God Almighty, The One who is and who was and who is to come, because You have taken Your great power and reigned" (Revelation 11:16-17). This is the final reference in the Bible to the giving of thanks. It records a scene in heaven where the 24 elders, representing all redeemed believers, are thanking God that His primeval promise of restoration and victory is about to be fulfilled.

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Missing Link or Another Fish Story?

 
‎24 ‎November ‎2014, ‏‎10:00:00 AMGo to full article

Recently there has been some celebration from the Darwinian community regarding a fossil discovery that allegedly links terrestrial animals to their future aquatic relatives.

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Plants' Built-in Photosynthesis Accelerators

 
‎20 ‎November ‎2014, ‏‎10:00:00 AMGo to full article

Sunlight can change in a heartbeat. One second, a leaf could be under intense sun and may receive more light than it needs to build sugar molecules through a process called photosynthesis. But a few seconds later, a cloud may wander overhead and block the sun, starving the plant's photosynthetic machinery. A team of plant biologists recently discovered new mechanisms that help plants cope with these fast-changing light conditions.

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Trees Really Are 'Pleasant to the Sight'

 
‎17 ‎November ‎2014, ‏‎10:00:00 AMGo to full article

Genesis 2:9 records one of the Lord's original intentions for creating trees, saying, "Out of the ground the LORD God made every tree grow that is pleasant to the sight and good for food." A new study has quantified just how pleasant to the sight trees can be, inadvertently confirming the truthfulness of this ancient biblical passage.

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Saber-Toothed Deer Alive in Afghanistan

 
‎14 ‎November ‎2014, ‏‎10:00:00 AMGo to full article

Based on journal entries, a Danish survey team probably sighted musk deer while working in the remote regions of northeast Afghanistan in 1948, but that was the last official sighting—until now. A new survey team recorded the species still alive, but endangered. Seven similar species found throughout Asia eat vegetation, so why do they need tusks?

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Dino Tracks

 
‎11 ‎November ‎2014, ‏‎10:00:00 AMGo to full article

Dinosaur tracks are found on every continent—but how did they form?

 


See how the awesome event of a global flood offers an explanation to this confounding scientific riddle.

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Exocomets: Evidence of Recent Creation

 
‎07 ‎November ‎2014, ‏‎10:00:00 AMGo to full article

Astronomers recently detected evidence of possible comets orbiting a faraway star system named β Pictoris. They compared what they saw to what our solar system may have looked like billions of years ago when the earth and moon were supposedly forming out of a chaotic debris cloud. But details from their report easily refute this imagined "planetary-system formation," and instead illustrate how God recently and uniquely created space objects.

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Human Fairness: Innate or Evolved?

 
‎05 ‎November ‎2014, ‏‎10:00:00 AMGo to full article

How does it make you feel when you put forth just as much effort as the next guy, but he receives twice the reward? Unfair! But how did people acquire the sensibilities involved when assessing fairness? Certain animals recognize unequal rewards too, prompting researchers to try and unravel the origins of fairness.

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Pro-Evolution Pope

 
‎31 ‎October ‎2014, ‏‎10:00:00 AMGo to full article

During an October 28 meeting of the Pontifical Academy of Sciences held in the Vatican, Pope Francis claimed that evolution and the Big Bang do not contradict the Bible. If the Pope says it's okay for Catholics to embrace naturalistic explanations, does that settle the controversy?

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Did God Make the Ebola Virus?

 
‎29 ‎October ‎2014, ‏‎10:00:00 AMGo to full article

When this article was written, the number of West Africans who contract the deadly Ebola virus was doubling about every three and a half weeks, making it the worst outbreak of the disease since the first recorded occurrence in 1976. Where did this virus come from?

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Gamma-Ray Bursts Limit Life in Universe

 
‎27 ‎October ‎2014, ‏‎10:00:00 AMGo to full article

What are the odds that life somehow self-generated? Many experiments have shown that the likelihood of just the right chemicals combining by chance to form even the simplest cell on Earth is so close to zero that some origin-of-life researchers have punted the possibility to some distant unknown planet. But a new study of gamma-ray burst frequency estimates has eliminated the possibility of life on other planets.

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Weather Channel Founder Blasts 'Climate Change'

 
‎24 ‎October ‎2014, ‏‎10:00:00 AMGo to full article

John Coleman, co-founder of the Weather Channel, claims that politics is influencing the supposedly unbiased realm of science—particularly in the debate over climate change.

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Brain Bath: A Clever Design Solution

 
‎17 ‎October ‎2014, ‏‎10:00:00 AMGo to full article

What makes sleep so mentally refreshing? University of Rochester neuroscientist Jeff Iliff addressed the crowd gathered at a September 2014 TEDMED event and explained his amazing new discoveries. The words he used perfectly match what one would expect while describing the works of an ingenious designer.

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Giant Clams Are Brilliant Algae Farmers

 
‎15 ‎October ‎2014, ‏‎10:00:00 AMGo to full article

Giant clams living in the Pacific Ocean's shallow-water tropics display brilliant, iridescent colors. Why do they display such radiance? Researchers uncovered five high-tech specifications that show how these giant clams use specialized iridescent cells to farm colonies of algae.

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A Fuss Over Dust: Planck Satellite Fails to Confirm Big Bang 'Proof'

 
‎13 ‎October ‎2014, ‏‎10:00:00 AMGo to full article

Planck satellite data confirm that the "smoking gun" Big Bang evidence is likely the result of something much more mundane: dust within our own galaxy.

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Throwing Darwin a Curve

 
‎10 ‎October ‎2014, ‏‎10:00:00 AMGo to full article

Great pitchers make it look so easy, and “practice makes perfect,” but it helps that the brain power necessary for control, neurological connections, and muscular arrangements for the human arm are exceedingly better than any system that exists on the planet. Is throwing a ball really that complex?

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Were Intestines Designed for Bacteria?

 
‎08 ‎October ‎2014, ‏‎10:00:00 AMGo to full article

Scientists purposefully made mice sick to test how the creatures’ intestines—and the microbes they harbor—would react. They discovered details behind a remarkable relationship that, when working well, keeps both parties healthy.

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Vital Function Found for Whale 'Leg' Bones

 
‎06 ‎October ‎2014, ‏‎10:00:00 AMGo to full article

Few animal traits are trotted out as illustrations of evolution as often as the whale’s supposed vestigial hip bones. Recent research has uncovered new details about the critical function of these whale hips—details that undermine this key evolutionary argument and confirm divine design.

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Jurassic Squirrels?

 
‎03 ‎October ‎2014, ‏‎10:00:00 AMGo to full article

Jurassic mammals made headlines recently, as Chinese paleontologists described six tiny skeletons comprising three new species. The squirrel-like fossils break the long-held idea that most so-called "dinosaur-era" mammals resembled shrews. These newfound mammals look like they lived in trees—not underground like shrews. Do the new fossils help evolutionists clarify their story for the origin of mammals, or do they crank more twists into evolution's troubled saga?

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Australopith Child Gets an Academic Spanking

 
‎29 ‎September ‎2014, ‏‎10:00:00 AMGo to full article

A fossil group of alleged evolutionary human ancestors called australopithecines—all quite ape-like in their features—have traditionally been uncooperative as transitional forms. Now the famous Taung child, a supposed example of early transitional skull features, has been debunked.

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Cambrian Fossil Intensifies Evolutionary Conundrum

 
‎26 ‎September ‎2014, ‏‎10:00:00 AMGo to full article

New fossil finds further verify one of evolution's biggest problems: the Cambrian explosion. According to evolutionary reckoning, a massive explosion of new life supposedly spawned dozens of brand-new fully formed body plans about 530 million years ago. Details from a newly described Canadian fossil fish intensify this Cambrian conundrum.

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Genome Scrambling and Encryption Befuddles Evolution

 
‎24 ‎September ‎2014, ‏‎10:00:00 AMGo to full article

One-cell creatures called ciliates are expanding the concept of genome complexity at an exponential rate. Now a newly sequenced ciliate genome reveals unimaginable levels of programmed rearrangement combined with an ingenious system of encryption.

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Big Bang Fizzles under Lithium Test

 
‎22 ‎September ‎2014, ‏‎10:00:00 AMGo to full article

Secular astrophysicists often talk about “primordial nucleosynthesis” as though it were a proven historical event. In theory, it describes how certain conditions during an early Big Bang universe somehow cobbled together the first elements. But no historical evidence corroborates this primordial nucleosynthesis, an idea beset by a theoretical barrier called the “lithium problem.” Secular scientists recently put this problem to a practical test.

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Are We Evolving Stupidity?

 
‎19 ‎September ‎2014, ‏‎10:00:00 AMGo to full article

Social psychologists are tracking IQ scores and noticed a decline in the last decade after a steady rise since the 1950s. Some wonder if the recent downturn reflects genes that have been eroding all along. Are we evolving stupidity?

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Ten Evidences for Creation

 
‎17 ‎September ‎2014, ‏‎10:00:00 AMGo to full article

Get some fast facts on the evidences for creation science!

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Bible May Solve Colossal Ancient Iceberg Riddle

 
‎15 ‎September ‎2014, ‏‎10:00:00 AMGo to full article

Five seafloor scour troughs show tell-tale signs of having been gouged out by colossal icebergs. But none of today’s icebergs are nearly big enough to scour the seafloor at such a great depth.

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Dual-Gene Codes Defy Evolution...Again

 
‎12 ‎September ‎2014, ‏‎10:00:00 AMGo to full article

Discoveries of DNA sequences that contain different languages, each one with multiple purposes, are utterly defying evolutionary predictions. What was once hailed as redundant code is proving to be key in protein production.

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Ciliate Genome Reveals Mind-Bending Complexity

 
‎10 ‎September ‎2014, ‏‎10:00:00 AMGo to full article

Certain types of fungi can be parasitic to both plants and animals. Two new studies show that this has developed, in part, by a loss of genetic information—not a gain as predicted by evolution.

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New Giant Dinosaur from Argentina

 
‎08 ‎September ‎2014, ‏‎10:00:00 AMGo to full article

Scientists described a new and remarkable fossil skeleton of a giant titanosaur, a group that includes the largest creatures ever to have lived on land. Because this specimen is nearly 45 percent complete, it gives more details than any other fossil of its kind, as well as some details that confirm the biblical creation model.

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Fungal Parasitism Marked by Gene Loss, Not Gain

 
‎05 ‎September ‎2014, ‏‎10:00:00 AMGo to full article

Certain types of fungi can be parasitic to both plants and animals. Two new studies show that this has developed, in part, by a loss of genetic information—not a gain as predicted by evolution.

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Decoding Snake-Venom Origins

 
‎03 ‎September ‎2014, ‏‎10:00:00 AMGo to full article

The origin of snake venom has long been a mystery to both creationists and evolutionists. However, by stepping outside the standard research paradigm, scientists recently showed that snake venom proteins may have arisen from existing salivary proteins, supporting the idea that they arose post-Fall through modification of existing features.

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Darwin's Finches: Answers From Epigenetics

 
‎29 ‎August ‎2014, ‏‎10:00:00 AMGo to full article

Authentic speciation is a process whereby organisms diversify within the boundaries of their gene pools, and this can result in variants with specific ecological adaptability. While it was once thought that this process was strictly facilitated by DNA sequence variability, Darwin's classic example of speciation in finches now includes a surprisingly strong epigenetic component as well.

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Octopus Skin Inspires High-Tech Camouflage Fabric

 
‎27 ‎August ‎2014, ‏‎10:00:00 AMGo to full article

An octopus can change the color of its skin at will to mimic any kind of surrounding. It actively camouflages itself with astoundingly complicated biological machinery. Wouldn't it be great if, say, a soldier's uniform or an armored vehicle used similar technology?

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New Finds Reveal Fully-Human Neandertal

 
‎25 ‎August ‎2014, ‏‎10:00:00 AMGo to full article

The case for Neandertals as more primitive members of an evolutionary continuum that spans from apes to modern man continues to weaken. Genetic and archaeological finds are completely reshaping modern concepts of Neandertal men and women.

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There's More to the Story

 
‎22 ‎August ‎2014, ‏‎10:00:00 AMGo to full article

The Dallas Morning News recently reported that a group of Ph.D. scientists is swimming upstream against the scientific community. Instead of believing in millions of years of evolution, the team at the Institute for Creation Research dares to suggest that science confirms biblical creation's view of a world only thousands of years old. And there's more to the story.

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What Is 'Real Scientific Research'?

 
‎20 ‎August ‎2014, ‏‎10:00:00 AMGo to full article

A recent article in The Dallas Morning News and a follow-up NBC interview presented some history and touched on the tenets of the Institute for Creation Research. Both news reports sparked inquiries from readers and viewers. For example, some are now asking, "What defines credible scientific research?"

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DNA Was Created as a Reservoir for the Information of Life

 
‎18 ‎August ‎2014, ‏‎10:00:00 AMGo to full article

Secular scientists claimed in the 1970s that chimp genomes are 98% similar to humans, and it was apparently verified by more modern techniques. But that estimate actually used isolated segments of DNA that we already share with chimps—not the whole genomes. The latest comparison that included all of the two species’ DNA revealed a huge difference from the percentage scientists have been claiming for years.

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Transhumanism is an international intellectual and cultural movement supporting the use of science and technology to improve human mental and physical characteristics and capacities.

by Dr. Martin Erdmann


The human species can, if it wishes, transcend itself. We need a name for this new belief. Perhaps transhumanism will serve: man remaining man, but transcending himself, by realizing new possibilities of and for his human nature.
Julian Huxley
1st director of the United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization (UNESCO) (wrote nearly fifty years ago)
Transhumanism is a word that is beginning to bubble to the top of our prophetic studies and horizon. Simply described, transhumanism is an international intellectual and cultural movement supporting the use of science and technology to improve human mental and physical characteristics and capacities - in essence, to create a "posthuman" society.
This is not a passing fad. Transhumanist programs are sponsored in institutions such as Oxford, Standford, and Caltech. Sponsorships come from organizations such as Ford, Apple, Intel, Xerox, Sun Microsystems, and others. DARPA, Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency, a technical department within the U.S. Department of Defense is also involved in transhumanist projects.
This briefing pack contains 2 hours of teachings
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The Origins of Information: Exploring and Explaining Biological Information


 

In the 21st century, the information age has finally come to biology. We now know that biology at its root is comprised of information rich systems, such as the complex digital code encoded in DNA. Groundbreaking discoveries of the past decade are revealing the information bearing properties of biological systems.

Dr. Stephen C. Meyer, a Cambridge trained philosopher of science is examining and explaining the amazing depth of digital technology found in each and every living cell such as nested coding, digital processing, distributive retrieval and storage systems, and genomic operating systems.

Meyer is developing a more fundamental argument for intelligent design that is based not on a single feature like the bacterial flagellum, but rather on a pervasive feature of all living systems. Alongside matter and energy, Dr. Meyer shows that there is a third fundamental entity in the universe needed for life: information.

 

http://www.stephencmeyer.org/

Got Science? Genesis 1 and Evidence

 

 

 
DVD - R159.00
 

 

Many scientists say complex life just randomly happened.
Primordial soup + lightning strike = Bingo! Is there any shred of scientific evidence that life was CREATED as Genesis 1 claims? Dr. Stephen Meyer, author of SIGNATURE IN THE CELL, says not a shred. Rather, a ton. Learn good reasoning techniques here.
 
08 June 2012, 08:09:11 PM
 

Intelligent Design is not Creationism

 
08 June 2012, 08:09:11 PM | Robert CrowtherGo to full article

This article was originally published in the Daily Telegraph (UK) on January 29. Original Article In 2004, the distinguished philosopher Antony Flew of the University of Reading made worldwide news when he repudiated a lifelong commitment to atheism and affirmed the reality of some kind of a creator. Flew cited evidence of intelligent design in DNA and the arguments of "American [intelligent] design theorists" as important reasons for this shift. Since then, British readers have learnt about the theory of intelligent design (ID) mainly from media reports about United States court battles over the legality of teaching students about it. According to most reports, ID is a "faith-based" alternative to evolution based solely on religion. But is this accurate? As one of the architects of the theory, I know it isn't. Contrary to media reports, ID is not a religious-based idea, but an evidence-based scientific theory about life's origins. According to Darwinian biologists such as Oxford University's Richard Dawkins, living systems "give the appearance of having been designed for a purpose". But, for modern Darwinists, that appearance of design is illusory, because the purely undirected process of natural selection acting on random mutations is entirely sufficient to produce the intricate designed-like structures found in living organisms. By contrast, ID holds that there are tell-tale features of living systems and the universe that are best explained by a designing intelligence. The theory does not challenge the idea of evolution defined as change over time, or even common ancestry, but it disputes Darwin's idea that the cause of biological change is wholly blind and undirected. What signs of intelligence do design advocates see? In recent years, biologists have discovered an exquisite world of nanotechnology within living cells - complex circuits, sliding clamps, energy-generating turbines and miniature machines. For example, bacterial cells are propelled by rotary engines called flagellar motors that rotate at 100,000rpm. These engines look like they were designed by engineers, with many distinct mechanical parts (made of proteins), including rotors, stators, O-rings, bushings, U-joints and drive shafts. The biochemist Michael Behe points out that the flagellar motor depends on the co-ordinated function of 30 protein parts. Remove one of these proteins and the rotary motor doesn't work. The motor is, in Behe's words, "irreducibly complex". This creates a problem for the Darwinian mechanism. Natural selection preserves or "selects" functional advantages as they arise by random mutation. Yet the flagellar motor does not function unless all its 30 parts are present. Thus, natural selection can "select" the motor once it has arisen as a functioning whole, but it cannot produce the motor in a step-by-step Darwinian fashion. Natural selection purportedly builds complex systems from simpler structures by preserving a series of intermediates, each of which must perform some function. With the flagellar motor, most of the critical intermediate structures perform no function for selection to preserve. This leaves the origin of the flagellar motor unexplained by the mechanism - natural selection - that Darwin specifically proposed to replace the design hypothesis. Is there a better explanation? Based on our uniform experience, we know of only one type of cause that produces irreducibly complex systems: intelligence. Whenever we encounter complex systems - whether integrated circuits or internal combustion engines - and we know how they arose, invariably a designing intelligence played a role. Consider an even more fundamental argument for design. In 1953, when Watson and Crick elucidated the structure of the DNA molecule, they made a startling discovery. Strings of precisely sequenced chemicals called nucleotides in DNA store and transmit the assembly instructions - the information - in a four-character digital code for building the protein molecules the cell needs to survive. Crick then developed his "sequence hypothesis", in which the chemical bases in DNA function like letters in a written language or symbols in a computer code. As Dawkins has noted, "the machine code of the genes is uncannily computer-like". The informational features of the cell at least appear designed. Yet, to date, no theory of undirected chemical evolution has explained the origin of the digital information needed to build the first living cell. Why? There is simply too much information in the cell to be explained by chance alone. The information in DNA (and RNA) has also been shown to defy explanation by forces of chemical necessity. Saying otherwise would be like saying a headline arose as the result of chemical attraction between ink and paper. Clearly, something else is at work. DNA functions like a software program. We know from experience that software comes from programmers. We know that information - whether, say, in hieroglyphics or radio signals - always arises from an intelligent source. As the pioneering information theorist Henry Quastler observed: "Information habitually arises from conscious activity." So the discovery of digital information in DNA provides strong grounds for inferring that intelligence played a causal role in its origin. Thus, ID is not based on religion, but on scientific discoveries and our experience of cause and effect, the basis of all scientific reasoning about the past. Unlike creationism, ID is an inference from biological data. Even so, ID may provide support for theistic belief. But that is not grounds for dismissing it. Those who do confuse the evidence for the theory with its possible implications. Many astrophysicists initially rejected the Big Bang theory because it seemed to point to the need for a transcendent cause of matter, space and time. But science eventually accepted it because the evidence strongly supported it. Today, a similar prejudice confronts ID. Nevertheless, this new theory must also be evaluated on the basis of the evidence, not philosophical preferences. As Professor Flew advises: "We must follow the evidence, wherever it leads." Stephen C Meyer edited 'Darwinism, Design and Public Education' (Michigan State University Press). He has a PhD in philosophy of science from Cambridge University and is a senior fellow at the Discovery Institute in Seattle.

 

09 December 2011, 11:13:24 PM

New Research Supports Meyer's Discussion of Pre-Biotic Chemistry in Signature in the Cell

 
09 December 2011, 11:13:24 PM | Andrew McDiarmidGo to full article
A recent Nature publication reports a new technique for measuring the oxygen levels in Earth's atmosphere some 4.4 billion years ago. The authors found that by studying cerium oxidation states in zircon, a compound formed from volcanic magma, they could ascertain the oxidation levels in the early earth. Their findings suggest that the early Earth's oxygen levels were very close to current levels. This research supports Dr. Meyer's discussion in Signature in the Cell. On pgs. 224-226 of Ch. 10: Beyond the Reach of Chance, Meyer states that when Stanley Miller conducted his famous 1953 experiment simulating early Earth's atmosphere, he "assumed that the earth's atmosphere contained virtually no free oxygen." Meyer reveals that new geochemical evidence showed that the assumptions Miller had made about the early atmosphere were incorrect. This new research is additional confirmation that oxygen was present in significant quantities. Because oxygen quenches organic reactions necessary to produce essential building blocks of life, the ability of inorganic materials to produce organic life, as chemical evolutionary theory assumes, is not possible. Read the complete article at ENV.

 

Dr. Meyer Debates Signature in the Cell Arguments with Keith Fox on Premier Radio UK

24 November 2011, 12:37:19 AM | Andrew McDiarmidGo to full article
During a recent visit to London, Dr. Stephen Meyer debated Keith Fox on Premier Radio UK's "Unbelievable" program. Fox is a professor of biochemistry at Southampton University and Chair of the UK's Christians in Science network. Two years after its publication, Meyer's Signature in the Cell continues to make an impact with its powerful argument for design in DNA. In this lively conversation, Meyer and Fox discuss origins of life and the design inference in science.

 

« Overflowtoday.com asks Stephen Meyer if he's got science | Main

Dr. Meyer Debates Signature in the Cell Arguments with Keith Fox on Premier Radio UK


During a recent visit to London, Dr. Stephen Meyer debated Keith Fox on Premier Radio UK's "Unbelievable" program. Fox is a professor of biochemistry at Southampton University and Chair of the UK's Christians in Science network. Two years after its publication, Meyer's Signature in the Cell continues to make an impact with its powerful argument for design in DNA. In this lively conversation, Meyer and Fox discuss origins of life and the design inference in science.


 

 

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