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This page is dedicated to My Grandson Brandon.

(Branstein)

***IN STOCK***
 HOLOGRAPHIC

UNIVERSE

by Chuck Missler

DVD

PRICE R 159.00

 

 

 

 

This DVD includes notes in PDF format and M4A files.


This briefing pack contains 2 hours of teachings

Available in the following formats

Session 1

• Epistemology 101: How do we “know”?

– Scientific Myths of the Past

– Scientific Myths of the Present

• The Macrocosm: The Plasma Universe: Gravitational Presumption?

• The Microcosm: The Planck Wall

• The Metacosm: Fracture of Hyperspace?

Session 2


• The Holographic Model: David Bohm

• GEO 600 “Noise”

• The Black Hole Paradox

– String Theorists examine the elephant

• A Holographic Universe:

– Distances are synthetic (virtual) images

– A Geocentric Cosmology?

– Some Scriptural Perspective(s)

 

 

“One can’t believe impossible things,”

Alice laughed.

“I daresay you haven’t had much practice,”

said the Queen.

“When I was your age, I always did it for

half-an-hour a day.

Why, sometimes I’ve believed as many

as six impossible things before breakfast.”

Through the Looking Glass

Lewis Carroll (Charles Lutwidge Dodgson)
 

DVD:

1 Disc
2 M4A Files
Color, Fullscreen 16:9, Dolby Digital 2.0 stereo, Region  This DVD will be viewable in other countries WITH the proper DVD player and television set.)
 

M4A File Video

Can be burned to disc and played on MP4 compatible DVD players.
Playable on iPod, iPhone, iPod Touch
Playable on any MP4 player
1 PDF Notes File
2 MP3 Files


 

 

 

 

 

 

Featured Briefing

A Holographic Universe?

by Dr. Chuck Missler

Are we actually living in a holographic universe? Are the distant galaxies only a virtual illusion? In a hologram, distances are synthetic! How does this impact our concepts of time and space?

There seems to be growing evidence to suggest that our world and everything in it may be only ghostly images, projections from a level of reality so beyond our own that the real reality is literally beyond both space and time.1

The Cosmos As a Super-Hologram?

An initiating architect of this astonishing idea was one of the world’s most eminent thinkers: University of London physicist David Bohm, a protégé of Einstein’s and one of the world’s most respected quantum physicists. Bohm’s work in plasma physics in the 1950s is considered a landmark. Earlier, at the Lawrence Radiation Laboratory, he noticed that in plasmas (ionized gases) the particles stopped behaving as individuals and started behaving as if they were part of a larger and interconnected whole. Moving to Princeton University in 1947, there, too, he continued his work in the behavior of oceans of ionized particles, noting their highly organized overall effects and their behavior, as if they knew what each of the untold trillions of individual particles was doing.

One of the implications of Bohm’s view has to do with the nature of location. Bohm’s interpretation of quantum physics indicated that at the subquantum level location ceased to exist. All points in space become equal to all other points in space, and it was meaningless to speak of anything as being separate from anything else. Physicists call this property “nonlocality”. The web of subatomic particles that compose our physical universe—the very fabric of “reality” itself—possesses what appears to be an undeniable “holographic” property. Paul Davis of the University of Newcastle upon Tyne, England, observed that since all particles are continually interacting and separating, “the nonlocal aspects of quantum systems is therefore a general property of nature.”2

The Nature of Reality

One of Bohm’s most startling suggestions was that the tangible reality of our everyday lives is really a kind of illusion, like a holographic image. Underlying it is a deeper order of existence, a vast and more primary level of reality that gives birth to all the objects and appearances of our physical world in much the same way that a piece of holographic film gives birth to a hologram. Bohm calls this deeper level of reality the implicate (“enfolded”) order and he refers to our level of existence the explicate (unfolded) order.3 This view is not inconsistent with the Biblical presentation of the physical (“explicate”) world as being subordinate to the spiritual (“implicate”) world as the superior reality.4

The Search for Gravity Waves

Gravitational waves are extremely small ripples in the structure of spacetime caused by astrophysical events like supernovae or coalescing massive binaries (neutron stars, black holes). They had been predicted by Albert Einstein in 1916, but not yet directly observed.

GEO 600 is a gravitational wave detector located near Sarstedt, Germany, which seeks to detect gravitational waves by means of a laser interferometer of 600 meter arms’ length. This instrument, and its sister interferometric detectors, are some of the most sensitive gravitational wave detectors ever designed. They are designed to detect relative changes in distance of the order of 10-21, about the size of a single atom compared to the distance from the Earth to the Sun! Construction on the project began in 1995.

Mystery Noise

On January 15, 2009, it was reported in New Scientist that some yet unidentified noise that was present in the GEO 600 detector measurements might be because the instrument is sensitive to extremely small quantum fluctuations of space-time affecting the positions of parts of the detector. This claim was made by Craig Hogan, a scientist from Fermilab, on the basis of his theory of how such fluctuations should occur motivated by the holographic principle.5 Apparently, the gravitational wave detector in Hannover may have detected evidence for a holographic Universe!

Gravitational Wave Observatories Join Forces

A number of major projects will now pool their data to analyze it, jointly boosting their chances of spotting a faint signal that might otherwise be hidden by detector noise. Using lasers, they measure the length between mirrored test masses hung inside tunnels at right angles to each other. Gravitational waves decrease the distance between the masses in one tunnel and increase it in the other by a tiny, but detectable amount. Combining the data will also make it possible to triangulate to find the source of any gravitational waves detected. These include: Laser Interferometer Gravitational Observatory based in Hanford, Washington and Livingston, Louisiana; Virgo Observatory, Pisa Italy; and, of course, the GEO 600 Observatory near Hanover, Germany.

The most ambitious of them is the Laser Interferometer Space Antenna (LISA), a joint mission between NASA and the European Space Agency to develop and operate a space-based gravitational wave detector sensitive at frequencies between 0.03 mHz and 0.1 Hz. LISA seeks to detect gravitational-wave induced strains in space-time by measuring changes of the separation between fiducial masses in three spacecraft 5 million kilometers apart.

Cosmic Implications

Are we actually living in a holographic universe? Are the distant galaxies only a virtual illusion? In a hologram, distances are synthetic! How does this impact our concepts of time and space?

It gets even worse: Could our universe be geocentric? The implications are too staggering to embrace. The holographic paradigm is still a developing concept and riddled with controversies. For decades, science has chosen to ignore evidences that do not fit their standard theories. However, the volume of evidence has now reached the point that denial is no longer a viable option.

Clearly, 20th-century science has discovered that our “macrocosm”—studies of largeness—is finite, not infinite. Our universe is finite and had a beginning, and that’s what has led to the “big bang” speculations. We also realize that gravity is dramatically eclipsed by electromagnetic considerations when dealing with galaxies, etc. The plasma physicists have been trying to tell astronomers that for decades but no one was listening.

What is even more shocking has been the discoveries in the “microcosm”—studies of smallness—that run up against the “Planck Wall” of the non-location of subatomic particles, and the many strange paradoxes of quantum physics. We now discover that we are in a virtual reality that is a digital, simulated environment. The bizarre realization that the “constants” of physics are changing indicates that our “reality” is “but a shadow of a larger reality,”6 and that’s what the Bible has maintained all along!7

The Bible is, of course, unique in that it has always presented a universe of more than three dimensions,8 and revealed a Creator that is transcendent over His creation. It is the only “holy book” that demonstrates these contemporary insights. It’s time for us to spend more time with the handbook that the Creator has handed to us. It is the ultimate adventure, indeed!

For background information on the Holographic Universe, see our briefing series, The Beyond Collection, available on DVD and other formats, in the Christmas catalog insert in this issue.


Notes

  1. We explore the limitations of the Macrocosm, the Microcosm, and the super-embracing “Metacosm” in our Beyond Series.
  2. Paul Davis, Superforce, Simon & Schuster, New York, 1948, p.48.
  3. This is reminiscent of the Red King’s dream in Through the Looking Glass, in which Alice finds herself in deep metaphysical waters when the Tweedle brothers defend the view that all material objects, including ourselves, are only “sorts of things” in the mind of God.
  4. 2 Corinthians 4:18.
  5. Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory (Fermilab), located just outside Batavia, Illinois, near Chicago, is a US Department of Energy national laboratory specializing in high-energy particle physics. (Craig Hogan was then put in charge…)
  6. Scientific American, June 2005, “The Inconstancy of Constants”.
  7. Hebrews 11:3; John 1:1-3; et al.
  8. Ephesians 3:18. Nachmonides, writing in the 13th century, concluded, from his studies of the Genesis texts, that our universe has ten dimensions, of which only four are directly “knowable”.
 
 
Space News from SpaceDaily.com
Space News From SpaceDaily.Com
 
 

NASA Study Finds Earth's Ocean Abyss Has Not Warmed

 
‎07 ‎October ‎2014, ‏‎03:56:03 AMGo to full article
Pasadena CA (JPL) Oct 07, 2014
The cold waters of Earth's deep ocean have not warmed measurably since 2005, according to a new NASA study, leaving unsolved the mystery of why global warming appears to have slowed in recent years. Scientists at NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory in Pasadena, California, analyzed satellite and direct ocean temperature data from 2005 to 2013 and found the ocean abyss below 1.24 miles (1,995
 

"Dream Chaser" Chases Its Dream

 
‎07 ‎October ‎2014, ‏‎03:56:03 AMGo to full article
Bethesda MD (SPX) Oct 07, 2014
"Dream Chaser" is the name given to a possible future reusable crewed suborbital and orbital lifting-body spaceplane. Sierra Nevada Corporation (SNC) has been working toward development of the vehicle for some time. In its latest embodiment the Dream Chaser is designed to carry up to seven people to and from low-earth orbit. In order to achieve orbit, the vehicle must employ a launch
 

CryoSat unveils secrets of the deep

 
‎07 ‎October ‎2014, ‏‎03:56:03 AMGo to full article
Paris (ESA) Oct 07, 2014
ESA's ice mission has been used to create a new gravity map, exposing thousands of previously unchartered 'seamounts', ridges and deep ocean structures. This vivid new picture of the least-explored part of the ocean offers fresh clues about how continents form and breakup. Carrying a radar altimeter, CryoSat's main role is to provide detailed measurements of the height of the world's ice.
 

Observing the Birkeland currents

 
‎07 ‎October ‎2014, ‏‎03:56:03 AMGo to full article
Washington DC (SPX) Oct 07, 2014
When the supersonic solar wind hits the Earth's magnetic field, a powerful electrical connection occurs with Earth's field, generating millions of amperes of current that drive the dazzling auroras. These so-called Birkeland currents connect the ionosphere to the magnetosphere and channel solar wind energy to Earth's uppermost atmosphere. Solar storms release torrential blasts of sol
 

ADS and Exelis To Provide ENVI Users Integrated Access to Imagery

 
‎07 ‎October ‎2014, ‏‎03:56:03 AMGo to full article
Leiden, Netherlands (SPX) Oct 07, 2014
Airbus Defence and Space and Exelis are teaming up to provide users of ENVI image analysis software an exclusive, limited time voucher offer for new imagery as well as easy access to the Airbus Defence and Space imagery archive through an application programming interface (API) plug-in integrated within Exelis' ENVI software. The partnership between Airbus Defence and Space and Exelis help
 

Setting sail for ESA spaceplane recovery

 
‎07 ‎October ‎2014, ‏‎03:56:03 AMGo to full article
Paris (ESA) Oct 07, 2014
The boat that will lift ESA's unmanned IXV spaceplane out of the Pacific Ocean after the research flight next month set sail on Saturday from Genoa in Italy. The Nos Aries received a special send-off at the 54th International boat show in Genoa as it began its long journey across the Mediterranean Sea and the Atlantic. A team of mission engineers will board in Panama and from there sail th
 

US Initiates Prototype System to Gauge National Marine Biodiversity

 
‎07 ‎October ‎2014, ‏‎03:56:03 AMGo to full article
Washington DC (SPX) Oct 07, 2014
The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) and NASA are funding three demonstration projects that will lay the foundation for the first national network to monitor marine biodiversity at scales ranging from microbes to whales. The U.S. Department of the Interior's Bureau of Ocean Energy Management (BOEM) also plans to contribute. The projects, funded at approximately $17 mi
 

Alexander Gerst set for spacewalk

 
‎07 ‎October ‎2014, ‏‎03:56:03 AMGo to full article
Paris (ESA) Oct 07, 2014
ESA astronaut Alexander Gerst has spent four months in the relative safety of the International Space Station but on Tuesday he will venture into open space with NASA astronaut Reid Wiseman on a seven-hour spacewalk. The spacewalk's main job is to move a failed cooling pump that was left in a temporary location by previous spacewalkers to its final position. Alexander and Reid will then i
 

New NASA Video Gives Hurricanes a Good 'HIWRAP'

 
‎07 ‎October ‎2014, ‏‎03:56:03 AMGo to full article
Washington DC (SPX) Oct 07, 2014
A new animation from NASA shows how a remarkable instrument called the HIWRAP looks into tropical cyclones at wind, rain and ice to analyze storm intensity. The HIWRAP is the High-Altitude Imaging Wind and Rain Airborne Profiler, a "conically scanning" Doppler radar, meaning it scans in a cone-shaped manner. Wind measurements are crucial for understanding and forecasting tropical storms si
 

S-400 Air Defense Regiment Takes up Duty in Russia's South

 
‎07 ‎October ‎2014, ‏‎03:56:03 AMGo to full article
Moscsow (RIA Novosti) Oct 01, 2014
The S-400 Triumf air defense missile system regiment that was deployed in the Southern Military District, has taken up combat duty near the Russian city of Krasnodar, the press service of the district reported Tuesday. "An air defense missile system regiment of the 4th Air and Air Defense Forces Command of the Southern Military District has taken up combat duty in the Krasnodar region. It
 

Saudi Arabia seeks billion-dollar air defense deal

 
‎07 ‎October ‎2014, ‏‎03:56:03 AMGo to full article
Washington (UPI) Oct 2, 2014
More than 200 Patriot Air Defense Systems with PAC-3 enhancement may be sold to Saudi Arabia under the U.S. Foreign Military Sales program. The U.S. Defense Security Cooperation Agency, which acts as the middle man for FMS deals, said in its required notification to Congress the possible deal carries a value of $1.750 billion. "The proposed sale will help replenish Saudi's curren
 

New NASA Technology Brings Critical Data to Pilots Over Remote Alaskan Territories

 
‎07 ‎October ‎2014, ‏‎03:56:03 AMGo to full article
Moffet Field CA (NASA) Oct 07, 2014
NASA has formally delivered to Alaskan officials a new technology that could help pilots flying over the vast wilderness expanses of the northern-most state. The technology is designed to help pilots make better flight decisions, especially when disconnected from the Internet, telephone, flight services and other data sources normally used by pilots. S. Peter Worden, director of NASA's Ame
 

Satellite pix suggest N. Korea reactor shut down: US think-tank

 
‎07 ‎October ‎2014, ‏‎03:56:03 AMGo to full article
Seoul (AFP) Oct 04, 2014
Recent satellite images suggest North Korea may have shut down the nuclear reactor seen as its main source of weapons-grade plutonium, a US think-tank said Saturday. The Washington-based Institute for Science and International Security (ISIS) said any shutdown could be for either partial refuelling or renovation. North Korea mothballed the five-megawatt reactor at its main Yongbyon nucle
 

Russia to reopen missile warning station on Crimea

 
‎07 ‎October ‎2014, ‏‎03:56:03 AMGo to full article
Moscow (AFP) Oct 04, 2014
Russia will modernise and relaunch a Soviet-era radar station on the Crimean peninsula annexed from Ukraine to provide early warning of missile strikes, a senior defence official said Saturday. The radar station in the port city of Sevastopol will become fully operational in 2016, the commander of the air and space defence forces, Alexander Golovko, was quoted as saying by the TASS news agen
 

USAF eyes in the sky provide global weather data

 
‎07 ‎October ‎2014, ‏‎03:56:03 AMGo to full article
Washington DC (AFNS) Oct 01, 2014
In the absolute silence of space, a special group of satellites circles our planet in a fast, low earth orbit, their cameras and sensors point toward Earth as they record endless data and images of storm systems and weather patterns moving across the globe below. Back on the ground, hidden in a D.C. suburb, Maj. Jonathan Whitaker squints against the sun and points to Marine One, the U.S. p
 

NASA's Orion Spacecraft, Rocket Move Closer to First Flight

 
‎06 ‎October ‎2014, ‏‎05:25:51 AMGo to full article
Washington DC (SPX) Oct 06, 2014
NASA's new Orion spacecraft and the Delta IV Heavy rocket that will carry it into space are at their penultimate stops in Florida on their path to a December flight test. Orion was moved Sunday out of the Payload Hazardous Servicing Facility at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida and the Delta IV Heavy rocket, built by United Launch Alliance, made its move Tuesday night, to nearby Space
 

Titan's Swirling Polar Cloud Is Cold And Toxic

 
‎06 ‎October ‎2014, ‏‎05:25:51 AMGo to full article
Paris (ESA) Oct 06, 2014
Scientists analysing data from the mission found that this giant polar vortex contains frozen particles of the toxic compound hydrogen cyanide. "The discovery suggests that the atmosphere of Titan's southern hemisphere is cooling much faster than we expected," says Remco de Kok of Leiden Observatory and SRON Netherlands Institute for Space Research, lead author of the study published in th
 

Mars Rover Technology Adapted to Detect Gas Leaks

 
‎06 ‎October ‎2014, ‏‎05:25:51 AMGo to full article
Pasadena CA (JPL) Oct 06, 2014
In collaboration with NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory in Pasadena, California, Pacific Gas and Electric Company (PG and E) announced that it is testing state-of-the-art technology adapted from NASA's Mars rover program. Originally designed to find methane on the Red Planet, this laser-based technology is lightweight and has superior sensitivity to methane, a major component of natural gas
 

Solving the mystery of the 'man in the moon'

 
‎06 ‎October ‎2014, ‏‎05:25:51 AMGo to full article
Boston MA (SPX) Oct 06, 2014
New data obtained by NASA's GRAIL mission reveals that the Procellarum region on the near side of the moon - a giant basin often referred to as the "man in the moon" - likely arose not from a massive asteroid strike, but from a large plume of magma deep within the moon's interior. The Procellarum region is a roughly circular, volcanic terrain some 1,800 miles in diameter - nearly as wide a
 

European pioneers: ESRO-1A and 1B

 
‎06 ‎October ‎2014, ‏‎05:25:51 AMGo to full article
Paris (ESA) Oct 06, 2014
Forty-five years ago this week, the ESRO-1B satellite was launched. One of a pair of satellites that formed the basis of ESRO's scientific programme, ESRO-1B took to the skies on 1 October 1969. The main ESRO-1 programme was a joint venture between NASA and ESRO. NASA had provided the Scout launch vehicle, as well as the launch facilities at the Western Test Range, Vandenberg Air Force Bas
 

Virgin Galactic could soon begin trips to space

 
‎06 ‎October ‎2014, ‏‎05:25:51 AMGo to full article
Washington DC (UPI) Oct 05, 2014
Virgin Galactic owner Richard Branson says his company might soon be ready to take civilians into space. "We have a fantastic team, and I'm not going to say any dates ... but we're on the verge," Branson said of his plans to transport civilians on Virgin Galactic. Branson made the comments on a webcast commemorating the 10-year anniversary of the Ansari X Prize victory. The legen
 

NASA Crashes Helicopter to Test Safety Improvements

 
‎06 ‎October ‎2014, ‏‎05:25:51 AMGo to full article
Hampton VA (SPX) Oct 06, 2014
"The big difference in this year's experiment is that we are testing three energy absorbing composite subfloor concepts that should help some of the dummy occupants sustain fewer injuries than they did in the first test," said lead test engineer Martin Annett. "We have also made other improvements based on things we learned after that drop last August." The team has instrumented a fo
 

This company is fighting NASA to bring people to space

 
‎06 ‎October ‎2014, ‏‎05:25:51 AMGo to full article
Washington (UPI) Oct 4, 2014
When NASA awarded Elon Musk's SpaceX company and Boeing the contract to start bringing astronauts to the International Space Station as early as 2017, the Sierra Nevada Corp. was not happy. They're planning to legally contest NASA's decision to choose those companies, instead of them, so they can one day be part of space missions run by a commercial company. The Sierra Nevada Corp. file
 

Station Crew Checks Out Spacesuits, Conducts Research

 
‎06 ‎October ‎2014, ‏‎05:25:51 AMGo to full article
Washington DC (SPX) Oct 06, 2014
The six-person Expedition 41 crew of the International Space Station was hard at work Wednesday supporting research with down-to-Earth benefits and gearing up for a series of spacewalks to maintain the orbiting laboratory. Commander Max Suraev and his team of five flight engineers began the day at 2 a.m. EDT, with some time for morning hygiene, breakfast and an inspection of the station. A
 

Novel approach to magnetic measurements atom-by-atom

 
‎06 ‎October ‎2014, ‏‎05:25:51 AMGo to full article
Uppsala, Sweden (SPX) Oct 03, 2014
Having the possibility to measure magnetic properties of materials at atomic precision is one of the important goals of today's experimental physics. Such measurement technique would give engineers and physicists an ultimate handle over magnetic properties of nano-structures for future applications. In an article published in Physical Review Letters researchers propose a new method, utiliz
 

Platinum meets its match in quantum dots from coal

 
‎06 ‎October ‎2014, ‏‎05:25:51 AMGo to full article
Houston TX (SPX) Oct 03, 2014
Graphene quantum dots created at Rice University grab onto graphene platelets like barnacles attach themselves to the hull of a boat. But these dots enhance the properties of the mothership, making them better than platinum catalysts for certain reactions within fuel cells. The Rice lab of chemist James Tour created dots known as GQDs from coal last year and have now combined these nanosca
 

Stressed Out: Research Sheds New Light on Why Rechargeable Batteries Fail

 
‎06 ‎October ‎2014, ‏‎05:25:51 AMGo to full article
Houghton MI (SPX) Oct 03, 2014
Pity the poor lithium ion. Drawn relentlessly by its electrical charge, it surges from anode to cathode and back again, shouldering its way through an elaborate molecular obstacle course. This journey is essential to powering everything from cell phones to cordless power tools. Yet, no one really understands what goes on at the atomic scale as lithium ion batteries are used and recharged, over a
 

Researchers develop transparent nanoscintillators for radiation detection

 
‎06 ‎October ‎2014, ‏‎05:25:51 AMGo to full article
Arlington TX (SPX) Oct 03, 2014
A University of Texas at Arlington research team says recently identified radiation detection properties of a light-emitting nanostructure built in their lab could open doors for homeland security and medical advances. In a paper to be published in Optics Letters, UT Arlington Physics Professor Wei Chen and his co-authors describe a new method to fabricate transparent nanoscintillators by
 

A new dimension for integrated circuits: 3-D nanomagnetic logic

 
‎06 ‎October ‎2014, ‏‎05:25:51 AMGo to full article
Munich, Germany (SPX) Oct 03, 2014
Electrical engineers at the Technische Universitat Munchen (TUM) have demonstrated a new kind of building block for digital integrated circuits. Their experiments show that future computer chips could be based on three-dimensional arrangements of nanometer-scale magnets instead of transistors. As the main enabling technology of the semiconductor industry - CMOS fabrication of silicon chips
 

All directions are not created equal for nanoscale heat sources

 
‎06 ‎October ‎2014, ‏‎05:25:51 AMGo to full article
Urbana IL (SPX) Oct 03, 2014
Thermal considerations are rapidly becoming one of the most serious design constraints in microelectronics, especially on submicron scale lengths. A study by researchers from the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign has shown that standard thermal models will lead to the wrong answer in a three-dimensional heat-transfer problem if the dimensions of the heating element are on the order of o
 

Dream Chaser Teams with Stratolaunch to Carry People into Space

 
‎03 ‎October ‎2014, ‏‎05:59:33 AMGo to full article
Washington DC (SPX) Oct 03, 2014
The Dream Chaser, a reusable crewed space shuttle currently under development by Sierra Nevada Corporation, may one day carry people into space with the help of Stratolaunch's massive carrier plane, the brainchild of aviation legend Burt Rutan and Microsoft co-founder Paul Allen. The news comes on the heels of Sierra Nevada Corporation's announcement that it will legally challenge NASA's d
 

US, India Cement Cooperation in Earth Exploration

 
‎03 ‎October ‎2014, ‏‎05:59:33 AMGo to full article
Moscow (RIA Novosti) Oct 03, 2014
The United States and India have signed two agreements according to which NASA and the ISRO (Indian Space Research Organization) will roll out a joint satellite mission to explore Earth's surface. "The signing of these two documents reflects the strong commitment NASA and ISRO have to advancing science and improving life on Earth," NASA administrator Charles Bolden said in a statement publ
 

Russia to Launch New GLONASS Navigation System Satellite by Year End

 
‎03 ‎October ‎2014, ‏‎05:59:33 AMGo to full article
Moscow (RIA Novosti) Oct 03, 2014
A new model of the Russian GLONASS navigation system satellite will be launched at the end of this year, the JSC Information Satellite Systems, a leading Russian satellite manufacturing company, announced Wednesday. "In November-December, 2014 we will launch the new GLONASS-K spacecraft. The launch is planned to be implemented from the Plesetsk Cosmodrome [in northern Russia] using a Soyuz
 

Scientists Resurrect Ancient Proteins to Learn about Primordial Life on Earth

 
‎03 ‎October ‎2014, ‏‎05:59:33 AMGo to full article
Moffet Field CA (NASA) Oct 03, 2014
Geological evidence tells us that ancient Earth probably looked and felt very different from the planet we all recognize today. Billions of years ago, our world was a comparatively harsh place. Earth likely had a hotter climate, acidic oceans and an atmosphere loaded with carbon dioxide. The fact that manmade climate change, through carbon dioxide pollution, is re-introducing such hotter, acidif
 

Wild ducks take flight in open cluster

 
‎03 ‎October ‎2014, ‏‎05:59:33 AMGo to full article
Paris (SPX) Oct 03, 2014
Messier 11 is an open cluster, sometimes referred to as a galactic cluster, located around 6000 light-years away in the constellation of Scutum (The Shield). It was first discovered by German astronomer Gottfried Kirch in 1681 at the Berlin Observatory, appearing as nothing more than a fuzzy blob through the telescope. It wasn't until 1733 that the blob was first resolved into separate sta
 

Running the Race to Cure Cancer From Space

 
‎03 ‎October ‎2014, ‏‎05:59:33 AMGo to full article
Washington DC (SPX) Oct 03, 2014
The race to find answers for cancer is not a sprint, but a marathon. When you participate in charity runs for yourself or your loved ones, it is in pursuit of improved treatments and hopefully a cure. While you are putting one foot in front of the other on the ground, there are researchers running tests aboard the International Space Station in support of this universal cause. Research don
 

Origin of moon's 'ocean of storms' revealed

 
‎03 ‎October ‎2014, ‏‎05:59:33 AMGo to full article
Providence RI (SPX) Oct 03, 2014
Oceanus Procellarum, a vast dark patch visible on the western edge of the Moon's near side, has long been a source of mystery for planetary scientists. Some have suggested that the "ocean of storms" is part of a giant basin formed by an asteroid impact early in the Moon's history. But new research published in Nature deals a pretty big blow to the impact theory. The new study, based on dat
 

Four candidate landing sites for ExoMars 2018

 
‎03 ‎October ‎2014, ‏‎05:59:33 AMGo to full article
Paris (ESA) Oct 03, 2014
Four possible landing sites are being considered for the ExoMars mission in 2018. Its rover will search for evidence of martian life, past or present. ExoMars is a joint two-mission endeavour between ESA and Russia's Roscosmos space agency. The Trace Gas Orbiter and an entry, descent and landing demonstrator module, Schiaparelli, will be launched in January 2016, arriving at Mars nine mont
 

To boldly go: what is the point of space exploration?

 
‎03 ‎October ‎2014, ‏‎05:59:33 AMGo to full article
Bristol, UK (SPX) Oct 03, 2014
The UK's space activities employs over 100,000 people and contributes nearly Pounds 10 billion to the economy but why bother with space exploration? This question will be debated by a panel including an aerospace engineering PhD student from the University of Bristol as part of the Battle of Ideas 2014 to be held in London this month [18 and 19 October]. Ashley Dale will speak alongside W
 

Winter is coming ... to Titan's south pole

 
‎03 ‎October ‎2014, ‏‎05:59:33 AMGo to full article
Bristol, UK (SPX) Oct 03, 2014
Titan is unique in our solar system because of its dense nitrogen-methane atmosphere, which is very similar to Earth's in some ways, but very different in others. For example, air temperatures are around 200 degrees colder and, in contrast to the warm salt water seas of Earth, frigid hydrocarbon lakes populate Titan's surface. Titan has seasons just like Earth, only each season lasts over
 

Europe sat-nav launch glitch linked to frozen pipe

 
‎03 ‎October ‎2014, ‏‎05:59:33 AMGo to full article
Paris (AFP) Oct 01, 2014
A frozen fuel pipe in the upper stage of a Soyuz launcher likely caused the failure last month to place two European navigation satellites in orbit, a source close to the inquiry said Wednesday. Confirming a report in French daily Le Monde, the source said investigators suspect a pipe containing hydrazine fuel, used by the Fregat upper stage to drive the satellites to their orbital slots, ha
 

Coppery reds of upcoming lunar eclipse may be accented with turquoise

 
‎03 ‎October ‎2014, ‏‎05:59:33 AMGo to full article
Washington (UPI) Oct 1, 2014
Next Wednesday, Oct. 8, the full moon will turn a coppery red as a lunar eclipse becomes visible across the entirety of the United States. "It promises to be a stunning sight, even from the most light polluted cities," Fred Espenak, NASA's resident eclipse expert, said in a recent press release. "I encourage everyone, especially families with curious children, to go out and enjoy the ev
 

'Man in the Moon' was born from lava - scientists

 
‎03 ‎October ‎2014, ‏‎05:59:33 AMGo to full article
Paris (AFP) Oct 01, 2014
A dark lunar basin that, seen from Earth, produces the "Man in the Moon" effect, was created by an outpouring of lava and not an asteroid strike, astronomers said Wednesday. Known as the Oceanus Procellarum - the "ocean of storms" as classical skygazers dubbed it - the vast basin measures nearly 3,000 kilometres (1,900 mile) across. Until now, the main theory to explain this extraordin
 

Europe shortlists four sites for 2019 Mars mission

 
‎03 ‎October ‎2014, ‏‎05:59:33 AMGo to full article
Paris (AFP) Oct 01, 2014
The European Space Agency (ESA) said on Wednesday it had identified four potential sites for landing a rover on Mars in 2019 in its boldest exploration yet of the Red Planet. The landing is the second part of a two-phase endeavour called ExoMars, a project between ESA and Russia's Roscosmos space agency to look for evidence of life on Mars. In the first step, an orbital probe will be lau
 

NASA's Swift satellite sees small star ejecting 'super flares'

 
‎03 ‎October ‎2014, ‏‎05:59:33 AMGo to full article
Greenbelt, Md. (UPI) Sep 30, 2014
Astronomers don't normally use canine clichés, but if they did, they might employ one - it's not the size of the dog in the fight, it's the size of the fight in the dog - to describe a small but energetic red dwarf in a binary system known as DG Canum Venaticorum, or DG CVn. That's because red dwarfs like DG CVn serve a serious electromagnetic punch in a small package. Astronomers kn
 

Cyanide fog marks winter's onset on Saturn moon Titan

 
‎02 ‎October ‎2014, ‏‎07:12:59 PMGo to full article
Paris (AFP) Oct 01, 2014
A cyanide cloud formed over Titan's south pole as the strange moon of Saturn entered its seven-year winter in 2009, astronomers reported on Wednesday. An enigma of the Solar System, Titan is studded with lakes of liquid hydrocarbons and a choking nitrogen-methane atmosphere, according to data sent back by a US-European scout mission. The satellite and its mother planet are so far from th
 

Chemists Observe Key Reaction To Produce 'Atmosphere's Detergent'

 
‎02 ‎October ‎2014, ‏‎07:12:59 PMGo to full article
Philadelphia PA (SPX) Sep 30, 2014
Earth's atmosphere is a complicated dance of molecules. The chemical output of plants, animals and human industry rise into the air and pair off in sequences of chemical reactions. Such processes help maintain the atmosphere's chemical balance; for example, some break down pollutants emitted from the burning of fossil fuels. Understanding exactly how these reactions proceed is critical for
 

Skin pigment renders sun's UV radiation harmless using projectiles

 
‎02 ‎October ‎2014, ‏‎07:12:59 PMGo to full article
Lund, Sweden (SPX) Sep 30, 2014
Researchers at Lund University in Sweden and other institutions have worked out how the pigment of the skin manages to protect the body from the sun's dangerous UV rays. The skin pigment converts the UV radiation into heat through a rapid chemical reaction that shoots protons from the molecules of the pigment. In a new study, the team from Lund University, working with colleagues in France
 

How things coil

 
‎02 ‎October ‎2014, ‏‎07:12:59 PMGo to full article
New York NY (SPX) Sep 30, 2014
When one sends an email from Boston to Beijing, it travels through submarine optical cables that someone had to install at some point. The positioning of these cables can generate intriguing coiling patterns that can also cause problems if, for instance, they are tangled or kinked. The deployment of a rodlike structure onto a moving substrate is commonly found in a variety of engineering a
 

System designed to improve hand function lost to nerve damage

 
‎02 ‎October ‎2014, ‏‎07:12:59 PMGo to full article
Corvallis OR (SPX) Oct 01, 2014
Engineers at Oregon State University have developed and successfully demonstrated the value of a simple pulley mechanism to improve hand function after surgery. The device, tested in cadaver hands, is one of the first instruments ever created that could improve the transmission of mechanical forces and movement while implanted inside the body. After continued research, technology suc

 

 
News About Time And Space
 
 

Novel approach to magnetic measurements atom-by-atom

 
‎06 ‎October ‎2014, ‏‎07:17:28 AMGo to full article
Uppsala, Sweden (SPX) Oct 03, 2014 - Having the possibility to measure magnetic properties of materials at atomic precision is one of the important goals of today's experimental physics. Such measurement technique would give engineers and physicists an ultimate handle over magnetic properties of nano-structures for future applications.

In an article published in Physical Review Letters researchers propose a new method, utilizing properties of the quantum world - the phase of the electron beam - to detect magnetism with atom-by-atom precision.

The electron microscope is a fascinating instrument. It uses a highly accelerated electron beam, which passes right through the sample. The way how the beam scatters in that process, gives scientists a whole lot of information about the sample itself. Today it allows us to watch individual atoms and distinguish them by their atomic number.

Scientists even learned how to extract a position of every single atom in a nanoparticle. Much of this became possible thanks to the invention of an aberration corrector - a device, which sharpens the image of microscope, the same way as glasses help our eyes.

There is however one domain, where microscopy is still relatively in its beginnings and that is the study of magnetic properties.

A team of three scientists, Jan Rusz from Uppsala University, Sweden, Juan-Carlos Idrobo from Oak Ridge National Laboratory, USA, and Somnath Bhowmick from Indian Institute of Technology, India, have proposed a new way, which should bring the resolution in magnetic studies on par with watching individual atoms.

The trick lies in an inovative use of the aberration corrector - "the glasses of the microscope". It is used to correct all errors of the microscope optics, except for one specific distortion, which is tuned to the symmetry of the measured crystal.

Imagine your glasses intentionally curved in a specific way, which allows you to see something, that you could not spot before. In the strange world of quantum mechanics this is exactly what happens. The distortion enhances the magnetic signal, which can be then easily measured.

"With this new method, we bring the atomic resolution magnetic measurements to about 400 laboratories world-wide, which are equipped with modern scanning transmission electron microscopes with aberration correctors", says Jan Rusz, and expects that the first experimental confirmations will come very soon.

Jan Rusz, Juan-Carlos Idrobo, Somnath Bhowmick (2014) Achieving atomic resolution magnetic dichroism by controlling the phase symmetry of an electron probe,

Physical Review Letters, 113, 145501 DOI: 10.1103/PhysRevLett.113.145501

 

 

Platinum meets its match in quantum dots from coal

 
‎06 ‎October ‎2014, ‏‎07:17:28 AMGo to full article
Houston TX (SPX) Oct 03, 2014 - Graphene quantum dots created at Rice University grab onto graphene platelets like barnacles attach themselves to the hull of a boat. But these dots enhance the properties of the mothership, making them better than platinum catalysts for certain reactions within fuel cells.

The Rice lab of chemist James Tour created dots known as GQDs from coal last year and have now combined these nanoscale dots with microscopic sheets of graphene, the one-atom-thick form of carbon, to create a hybrid that could greatly cut the cost of generating energy with fuel cells.

The research is the subject of a new paper in the American Chemical Society journal ACS Nano.

The lab discovered boiling down a solution of GQDs and graphene oxide sheets (exfoliated from common graphite) combined them into self-assembling nanoscale platelets that could then be treated with nitrogen and boron.

The hybrid material combined the advantages of each component: an abundance of edges where chemical reactions take place and excellent conductivity between GQDs provided by the graphene base. The boron and nitrogen collectively add more catalytically active sites to the material than either element would add alone.

"The GQDs add to the system an enormous amount of edge, which permits the chemistry of oxygen reduction, one of the two needed reactions for operation in a fuel cell," Tour said.

"The graphene provides the conductive matrix required. So it's a superb hybridization."

The Tour lab's material outperformed commercial platinum/carbon hybrids commonly found in fuel cells. The material showed an oxygen reduction reaction of about 15 millivolts more in positive onset potential - the start of the reaction - and 70 percent larger current density than platinum-based catalysts.

The materials required to make the flake-like hybrids are much cheaper, too, Tour said. "The efficiency is better than platinum in terms of oxygen reduction, permitting one to sidestep the most prohibitive hurdle in fuel-cell generation - the cost of the precious metal," he said.

Rice graduate student Huilong Fei is the paper's lead author. Co-authors are graduate students Ruquan Ye, Gonglan Ye, Yongji Gong, Zhiwei Peng and Errol Samuel; research technician Xiujun Fan; and Pulickel Ajayan, the Benjamin M. and Mary Greenwood Anderson Professor in Mechanical Engineering and Materials Science and of chemistry and chair of the Department of Materials Science and NanoEngineering, all of Rice.

Tour is the T.T. and W.F. Chao Chair in Chemistry as well as a professor of materials science and nanoengineering and of computer science.

The Office of Naval Research Multidisciplinary University Research Initiative (MURI) program, the Air Force Office of Scientific Research and its MURI program supported the research.

 

 

A piece of work by NUP/UPNA researchers demonstrates various ways for controlling light in the terahertz frequency range

 
‎06 ‎October ‎2014, ‏‎07:17:28 AMGo to full article
Usurbil, Spain (SPX) Sep 25, 2014 - The Journal of Optics has devoted the front page of its special edition on Mid-infrared and THz Photonics to the work produced by the NUP/UPNA-Public University of Navarre researchers Victor Pacheco-Pena, Victor Torres, Miguel Beruete and Miguel Navarro-Cia (former student currently working at Imperial College London), together with Nader Engheta (University of Pennsylvania), one of the world's leading experts in metamaterials.

In their research they have proposed various devices capable of redirecting electromagnetic waves with efficiency levels close to 100%.

To explain what their work consists of they have put forward the following example: "If we shine a torch on a wall in which we have made a hole, experience tells us that the bigger the hole is, the greater the amount of light that will pass through to the other side.

"However, if we fill the hole with an ENZ metamaterial, something that appears to defy logic happens: the smaller the hole is, the greater the amount of light that passes through. This phenomenon has a tremendous practical implication because it opens up new ways of miniaturising numerous components and for light control."

Metamaterials are artificial materials with properties that go beyond those of natural means. To understand how they work, we can take a look at nature itself: while natural elements acquire their physical properties from the atoms that form them and the way in which they are ordered, metamaterials use natural means, like small metal fragments that fit together like parts of a Meccano model to artificially synthesise properties that are impossible to find otherwise.

Initially put forward to control electromagnetic radiation, right now their use has become widespread and has extended to other areas like mechanical waves (sound, for example).

The piece of work referred to above proposes various compact devices comprising rectangular metal tubes with extremely narrow openings of dimensions designed in such a way that they are capable of redirecting the electromagnetic waves with levels of efficiency close to 100%.

These gaps are capable of imitating an ENZ (Epsilon Near Zero, which means permittivity close to zero) metamaterial so that it is not necessary to "fill them" with anything in order to obtain amazing results.

Amazing properties
Among the electromagnetic metamaterials, the above-mentioned ENZ ones make it possible to achieve the super coupling of the light, the tunnel effect and the confining of energy in tiny spaces.

"Going back to the first example," say the authors, "super coupling means that all the light will be transferred from one side of the wall to the other through any shape of hole we want to make; tunnel effect refers to light passing through a hole of any length, no matter how long we want to make it; and the confining of energy is due to the fact that the light is transferred even through very small holes, so the energy inside the hole is squeezed enormously."

This work has shown theoretically and by means of simulations how beam steerers and power splitters work for terahertz waves, and is of tremendous importance in view of their huge potential in sectors like security, biomedical engineering, pharmacy, space, etc. Right now, the authors of this piece of research are working to confirm the study through experimental means.

In this respect, they stress that "this constitutes another milestone in an initiative of an international nature that has been going on for nearly four years".

Pacheco-Pena V., Torres V., Beruete M., Navarro-Cia M., Nader Engheta. 2014. " -near-zero (ENZ) graded index quasi-optical devices: steering and splitting millimeter waves". Journal of Optics, 16: 094009

 

 

Uncovering the forbidden side of molecules

 
‎06 ‎October ‎2014, ‏‎07:17:28 AMGo to full article
Basel, Switzerland (SPX) Sep 23, 2014 - Researchers at the University of Basel in Switzerland have succeeded in observing the "forbidden" infrared spectrum of a charged molecule for the first time.

These extremely weak spectra offer perspectives for extremely precise measurements of molecular properties and may also contribute to the development of molecular clocks and quantum technology.

The results were published in the scientific journal Nature Physics.

Spectroscopy, the study of the interaction between matter and light, is probably the most important method for investigating the properties of molecules. Molecules can only absorb light at well-defined wavelengths which correspond to the difference between two quantum-mechanical energy states.

This is referred to as a spectroscopic transition. An analysis of the wavelengths and the intensity of the transitions provides information about the chemical structure and molecular motions, such as vibration or rotation.

In certain cases, however, the transition between two energy levels is not permitted. The transition is then called "forbidden". Nevertheless, this restriction is not categorical, meaning that forbidden transitions can still be observed with an extremely sensitive method of measurement.

Although the corresponding spectra are extremely weak, they can be measured to an exceptionally accurate degree. They provide information on molecular properties with a level of precision not possible within allowed spectra.

Precise measurements of molecular properties
Within the framework of the National Centre of Competence in Research QSIT - Quantum Science and Technology, the research group headed by Professor Stefan Willitsch at the University of Basel's Department of Chemistry has established methods for the precise manipulation and control of molecules on the quantum level.

In the present study, individual charged nitrogen molecules (ions) were generated in a well-defined molecular energy state. The ions were then implanted into a structure of ultra-cold, laser-cooled calcium ions - a Coulomb crystal - in an ultra-high vacuum chamber.

The molecular ions were thus cooled to a few thousandths of a degree above absolute zero to localize in space. In this isolated, cold environment, the molecules could be investigated without perturbations over long periods of time. This enabled the researchers to excite and observe forbidden transitions in the infrared spectral domain using an intensive laser.

Potential for new applications
The new method paves the way for new applications, such as the highly precise measurement of molecular properties, the development of extremely precise clocks based on individual molecules and quantum information processing using molecules.

It also offers perspectives to test fundamental concepts using spectroscopic precision measurements on single molecules which were up to now the domain of high-energy physics. One example is the important question whether the physical constants of nature are actually really constant.

Matthias Germann, Xin Tong and Stefan Willitsch "Observation of electric-dipole-forbidden infrared transitions in cold molecular ions" Nature Physics, doi: 10.1038/nphys3085

 

 

Chemical bond between a superheavy element and a carbon atom established

 
‎06 ‎October ‎2014, ‏‎07:17:28 AMGo to full article
Mainz, Germany (SPX) Sep 23, 2014 - An international collaboration led by research groups from Mainz and Darmstadt has achieved the synthesis of a new class of chemical compounds for superheavy elements at the RIKEN Nishina Center for Accelerator-based Research (RNC) in Japan. For the first time, a chemical bond was established between a superheavy element - seaborgium (element 106) in the present study - and a carbon atom.

Eighteen atoms of seaborgium were converted into seaborgium hexacarbonyl complexes, which include six carbon monoxide molecules bound to the seaborgium. Its gaseous properties and adsorption to a silicon dioxide surface were studied and compared with similar compounds of neighbors of seaborgium in the same group of the periodic table.

The study recently published in Science opens perspectives for much more detailed investigations of the chemical behavior of elements at the end of the periodic table, where the influence of effects of relativity on chemical properties is most pronounced.

Chemical experiments with superheavy elements - with atomic number beyond 104 - are most challenging: First, the very element to be studied has to be artificially created using a particle accelerator.

Maximum production rates are on the order of a few atoms per day at most and are even less for the heavier ones. Second, the atoms decay quickly through radioactive processes - in the present case within about 10 seconds, adding to the experiment's complexity.

A strong motivation for such demanding studies is that the very many positively charged protons inside the atomic nuclei accelerate electrons in the atom's shells to very high velocities - about 80 percent of the speed of light.

According to Einstein's theory of relativity, the electrons become heavier than they are at rest. Consequently, their orbits may differ from those of corresponding electrons in lighter elements, where the electrons are much slower. Such effects are expected to be best seen by comparing properties of so-called homologue elements, which have a similar structure in their electronic shell and stand in the same group in the periodic table.

This way, fundamental underpinnings of the periodic table of the elements, i.e., the standard elemental ordering scheme for chemists all around the world, can be probed.

Chemical studies with superheavy elements often focus on compounds, which are gaseous already at comparatively low temperatures. This allows their rapid transport in the gas phase, benefitting a fast process as needed in light of the short lifetimes.

To date, compounds containing halogens and oxygen have often been selected; as an example, seaborgium was studied previously in a compound with two chlorine and two oxygen atoms - a very stable compound with high volatility.

However, in such compounds, all of the outermost electrons are occupied in covalent chemical bonds, which may mask relativistic effects. The search for more advanced systems, involving compounds with different bonding properties that exhibit effects of relativity more clearly, continued for many years.

In the preparation for the current work, the superheavy element chemistry groups at the Institute for Nuclear Chemistry at Johannes Gutenberg University Mainz (JGU), the Helmholtz Institute Mainz (HIM), and the GSI Helmholtz Center for Heavy Ion Research (GSI) in Darmstadt together with Swiss colleagues from the Paul Scherrer Institute, Villigen, and the University of Berne developed a new approach, which promised to allow chemical studies with single, short-lived atoms also for compounds which were less stable.

Initial tests were carried out at the TRIGA Mainz research reactor and were shown to work exceptionally well with short-lived atoms of molybdenum. The method was elaborated at Berne University and in accelerator experiments at GSI.

Dr. Alexander Yakushev from the GSI team explained: "A big challenge in such experiments is the intense accelerator beam, which destroys even moderately stable chemical compounds. To overcome this problem, we first sent tungsten, the heavier neighbor of molybdenum, through a magnetic separator and separated it from the beam. Chemical experiments were then performed behind the separator, where conditions are ideal to study also new compound classes."

The focus was on the formation of hexacarbonyl complexes.

Theoretical studies starting in the 1990s predicted these to be rather stable. Seaborgium is bound to six carbon monoxide molecules through metal-carbon bonds, in a way typical of organometallic compounds, many of which exhibit the desired electronic bond situation the superheavy element chemists were dreaming of for long.

The Superheavy Element Group at the RNC in Wako, Japan, optimized the seaborgium production in the fusion process of a neon beam (element 10) with a curium target (element 96) and isolated it in the GAs-filled Recoil Ion Separator (GARIS).

Dr. Hiromitsu Haba, team leader at RIKEN, explained: "In the conventional technique for producing superheavy elements, large amounts of byproducts often disturb the detection of single atoms of superheavy elements such as seaborgium. Using the GARIS separator, we were able at last to catch the signals of seaborgium and evaluate its production rates and decay properties. With GARIS, seaborgium became ready for next-generation chemical studies."

In 2013, the two groups teamed up, together with colleagues from Switzerland, Japan, the United States, and China, to study whether they could synthesize a superheavy element compound like seaborgium hexacarbonyl. In two weeks of round-the-clock experiments, with the German chemistry setup coupled to the Japanese GARIS separator, 18 seaborgium atoms were detected.

The gaseous properties as well as the adsorption on a silicon dioxide surface were studied and found to be similar to those of the corresponding hexacarbonyls of the homologs molybdenum and tungsten - very characteristic compounds of the group-6 elements in the periodic table - adding proof to the identity of the seaborgium hexacarbonyl. The measured properties were in agreement with theoretical calculations, in which the effects of relativity were included.

Dr. Hideto En'yo, the director of RNC, said: "This breakthrough experiment could not have succeeded without the powerful and tight collaboration between fourteen institutes around the world."

Professor Frank Maas, the director of the HIM, said: "The experiment represents a milestone in chemical studies of superheavy elements, showing that many advanced compounds are within reach of experimental investigation. The perspectives that this opens up for gaining more insight into the nature of chemical bonds, not only in superheavy elements, are fascinating."

Following this first successful step along the path to more detailed studies of the superheavy elements, the team already has plans for further studies of yet other compounds and with even heavier elements than seaborgium. Soon, Einstein may have to show the deck in his hand with which he twists the chemical properties of elements at the end of the periodic table.

 

 

Big surprises can come in small packages

 
‎06 ‎October ‎2014, ‏‎07:17:28 AMGo to full article
Washington DC (SPX) Sep 23, 2014 - Astronomers using the NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope have found a monster lurking in a very unlikely place. New observations of the ultracompact dwarf galaxy M60-UCD1 have revealed a supermassive black hole at its heart, making this tiny galaxy the smallest ever found to host a supermassive black hole.

This suggests that there may be many more supermassive black holes that we have missed, and tells us more about the formation of these incredibly dense galaxies. The results will be published in the journal Nature on 18 September 2014.

Lying about 50 million light-years away, M60-UCD1 is a tiny galaxy with a diameter of 300 light-years - just 1/500th of the diameter of the Milky Way. Despite its size it is pretty crowded, containing some 140 million stars. While this is characteristic of an ultracompact dwarf galaxy (UCD) like M60-UCD1, this particular UCD happens to be the densest ever seen [1].

Despite their huge numbers of stars, UCDs always seem to be heavier than they should be. Now, an international team of astronomers has made a new discovery that may explain why - at the heart of M60-UCD1 lurks a supermassive black hole [2] with the mass of 20 million Suns.

"We've known for some time that many UCDs are a bit overweight. They just appear to be too heavy for the luminosity of their stars," says co-author Steffen Mieske of the European Southern Observatory in Chile.

"We had already published a study that suggested this additional weight could come from the presence of supermassive black holes, but it was only a theory. Now, by studying the movement of the stars within M60-UCD1, we have detected the effects of such a black hole at its centre. This is a very exciting result and we want to know how many more UCDs may harbour such extremely massive objects."

The supermassive black hole at the centre of M60-UCD1 makes up a huge 15 percent of the galaxy's total mass, and weighs five times that of the black hole at the centre of the Milky Way. "That is pretty amazing, given that the Milky Way is 500 times larger and more than 1000 times heavier than M60-UCD1," explains Anil Seth of the University of Utah, USA, lead author of the international study.

"In fact, even though the black hole at the centre of our Milky Way galaxy has the mass of 4 million Suns it is still less than 0.01 percent of the Milky Way's total mass, which makes you realise how significant M60-UCD1's black hole really is."

The team discovered the supermassive black hole by observing M60-UCD1 with both the NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope and the Gemini North 8-metre optical and infrared telescope on Hawaii's Mauna Kea, USA.

The sharp Hubble images provided information about the galaxy's diameter and stellar density, whilst Gemini was used to measure the movement of stars in the galaxy as they were affected by the black hole's gravitational pull. These data were then used to calculate the mass of the unseen black hole.

The finding implies that there may be a substantial population of previously unnoticed black holes. In fact, the astronomers predict there may be as many as double the known number of black holes in the local Universe.

Additionally, the results could affect theories of how such UCDs form.

"This finding suggests that dwarf galaxies may actually be the stripped remnants of larger galaxies that were torn apart during collisions with other galaxies, rather than small islands of stars born in isolation," explains Seth.

"We don't know of any other way you could make a black hole so big in an object this small."

One explanation is that M60-UCD1 was once a large galaxy containing 10 billion stars, and a supermassive black hole to match. "This galaxy may have passed too close to the centre of its much larger neighbouring galaxy, Messier 60," explains co author Remco van den Bosch of the Max Planck Institute for Astronomy in Heidelberg, Germany.

"In that process the outer part of the galaxy would have been torn away to become part of Messier 60, leaving behind only the small and compact galaxy we see today."

The team believes that M60-UDC1 may one day merge with Messier 60 to form a single galaxy. Messier 60 also has its own monster black hole an amazing 4.5 billion times the size of our Sun and more than 1000 times bigger than the black hole in our Milky Way. A merger between the two galaxies would also cause the black holes to merge, creating an even more monstrous black hole.

Notes
[1] In fact, if you lived inside this galaxy the night sky would dazzle with the light of at least a million stars, all visible to the naked eye. On Earth, a comparatively measly 4000 stars are visible.

[2] Black holes are ultracompact objects with a gravitational pull so strong that even light cannot escape. Supermassive black holes - those with the mass of at least 1 million stars like our Sun - are thought to be at the centres of many galaxies.

 

 

Hubble Helps Find Smallest Known Galaxy Containing a Supermassive Black Hole

 
‎06 ‎October ‎2014, ‏‎07:17:28 AMGo to full article
Washington DC (SPX) Sep 23, 2014 - Astronomers using data from NASA's Hubble Space Telescope and ground observation have found an unlikely object in an improbable place -- a monster black hole lurking inside one of the tiniest galaxies ever known.

The black hole is five times the mass of the one at the center of our Milky Way galaxy. It is inside one of the densest galaxies known to date -- the M60-UCD1 dwarf galaxy that crams 140 million stars within a diameter of about 300 light-years, which is only 1/500th of our galaxy's diameter.

If you lived inside this dwarf galaxy, the night sky would dazzle with at least 1 million stars visible to the naked eye. Our nighttime sky as seen from Earth's surface shows 4,000 stars.

The finding implies there are many other compact galaxies in the universe that contain supermassive black holes. The observation also suggests dwarf galaxies may actually be the stripped remnants of larger galaxies that were torn apart during collisions with other galaxies rather than small islands of stars born in isolation.

"We don't know of any other way you could make a black hole so big in an object this small," said University of Utah astronomer Anil Seth, lead author of an international study of the dwarf galaxy published in Thursday's issue of the journal Nature.

Seth's team of astronomers used the Hubble Space Telescope and the Gemini North 8-meter optical and infrared telescope on Hawaii's Mauna Kea to observe M60-UCD1 and measure the black hole's mass.

The sharp Hubble images provide information about the galaxy's diameter and stellar density. Gemini measures the stellar motions as affected by the black hole's pull. These data are used to calculate the mass of the black hole.

Black holes are gravitationally collapsed, ultra-compact objects that have a gravitational pull so strong that even light cannot escape. Supermassive black holes -- those with the mass of at least one million stars like our sun -- are thought to be at the centers of many galaxies.

The black hole at the center of our Milky Way galaxy has the mass of four million suns. As heavy as that is, it is less than 0.01 percent of the Milky Way's total mass. By comparison, the supermassive black hole at the center of M60-UCD1, which has the mass of 21 million suns, is a stunning 15 percent of the small galaxy's total mass.

"That is pretty amazing, given that the Milky Way is 500 times larger and more than 1,000 times heavier than the dwarf galaxy M60-UCD1," Seth said.

One explanation is that M60-UCD1 was once a large galaxy containing 10 billion stars, but then it passed very close to the center of an even larger galaxy, M60, and in that process all the stars and dark matter in the outer part of the galaxy were torn away and became part of M60.

The team believes that M60-UCD1 may eventually be pulled to fully merge with M60, which has its own monster black hole that weighs a whopping 4.5 billion solar masses, or more than 1,000 times bigger than the black hole in our galaxy. When that happens, the black holes in both galaxies also likely will merge. Both galaxies are 50 million light-years away.

 

 

Magnetic fields make the excitons go 'round

 
‎06 ‎October ‎2014, ‏‎07:17:28 AMGo to full article
Boston MA (SPX) Sep 23, 2014 - A major limitation in the performance of solar cells happens within the photovoltaic material itself: When photons strike the molecules of a solar cell, they transfer their energy, producing quasi-particles called excitons - an energized state of molecules. That energized state can hop from one molecule to the next until it's transferred to electrons in a wire, which can light up a bulb or turn a motor.

But as the excitons hop through the material, they are prone to getting stuck in minuscule defects, or traps - causing them to release their energy as wasted light.

Now a team of researchers at MIT and Harvard University has found a way of rendering excitons immune to these traps, possibly improving photovoltaic devices' efficiency. The work is described in a paper in the journal Nature Materials.

Their approach is based on recent research on exotic electronic states known as topological insulators, in which the bulk of a material is an electrical insulator - that is, it does not allow electrons to move freely - while its surface is a good conductor.

The MIT-Harvard team used this underlying principle, called topological protection, but applied it to excitons instead of electrons, explains lead author Joel Yuen, a postdoc in MIT's Center for Excitonics, part of the Research Laboratory of Electronics. Topological protection, he says, "has been a very popular idea in the physics and materials communities in the last few years," and has been successfully applied to both electronic and photonic materials.

Moving on the surface
Topological excitons would move only at the surface of a material, Yuen explains, with the direction of their motion determined by the direction of an applied magnetic field. In that respect, their behavior is similar to that of topological electrons or photons.

In its theoretical analysis, the team studied the behavior of excitons in an organic material, a porphyrin thin film, and determined that their motion through the material would be immune to the kind of defects that tend to trap excitons in conventional solar cells.

The choice of porphyrin for this analysis was based on the fact that it is a well-known and widely studied family of materials, says co-author Semion Saikin, a postdoc at Harvard and an affiliate of the Center for Excitonics. The next step, he says, will be to extend the analysis to other kinds of materials.

While the work so far has been theoretical, experimentalists are eager to pursue the concept. Ultimately, this approach could lead to novel circuits that are similar to electronic devices but based on controlling the flow of excitons rather that electrons, Yuen says.

"If there are ever excitonic circuits," he says, "this could be the mechanism" that governs their functioning. But the likely first application of the work would be in creating solar cells that are less vulnerable to the trapping of excitons.

 

 

New 'star' shaped molecule breakthrough

 
‎06 ‎October ‎2014, ‏‎07:17:28 AMGo to full article
Manchester, UK (SPX) Sep 23, 2014 - Scientists at The University of Manchester have generated a new star-shaped molecule made up of interlocking rings, which is the most complex of its kind ever created.

Known as a 'Star of David' molecule, scientists have been trying to create one for over a quarter of a century and the team's findings are published in the journal Nature Chemistry.

Consisting of two molecular triangles, entwined about each other three times into a hexagram, the structure's interlocked molecules are tiny - each triangle is 114 atoms in length around the perimeter.

The molecular triangles are threaded around each other at the same time that the triangles are formed, by a process called 'self-assembly', similar to how the DNA double helix is formed in biology.

The molecule was created at The University of Manchester by PhD student Alex Stephens.

Professor David Leigh, in Manchester's School of Chemistry, said: "It was a great day when Alex finally got it in the lab. In nature, biology already uses molecular chainmail to make the tough, light shells of certain viruses and now we are on the path towards being able to reproduce its remarkable properties.

"It's the next step on the road to man-made molecular chainmail, which could lead to the development of new materials which are light, flexible and very strong.

"Just as chainmail was a breakthrough over heavy suits of armour in medieval times, this could be a big step towards materials created using nanotechnology. I hope this will lead to many exciting developments in the future."

The team's next step will be to make larger, more elaborate, interlocked structures.

 

 

Penn research helps uncover mechanism behind solid-solid phase transitions

 
‎06 ‎October ‎2014, ‏‎07:17:28 AMGo to full article
University Park PA (SPX) Sep 23, 2014 - Two solids made of the same elements but with different geometric arrangements of the atoms, or crystal phases, can produce materials with different properties. Coal and diamond offer a spectacular example of this effect.

While it is well known that one crystal phase can transform into another under the right circumstances, the mechanisms that facilitate solid-to-solid transitions are still not well understood.

Atoms can rearrange themselves to transform from a "parent" phase into a "daughter" phase by two major routes, but it is difficult to predict which route a material will take or why it took one route versus the other.

To this end, researchers from the Hong Kong University of Science and Technology, the University of Pennsylvania, Soochow University in Suzhou, China, and Solvay, have studied colloidal solid-solid transitions with single-particle resolution, and they have discovered a surprising mechanism that facilitates one of these routes.

They found that some crystals have an easier time of making the solid-solid transition if they take it in two steps.

Surprisingly, the first step of the process involves the parent phase producing droplets of liquid. The liquid droplets then evolve into the daughter phase.

The observations provide new insight for all sorts of solid-solid phase transformations, and have potential implications for development and manufacture of alloys, as well as natural processes that occur deep within Earth's mantle.

The research team was led by graduate student Yi Peng and associate professor of physics Yilong Han, both of the Hong Kong University of Science and Technology, as well as Arjun Yodh, director of the Laboratory for Research on the Structure of Matter and professor in the Department of Physics and Astronomy in Penn's School of Arts and Sciences.

It was published in Nature Materials.

The two main routes by which a solid-solid phase transition can occur differ by whether the atoms move together or independently of one another. A diffusionless, or martensitic, transition involves many atoms moving cooperatively in unison. This route is often described as a "military" transition, as the atoms "march" in a concerted way.

By contrast, a "civilian" transition involves diffusion. It is associated with the formation of "droplets" of the daughter phase within the parent phase, with individual atoms diffusing back and forth in a random manner across the interface between the two phases.

"The process we observed is called nucleation," Yodh said. "Particles from the parent phase break away and form droplets of a new phase, and when the droplets get large enough the new crystal phase grows rapidly. What was surprising was that the initial droplets we saw were liquid rather than crystallites."

"A system may not directly transform to the ideal final state if the energy barrier to transformation is high," Han said. "Instead an indirect pathway through some intermediate metastable state with lower barrier height could be more favorable. Such effects can in principle arise in any barrier-crossing process including protein folding, chemical reactions or even some evolutional or social transformations."

The research team devised a way to watch this process in action, using polymer particles synthesized in the Yodh lab that have a unique property: they shrink when heated. The team formed thin films of these particles of a few layers trapped between two transparent walls.

Importantly, the crystalline packing of these spherical particles is highly dependent on the volume occupied in the film by the particles, as well as the ratio of the film thickness to the particle diameter.

The solid regions formed by the packing of these spheres had either square or triangular symmetry. The colloidal thin films thus mimicked crystal phases of atoms, and the sample design permitted experimenters to record particle behaviors by video microscopy as they switched from one phase to another.

Because the team was able to shrink the spheres without removing them from the film, simply by shining a heating light on them, they could study the solid-solid phase transition that occurs when the particle size and packing fraction change.

"In our case, the spheres start off in a square lattice," Yodh said, "and, when we shrink them, they transition into a triangular lattice. Such transitions between lattices with different types of lattice symmetries are often difficult to predict, and a liquid intermediate stage has never been suggested in theory before."

With a window into the particles' movements, the team closely observed the process by which this transition occurred. Whether the heated regions of square lattice pattern had defects or not, they found that the transition always exhibited the same basic mechanism.

The "colloidal atoms" first formed liquid droplets within the square parent phase, and then a solid triangular crystal phase formed within these liquid droplets. Eventually the triangular crystal phases grew large, replacing both the liquid in the droplets and the parent square phase.

This two-step process, square-crystal to liquid, then liquid to triangular-crystal, was surprising and is potentially indicative of the way in which many solid-solid transitions might occur on the atomic level. The key is that the interfacial energy between the parent crystal and the liquid phase is less than the interfacial energy between the parent crystal and daughter crystal.

"The system first nucleates a liquid, because it costs less interfacial energy than to nucleate the daughter crystal," Yodh said. "The two-step process effectively reduces the energy barrier for the process as a whole."

 

 

Physicists teleport photon over 15 miles

 
‎01 ‎October ‎2014, ‏‎06:38:16 PMGo to full article
Geneva, Switzerland (UPI) Sep 21, 2014 - Professor Nicolas Gisin and his team have successfully teleported a photon over 15 miles in its quantum state. The Swiss team of scientists aimed to transport the photon into a crystal without the two touching, and they did just that. The same team were able to accomplish this in 2003, but they were only able to teleport the light a little less than four miles. The reporting of the accomplishment can be found in the latest issue of Nature Photonics.

In May of 2012, a team of scientists was able to teleport a photon between two Canary islands, at a distance of roughly 88 miles. In both situations optical fiber was used to carry the light particle. "The next step is satellite-based quantum teleportation, which should enable quantum communication on a global scale. We have now taken a major step in this direction and will use our know-how in an international cooperation, which involves our colleagues at the Chinese Academy of Sciences. The goal is to launch a 'quantum satellite mission'," physicist Anton Zeilinger said at the time.

Forbes claims a satellite-based quantum teleportation could result in highly advanced quantum internet devices.

 

 

Three's a charm: NIST detectors reveal entangled photon triplets

 
‎01 ‎October ‎2014, ‏‎06:38:16 PMGo to full article
Boulder CO (SPX) Sep 18, 2014 - Researchers at the University of Waterloo in Canada have directly entangled three photons in the most technologically useful state for the first time, thanks in part to superfast, super-efficient single-photon detectors developed by the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST).

Entanglement is a special feature of the quantum world in which certain properties of individual particles become linked such that knowledge of the quantum state of any one particle dictates that of the others. Entanglement plays a critical role in quantum information systems. Prior to this work it was impossible to entangle more than two photons without also destroying their fragile quantum states.

Entangled photon triplets could be useful in quantum computing and quantum communications-technologies with potentially vast power based on storing and manipulating information in quantum states-as well as achieving elusive goals in physics dating back to Einstein. The team went on to use the entangled triplets to perform a key test of quantum mechanics.

The Waterloo/NIST experiment, described in Nature Photonics, generated three photons with entangled polarization-vertical or horizontal orientation-at a rate of 660 triplets per hour. (The same research group previously entangled the timing and energy of three photons, a state that is more difficult to use in quantum information systems.)

"The NIST detectors enabled us to take data almost 100 times faster," says NIST physicist Krister Shalm, who was a postdoctoral researcher at Waterloo. "The detectors enabled us to do things we just couldn't do before. They allowed us to speed everything up so the experiment could be much more stable, which greatly improved the quality of our results."

The experiments started with a blue photon that was polarized both vertically and horizontally-such a superposition of two states is another unique feature of the quantum world.

The photon was sent through a special crystal that converted it to two entangled red daughter photons, each with half the original energy. Researchers engineered the system to ensure that this pair had identical polarization. Then one daughter photon was sent through another crystal to generate two near-infrared granddaughter photons entangled with the second daughter photon.

The result was three entangled photons with the same polarization, either horizontal or vertical-which could represent 0 and 1 in a quantum computer or quantum communications system. As an added benefit, the granddaughter photons had a wavelength commonly used in telecommunications, so they can be transmitted through fiber, an advantage for practical applications.

Triplets are rare. In this process, called cascaded down-conversion, the first stage works only about 1 in a billion times, and the second is not much better: 1 in a million.

To measure experimental polarization results against 27 possible states of a set of three photons, researchers performed forensic reconstructions by taking snapshot measurements of the quantum states of thousands of triplets. The NIST detectors were up to these tasks, able to detect and measure individual photons at telecom wavelengths more than 90 percent of the time.

The superconducting nanowire single-photon detectors incorporated key recent improvements made at NIST, chiefly the use of tungsten silicide, which among other benefits greatly boosted efficiency.

To demonstrate the quality and value of the triplets, researchers tested local realism-finding evidence that, as quantum theory predicts, entangled particles do not have specific values before being measured.

Researchers also measured one of each of a succession of triplets to show they could herald or announce the presence of the remaining entangled pairs. An on-demand system like this would be useful in quantum repeaters, which could extend the range of quantum communications systems, or sharing of secret data encryption keys.

With improvements in conversion efficiency through use of novel materials or other means, it may be possible to add more stages to the down-conversion process to generate four or more entangled photons.

D.R. Hamel, L.K. Shalm, H.H. Hubel, A.J. Miller, F. Marsili, V.B. Verma, R.P. Mirin, S.W. Nam, K.J. Resch and T. Jennewein. Direct generation of three-photon polarization entanglement. Nature Photonics.

 

 

Elusive quantum transformations found near absolute zero

 
‎27 ‎September ‎2014, ‏‎12:09:53 AMGo to full article
Upton NY (SPX) Sep 18, 2014 - Heat drives classical phase transitions-think solid, liquid, and gas-but much stranger things can happen when the temperature drops. If phase transitions occur at the coldest temperatures imaginable, where quantum mechanics reigns, subtle fluctuations can dramatically transform a material.

Scientists from the U.S. Department of Energy's Brookhaven National Laboratory and Stony Brook University have explored this frigid landscape of absolute zero to isolate and probe these quantum phase transitions with unprecedented precision.

"Under these cold conditions, the electronic, magnetic, and thermodynamic performance of metallic materials is defined by these elusive quantum fluctuations," said study coauthor Meigan Aronson, a physicist at Brookhaven Lab and professor at Stony Brook. "For the first time, we have a picture of one of the most fundamental electron states without ambient heat obscuring or complicating those properties."

The scientists explored the onset of ferromagnetism-the same magnetic polarization exploited in advanced electronic devices, electrical motors, and even refrigerator magnets-in a custom-synthesized iron compound as it approached absolute zero.

The research provides new methods to identify and understand novel materials with powerful and unexpected properties, including superconductivity-the ability to conduct electricity with perfect efficiency. The study will be published online Sept. 15, 2014, in the journal Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences.

"Exposing this quantum phase transition allows us to predict and potentially boost the performance of new materials in practical ways that were previously only theoretical," said study coauthor and Brookhaven Lab physicist Alexei Tsvelik.

Mapping Quantum Landscapes
The presence of heat complicates or overpowers the so-called quantum critical fluctuations, so the scientists conducted experiments at the lowest possible temperatures.

"The laws of thermodynamics make absolute zero unreachable, but the quantum phase transitions can actually be observed at nonzero temperatures," Aronson said.

"Even so, in order to deduce the full quantum mechanical nature, we needed to reach temperatures as low as 0.06 Kelvin-much, much colder than liquid helium or even interstellar space."

The researchers used a novel compound of yttrium, iron, and aluminum (YFe2Al10), which they discovered while searching for new superconductors. This layered, metallic material sits poised on the threshold of ferromagnetic order, a key and very rare property.

"Our thermodynamic and magnetic measurements proved that YFe2Al10 becomes ferromagnetic exactly at absolute zero-a sharp contrast to iron, which is ferromagnetic well above room temperature," Aronson said. "Further, we used magnetic fields to reverse this ferromagnetic order, proving that quantum fluctuations were responsible."

The collaboration produced near-perfect samples to prove that material defects could not impact the results. They were also the first group to prepare YFe2Al10 in single-crystal form, which allowed them to show that the emergent magnetism resided within two-dimensional layers.

"As the ferromagnetism decayed with heat or applied magnetic fields, we used theory to identify the spatial and temporal fluctuations that drove the transition," Tsvelik said. "That fundamental information provides insight into countless other materials."

Quantum Clues to New Materials
The scientists plan to modify the composition of YFe2Al10 so that it becomes ferromagnetic at nonzero temperatures, opening another window onto the relationship between temperature, quantum transitions, and material performance.

"Robust magnetic ordering generally blocks superconductivity, but suppressing this state might achieve the exact balance of quantum fluctuations needed to realize unconventional superconductivity," Tsvelik said. "It is a matter of great experimental and theoretical interest to isolate these competing quantum interactions that favor magnetism in one case and superconductivity on the other."

Added Aronson, "Having more examples displaying this zero-temperature interplay of superconductivity and magnetism is crucial as we develop a holistic understanding of how these phenomena are related and how we might ultimately control these properties in new generations of materials."

 

 

Making quantum dots glow brighter

 
‎23 ‎September ‎2014, ‏‎09:10:48 PMGo to full article
Washington DC (SPX) Sep 18, 2014 - Researchers from the University of Alabama in Huntsville and the University of Oklahoma have found a new way to control the properties of quantum dots, those tiny chunks of semiconductor material that glow different colors depending on their size.

Quantum dots, which are so small they start to exhibit atom-like quantum properties, have a wide range of potential applications, from sensors, light-emitting diodes, and solar cells, to fluorescent tags for biomedical imaging and qubits in quantum computing.

A key property of quantum dots that makes them so useful is their fluorescence. Scientists can "tune" quantum dots to emit a specific color of light by adjusting their size -- small dots glow blue and large dots glow red. However, the dots' ability to glow can change over time with exposure to light and air.

Seyed Sadeghi, a physicist at the University of Alabama in Huntsville, wondered if it would be possible to better control how quantum dots react to their environment.

His team had previously found that placing quantum dots of a certain type on nanometer-thin layers of chromium and aluminum oxides significantly altered the dots' behavior: the aluminum oxide increased their emission efficiency, while the chromium oxide increased the dots' degradation rate when exposed to air. The researchers decided to extend their investigations to quantum dots with different structures.

Quantum dots come in a variety of shapes, sizes, and materials. For Sadeghi and his colleagues' most recent studies, published in the Journal of Applied Physics, from AIP Publishing, the researchers probed the behavior of four different types of commercially available quantum dots.

Some of the quantum dots had protective shells, while others did not. Additionally, some of the dots had cores made of binary materials (two types of semiconductors), while others had ternary material cores (three types of semiconductors). All of the quantum dots had been manufactured by chemical synthesis.

The researchers found that ultrathin aluminum oxide could make quantum dots glow brighter and that the effect was much more significant for quantum dots without protective shells. They also found that while quantum dots with both binary and ternary cores shrink after reacting with the oxygen in air, ternary core dots placed on aluminum oxide glowed brighter despite the shrinkage.

This observation surprised the researchers, Sadeghi said, and while they don't yet have an explanation for the difference, they are continuing to study it.

"The results of these studies can serve to enhance emission efficiency of quantum dots, which is an important feature for many applications such as light emitting devices, sensors, detectors, photovoltaic devices, and the investigation of a wide range of quantum and nano-scale physical phenomena," Sadeghi said.

Quantum dots have already helped increase the efficiencies of many optical devices, he noted, and the further development and application of quantum dots' unique properties, including in the fields of biological imaging and medicine, continues to be a prime focus of scientific study. As a next step in their own research, Sadeghi and his colleagues plan to investigate how metal oxides might affect the behavior of quantum dots when they are close to metallic nanoparticles.

"Probing the structural dependency of photoinduced properties of colloidal quantum dots using metal-oxide photo-active substrates," is authored by K. Patty, S. M. Sadeghi, Q. Campbell, N. Hamilton, R. G. West, and C. B. Mao. It will be published in the Journal of Applied Physics on September 16, 2014 (DOI: 10.1063/1.4894445).

 

 

UCI team is first to capture motion of single molecule in real time

 
‎23 ‎September ‎2014, ‏‎09:10:48 PMGo to full article
Irvine CA (SPX) Sep 18, 2014 - UC Irvine chemists have scored a scientific first: capturing moving images of a single molecule as it vibrates, or "breathes," and shifts from one quantum state to another. The groundbreaking achievement, led by Ara Apkarian, professor of chemistry, and Eric Potma, associate professor of chemistry, opens a window into the strange realm of quantum mechanics - where nanoscopic bits of matter seemingly defy the logic of classical physics.

This could lead to a wide variety of important applications, including lightning-fast quantum computers and uncrackable encryption of private messages.

It also moves researchers a step closer to viewing the molecular world in action - being able to see the making and breaking of bonds, which controls biological processes such as enzymatic reactions and cellular dynamics.

The August issue of Nature Photonics features this breakthrough as its cover story.

"Our work is the first to capture the motion of one molecule in real time," Apkarian said. While still images of single molecules have been possible since the 1980s, recording a molecule's extremely rapid movements had proven elusive.

In addition to using precisely tuned, ultrafast lasers and microscopes, the researchers had to equip the molecule with a tiny antenna consisting of two gold nanospheres in order to track its activity and record measurements over the course of an hour.

When the many repeated measurements were averaged, an astonishing finding emerged: The molecule was oscillating from one quantum state to another.

The scientists have produced a movie in which a small, glowing dot appears to emit pulses of bright light. "That's the light broadcast from the antenna every time the molecule completes a cycle of its vibrational motion," Apkarian said.

"The bond moves at a rate of 1013 cycles per second - a million, million times 10 cycles in one second." Making the movie was like freeze-frame photography with a very fast flash and repeating the measurement over and over again.

Seeing a molecule as it moves is "essential to a deeper understanding of how it forms and breaks chemical bonds," Potma said. "The aim of the present experiment was to demonstrate that we can capture a molecule in motion on its own timescale."

The next and even more ambitious goal is to acquire moving images of molecules in their natural environment without tethering them to an antenna. "Ultimately, we'd like to be able to [examine] a molecule ... as it's undergoing chemistry," Apkarian said.

He and Potma are members of the Center for Chemistry at the Space-Time Limit, a research entity funded by the National Science Foundation that involves about 60 scientists on five campuses.

 

 

Mysterious quasar sequence explained

 
‎18 ‎September ‎2014, ‏‎10:58:02 PMGo to full article
Pasadena, CA (SPX) Sep 12, 2014 - Quasars are supermassive black holes that live at the center of distant massive galaxies. They shine as the most luminous beacons in the sky across the entire electromagnetic spectrum by rapidly accreting matter into their gravitationally inescapable centers. New work from Carnegie's Hubble Fellow Yue Shen and Luis Ho of the Kavli Institute for Astronomy and Astrophysics (KIAA) at Peking University solves a quasar mystery that astronomers have been puzzling over for 20 years.

Their work, published in the September 11 issue of Nature, shows that most observed quasar phenomena can be unified with two simple quantities: one that describes how efficiently the hole is being fed, and the other that reflects the viewing orientation of the astronomer.

Quasars display a broad range of outward appearances when viewed by astronomers, reflecting the diversity in the conditions of the regions close to their centers. But despite this variety, quasars have a surprising amount of regularity in their quantifiable physical properties, which follow well-defined trends (referred to as the "main sequence" of quasars) discovered more than 20 years ago. Shen and Ho solved a two-decade puzzle in quasar research: What unifies these properties into this main sequence?

Using the largest and most-homogeneous sample to date of over 20,000 quasars from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey, combined with several novel statistical tests, Shen and Ho were able to demonstrate that one particular property related to the accretion of the hole, called the Eddington ratio, is the driving force behind the so-called main sequence.

The Eddington ratio describes the efficiency of matter fueling the black hole, the competition between the gravitational force pulling matter inward and the luminosity driving radiation outward. This push and pull between gravity and luminosity has long been suspected to be the primary driver behind the so-called main sequence, and their work at long last confirms this hypothesis.

Of additional importance, they found that the orientation of an astronomer's line-of-sight when looking down into the black hole's inner region plays a significant role in the observation of the fast-moving gas innermost to the hole, which produces the broad emission lines in quasar spectra.

This changes scientists' understanding of the geometry of the line-emitting region closest to the black hole, a place called the broad-line region: the gas is distributed in a flattened, pancake-like configuration. Going forward, this will help astronomers improve their measurements of black hole masses for quasars.

"Our findings have profound implications for quasar research. This simple unification scheme presents a pathway to better understand how supermassive black holes accrete matter and interplay with their environments," Shen said.

"And better black hole mass measurements will benefit a variety of applications in understanding the cosmic growth of supermassive black holes and their place in galaxy formation," Ho added.

 

 

Two-dimensional electron liquids

 
‎18 ‎September ‎2014, ‏‎10:58:02 PMGo to full article
College Park MD (SPX) Sep 11, 2014 - Truly two-dimensional objects are rare. Even a thin piece of paper is trillions of atoms thick. When physicists do succeed in producing 2D systems, quantum interactions can lead to new phenomena and Nobel prizes.

Two examples: graphene - single-atom-thick sheets of carbon atoms - has unique mechanical, electrical, and optical properties; and two-dimensional electron gases (2DEG) - planar collections of electrons supported at the interface between certain semiconductors such as gallium arsenide - allow the observation of such emergent behaviors as the quantum Hall effect and the spin Hall effect.

A relatively new frontier for studying 2D matter is provided by planar collections of electrons at the surface of transition-metal-oxide (TMO) materials, in which high electron densities give rise to interactions that are stronger than in semiconductors.

Consequently it is more accurate to refer to the TMO electron ensemble as a 2D liquid rather than as a 2D gas. Scientists hope to find exotic emergent phenomena in these high-density, highly-interactive electron environments.

One of the leaders in this effort is James Williams, a new fellow at the Joint Quantum Institute (JQI), where he is also an assistant professor of physics at the University of Maryland.

Before he left Stanford University, Williams and his colleagues performed tests on a thin sample of strontium titanate (STO) covered over with an electrolyte gel, a material in which negative and positive ions dissociate (saltwater is a common electrolyte: Na+ and Cl- ions come apart in a water solution). Their results appear in the journal Nature Physics. The article is accompanied by a "News and Views" essay recounting the highlights of the work.

The Experiment
The figure shows the basic setup of the work conducted at Stanford. A thin STO panel, covered by a gate electrode down the middle, is wetted by an electrolyte gel. The negative ions in the electrolyte are drawn off by an unseen electrode and can be forgotten. Meanwhile the positive electrolyte ions settle down on the STO surface, where they induce a dense 2D layer of electrons to form directly beneath.

The transport of these electrons as a current can be encouraged or discouraged by a voltage applied to an overlying electrostatic gate, pretty much the same arrangement used to move currents through field-effect-transistors (FETs), one of the universal components of myriad electronic devices. In effect, voltages applied at the 50-nm-wide gate region can create a barrier cutting off one portion of the material from the other or, conversely, offering a passage from the one side to the other.

Now is the time to mention that TMO materials are versatile. They can be insulating, conducting, semiconducting, superconducting and even show signs of ferromagnetism.

Williams and his colleagues at Stanford and Santa Barbara were the first to discover that bulk strontium titanate (a common TMO) that was simultaneously superconducting and ferromagnetic. Furthermore, the same material can be tuned from one type of behavior to another, usually by changing the density of electrons in the sample.

In the present experiment, the interest is in seeing how normal and supercurrents flow through tiny channels from one superconducting STO panel to another through a narrow passage. The passage is so narrow -- comparable to the size of the electrons considered in their wavelike manifestation -- that quantum effects are expected to occur.

The size of the opening and the consequent flow of current through the barrier to the other side can be controlled by changing the gate voltage. At low voltages (and at densities of less than about 8 x 10^12 electrons per sq. centimeter) the barrier material remains an insulator. Little or no current flows.

At medium voltage and density, some quantum tunneling proceeds; that is, some electron-pairs can leap to the other size. At higher voltage and at higher density (above 5 x 10^13 per/cm^2---a hundred times larger than is present in most FETs) tiny conducting zones can materialize. When some of these zones link to span the barrier, an effective channel allows superconducting currents to flow freely.

These little free-current gauntlets---called quantum point contacts---have been studied before, but not in strontium titanates. What justifies the use of the word quantum here is that the conductivity of the superconducting STO material is quantized. That is, the conductivity of Cooper pairs should only occur at certain levels, namely multiples of 2e^2/h, where e is the charge of an electron and h is Planck's constant.

But graphs of current versus gate voltage show that the conductivity (equal to the slope of the graph at any one voltage) can also occur at multiples of e^2/h. This suggests that the electrons flowing through the tiny passage have their spin degree of freedom broken, just as electrons in a ferromagnet don't have the freedom to point in any direction but are lined up in a coordinated way.

The combination of the high electron density and potent electron interactions are not seen in other materials and the quantum regime enforced by the tight passageway, might here be engendering some new kind of electron transport.

As the electron density outside the quantum point contact is increased, the material becomes superconducting and the transmission of Cooper pairs - the particles that comprise a superconducting current - through the constriction was also studied in this work. But something is missing: Cooper pairs are made of pairs of electrons with opposite spins, yet in the constriction these two degrees of freedom are not available. How then, do Cooper pairs make it through the constriction? Could this particular TMO have Cooper pairs that don't get together in the conventional way?

Looking for Novel Forms of Superconductivity: P-Wave Versus S-Wave
Their new experimental results are reported online in the journal Nature Physics on August 31, 2014. The authors speculate that this behavior is consistent with (but not yet proof of) of novel superconductivity, one candidate of which is a p-wave superconductor.

More research needs to be done before this speculation is given a strong footing. In conventional, or s-wave superconductivity, the pairs of electrons (Cooper pairs) that constitute a zero-resistance current, are spherical in shape. In p-wave superconductivity, the pairs would look more like miniature dumbbells festooned with additional lobes.

P-wave superconductivity has not been unambiguously seen yet since the anatomy of the electron pairs is difficult to establish. But the search has generated much interest. This is because theorists believe the p-wave materials could support the existence of Majorana particles (named for physicist Ettore Majorana), which are expected to have strange properties, such as being their own antiparticles.

 

 

God Particle could destroy universe, according to Hawking

 
‎18 ‎September ‎2014, ‏‎10:58:02 PMGo to full article
Washington DC (UPI) Sep 08, 2014 - In the preface of an upcoming book, Starmus, Stephen Hawking claims the Higgs Boson particle, a.k.a. the "God particle," could destroy the universe.

As first discovered by the Sunday Times of the United Kingdom, Hawking claims if enough energy is directed at the particle, it could cause space and time to completely collapse. He also claims that we "wouldn't see it coming."

The Higgs Boson particle is said to be the particle that gives matter its mass. "The Higgs potential has the worrisome feature that it might become metastable at energies above 100bn gigaelectronvolts (GeV)," Hawking writes. He claims that under such conditions, it is theoretically possible the particle would cause an unstoppable vacuum to form that would expand at the speed of light.

The likelihood of such an event occurring is apparently very low. According to Hawking, "A particle accelerator that reaches 100bn GeV would be larger than Earth, and is unlikely to be funded in the present economic climate." The end of days scenario is theoretical, but he said he still believes it is possible.

 

 

Co-flowing liquids can stabilize chaotic 'whipping' in microfluidic jets

 
‎18 ‎September ‎2014, ‏‎10:58:02 PMGo to full article
Atlanta GA (SPX) Sep 09, 2014 - Industrial wet spinning processes produce fibers from polymers and other materials by using tiny needles to eject continuous jets of liquid precursors. The electrically charged liquids ejected from the needles normally exhibit a chaotic "whipping" structure as they enter a secondary liquid that surrounds the microscopic jets.

But the liquid jets sometimes form a helical wave. And that was intriguing to Alberto Fernandez-Nieves, an associate professor in the School of Physics at the Georgia Institute of Technology.

By controlling the viscosity and speed of the secondary liquid surrounding the jets, a research team led by Fernandez-Nieves has now figured out how to convert the standard chaotic waveform to the stable helical form. Based on theoretical modeling and experiments using a microfluidic device, the findings could help improve industrial processes that are used for fiber formation and electro-spray.

The research, conducted in collaboration with the University of Seville in Spain, was supported by the National Science Foundation (NSF). It was reported Sept. 8, 2014, in the early online edition of the journal Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences (PNAS).

"We are developing an understanding of the basic coupling between hydrodynamic and electric fields in these systems," said Fernandez-Nieves. "The issue we examined is fundamental physics, but it could potentially lead to something more interesting in fiber generation through electro-spinning."

In conventional industrial processes, tiny metal needles apply an electric field as they eject the polymer-containing solution.

In the laboratory, the researchers used a glass-based microfluidic device to create the jets so they could more closely examine what was happening. Using a conductive liquid, ethylene glycol, allowed them to apply an electrical field to produce electrified jets.

"When you charge these polymer solutions, the jets themselves move out of axis, which creates a chaotic phenomenon known as whipping," Fernandez-Nieves explained.

"This off-axis movement causes the jet to abruptly move in all directions, and in the industrial world, all that motion seems to be beneficial from the standpoint of making thinner fibers."

The researchers experimented with many variables as their liquid jets emerged into a co-flowing secondary liquid inside the microfluidic device.

Those variables included the applied electrical field, the flow rate of the ejected liquid and the secondary liquid, the viscosities of the liquids, the needle diameters and the physical geometry of microfluidic device.

While producing a whipped jet in a viscous dielectric material - polydimethylsiloxane oil - the researchers were surprised to see the chaotic motion switch over to a steady-state helical structure.

"We were able to stabilize the structure associated with the whipping behavior and found that the stable structure is a helix with a conical shape," said Fernandez-Nieves.

"You can picture it as a conical envelope, and inside the envelope you have a helix. Once the viscosity of the outer liquid is sufficient, you stabilize the structure and get this beautiful helix."

Georgia Tech postdoctoral fellow Josefa Guerrero used a high-speed, microscope-based video camera operating at 50,000 frames per second to study the waveforms emerging from the experimental jets, which were less than five microns in diameter. The video allowed precise examination of the waveforms produced when the liquid flowed out of the glass needle and into the second liquid flowing around it.

Working with collaborators Javier Rivero-Rodriguez and Miguel Perez-Saborid at the University of Seville, the Georgia Tech team - Fernandez-Nieves, Guerrero and former postdoctoral fellow Venkata R. Gundabala - used hydrodynamics theory to help understand what they were seeing experimentally.

"By developing the model, we were able to balance the importance of the different forces in the experiment," explained Fernandez-Nieves.

"The helix was part of the solutions in the model and it reproduced some aspects of the experimentally observed helices."

Once the jets were stabilized by the viscous secondary liquid, the properties of the helix were controlled by the electrical charge. In the experiment, the researchers applied approximately 1,000 volts to generate the jets.

"We learned that the outer fluid plays a major role in stabilizing the structure of the jets," Fernandez-Nieves added. "Once the structure is stable, the details of the properties of the helical structure depend on the charge."

Ultimately, the stable jets break up into spherical droplets. The researchers have not yet formed fibers with their experimental setup.

In future work, Fernandez-Nieves hopes to study other waveforms that may be produced by the system, and evaluate how controlling the liquid jets could improve industrial techniques used in fiber production and electro-spray processes that generate clouds of droplets.

"We are interested in trying to map out those different behaviors," he said. "For us as physicists, this is interesting because it allows us to explore, address and measure things that nobody could look at before in the way we can today. We are anxious to understand the applied impact."

Josefa Guerrero, et al., "Whipping of electrified jets," Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, 2014.

 

 

Single laser stops molecular tumbling motion instantly

 
‎18 ‎September ‎2014, ‏‎10:58:02 PMGo to full article
Evanston IL (SPX) Sep 04, 2014 - In the quantum world, making the simple atom behave is one thing, but making the more complex molecule behave is another story.

Now Northwestern University scientists have figured out an elegant way to stop a molecule from tumbling so that its potential for new applications can be harnessed: shine a single laser on a trapped molecule and it instantly cools to the temperature of outer space, stopping the rotation of the molecule.

"It's counterintuitive that the molecule gets colder, not hotter when we shine intense laser light on it," said Brian Odom, who led the research. He is an assistant professor of physics and astronomy in the Weinberg College of Arts and Sciences.

"We modify the spectrum of a broadband laser, such that nearly all the rotational energy is removed from the illuminated molecules. We are the first to stop molecular tumbling in such a powerful yet simple way."

It is not very difficult to trap many types of molecules and hold them precisely in place, Odom said, but they stubbornly persist in rotating just as much as if they were not trapped at all.

Using their customized laser, he and his colleagues cooled singly charged aluminum monohydride molecules from room temperature to 4 degrees Kelvin (minus 452 degrees Fahrenheit) in a fraction of a second. The abrupt temperature drop stopped the molecules' normally persistent tumbling motion in its tracks.

Such control of molecules, of their rotational and vibrational states, is essential to using molecules in the construction of superfast quantum computers -- machines whose processing power would be exponentially faster than today's computers.

The new technique is faster, easier and more practical and efficient than techniques developed thus far to control molecules. Details will be published Sept. 2 by the journal Nature Communications.

Previously, it was long assumed that far too many lasers would be required to cool molecular rotations. However, broadband laser light contains many different frequency components, and the Northwestern researchers used those components to custom design a laser for their task.

They filtered out the part of the spectrum that causes molecules to start spinning faster (and become hotter) while leaving in the useful frequency components that slows the molecules down (and also cools them).

Also noteworthy, Odom said, is that they cooled the molecule to its very lowest quantum rotational state using a room-temperature apparatus, not the cumbersome liquid helium cryostats some other researchers have used.

"In our quantum world, every type of motion has only certain allowed energies," said Odom, an atomic physicist. "If I want to slow down a molecule, quantum mechanics tells me that it happens in steps. And there is a very lowest step that we can get the molecule down to, which is what we've done."

Odom and his team chose to work with singly charged aluminum monohydride molecules because the molecule does not vibrate when it interacts with a laser.

"By choosing the right molecule we were able to stop the molecules from rotating without worrying about the vibrations," Odom said.

Aluminum monohydride molecules are inexpensive and could be used in wide range of applications, beyond quantum computing.

"There is a lot you can do if you get one species of molecule under control, such as we've done in this study," Odom said.

In addition to quantum information processing, applications that could springboard off this new ability to control molecular rotors include ultracold quantum-controlled chemistry and tests of whether fundamental constants are truly static or if they vary in time.

The title of the paper is "Broadband optical cooling of molecular rotors from room temperature to the ground state."

 

 

Cool Calculations for Cold Atoms

 
‎18 ‎September ‎2014, ‏‎10:58:02 PMGo to full article
College Park MD (SPX) Sep 03, 2014 - Chemical reactions drive the mechanisms of life as well as a million other natural processes on earth. These reactions occur at a wide spectrum of temperatures, from those prevailing at the chilly polar icecaps to those at work churning near the earth's core. At nanokelvin temperatures, by contrast, nothing was supposed to happen.

Chemistry was expected to freeze up. Experiments and theoretical work have now show that this is not true. Even at conditions close to absolute zero atoms can interact and manage to form chemical bonds.

Within this science of ultracold chemistry, there is a sub-field that deals with "Efimov states," named for Russian physicist Vitaly Efimov. In 1970 he predicted that under some conditions all two-particle bound states would be unstable while (paradoxically) some three-particle states could exist. Such states were eventually seen experimentally in 2006, among cesium atoms (see Related JQI Article below).

Two scientists at the Joint Quantum Institute have now formulated a universal theory to describe the properties of these Efimov states, a theory that, for the first time, does not need extra adjustable unknown parameters . This should allow physicists to predict the rates of chemical processes involving three atoms---or even more---using only a knowledge of the interaction forces at work.

The JQI authors, Yujun Wang and Paul Julienne, publish their results in the journal Nature Physics.

Pico-Electron Volts
Efimov states are fragile. They depend for their existence on quantum effects and on the subtle interplay of two phenomena: Feshbach resonance and van der Waal forces. Quantum effects are necessarily at work at ultracold temperatures in the nano-kelvin regime. Here atoms should be viewed not as hard balls, typically a few tenths of nanometers across, but as wave packets, blobs extending over hundreds of nm.

It is common, when talking about colliding particles, to see them as cars speeding toward each other, perhaps meeting head on or glancing off at a relative angle. It is more unusual to visualize the collision if the "particles" are so large as to overlap each other at relatively great distances.

More strange still if three such particles are involved in an interaction whose result will be a loosely-bound confederation. In the study of Efimov states, the primary force at work among the atoms is the van der Waals force, named for Dutch physicist Johannes Diderik van der Waals. This long-range force among atoms or molecules arises from the temporary appearance of electric dipole moments in the particles.

Even for a neutral atom, a momentary imbalance of charge---more of the atomic electrons' negative charge might appear to the left, say, leaving a positive preponderance on the right---will constitute an electric dipole, which in turn can attract an atom with a complementary dipole orientation.

This induced-dipole force varies at the inverse sixth power of the distance between the two particles. Another way of controlling inter-particle collisions at ultracold temperatures is to turn on an external magnetic field.

For certain ranges of field strength, two particles can be coaxed to form semi-stable objects called Feshbach resonances, named for US physicist Herman Feshbach. Feshbach resonances are commonly used in cold-physics to control interactions, and this is especially true in the study of Efimov states.

Often Feshbach resonances are described in terms of a parameter, a, called the scattering length, denoting the effective distance over which the interaction takes place If a is positive and large (much larger than the nominal range of the force between the atoms), weak binding of atoms can happen.

If a is negative, a slight attraction of two atoms can occur but not binding. If, however, a is large and three atoms are present, then the Efimov state can appear.

Indeed an infinite number of such states can occur. In general since it allows interactions over large distances, the Feshbach effect is more important than the van der Waals force. But the JQI research has shown how the van der Waals force can be decisive in forming Efimov states, especially when the scattering length is short.

Many scientists had believed that making consistent predictions of triplet-forming interactions would be difficult to make. Instead, the Wang-Julienne model successfully incorporates this short-distance regime. Thus there should be a series of Efimov states, with various binding energies.

But unlike atoms, where the quantum energy levels (denoting how much energy is needed to liberate the electron from its atomic binding) are in the electron volt (eV) range, Efimof states are typified by quantum energies of billionths of an eV or less.

The New JQI Theory
Wang and Julienne build their theory of 3-body van der Waals physics around the Schrodinger equation, the equation introduced by Erwin Schrodinger in the 1920s to treat particles as waves. Only here it is three particles---viewed as three sets of waves, or rather as a complex of waves representing the three particles---carefully studied in pairwise fashion to simulate an effective composite force field in which the three particles operate.

The result is a theoretical tool that can predict the important Efimov properties, namely the energies of the Efimov states, the widths of those states (essentially the fuzziness of our knowledge of the precise energy value), and the rates at which the three-particle states will form inside a gas of ultracold atoms.

"Our theory works for a full range of scattering lengths," said Yujun Wang describing the JQI work, "whereas the previous theories could only apply to large scattering lengths. We don't need adjustable parameters. The only inputs in our theory are the known two-body Feshbach parameters and our calculations using the Schrodinger equation. So our theory does not rely on any of the unknown three-body inputs that have been used in previous theories to fit the experimental data. In these two aspects our theory is more comprehensive and powerful. We can make quantitative predictions without relying on the unknowns, so that our results can be directly compared to experiments."

"Universal van der Waals physics for three cold atoms near Feshbach resonances," Y. Wang, P.S. Julienne, Nature Physics, , (2014)

 

 

Measurement at Big Bang Conditions Confirms Lithium Problem

 
‎16 ‎September ‎2014, ‏‎06:24:12 PMGo to full article
Dresden, Germany (SPX) Aug 29, 2014 - The field of astrophysics has a stubborn problem and it's called lithium. The quantities of lithium predicted to have resulted from the Big Bang are not actually present in stars. But the calculations are correct - a fact which has now been confirmed for the first time in experiments conducted at the underground laboratory in the Gran Sasso mountain in Italy.

As part of an international team, researchers from the Helmholtz-Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf (HZDR) studied how much lithium forms under Big Bang conditions. The results were published in "Physical Review Letters"

Lithium, aside from hydrogen and helium, is one of the three elements that are created before the first stars form. These three elements were - according to the theory - already created early on, through what is known as "primordial nucleosynthesis."

That means that when the universe was only a few minutes old, neutrons and protons merged to form the nuclei of the these elements. At the Laboratory for Underground Nuclear Astrophysics (LUNA), the nucleosynthesis of lithium has now been reproduced by an international team of scientists.

Michael Anders, who earned his doctorate in the last year at TU Dresden and HZDR on this very topic, took a leading role on the team. Within the framework of a project that was funded by the German Research Foundation, he was supervised by Dr. Daniel Bemmerer, group leader at HZDR.

In the Italian underground laboratory, the scientists fired helium nuclei at heavy hydrogen (known as deuterium) in order to reach energies similar to those just after the Big Bang.

The idea was to measure how much lithium forms under similar conditions to those during the early stages of the universe. The result of the experiment: the data confirmed the theoretical predictions, which are incompatible with the observed lithium concentrations found in the universe.

"For the first time, we could actually study the lithium-6 production in one part of the Big Bang energy range with our experiment," explains Daniel Bemmerer. Lithium-6 (three neutrons, three protons) is one of the element's two stable isotopes. The formation of lithium-7, which possesses an additional neutron, was studied in 2006 by Bemmerer at LUNA.

With these new results, what is known as the "lithium problem" remains a hard nut to crack: on the one hand, now all laboratory results of the astrophysicists suggest that the theory of primordial nucleosynthesis is correct.

On the other hand, many observations of astronomers show that the oldest stars in our Milky Way contain only half as much lithium-7 as predicted. Sensational reports by Swedish researchers, who discovered clearly more lithium-6 in such stars than predicted, must also likely be checked again based on the new LUNA data.

Bemmerer says, "Should unusual lithium concentrations be observed in the future, we know, thanks to the new measurements, that it cannot be due to the primordial nucleosynthesis."

Further research will soon be carried out in a new underground laboratory in Dresden

What was important for the studies was the special location of LUNA: in the mountainous Gran Sasso d'Italia, 1400 meters of solid rock keep the disturbance from cosmic radiation at bay.

The experimental setup is additionally enveloped in a lead shell. Only with such good shielding can the rare interactions between the nuclei be precisely determined. But within the next year, similar research will also be possible in Dresden. TU Dresden and HZDR will put the accelerator laboratory "Felsenkeller" into operation.

Although the solid rock shielding from natural radiation in this former brewery cellar is only forty-five meters, it is already sufficient for many measurements. The new laboratory also possesses a particle accelerator that is more than twelve times as strong: "There we can expand our experiments and study the formation of elements at high energy ranges", says Bemmerer.

M. Anders et al. (2014), First Direct Measurement of the 2H(a,?)6Li Cross Section at Big Bang Energies and the Primordial Lithium Problem. Physical Review Letters 113, 042501. DOI 10.1103/PhysRevLett.113.042501

 

 

Quantum physics enables revolutionary imaging method

 
‎16 ‎September ‎2014, ‏‎06:24:12 PMGo to full article
Vienna, Austria (SPX) Sep 01, 2014 - Researchers from the Institute for Quantum Optics and Quantum Information (IQOQI), the Vienna Center for Quantum Science and Technology (VCQ), and the University of Vienna have developed a fundamentally new quantum imaging technique with strikingly counterintuitive features.

For the first time, an image has been obtained without ever detecting the light that was used to illuminate the imaged object, while the light revealing the image never touches the imaged object.

In general, to obtain an image of an object one has to illuminate it with a light beam and use a camera to sense the light that is either scattered or transmitted through that object.

The type of light used to shine onto the object depends on the properties that one would like to image. Unfortunately, in many practical situations the ideal type of light for the illumination of the object is one for which cameras do not exist.

The experiment published in Nature this week for the first time breaks this seemingly self-evident limitation.

The object (e.g. the contour of a cat) is illuminated with light that remains undetected. Moreover, the light that forms an image of the cat on the camera never interacts with it.

In order to realise their experiment, the scientists use so-called "entangled" pairs of photons. These pairs of photons - which are like interlinked twins - are created when a laser interacts with a non-linear crystal.

In the experiment, the laser illuminates two separate crystals, creating one pair of twin photons (consisting of one infrared photon and a "sister" red photon) in either crystal. The object is placed in between the two crystals.

The arrangement is such that if a photon pair is created in the first crystal, only the infrared photon passes through the imaged object. Its path then goes through the second crystal where it fully combines with any infrared photons that would be created there.

With this crucial step, there is now, in principle, no possibility to find out which crystal actually created the photon pair.

Moreover, there is now no information in the infrared photon about the object. However, due to the quantum correlations of the entangled pairs the information about the object is now contained in the red photons - although they never touched the object. Bringing together both paths of the red photons (from the first and the second crystal) creates bright and dark patterns, which form the exact image of the object.

Stunningly, all of the infrared photons (the only light that illuminated the object) are discarded; the picture is obtained by only detecting the red photons that never interacted with the object.

The camera used in the experiment is even blind to the infrared photons that have interacted with the object. In fact, very low light infrared cameras are essentially unavailable on the commercial market.

The researchers are confident that their new imaging concept is very versatile and could even enable imaging in the important mid-infrared region. It could find applications where low light imaging is crucial, in fields such as biological or medical imaging.

 

 

New technique uses fraction of measurements to efficiently find quantum wave functions

 
‎16 ‎September ‎2014, ‏‎06:24:12 PMGo to full article
Rochester NY (SPX) Sep 01, 2014 - The result of every possible measurement on a quantum system is coded in its wave function, which until recently could be found only by taking many different measurements of a system and estimating a wave function that best fit all those measurements.

Just two years ago, with the advent of a technique called direct measurement, scientists discovered they could reliably determine a system's wave function by "weakly" measuring one of its variables (e.g. position) and "strongly" measuring a complementary variable (momentum). Researchers at the University of Rochester have now taken this method one step forward by combining direct measurement with an efficient computational technique.

The new method, called compressive direct measurement, allowed the team to reconstruct a quantum state at 90 percent fidelity (a measure of accuracy) using only a quarter of the measurements required by previous methods.

"We have, for the first time, combined weak measurement and compressive sensing to demonstrate a revolutionary, fast method for measuring a high-dimensional quantum state," said Mohammad Mirhosseini, a graduate student in the Quantum Photonics research group at the University of Rochester and lead author of a paper appearing in Physical Review Letters.

The research team, which also included graduate students Omar Magana-Loaiza and Seyed Mohammad Hashemi Rafsanjani, and Professor Robert Boyd, initially tested their method on a 192-dimensional state. Finding success with that large state, they then took on a massive, 19,200-dimensional state.

Their efficient technique sped up the process 350-fold and took just 20 percent of the total measurements required by traditional direct measurement to reconstruct the state.

"To reproduce our result using a direct measurement alone would require more than one year of exposure time," said Rafsanjani. "We did the experiment in less than 48 hours."

While recent compressive sensing techniques have been used to measure sets of complementary variables like position and momentum, Mirhosseini explains that their method allows them to measure the full wave function.

Compression is widely used in the classical world of digital media, including recorded music, video, and pictures. The MP3s on your phone, for example, are audio files that have had bits of information squeezed out to make the file smaller at the cost of losing a small amount of audio quality along the way.

In digital cameras, the more pixels you can gather from a scene, the higher the image quality and the larger the file will be. But it turns out that most of those pixels don't convey essential information that needs to be captured from the scene. Most of them can be reconstructed later.

Compressive sensing works by randomly sampling portions from all over the scene, and using those patterns to fill in the missing information.

Similarly for quantum states, it is not necessary to measure every single dimension of a multidimensional state. It takes only a handful of measurements to get a high-quality image of a quantum system.

The method introduced by Mirhosseini et al. has important potential applications in the field of quantum information science. This research field strives to make use of fundamental quantum effects for diverse applications, including secure communication, teleportation of quantum states, and ideally to perform quantum computation.

This latter process holds great promise as a method that can, in principle, lead to a drastic speed-up of certain types of computation. All of these applications require the use of complicated quantum states, and the new method described here offers an efficient means to characterize these states.

 

 

Scientists observe quantum vortices in cold helium droplets

 
‎16 ‎September ‎2014, ‏‎06:24:12 PMGo to full article
Helmholtz, Germany (SPX) Aug 27, 2014 - An international research team including DESY scientists has observed tiny quantum vortices in cold droplets of liquid helium. The team reports in the journal Science that the exotic vortices arrange themselves as densely packed lattices inside the nanodroplets.

It is the first time that the quantum vortices, which have already been observed in larger samples of what is known as superfluid helium, have been detected in nanodroplets. "The experiment has exceeded our best expectations," says Andrey Vilesov of the University of Southern California, one of the experiment's three leads.

The noble gas helium becomes liquid at minus 269 degrees Celsius. Below minus 271 degrees a quantum effect occurs, through which the liquid helium loses all internal friction and becomes superfluid. In this exotic state it can even crawl up walls.

To explore the dynamics of superfluid helium, the scientists X-rayed tiny helium nanodroplets with what is currently the world's strongest X-ray laser, the Linac Coherent Light Source LCLS at the SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory in California.

The production of the cold droplets with an average of only 0.2 to 2 thousandths of a millimetre was no easy task. The scientists sprayed the liquid helium through a fine nozzle into a vacuum chamber. A portion of the helium evaporated on the way, and the remaining portion of the drop continued cooling due to evaporative cooling.

"After a distance of few millimeters, the drops reached the superfluid state and were struck by the intense X-ray laser flash further downstream," explains DESY scientist Daniel Rolles of the Center for Free-Electron Laser Science CFEL, a joint facility run by DESY, the University of Hamburg and the Max-Planck Society.

An especially detailed recording of the X-ray scattering patterns of the nanodroplets was made possible using the CAMP experimental vacuum chamber, developed by a Max Planck Group in Hamburg at CFEL.

"CAMP has two large detectors that can even register individual photons and can determine their energy very precisely," stresses Benjamin Erk of CFEL. "The detectors create a series of 120 images per second while doing so."

"The analyses of the images shows that a surprising number of drops were not spherical as expected, but were pulled length-wise by rapid rotation," says Rolles.

"In fact, some drops possessed more of a shape resembling a thick wheel with two almost parallel sides." The rotation stems from the expansion of the liquid helium inside the nozzle, through which they enter the experimental chamber.

The droplets rotated up to fourteen million times per second - far faster than a normal round drop could withstand according to the laws of classical physics.

Due to the rapid rotation, tiny "quantum vortices" formed within the nanodroplets, reminiscent of a miniature whirlpool swirling around a bathtub drain. This phenomenon had already been observed in larger units of superfluid helium, but has just now been detected in nanodroplets for the first time. As observed earlier, the vortices form a regular lattice.

"In nanodroplets, the quantum vortices are surprisingly 100,000 times more densely packed than in the larger samples of superfluid helium that were previously studied," says Vilesov.

"What we have observed in this experiment is really surprising," stresses co-lead Christopher Bostedt of SLAC. The experiment's third co-lead, Oliver Gessner from the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, adds: "Now that we have shown that we can detect and characterize quantum rotation in helium nanodroplets, it will be important to understand its origin and, ultimately, to try and control it."

 

 

 

 

 

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Curiosity Rover Report: A Taste Of Mount Sharp (Sept. 25, 2014)

 
‎26 ‎September ‎2014, ‏‎11:15:28 AMGo to full article
0 NASA's Curiosity Mars rover has collected its first drill sample from the base of Mount Sharp. The scientific allure of the layered mountain inside a crater drew the team to choose this part Mars as its landing site. Credit: NASA Jet Propulsion Laboratory > More Information...
 

ENLIL Model Of March 5, 2013 CME

 
‎26 ‎September ‎2014, ‏‎11:13:03 AMGo to full article
0 Space weather models combined with real time observations help scientists track CMEs. These images were produced from a model known as ENLIL named after the Sumerian storm god. It shows the journey of a CME on March 5, 2013, as it moved toward Mars. Credit: NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center Scientific Visualization Studio, the Space Weather Research Center (SWRC) and the Community-Coordinated Modeling Center (CCMC)
 

Expedition 41 Docks To International Space Station

 
‎26 ‎September ‎2014, ‏‎11:09:13 AMGo to full article
0 After launching in their Soyuz TMA-14M spacecraft from the Baikonur Cosmodrome in Kazakhstan, Expedition 41/42 Soyuz Commander Alexander Samokutyaev and Flight Engineers Elena Serova of the Russian Federal Space Agency (Roscosmos) and Barry Wilmore of NASA arrived at the International Space Station on Sept. 26, Kazakh time, following a six-hour rendezvous. They docked their craft to the Poisk module on the Russian segment of the complex. Once aboard the orbital outpost, the trio will start a 5 ½ month mission. Credit: NASA > More Information...
 

Earth From Space: Athens On The Radar

 
‎26 ‎September ‎2014, ‏‎11:05:12 AMGo to full article
0 Earth from Space is presented by Kelsea Brennan-Wessels from the ESA Web-TV virtual studios. Explore this Sentinel-1 image of Greece’s Attica peninsula in the one-hundred-seventeenth edition. Credit: ESA
 

New Technique For Studying Out-Of-This-World Particles

 
‎26 ‎September ‎2014, ‏‎06:45:04 AMGo to full article
0 Earth is constantly blasted with dust from comets and asteroids. Researchers at NASA say that, despite their small size, these dust particles “may have provided higher quantities and steadier supply of extraterrestrial organic material to early Earth” than meteorite impacts. But their extremely small size has kept them from being studied heavily. Scientists at NASA’s Goddard Astrobiology Analytical Laboratory used a nanoflow liquid chromatography instrument to sort the molecules, then applied nanoelectrospray ionization to identify the molecules based on their mass. They said they “are pioneering the application of these techniques for the study of meteorite organics.” They also said that these techniques and any others they develop will be beneficial to future sample return missions, such as ones to Mars, where sample size will be limited. [ Read the Article: New Techniques Tease Out Building Blocks Of Life In Meteorites ]
 

A Giant Among Earth Satellites

 
‎26 ‎September ‎2014, ‏‎06:30:57 AMGo to full article
0 The weekend launch of ISS-RapidScat onboard SpaceX-4 has kickstarted a new era for the International Space Station as a giant Earth-observing satellite. Credit: NASA > More Information...
 

ScienceCasts: A Colorful Lunar Eclipse

 
‎26 ‎September ‎2014, ‏‎06:15:37 AMGo to full article
0 Mark your calendar: On Oct. 8th, the Moon will pass through the shadow of Earth for a total lunar eclipse. Sky watchers in the USA will see the Moon turn a beautiful shade of celestial red and maybe turquoise, too. Credit: NASA > Explore further...
 

NASA Issues "Space Tool Challenge" For Future Engineers

 
‎26 ‎September ‎2014, ‏‎06:00:24 AMGo to full article
0 NASA in conjunction with the American Society of Mechanical Engineers Foundation, has issued a series of "Future Engineers" 3D Space Challenges for students focused on solving real-world space exploration problems. Students will become the creators and innovators of tomorrow by using 3D modeling software to submit their designs and have the opportunity for their design to be printed on the first 3D printer aboard the International Space Station. The winning student will watch from NASA’s Payload Operations Center with the mission control team as the item is printed in space. Credit: NASA Future Engineers > More Information...
 

Panning Across DDO 68

 
‎25 ‎September ‎2014, ‏‎11:30:55 AMGo to full article
0 This video pans over NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope observations of dwarf galaxy DDO 68. This ragged collection of stars and gas clouds looks at first glance like a recently-formed galaxy in our own cosmic neighborhood. But, is it really as young as it looks? Credit: NASA, ESA Acknowledgement: A. Aloisi (Space Telescope Science Institute) > More Information...
 

Zooming In On Dwarf Galaxy DDO 68

 
‎25 ‎September ‎2014, ‏‎11:20:12 AMGo to full article
0 This video begins with a ground based view of the night sky, before zooming in on dwarf galaxy DDO 68 as the NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope sees it. This ragged collection of stars and gas clouds looks at first glance like a recently-formed galaxy in our own cosmic neighborhood. But, is it really as young as it looks? Credit: NASA, ESA, Digitized Sky Survey 2, N. Risinger (Skysurvey.org) Acknowledgement: A. Aloisi (Space Telescope Science Institute) > More Information...
 

Zoom Into HAT-P-11

 
‎25 ‎September ‎2014, ‏‎07:00:52 AMGo to full article
0 This video shows a zoom from a ground-based image of the region surrounding HAT-P-11, to a close up of the star taken with the NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope. Not visible here is a Neptune-sized planet named HAT-P-11b, which orbits the star. Astronomers have discovered clear skies and steamy water vapor on the planet. It is the smallest planet ever for which water vapour has been detected. The small bright object next to the star is not the planet in question; in fact it is not a planet at all, but another star. Credit: NASA, ESA, J. Fraine > More Information...
 

Many Views Of A Massive CME

 
‎25 ‎September ‎2014, ‏‎06:45:04 AMGo to full article
0 On July 23, 2012, a massive cloud of solar material erupted off the sun's right side, zooming out into space. It soon passed one of NASA's Solar Terrestrial Relations Observatory, or STEREO, spacecraft, which clocked the CME as traveling between 1,800 and 2,200 miles per second as it left the sun. This was the fastest CME ever observed by STEREO. Two other observatories – NASA's Solar Dynamics Observatory and the joint European Space Agency/NASA Solar and Heliospheric Observatory -- witnessed the eruption as well. The July 2012 CME didn't move toward Earth, but watching an unusually strong CME like this gives scientists an opportunity to observe how these events originate and travel through space. STEREO's unique viewpoint from the sides of the sun combined with the other two observatories watching from closer to Earth helped scientists create models of the entire July 2012 event. They learned that an earlier, smaller CME helped clear the path for the larger event, thus contributing to its unusual speed. Such data helps advance our understanding of what causes CMEs and improves modeling of similar CMEs that could be Earth-directed. Credit: NASA Goddard Space Flight Center > More Information...
 

Space Scoop: The Butterfly Hunter

 
‎25 ‎September ‎2014, ‏‎06:15:08 AMGo to full article
0 Astronomers using Chandra X-ray Observatory have set out on a hunt, to look at as many planetary nebulae as they can. Credit: NASA
 

Robots On Way To Help Astronauts Work, Explore And Live In Space

 
‎24 ‎September ‎2014, ‏‎05:43:39 PMGo to full article
0 The Human Exploration Telerobotics project, managed by NASA's Ames Research Center in Moffett Field, California, is developing and testing robots to improve the way humans live and work in space. Some of the project's robots have human-like "hands" and "legs" while others have wheels or are small, free-flying satellites. All have the potential to help astronauts reduce the amount of time they spend on routine maintenance tasks; to safely and quickly make repairs outside the spacecraft; or to remotely explore and work on a planet or asteroid's surface. Credit: NASA Marshall Space Flight Center
 

US Cargo Ship Arrives And Grapples At The International Space Station

 
‎24 ‎September ‎2014, ‏‎12:50:34 PMGo to full article
0 An unmanned U.S. resupply ship arrived at the International Space Station Sept. 23, two days after its launch from the Cape Canaveral Air Force Station, carrying more than 5000 pounds of supplies and critical experiments to the orbital laboratory. Space Exploration Technologies Corporation’s (SpaceX) Dragon cargo vehicle was grappled by station Flight Engineers Alexander Gerst of the European Space Agency and Reid Wiseman of NASA, who operated the station’s Canadarm2 robotic arm from the cupola. Dragon was subsequently berthed to the Earth-facing port of the Harmony module, where it will remain until around October 18th. This is the fourth commercial resupply mission of the station by SpaceX. Credit: NASA > More Information...
 

The Difference Between CMEs And Solar Flares

 
‎24 ‎September ‎2014, ‏‎06:30:18 AMGo to full article
0 Coronal mass ejections (CMEs) and flares are both solar events, but they are not the same. This video shows the differences between the two by highlighting specific features of each. Credit: NASA Goddard Space Flight Center
 

Mars Evolution

 
‎24 ‎September ‎2014, ‏‎06:15:05 AMGo to full article
0 Billions of years ago when the Red Planet was young, it appears to have had a thick atmosphere that was warm enough to support oceans of liquid water - a critical ingredient for life. The animation shows how the surface of Mars might have appeared during this ancient clement period, beginning with a flyover of a Martian lake. The artist's concept is based on evidence that Mars was once very different. Rapidly moving clouds suggest the passage of time, and the shift from a warm and wet to a cold and dry climate is shown as the animation progresses. The lakes dry up, while the atmosphere gradually transitions from Earthlike blue skies to the dusty pink and tan hues seen on Mars today. Credit: NASA Goddard Space Flight Center > More Information...
 

Arctic Sea Ice, Summer 2014

 
‎23 ‎September ‎2014, ‏‎09:38:35 AMGo to full article
0 An animation of daily Arctic sea ice extent in summer 2014, from March 21, 2014 to Sept. 17, 2014 – when the ice appeared to reach it’s minimum extent for the year. It’s the sixth lowest minimum sea ice extent in the satellite era. The data was provided by the Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency from their GCOM-W1 satellite’s AMSR2 instrument. Credit: NASA
 

Mars Balance Challenge

 
‎23 ‎September ‎2014, ‏‎06:45:19 AMGo to full article
0 The Challenge is to develop ideas for how NASA can turn available entry, descent, and landing balance mass on a future Mars mission into a scientific or technological payload. Proposed concepts should indicate uses for ejectable mass up to 150 kg prior to Mars atmospheric entry and/or another 150 kg during the entry and landing phases of the mission. NASA is seeking concepts that expand scientific knowledge or technological capabilities while exhibiting a high degree of practicality. Credit: NASA
 

Space Scoop: Archaeologists Of The Universe

 
‎23 ‎September ‎2014, ‏‎06:30:31 AMGo to full article
0 This picture shows the aftermath of a collision between two huge groups of galaxies, which are called galaxy clusters. Credit: NASA
 

Earth From Space: Helsinki

 
‎23 ‎September ‎2014, ‏‎06:15:43 AMGo to full article
0 Earth from Space is presented by Kelsea Brennan-Wessels from the ESA Web-TV virtual studios. In the one-hundred-sixteenth edition, explore the jagged Baltic coastline near Finland’s capital. [ Download Image ] Credit: ESA
 

Liftoff Of SpaceX-4

 
‎23 ‎September ‎2014, ‏‎06:00:02 AMGo to full article
0 The SpaceX-4 Falcon 9 rocket lifts off from Space Launch Complex 40 at Cape Canaveral Air Force Station carrying a Dragon spacecraft to the International Space Station. Liftoff was at 1:52 a.m. EDT. Credit: NASA Kennedy Space Flight Center
 

Investigating The Martian Atmosphere

 
‎22 ‎September ‎2014, ‏‎06:45:53 AMGo to full article
0 The Martian surface bears ample evidence of flowing water in its youth, from crater lakes and riverbeds to minerals that only form in water. But today Mars is cold and dry, and scientists think that the loss of Mars' water may have been caused by the loss of its early atmosphere. NASA's Mars Atmosphere and Volatile EvolutioN mission, or MAVEN, will be the first spacecraft devoted to studying the Red Planet's upper atmosphere, in an effort to understand how the Martian climate has changed over time. Credit: NASA Goddard Space Flight Center > Explore further...
 

ISS Mailbag - Bacon!

 
‎22 ‎September ‎2014, ‏‎06:00:05 AMGo to full article
0 NASA astronauts Don Pettit and Mike Massimino answer questions submitted via Twitter. Credit: NASA
 

A Tour Of M82 SN2014J

 
‎19 ‎September ‎2014, ‏‎03:26:28 PMGo to full article
0 Earlier this year, astronomers discovered one of the closest supernovas in decades. Credit: Chandra X-ray Observatory
 

Space To Ground: Preparing For Liftoff: 9/19/14

 
‎19 ‎September ‎2014, ‏‎03:12:05 PMGo to full article
0 NASA's Space to Ground is your weekly update on what's happening aboard the International Space Station. Credit: NASA
 

Pan Across Galaxy Pair Arp 116

 
‎18 ‎September ‎2014, ‏‎12:00:24 PMGo to full article
0 This video shows Hubble observations of Arp 116, a pair of galaxies made up of a giant elliptical galaxy known as M60, and a much smaller spiral galaxy, NGC 4647. Astronomers have long tried to determine whether these two galaxies are actually interacting. Although they overlap as seen from Earth, there is no evidence of new star formation, which would be one of the clearest signs that the two galaxies are indeed interacting. However, recent studies of very detailed Hubble images suggest the onset of some tidal interaction between the two. Although not visible here, just below and to the right of M60, is their even smaller neighbor M60-UCD1. An international team of astronomers has found a supermassive black hole at the center of M60-UCD1 with the mass of 20 million Suns. Credit: NASA, ESA. Music: R. Vreeland (disasterpeace.com) > Explore further...
 

Zoom Into Galaxy Pair Arp 116

 
‎18 ‎September ‎2014, ‏‎11:56:08 AMGo to full article
0 This video zooms in from a view of the night sky, through the constellation of Virgo, and into a Hubble view of Arp 116, a pair of galaxies made up of a giant elliptical galaxy known as M60, and a much smaller spiral galaxy, NGC 4647. Just below and to the right of M60, is their even smaller neighbor M60-UCD1. Credit: NASA, ESA, A. Fujii, Digitized Sky Survey 2. Music: R. Vreeland (disasterpeace.com) > Explore further...
 

The Mysterious Holes In The Atmosphere On Venus

 
‎12 ‎September ‎2014, ‏‎06:45:10 AMGo to full article
0 The European Space Agency's Venus Express mission saw something it could not explain. It appeared that there were holes on the nightside of Venus' ionosphere. Researchers at NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center investigated these mysterious holes, and found evidence that the sun's magnetic field lines may be penetrating through the planet. Credit: NASA Goddard Space Flight Center > Explore Further...
 

ScienceCasts: Jellyfish Flame On The International Space Station

 
‎12 ‎September ‎2014, ‏‎06:30:09 AMGo to full article
0 Astronauts onboard the International Space Station report seeing flames that behave like jellyfish. Video of the microgravity phenomenon is a must-see. Credit: NASA > Explore Further...
 

Expedition 40 Undocks, Ending Mission

 
‎11 ‎September ‎2014, ‏‎01:00:49 PMGo to full article
0 After spending 167 days aboard the International Space Station, Steve Swanson, Alexander Skvortsov and Oleg Artemyev undocked from the station's Poisk module at 7:01 p.m. EDT to begin their voyage home. Skvortsov, the Soyuz commander, is at the controls of the Soyuz TMA-12M spacecraft. The departure of Swanson, Skvortsov and Artemyev marks the end of Expedition 40. The Expedition 41 crew members, Reid Wiseman of NASA, Alexander Gerst of the European Space Agency and space station Commander Max Suraev from Roscosmos, will continue research and maintenance aboard the station. Credit: NASA > Explore Further...
 

Zooming In On The Globular Star Cluster Messier 54

 
‎11 ‎September ‎2014, ‏‎07:00:31 AMGo to full article
0 This video takes you on a journey past the center of the Milky Way and far out the other side to the globular cluster Messier 54. This cluster looks very similar to many others, but it has a secret. Messier 54 doesn’t belong to the Milky Way, but actually is part of a small satellite galaxy, the Sagittarius Dwarf Galaxy. The final close-up view comes from the VLT Survey Telescope at ESO’s Paranal Observatory in northern Chile. Credit: ESO/N. Risinger (skysurvey.org). Music: John Dyson > Explore Further...
 

Earth Images From Alexander Gerst In 4K

 
‎11 ‎September ‎2014, ‏‎06:45:10 AMGo to full article
0 This timelapse video was made from images taken by ESA astronaut Alexander Gerst orbiting Earth on the International Space Station. The video is offered in Ultra High Definition, the highest available to consumers. Be sure to change the settings in YouTube if your computer or television can handle it for the full effect. The montage is made from a long sequence of still photographs taken at a resolution of 4256 x 2832 pixels at a rate of one every second. The high resolution allowed the ESA production team to create a 3840 x 2160 pixel movie, also known as Ultra HD or 4K. Playing these sequences at 25 frames per second, the film runs 25 times faster than it looks for the astronauts in space. The artistic effects of the light trails from stars and cities at night are created by superimposing the individual images and fading them out slowly. Alexander Gerst is a member of the International Space Station Expedition 40 crew. He is spending five and a half months living and working on the ISS for his Blue Dot mission. Credit: ESA
 

RapidScat: NASA's Newest Wind Watcher

 
‎11 ‎September ‎2014, ‏‎06:30:34 AMGo to full article
0 Mission scientists and engineers describe how their small team, on a tight budget and short deadline, created the ISS-RapidScat instrument to gather high-priority measurements of ocean winds from a berth on the International Space Station. Credit: NASA Jet Propulsion Laboratory
 

Expedition 40/41 Change Of Command Aboard Station

 
‎11 ‎September ‎2014, ‏‎06:00:19 AMGo to full article
0 The reins of the International Space Station were passed from NASA’s Steve Swanson to Max Suraev of the Russian Federal Space Agency (Roscosmos) during a ceremony on the orbital outpost on Sept. 9. Swanson will return to Earth Sept. 11, Kazakh time, in the Soyuz TMA-12M spacecraft with Russian cosmonauts Alexander Skvortsov and Oleg Artemyev to wrap up almost six months in orbit. Suraev will remain on board with NASA Flight Engineer Reid Wiseman and European Space Agency Flight Engineer Alexander Gerst, awaiting the arrival of Alexander Samokutyaev of Roscosmos, Barry Wilmore of NASA and Elena Serova of Roscosmos, who will launch to the complex on Sept. 26, Kazakh time. Credit: NASA
 

Capillary Flow Experiments On Space Station

 
‎10 ‎September ‎2014, ‏‎05:02:23 PMGo to full article
0 Capillary Flow Experiments on the International Space Station are fluid physics experiments that investigate capillary flows and flows of fluids in containers with complex geometries. Results will improve current computer models that are used by designers of fluid systems on Earth and may improve fluid transfer systems on future spacecraft. Credit: NASA
 

First Evidence For Water Ice Clouds Found Outside Solar System

 
‎10 ‎September ‎2014, ‏‎04:52:10 PMGo to full article
0 A team of scientists led by Carnegie's Jacqueline Faherty has discovered the first evidence of water ice clouds on an object outside of our own Solar System. Water ice clouds exist on our own gas giant planets--Jupiter, Saturn, Uranus, and Neptune--but have not been seen outside of the planets orbiting our Sun until now. Their findings are published by The Astrophysical Journal Letters. Credit: Carnegie Institution for Science > Explore Further...
 

Close-Up View Of The Globular Star Cluster Messier 54

 
‎10 ‎September ‎2014, ‏‎04:27:51 PMGo to full article
0 This video gives a close-up view of an image from the VLT Survey Telescope at ESO’s Paranal Observatory in northern Chile showing the globular cluster Messier 54. This cluster looks very similar to many others, but it has a secret. Messier 54 doesn’t belong to the Milky Way, but actually is part of a small satellite galaxy, the Sagittarius Dwarf Galaxy. This unusual parentage has allowed astronomers to use the Very Large Telescope (VLT) to test whether unexpectedly low levels of the element lithium are also found in stars outside the Milky Way. Credit: ESO > Explore Further...
 

Opportunity's Long Tracks On Crater Rim

 
‎10 ‎September ‎2014, ‏‎04:15:34 PMGo to full article
0 Overhead and on-the-ground views of the 25-mile journey NASA's Opportunity Mars rover has made since landing in 2004. Credit: JPL/Cal-Tech > Explore further...
 

Targeting Mars

 
‎10 ‎September ‎2014, ‏‎06:30:27 AMGo to full article
0 NASA's MAVEN spacecraft is quickly approaching Mars on a mission to study its upper atmosphere. When it arrives on September 21, 2014, MAVEN's winding journey from Earth will culminate with a dramatic engine burn, pulling the spacecraft into an elliptical orbit. Credit: NASA Goddard Space Flight Center > More Information...

 

 

 

 
RedOrbit Videos
 
 

How Does Cloaking Work In The Real World?

 
‎06 ‎October ‎2014, ‏‎07:00:49 AMGo to full article
0 If you're a fan of Harry Potter or Star Trek, you probably already know what cloaking devices do. In the world of science fiction, they can make things disappear, just like magic. But how does cloaking work in the real world?

It can often be a very complicated setup that involves a lot of math and specialized optics, but researchers at the University of Rochester have been working on simplifying that approach.

Credit: University of Rochester

[ Read the Article: Inexpensive Harry Potter-Inspired Cloaking Device Developed At University Of Rochester ]
 

Twisting Solar Eruption And Flare

 
‎06 ‎October ‎2014, ‏‎06:45:17 AMGo to full article
0 The sun emitted a mid-level solar flare, peaking at 3:01 p.m. EDT on Oct. 2, 2014. NASA's Solar Dynamics Observatory, which watches the sun 24-hours a day, captured images of the flare. Solar flares are powerful bursts of radiation. Harmful radiation from a flare cannot pass through Earth's atmosphere to physically affect humans on the ground, however -- when intense enough -- they can disturb the atmosphere in the layer where GPS and communications signals travel.

This flare is classified as an M7.3 flare. M-class flares are one-tenth as powerful as the most powerful flares, which are designated X-class flares.

Credit: NASA Goddard Space Flight Center

[ Read the Article: NASA Releases Images Of A New Mid-Level Solar Flare ]
 

Earth From Space: Athabasca Oil Sands

 
‎06 ‎October ‎2014, ‏‎06:30:58 AMGo to full article
0 Earth from Space is presented by Kelsea Brennan-Wessels from the ESA Web-TV virtual studios. The one-hundred-eighteenth edition features an image over the world’s largest known reservoir of crude bitumen – and the open-pit mining that’s disturbing the local forest cover.

Credit: ESA
 

ScienceCasts: A Colorful Lunar Eclipse

 
‎06 ‎October ‎2014, ‏‎06:15:37 AMGo to full article
0 Mark your calendar: On Oct. 8th, the Moon will pass through the shadow of Earth for a total lunar eclipse. Sky watchers in the USA will see the Moon turn a beautiful shade of celestial red and maybe turquoise, too.

Credit: NASA

[ Read the Article: Colorful Lunar Eclipse Expected On October 8 ]
 

Beware Of The Fat Suit

 
‎06 ‎October ‎2014, ‏‎06:00:47 AMGo to full article
0 [ Read the Article: The Larger Your Friends The Larger Your Appetite ]

Have you ever ordered more food at a restaurant than you intended? There are elements of dining rooms that actually prime you to eat more food. One such element is the weight of those dining with or near you. This new Cornell University study found that the body type of your dining partner, or that of those dining nearby, may actually influence how much you serve yourself and how much you eat!

The study investigated the impact the presence of an overweight diner on healthy and unhealthy food choices and found you are more likely to serve and eat more unhealthy foods and less healthy foods when eating with or near someone who is overweight. These findings support a theory that when eating with or near an overweight person, you may be less likely to adhere to your own health goals. “This finding emphasizes the importance of pre-committing to meal choices before entering the restaurant,” says lead author Mitsuru Shimizu, Assistant Professor of Psychology at Southern Illinois University, Edwardsville. “If you go into the restaurant knowing what you will order you’re less likely to be negatively influenced by all of the things that nudge you to eat more.”

The study published in Appetite was co-authored by Katie Johnson of Mayo Medical School and Brian Wansink, PhD director of Cornell University’s Food and Brand Lab and author of the new book: Slim by Design: Mindless Eating Solutions for Everyday Life. The researchers recruited 82 undergraduate college students to eat a spaghetti and salad lunch. They also enlisted an actress to wear a prosthesis that added 50 pounds to her normally average weight. Each of the 82 participants was randomly assigned to one of four scenarios: the actress served herself healthfully (more salad and less pasta) while wearing the prosthesis, she served herself the same healthy meal without the prosthesis, she served herself less healthfully (more pasta and less salad) while wearing the prosthesis, or she served herself the same less healthy meal without the prosthesis. Participants in each scenario viewed the actress serving herself and then served themselves pasta and salad. Researchers found that when the actress wore the prosthesis, and appeared overweight, the other participants served and ate 31.6% more pasta regardless of whether she served herself mostly pasta or mostly salad. When she wore the prosthesis and served herself more salad, the other participants actually served and ate 43.5% less salad.

These findings demonstrate that people may serve and eat larger portions of unhealthy foods and smaller portions of healthy foods when eating with an overweight person because they are less in tune with their own health goals. Luckily, this phenomenon is easy to avoid by simply assessing your level of hunger before going to the restaurant and planning your meal accordingly. Wansink recommends, “Look up the menu beforehand and select a meal that suits your dietary goals. Or, if you’re going to a buffet, pre-commit to selecting modest portions of healthy foods and with that goal in mind, those around you will have less of a negative influence over what you eat.”

Credit: Brian Wansink, Cornell University Food and Brand Lab
 

What Happens When Asteroids Go Rogue?

 
‎03 ‎October ‎2014, ‏‎07:00:47 AMGo to full article
0 Scientists at MIT and the Paris Observatory claim that rogue asteroids are more common than previously thought. While working on a map of asteroids, these scientists say they now think the Solar System has been very dynamic. They theorize that Jupiter once drifted very close to the Sun, bringing along asteroids from the outer edges of the Solar System and displacing other asteroids that were already near the Sun. They said it’s like Jupiter bowled a strike right through the Solar System. They also said that this type of displacement could have once led to an icy asteroid colliding with Earth and depositing water onto our planet’s surface. They said all asteroid types exist in every region of the main belt and, through their mapping, they have discovered many asteroids in unexpected locations.

[ Read the Article: MIT Scientists Claim Rogue Asteroids Are More Common Than Once Thought ]
 

NASA's Earth Minute: Earth Has A Fever

 
‎03 ‎October ‎2014, ‏‎06:45:24 AMGo to full article
0 Earth's average temperature has risen over 1º F in the past century. It is projected to rise an additional 3º and 10º over the next 100 years. Data from NASA's global network of satellites, airborne missions and surface monitoring systems is used to build climate models that help us understand the causes & effects of global warming.

Credit: NASA
 

James Webb Space Telescope (JWST) Sunshield Deployment Test

 
‎03 ‎October ‎2014, ‏‎06:30:19 AMGo to full article
0 A major test of the sunshield for NASA’s James Webb Space Telescope was conducted in July 2014 by Northrop Grumman in Redondo Beach, Calif. For the first time, the five sunshield test layers were unfolded and separated; unveiling important insights for the engineers and technicians as to how the deployment will take place when the telescope launches into space.

Credit: Northrop Grumman
 

Helping Babies Learn Language Skills

 
‎03 ‎October ‎2014, ‏‎06:15:59 AMGo to full article
0 Research shows that a new game developed in the Infancy Studies Lab at Rutgers University-Newark helps babies develop the skills needed to learn language. The work could prove especially helpful for babies who come from families with a history of language impairment.

Credit: Rutgers University

[ Read the Article: Improving Babies’ Language Skills Before They’re Even Old Enough To Speak ]
 

ISS Science Garage - Gieger Counters In Space

 
‎03 ‎October ‎2014, ‏‎06:00:00 AMGo to full article
0 How is radiation measured on the Space Station? Mass and Don know.

Credit: NASA
 

ScienceLives Interview With Tom Statler

 
‎02 ‎October ‎2014, ‏‎12:28:38 PMGo to full article
0 Tom Statler is an expert on galaxies as well as solar system dynamics, especially near-Earth asteroids.

He has made use of the Hubble Space Telescope and the Chandra X-ray Observatory in space, and ground-based telescopes ranging from the 6.5-meter MMT observatory's telescopes down to the 4-inch reflector his older brother got for Christmas when they were kids. For five years he wrote a regular astronomy column for the Columbus Dispatch newspaper, and has done numerous radio shows on astronomy.

Credit: National Science Foundation
 

NASA Helicopter Crash Test A Smashing Success

 
‎02 ‎October ‎2014, ‏‎12:19:59 PMGo to full article
0 NASA researchers and others from the military and national and international government agencies spent more than three years preparing for less than 10 seconds. That's about how long it took for a 45-foot-long former Marine helicopter to fall 30 feet into a bed of dirt during the Transport Rotorcraft Airframe Crash Testbed (TRACT 2) full-scale crash test at NASA Langley's Landing and Impact Research (LANDIR) facility.

Credit: NASA Langley Research Center
 

Lift Weights, Improve Your Memory

 
‎02 ‎October ‎2014, ‏‎06:45:30 AMGo to full article
0 [ Read the Article: Lift Weights To Improve Your Memory ]

Here’s another reason why it’s a good idea to hit the gym: it can improve memory. A new Georgia Institute of Technology study shows that an intense workout of as little as 20 minutes can enhance episodic memory, also known as long-term memory for previous events, by about 10 percent in healthy young adults.

Credit: Georgia Institute of Technology
 

What's Up For October 2014

 
‎02 ‎October ‎2014, ‏‎06:30:09 AMGo to full article
0 What's Up for October? A lunar eclipse, a solar eclipse and Mars has a close encounter with a comet.

Credit: NASA Jet Propulsion Laboratory
 

Swift Catches Mega Flares From A Mini Star

 
‎02 ‎October ‎2014, ‏‎06:15:45 AMGo to full article
0 [ Read the Article: Superflares From A Nearby Red Dwarf Star Observed By NASA’s Swift Satellite ]

On April 23, NASA's Swift satellite detected the strongest, hottest, and longest-lasting sequence of stellar flares ever seen from a nearby red dwarf star. The initial blast from this record-setting series of explosions was as much as 10,000 times more powerful than the largest solar flare ever recorded.

At its peak, the flare reached temperatures of 360 million degrees Fahrenheit (200 million Celsius), more than 12 times hotter than the center of the sun.

The "superflare" came from one of the stars in a close binary system known as DG Canum Venaticorum, or DG CVn for short, located about 60 light-years away. Both stars are dim red dwarfs with masses and sizes about one-third of our sun's. They orbit each other at about three times Earth's average distance from the sun, which is too close for Swift to determine which star erupted.

At 5:07 p.m. EDT on April 23, the rising tide of X-rays from DG CVn's superflare triggered Swift's Burst Alert Telescope (BAT). Swift turned to observe the source in greater detail with other instruments and, at the same time, notified astronomers around the globe that a powerful outburst was in progress.

For about three minutes after the BAT trigger, the superflare's X-ray brightness was greater than the combined luminosity of both stars at all wavelengths under normal conditions.

The largest solar explosions are classified as extraordinary, or X class, solar flares based on their X-ray emission. The biggest flare ever seen from the sun occurred in November 2003 and is rated as X 45. But if the flare on DG CVn were viewed from a planet the same distance as Earth is from the sun and measured the same way, it would have been ranked 10,000 times greater, at about X 100,000.

How can a star just a third the size of the sun produce such a giant eruption? The key factor is its rapid spin, a crucial ingredient for amplifying magnetic fields. The flaring star in DG CVn rotates in under a day, about 30 or more times faster than our sun. The sun also rotated much faster in its youth and may well have produced superflares of its own, but, fortunately for us, it no longer appears capable of doing so.

Credit: NASA Goddard Space Flight Center
 

Close-Up View Of The Open Cluster Messier 11

 
‎01 ‎October ‎2014, ‏‎11:15:49 AMGo to full article
0 This video gives a close-up view of an image of the open cluster Messier 11 as seen with the Wide Field Imager (WFI) on the MPG/ESO 2.2-meter telescope at the La Silla Observatory. The blue stars in the center of the image are the young, hot stars of the cluster. The surrounding redder stars are older, cooler background stars.

Credit: ESO. Music: movetwo

> More Information...
 

Zooming In On The Open Cluster Messier 11

 
‎01 ‎October ‎2014, ‏‎11:10:34 AMGo to full article
0 This video takes you on a journey to the open cluster Messier 11 as seen with the Wide Field Imager (WFI) on the MPG/ESO 2.2-meter telescope at the La Silla Observatory.

Credit: ESO/N. Risinger (skysurvey.org)/J. Bohanon. Music: movetwo

> More Information...
 

What Can Earwax Say About You?

 
‎01 ‎October ‎2014, ‏‎07:00:58 AMGo to full article
0 Chemists from the Monell Chemical Senses Center in Philadelphia found that your earwax can tell a lot about you—for instance...where you came from. Their research showed that earwax substances varied between individuals of East Asian origin and Caucasians. Their previous work found that underarm body odors convey a lot of info about a person, like identity and health issues, and now they think earwax can too. They analyzed the release of volatile organic compounds from earwax samples taken from males of both East Asian and Caucasian descent. They found that 12 VOCs were present in all of the men, but that the Caucasians possessed greater amounts of 11 of 12 VOCs than East Asians. They said, “In essence, we could obtain information about a person’s ethnicity simply by looking in his ears.”

[ Read the Article: Earwax Substance Can Help Determine A Person’s Ethnic Origin ]
 

What's The New Buzz On Saving Honeybees?

 
‎01 ‎October ‎2014, ‏‎06:45:35 AMGo to full article
0 Researchers at CSIRO are fitting tiny sensors onto honeybees in Australia to try to understand the drivers behind Colony Collapse Disorder. CCD is a growing problem amongst honeybee populations, but these sensors will help scientists monitor the bees’ pollination and productivity on farms. The tiny little insects play a big role, providing free pollination services for agriculture that various crops rely on. They're nature’s farmhand if you will. Get this—around one-third of the food we eat relies on pollination. But CCD is wiping out honeybees. The researchers are also going to look at the impacts of agricultural pesticides on the honeybees. The tiny sensors work sort of like vehicle tags. Each time the bee passes a checkpoint, information is sent to a central location where researchers use the sensor signals to build a comprehensive 3D model.

[ Read the Article: Swarm Sensing Project To Monitor Australian Honey Bees Using Tiny Sensors ]
 

Investigating The Martian Atmosphere

 
‎01 ‎October ‎2014, ‏‎06:15:53 AMGo to full article
0 The Martian surface bears ample evidence of flowing water in its youth, from crater lakes and riverbeds to minerals that only form in water. But today Mars is cold and dry, and scientists think that the loss of Mars' water may have been caused by the loss of its early atmosphere. NASA's Mars Atmosphere and Volatile EvolutioN mission, or MAVEN, will be the first spacecraft devoted to studying the Red Planet's upper atmosphere, in an effort to understand how the Martian climate has changed over time.

Credit: NASA Goddard Space Flight Center

> Explore further...
 

Chefs Move To Schools

 
‎01 ‎October ‎2014, ‏‎06:00:57 AMGo to full article
0 On May 2nd, 2013, 12 schools welcomed local chefs into their cafeterias for the inaugural Chefs Move to Dallas ISD event. Chefs Move to Schools is an integral part of First Lady Michelle Obama's Lets Move! Campaign. The program encourages chefs and schools to create partnerships in their communities with the mission of collaboratively educating students about food and healthy eating in an effort to end the childhood obesity epidemic within a generation. In Dallas, the program allows the chance for local chefs to educate students, staff, administrators and school food service employees about their passion for food and how it's the key to a healthy lifestyle.

Credit: Dallas Independent School District

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Carbon Fiber The Next Level Of 3D Printing

 
‎30 ‎September ‎2014, ‏‎07:00:22 AMGo to full article
0 A startup called MarkForged is taking 3D printers to the next level using carbon fiber. Why? Because carbon fiber is stronger, that’s why. They wanted to overcome the strength limitations of other 3D printed materials that have been created. The MarkForged website says that “now you can print parts, tooling, and fixtures with a higher strength-to-weight ratio than 6061-T6 Aluminum. Now that’s pretty strong.

[ Read the Article: Carbon Fiber Becomes The Next Medium For 3D Printing ]
 

Curiosity Rover Report: A Taste Of Mount Sharp (Sept. 25, 2014)

 
‎30 ‎September ‎2014, ‏‎06:45:28 AMGo to full article
0 NASA's Curiosity Mars rover has collected its first drill sample from the base of Mount Sharp. The scientific allure of the layered mountain inside a crater drew the team to choose this part Mars as its landing site.

Credit: NASA Jet Propulsion Laboratory

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The Rochester Cloak (Of Invisibility)

 
‎30 ‎September ‎2014, ‏‎06:30:42 AMGo to full article
0 Inspired perhaps by Harry Potter’s invisibility cloak, scientists have recently developed several ways—some simple and some involving new technologies—to hide objects from view. The latest effort, developed at the University of Rochester, not only overcomes some of the limitations of previous devices, but it uses inexpensive, readily available materials in a novel configuration.

Credit: University of Rochester

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Alaska Mountain Glaciers Retreating Due To Climate Change

 
‎30 ‎September ‎2014, ‏‎06:15:10 AMGo to full article
0 Tighten your seat belt! This runway is made of ice. Welcome to Ruth Glacier, deep inside Alaska’s Denali National Park and Preserve. Some of the visitors are here for recreational activities, such as backcountry skiing, but this is no vacation for University of Maine paleoclimatologist Karl Kreutz and his team. For them, time on the ice is all part of the job.

With support from the National Science Foundation, the scientists are working to reconstruct the climate history of this area over the last thousand years. They’re researching the relationship between the temperatures and precipitation rates, and the response of glaciers in this area to climate changes.

In 2013, the team drilled ice cores high atop Denali’s Mount Hunter. By carefully analyzing ice layers inside the cores, the team is developing a record of temperature change in the Alaska Range over the last millennium. While the vast majority of glacier ice on our planet lies in Greenland and Antarctica, Kreutz says the glaciers in Alaska could also make a significant contribution to global sea level rise in the coming decades.

Credit: National Science Foundation
 

A Giant Among Earth Satellites

 
‎30 ‎September ‎2014, ‏‎06:00:57 AMGo to full article
0 The weekend launch of ISS-RapidScat onboard SpaceX-4 has kickstarted a new era for the International Space Station as a giant Earth-observing satellite.

Credit: NASA

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Efficient Solar To Hydrogen Conversion

 
‎26 ‎September ‎2014, ‏‎11:38:07 AMGo to full article
0 Science published on Sept. 25, 2014 the latest developments in Michael Grätzel's laboratory at EPFL in the field of hydrogen production from water. By combining a pair of perovskite solar cells and low price electrodes without using rare metals, scientists have obtained a 12.3% conversion efficiency from solar energy to hydrogen, a record with earth-abundant materials. Jingshan Luo, post-doctoral researcher, explains how.

Credit: EPFL
 

ENLIL Model Of March 5, 2013 CME

 
‎26 ‎September ‎2014, ‏‎11:13:03 AMGo to full article
0 Space weather models combined with real time observations help scientists track CMEs. These images were produced from a model known as ENLIL named after the Sumerian storm god. It shows the journey of a CME on March 5, 2013, as it moved toward Mars.

Credit: NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center Scientific Visualization Studio, the Space Weather Research Center (SWRC) and the Community-Coordinated Modeling Center (CCMC)
 

Expedition 41 Docks To International Space Station

 
‎26 ‎September ‎2014, ‏‎11:09:13 AMGo to full article
0 After launching in their Soyuz TMA-14M spacecraft from the Baikonur Cosmodrome in Kazakhstan, Expedition 41/42 Soyuz Commander Alexander Samokutyaev and Flight Engineers Elena Serova of the Russian Federal Space Agency (Roscosmos) and Barry Wilmore of NASA arrived at the International Space Station on Sept. 26, Kazakh time, following a six-hour rendezvous. They docked their craft to the Poisk module on the Russian segment of the complex. Once aboard the orbital outpost, the trio will start a 5 ½ month mission.

Credit: NASA

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Earth From Space: Athens On The Radar

 
‎26 ‎September ‎2014, ‏‎11:05:12 AMGo to full article
0 Earth from Space is presented by Kelsea Brennan-Wessels from the ESA Web-TV virtual studios. Explore this Sentinel-1 image of Greece’s Attica peninsula in the one-hundred-seventeenth edition.

Credit: ESA
 

Do Selfies Spread Lice?

 
‎26 ‎September ‎2014, ‏‎07:00:54 AMGo to full article
0 When you’re capturing a selfie, you might be capturing a little something extra. That’s according to one expert at a lice-treatment center in California who says that there has been a big increase in lice incidents in young people due in part to the rising popularity of the selfie. Lice is spread from head-to-head contact, they don’t just jump from one head to another. But put your heads together, and you’re bridging the divide for the little critters. Of the teens treated for lice, all admitted they were taking selfies every day. So when there’s more than one person in a selfie, is it still technically considered a selfie?

[ Read the Article: Claim That Teen Selfies Cause Head Lice Epidemic May Be Nonsense ]
 

New Technique For Studying Out-Of-This-World Particles

 
‎26 ‎September ‎2014, ‏‎06:45:04 AMGo to full article
0 Earth is constantly blasted with dust from comets and asteroids. Researchers at NASA say that, despite their small size, these dust particles “may have provided higher quantities and steadier supply of extraterrestrial organic material to early Earth” than meteorite impacts. But their extremely small size has kept them from being studied heavily. Scientists at NASA’s Goddard Astrobiology Analytical Laboratory used a nanoflow liquid chromatography instrument to sort the molecules, then applied nanoelectrospray ionization to identify the molecules based on their mass. They said they “are pioneering the application of these techniques for the study of meteorite organics.” They also said that these techniques and any others they develop will be beneficial to future sample return missions, such as ones to Mars, where sample size will be limited.

[ Read the Article: New Techniques Tease Out Building Blocks Of Life In Meteorites ]
 

NASA Issues "Space Tool Challenge" For Future Engineers

 
‎26 ‎September ‎2014, ‏‎06:00:24 AMGo to full article
0 NASA in conjunction with the American Society of Mechanical Engineers Foundation, has issued a series of "Future Engineers" 3D Space Challenges for students focused on solving real-world space exploration problems. Students will become the creators and innovators of tomorrow by using 3D modeling software to submit their designs and have the opportunity for their design to be printed on the first 3D printer aboard the International Space Station. The winning student will watch from NASA’s Payload Operations Center with the mission control team as the item is printed in space.

Credit: NASA Future Engineers

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Panning Across DDO 68

 
‎25 ‎September ‎2014, ‏‎11:30:55 AMGo to full article
0 This video pans over NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope observations of dwarf galaxy DDO 68.

This ragged collection of stars and gas clouds looks at first glance like a recently-formed galaxy in our own cosmic neighborhood. But, is it really as young as it looks?

Credit: NASA, ESA
Acknowledgement: A. Aloisi (Space Telescope Science Institute)

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Zooming In On Dwarf Galaxy DDO 68

 
‎25 ‎September ‎2014, ‏‎11:20:12 AMGo to full article
0 This video begins with a ground based view of the night sky, before zooming in on dwarf galaxy DDO 68 as the NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope sees it.

This ragged collection of stars and gas clouds looks at first glance like a recently-formed galaxy in our own cosmic neighborhood. But, is it really as young as it looks?

Credit: NASA, ESA, Digitized Sky Survey 2, N. Risinger (Skysurvey.org)
Acknowledgement: A. Aloisi (Space Telescope Science Institute)

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Zoom Into HAT-P-11

 
‎25 ‎September ‎2014, ‏‎07:00:52 AMGo to full article
0 This video shows a zoom from a ground-based image of the region surrounding HAT-P-11, to a close up of the star taken with the NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope.

Not visible here is a Neptune-sized planet named HAT-P-11b, which orbits the star. Astronomers have discovered clear skies and steamy water vapor on the planet. It is the smallest planet ever for which water vapour has been detected.

The small bright object next to the star is not the planet in question; in fact it is not a planet at all, but another star.

Credit: NASA, ESA, J. Fraine

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Many Views Of A Massive CME

 
‎25 ‎September ‎2014, ‏‎06:45:04 AMGo to full article
0 On July 23, 2012, a massive cloud of solar material erupted off the sun's right side, zooming out into space. It soon passed one of NASA's Solar Terrestrial Relations Observatory, or STEREO, spacecraft, which clocked the CME as traveling between 1,800 and 2,200 miles per second as it left the sun. This was the fastest CME ever observed by STEREO.

Two other observatories – NASA's Solar Dynamics Observatory and the joint European Space Agency/NASA Solar and Heliospheric Observatory -- witnessed the eruption as well. The July 2012 CME didn't move toward Earth, but watching an unusually strong CME like this gives scientists an opportunity to observe how these events originate and travel through space.

STEREO's unique viewpoint from the sides of the sun combined with the other two observatories watching from closer to Earth helped scientists create models of the entire July 2012 event. They learned that an earlier, smaller CME helped clear the path for the larger event, thus contributing to its unusual speed.

Such data helps advance our understanding of what causes CMEs and improves modeling of similar CMEs that could be Earth-directed.

Credit: NASA Goddard Space Flight Center

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Penn State Research Team Creates "Diamond Nanothreads"

 
‎25 ‎September ‎2014, ‏‎06:30:22 AMGo to full article
0 John Badding, professor of chemistry at Penn State University, leads a research team that has discovered how to produce super-strong, super-thin "diamond nanothreads" that promise extraordinary properties such as strength and stiffness higher than that of carbon nanotubes or conventional high-strength polymers. A paper describing this discovery will be published in the 21 September 2014 issue of the journal Nature Materials.

Credit: Penn State University

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Space Scoop: The Butterfly Hunter

 
‎25 ‎September ‎2014, ‏‎06:15:08 AMGo to full article
0 Astronomers using Chandra X-ray Observatory have set out on a hunt, to look at as many planetary nebulae as they can.

Credit: NASA
 

Robots On Way To Help Astronauts Work, Explore And Live In Space

 
‎24 ‎September ‎2014, ‏‎05:43:39 PMGo to full article
0 The Human Exploration Telerobotics project, managed by NASA's Ames Research Center in Moffett Field, California, is developing and testing robots to improve the way humans live and work in space. Some of the project's robots have human-like "hands" and "legs" while others have wheels or are small, free-flying satellites. All have the potential to help astronauts reduce the amount of time they spend on routine maintenance tasks; to safely and quickly make repairs outside the spacecraft; or to remotely explore and work on a planet or asteroid's surface.

Credit: NASA Marshall Space Flight Center

 

 

RedOrbit Videos Science

 
 

NASA's Earth Minute: Earth Has A Fever

 
‎03 ‎October ‎2014, ‏‎06:45:24 AMGo to full article
0 Earth's average temperature has risen over 1º F in the past century. It is projected to rise an additional 3º and 10º over the next 100 years. Data from NASA's global network of satellites, airborne missions and surface monitoring systems is used to build climate models that help us understand the causes & effects of global warming. Credit: NASA
 

Helping Babies Learn Language Skills

 
‎03 ‎October ‎2014, ‏‎06:15:59 AMGo to full article
0 Research shows that a new game developed in the Infancy Studies Lab at Rutgers University-Newark helps babies develop the skills needed to learn language. The work could prove especially helpful for babies who come from families with a history of language impairment. Credit: Rutgers University [ Read the Article: Improving Babies’ Language Skills Before They’re Even Old Enough To Speak ]
 

What Can Earwax Say About You?

 
‎01 ‎October ‎2014, ‏‎07:00:58 AMGo to full article
0 Chemists from the Monell Chemical Senses Center in Philadelphia found that your earwax can tell a lot about you—for instance...where you came from. Their research showed that earwax substances varied between individuals of East Asian origin and Caucasians. Their previous work found that underarm body odors convey a lot of info about a person, like identity and health issues, and now they think earwax can too. They analyzed the release of volatile organic compounds from earwax samples taken from males of both East Asian and Caucasian descent. They found that 12 VOCs were present in all of the men, but that the Caucasians possessed greater amounts of 11 of 12 VOCs than East Asians. They said, “In essence, we could obtain information about a person’s ethnicity simply by looking in his ears.” [ Read the Article: Earwax Substance Can Help Determine A Person’s Ethnic Origin ]
 

What's The New Buzz On Saving Honeybees?

 
‎01 ‎October ‎2014, ‏‎06:45:35 AMGo to full article
0 Researchers at CSIRO are fitting tiny sensors onto honeybees in Australia to try to understand the drivers behind Colony Collapse Disorder. CCD is a growing problem amongst honeybee populations, but these sensors will help scientists monitor the bees’ pollination and productivity on farms. The tiny little insects play a big role, providing free pollination services for agriculture that various crops rely on. They're nature’s farmhand if you will. Get this—around one-third of the food we eat relies on pollination. But CCD is wiping out honeybees. The researchers are also going to look at the impacts of agricultural pesticides on the honeybees. The tiny sensors work sort of like vehicle tags. Each time the bee passes a checkpoint, information is sent to a central location where researchers use the sensor signals to build a comprehensive 3D model. [ Read the Article: Swarm Sensing Project To Monitor Australian Honey Bees Using Tiny Sensors ]
 

Alaska Mountain Glaciers Retreating Due To Climate Change

 
‎30 ‎September ‎2014, ‏‎06:15:10 AMGo to full article
0 Tighten your seat belt! This runway is made of ice. Welcome to Ruth Glacier, deep inside Alaska’s Denali National Park and Preserve. Some of the visitors are here for recreational activities, such as backcountry skiing, but this is no vacation for University of Maine paleoclimatologist Karl Kreutz and his team. For them, time on the ice is all part of the job. With support from the National Science Foundation, the scientists are working to reconstruct the climate history of this area over the last thousand years. They’re researching the relationship between the temperatures and precipitation rates, and the response of glaciers in this area to climate changes. In 2013, the team drilled ice cores high atop Denali’s Mount Hunter. By carefully analyzing ice layers inside the cores, the team is developing a record of temperature change in the Alaska Range over the last millennium. While the vast majority of glacier ice on our planet lies in Greenland and Antarctica, Kreutz says the glaciers in Alaska could also make a significant contribution to global sea level rise in the coming decades. Credit: National Science Foundation
 

Efficient Solar To Hydrogen Conversion

 
‎29 ‎September ‎2014, ‏‎06:15:07 AMGo to full article
0 Science published on Sept. 25, 2014 the latest developments in Michael Grätzel's laboratory at EPFL in the field of hydrogen production from water. By combining a pair of perovskite solar cells and low price electrodes without using rare metals, scientists have obtained a 12.3% conversion efficiency from solar energy to hydrogen, a record with earth-abundant materials. Jingshan Luo, post-doctoral researcher, explains how. Credit: EPFL > More Information...
 

Do Selfies Spread Lice?

 
‎26 ‎September ‎2014, ‏‎07:00:54 AMGo to full article
0 When you’re capturing a selfie, you might be capturing a little something extra. That’s according to one expert at a lice-treatment center in California who says that there has been a big increase in lice incidents in young people due in part to the rising popularity of the selfie. Lice is spread from head-to-head contact, they don’t just jump from one head to another. But put your heads together, and you’re bridging the divide for the little critters. Of the teens treated for lice, all admitted they were taking selfies every day. So when there’s more than one person in a selfie, is it still technically considered a selfie? [ Read the Article: Claim That Teen Selfies Cause Head Lice Epidemic May Be Nonsense ]
 

Penn State Research Team Creates "Diamond Nanothreads"

 
‎25 ‎September ‎2014, ‏‎06:30:22 AMGo to full article
0 John Badding, professor of chemistry at Penn State University, leads a research team that has discovered how to produce super-strong, super-thin "diamond nanothreads" that promise extraordinary properties such as strength and stiffness higher than that of carbon nanotubes or conventional high-strength polymers. A paper describing this discovery will be published in the 21 September 2014 issue of the journal Nature Materials. Credit: Penn State University > More Information...
 

Arctic Sea Ice, Summer 2014

 
‎23 ‎September ‎2014, ‏‎09:38:35 AMGo to full article
0 An animation of daily Arctic sea ice extent in summer 2014, from March 21, 2014 to Sept. 17, 2014 – when the ice appeared to reach it’s minimum extent for the year. It’s the sixth lowest minimum sea ice extent in the satellite era. The data was provided by the Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency from their GCOM-W1 satellite’s AMSR2 instrument. Credit: NASA
 

Brain Training - Does It Really Work?

 
‎23 ‎September ‎2014, ‏‎07:00:43 AMGo to full article
0 A new study from the University of Oregon says that those brain training programs work, but there’s a catch. These games do enhance performance for the particular task involved in the game, but that advantage doesn’t necessarily carry over to other cognitive abilities. The team looked specifically at inhibitory control. There were two groups, an experimental group that was trained in inhibitory control and a control group that performed another task that did not affect inhibitory control. The researchers found performance improvement in the training group but not in the control group, though it was relatively small. And since the focus was solely on inhibitory control, they were unable to conclude whether or not improvement extended further than that to other executive functions of the brain. Researchers say they hope the revealing study will lead to the design of better prevention tools to promote mental health. [ Read the Article: Do Brain Training Programs Really Make You Smarter? ]
 

Science Showdown Over Spider Silk

 
‎22 ‎September ‎2014, ‏‎07:00:42 AMGo to full article
0 There’s a show down of sorts in the science community. In one corner we have Iowa State University saying that spider silk conducts heat as well as metal. In the other corner, the Challenger University of the Basque Country in Spain, says that just not so. Last year, we reported a finding from Iowa State University saying that spider silk was as good of a heat conductor as metal. Now, physicists from the University of the Basque Country say that they were not able to repeat those findings. Basque Country is bringing Iowa State’s findings into question. The Basque team found that the thermal diffusivity of the spider silk was about 300 times smaller than the Iowa study. They said this is because spider silk is formed of amino acid chains, which are poor conductors of heat. Iowa State, are you gonna answer back? [ Read the Article: Spider Silk Not Great Heat Conductor, Despite 2012 Study’s Findings ]
 

Science Nation - Rising CO2 Levels Make Forests Work Overtime

 
‎22 ‎September ‎2014, ‏‎06:30:46 AMGo to full article
0 You might never know it, but the seemingly quiet Harvard Forest in Massachusetts is actually hard at work. Like other forests, it's busy doing some serious global housekeeping, which is being monitored by scientists at Harvard University. "There's this enormous sucking sound, metaphorically speaking, that is happening across the New England landscape and the eastern US. It's the carbon being brought down out of the atmosphere, into our forests, which is reducing the amount that is up in the atmosphere," says David Foster, who is director of the Harvard Forest, which stretches for 3,000 acres, near Petersham, Massachusetts, about 60 miles west of Boston. With support from the National Science Foundation, Foster and other researchers here study forest ecology. "We're trying to understand what shaped the land, where the landscape is going, and what's going to be the fate of the land in the eastern United States," he explains. That research includes determining how the forest responds to carbon dioxide in the atmosphere. Credit: National Science Foundation
 

Wildfires Heated Up The Early Earth

 
‎19 ‎September ‎2014, ‏‎07:00:06 AMGo to full article
0 New research from Yale University found that wildfires contributed to Earth’s scorching ancient climate of three million years ago. The team used a NASA model to simulate Earth’s ecosystem emissions and atmospheric composition of the Pliocene and pre-industrial eras. They determined that forests and smoke from wildfires released volatile compounds into the atmosphere causing more global warming than atmospheric levels of carbon dioxide. And since deforestation didn’t exist then, well, obviously there were no humans and a lot of trees to burn. These compounds altered Earth’s radiation balance which resulted in two to three times the warming of carbon dioxide, making a much hotter climate, even though carbon dioxide levels are about the same as today. So in conclusion, trees are typically good for climate change, but as with anything - too much of a good thing can be bad. [ Read the Article: Wildfires Could Help Explain A Warm Ancient Earth ]
 

Science Minute: Dr. Elizabeth Hobson

 
‎19 ‎September ‎2014, ‏‎06:45:25 AMGo to full article
0 In this Science Minute from the National Institute for Mathematical and Biological Synthesis (NIMBioS), Dr.Elizabeth Hobson explains what monk parakeets can teach us about complex sociality. Credit: National Institute for Mathematical and Biological Synthesis > Explore further...
 

Optimism In Dogs

 
‎19 ‎September ‎2014, ‏‎06:30:51 AMGo to full article
0 Dogs generally seem to be cheerful, happy-go-lucky characters, so you might expect that most would have an optimistic outlook on life. Credit: University of Sydney > Explore further...
 

Recruiting Bacteria To Be Technology Innovation Partners

 
‎19 ‎September ‎2014, ‏‎06:15:46 AMGo to full article
0 In this video, Wyss Institute Core Faculty member Neel Joshi and Postdoctoral Fellow Peter Nguyen describe how their protein engineering system called BIND (Biofilm-Integrated Nanofiber Display) could redefine biofilms as large-scale production platforms for biomaterials with functionality not currently possible with existing materials. An animation depicts how it works on a molecular level. Credit: Harvard's Wyss Institute > Explore further...
 

Dormant Volcanoes Can Quickly Become Active

 
‎19 ‎September ‎2014, ‏‎06:00:33 AMGo to full article
0 A dormant volcano can quickly become active again according to new research by UC Davis and Oregon State University. They may now have new information that will lead to new eruption forecasting. Looking at Mount Hood in Oregon they found that the magma located about three miles below the surface has been near-solid for thousands of years. However, they also found that it takes a very short period - as little as a few months - for the magma to liquefy. This can happen if magma from closer to the Earth’s crust rises and warms the solid magma or even if temperatures rise just slightly. They likened the near-solid magma to peanut butter in a jar in the fridge - it’s not really going anywhere. While they say Mount Hood has liquid magma only about 10% of the time, meaning it is mostly dormant, researchers say that the presence of liquid magma at all means there’s an eruption in the forecast. [ Read the Article: Mount Hood Study Suggests Dormant Volcanoes Quickly Become Active ]
 

Can Sad Music Cure The Blues?

 
‎18 ‎September ‎2014, ‏‎07:00:12 AMGo to full article
0 “Beautiful but sad music” can help cure a case of the blues, according to psychologists at the universities of Kent and Limerick. The researchers wanted to know why we choose to listen to certain music when we are sad. They had participants recall a negative emotional event in their lives and what sad music they had listened to following the event. They found that the sad people’s motives to choosing music they perceived as ‘sad,’ wasn’t to enhance their mood. Instead, the music participants identified as ‘beautiful’ was what ultimately enhanced their mood. [ Read the Article: Beautiful, Sad Music Can Really Make The Blues Go Away: Study ]
 

Making Saharan Air Apparent

 
‎18 ‎September ‎2014, ‏‎06:30:29 AMGo to full article
0 NASA's Cloud Physics Lidar (CPL) instrument, flying aboard an unmanned Global Hawk aircraft in this summer's Hurricane and Severe Storm Sentinel or HS3 mission, is studying the changing profile of the atmosphere in detail to learn more about how hurricanes form and strengthen. Credit: NASA Goddard Space Flight Center > More information...
 

More Bad News For Bees

 
‎18 ‎September ‎2014, ‏‎06:15:12 AMGo to full article
0 Diseases that are common in managed honeybee colonies are now widespread in the UK’s wild bumblebees say researchers from the Royal Holloway University of London. As we’ve talked about often, wild and managed bee populations globally are in major decline, which is bad for pollination. So we’ve got to figure out why. These researchers suggest that the spread of disease from managed bees to wild bees might be a major culprit. They found that wild bumblebees are also falling prey a common killer of honeybees - the deformed wing virus - and they think the honeybees are responsible for spreading the parasite. Infected bees leave behind a fungal spore or virus particle on a flower, and there you go, the virus spreads. Researchers say that there needs to be policies created to protect, not just the managed honeybees, but wild bees as well. [ Read the Article: Managed Honeybees Infecting Wild Bumblebees With Disease ]
 

Science Nation - How Did Life On Earth Begin?

 
‎16 ‎September ‎2014, ‏‎06:15:15 AMGo to full article
0 It's one of the most profound questions of all--how did life on Earth begin? With support from the National Science Foundation (NSF) and National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA), Georgia Tech biochemist Nicholas Hud and a team at the Center for Chemical Evolution (CCE) are working to chip away at the question. They are homing in on how chain-like chemicals called polymers first came together and evolved 3.5 to 4 billion years ago. Hud says the researchers are working on the premise that the molecules that gave rise to the first polymers of life, such as RNA and DNA, started when small molecules began interacting with each other and forming ordered structures. In other words, they assembled themselves. So far, none of the labs working on chemical evolution has been able to coax actual RNA to self-assemble from the set of molecules that make up RNA in present day life. But, Hud and his team have identified a couple of molecules that make a structure that almost looks like RNA. The CCE is co-funded by the NASA Astrobiology program and the NSF Centers for Chemical Innovation (CCI) program. The NSF-funded centers are focused on major, long-term fundamental chemical research challenges. CCIs are producing transformative research that is leading to innovation and attracting broad scientific and public interest. Credit: National Science Foundation
 

Jellyfish Swarms And Environmental Change

 
‎16 ‎September ‎2014, ‏‎06:00:13 AMGo to full article
0 Jellyfish swarms in the Gulf of Mexico help researchers identify environmental changes in the water. Dr. Monty Graham at the University of Southern Mississippi studies these massive jellyfish swarms that can stretch for up to 100 miles. Credit: National Science Foundation
 

NASA Radar Data Reveals Fault Movement From Napa Quake

 
‎15 ‎September ‎2014, ‏‎06:30:13 AMGo to full article
0 An airborne radar survey in the Napa Valley area of Northern California conducted by NASA scientists has revealed clear indications of fault-line displacements near the epicenter of the 6.0-magnitude Napa Valley earthquake that occurred Aug. 24, 2014. Results from a sophisticated radar system developed by NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory in Pasadena, California, showed distinct lines that reflect slippage along multiple strands of the fault when compared with radar imagery taken over the area three months earlier. Credit: NASA Armstrong Flight Research Center > Explore Further...
 

UM Research Reveals Secrets Of Animal Weapons

 
‎12 ‎September ‎2014, ‏‎06:00:08 AMGo to full article
0 From antlers to horns, humans have long been fascinated by animals’ ability to defend themselves with their natural-born weapons. But until now, no studies have directly tested whether those weapons perform better at the animals’ own style of fighting than they would using the fighting style of another species. Researchers at the University of Montana recently discovered each species’ weapons are structurally adapted to meet their own functional demands of fighting. The groundbreaking research, conducted over the past year by UM doctoral student Erin McCullough and designed with the help of UM researchers Doug Emlen and Bret Tobalske, is published in the journal Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences. Credit: University of Montana > Explore Further...
 

RapidScat: NASA's Newest Wind Watcher

 
‎11 ‎September ‎2014, ‏‎06:30:34 AMGo to full article
0 Mission scientists and engineers describe how their small team, on a tight budget and short deadline, created the ISS-RapidScat instrument to gather high-priority measurements of ocean winds from a berth on the International Space Station. Credit: NASA Jet Propulsion Laboratory
 

Science Nation - Plum Island Estuary: Studying How Marshes Respond To Sea-Level Rise

 
‎11 ‎September ‎2014, ‏‎06:15:31 AMGo to full article
0 At the Plum Island Sound estuary in northeastern Massachusetts, the marsh floods like clockwork. At high tide, you can pass over the mudflats into the grass in a boat. At low tide, the ocean waters recede, leaving behind fresh deposits of nutrient-rich food for the birds and other wildlife, including juvenile game fish, such as Striped bass. It’s an ecosystem that is at once both hardy and fragile. The estuary is part of the Plum Island Ecosystems LTER, and LTER stands for “Long Term Ecological Research.” The LTER Network was created by the National Science Foundation (NSF) in 1980 to conduct research on ecological issues that can last decades and span huge geographical areas. The Plum Island Ecosystems LTER was established in 1998, and like other LTER sites, this one is focused on the long view, and the research is expected to continue for a generation or more. Biogeochemist Anne Giblin, of the Marine Biological Laboratory, is leading a team of researchers who are studying the Plum Island salt marshes to determine how this two thousand year old ecosystem is holding up under climate change, land use changes, and sea level rise. “The Plum Island Estuary LTER has given us some valuable insights about how marsh systems will respond to future climate and environmental changes,” says David Garrison, a program director in the NSF Directorate for Geosciences. “These findings would have not been possible without the funding commitment to collect long term observations.” The Plum Island Estuary LTER is co-funded by the NSF Directorates for Geosciences and Biological Sciences. Credit: National Science Foundation > Explore Further...
 

Capillary Flow Experiments On Space Station

 
‎10 ‎September ‎2014, ‏‎05:02:23 PMGo to full article
0 Capillary Flow Experiments on the International Space Station are fluid physics experiments that investigate capillary flows and flows of fluids in containers with complex geometries. Results will improve current computer models that are used by designers of fluid systems on Earth and may improve fluid transfer systems on future spacecraft. Credit: NASA
 

Researchers Discover New Species Of Dinosaur In Tanzania

 
‎10 ‎September ‎2014, ‏‎07:00:29 AMGo to full article
0 NSF-funded paleontologists at Ohio University have discovered a new species of titanosaurian dinosaur in Tanzania. It was discovered embedded in a cliff wall in the Rukwa Rift Basin of Southwestern Tanzania. Only four have been unearthed in African, making this a rare find. Credit: National Science Foundation > More Information...
 

Bacteria From Bees Possible Alternative To Antibiotics

 
‎10 ‎September ‎2014, ‏‎06:45:10 AMGo to full article
0 13 lactic acid bacteria found in the honey stomach of bees have shown promising results in a series of studies at Lund University in Sweden. Credit: Lund University > More Information...
 

What Do People Really Think About DNA Research?

 
‎09 ‎September ‎2014, ‏‎07:00:18 AMGo to full article
0 Here’s a question for you: “Which comes closer to your opinion about scientific research on human, plant and animal DNA? A. I worry that this research poses unforeseen dangers? B. I’m excited that this research could lead to major scientific breakthroughs. C. Both of these. D. Neither. or E. Not sure?” Well, according to a new Huffington Post Poll that posed this question, seventy-one percent said they were “B” excited but showed some concern in their responses to some of the other questions. When it came to cloning, fifty-five percent said they were against the idea. And when it came to designer DNA babies, they really didn’t go for it with 72% disapproving of such efforts. Gattica anybody? And when asked if they felt that scientists were “playing God” by tinkering with DNA in such ways, thirty-five percent said they were very worried about that possibility. [ Read the Article: Americans Excited Over DNA Breakthroughs, But Many Worry About The Implications: Poll ]
 

A New Measure Of Ocean Winds

 
‎09 ‎September ‎2014, ‏‎06:45:53 AMGo to full article
0 A new tool for tracking hurricanes and tropical storms, ISS-RapidScat is the first instrument specifically created to watch Earth from the International Space Station. In the station's unique orbit, it will collect the first data ever on how ocean winds change throughout the day in different parts of the world -- vital knowledge for honing the accuracy of all satellite wind measurements. Credit: NASA Jet Propulsion Laboratory
 

Classroom Decorations Disrupt Attention And Learning In Young Children

 
‎09 ‎September ‎2014, ‏‎06:30:57 AMGo to full article
0 [ Read the Article: Too Many Decorations In A Classroom Can Disrupt Attention And Learning In Young Children ] Maps, number lines, shapes, artwork and other materials tend to cover elementary classroom walls. However, new research from Carnegie Mellon University shows that too much of a good thing may end up disrupting attention and learning in young children. Published in Psychological Science, Carnegie Mellon's Anna V. Fisher, Karrie E. Godwin and Howard Seltman looked at whether classroom displays affected children's ability to maintain focus during instruction and to learn the lesson content. They found that children in highly decorated classrooms were more distracted, spent more time off-task and demonstrated smaller learning gains than when the decorations were removed. Credit: Carnegie Mellon University
 

Decoding Brown Tide

 
‎09 ‎September ‎2014, ‏‎06:15:37 AMGo to full article
0 A new study by researchers at Columbia University’s Lamont-Doherty Earth Observatory and Stony Brook University highlights up close the survival skills that have made Aureococcus, or 'Brown Tide' algae, the bane of fishermen, boaters and real-estate agents. Credit: Lamont-Doherty Earth Observatory > More Information...
 

Science Nation - Damaging Volcanic Ash Stays Well Beyond Welcome

 
‎08 ‎September ‎2014, ‏‎06:45:10 AMGo to full article
0 Volcanic ash can become a multimillion-dollar nightmare, lingering in the skies, getting into engines and damaging aircraft. Volcanic ash is known to present hazards to aviation, infrastructure, agriculture, and human and animal health. With the emergence of aviation in the last 50 years as a key component of global travel and transport, the importance of understanding how long ash is suspended in the atmosphere, and how far it is transported has taken on greater importance. Airborne ash abrades the exteriors of aircraft, enters modern jet engines and melts while coating the interior parts, thus causing damage and failure. For example, the 2010 Eyjafjallajökull eruption in Iceland was the most disruptive event in aviation history, with billions of dollars of losses to the aviation industry and global economy. Much of this was unnecessary and better knowledge of the transport of fine ash could minimize such losses in the future. However, present understanding of ash transportation can only account for general air movements, but cannot fully address how much or how long ash remains in the atmosphere, and how much falls out as the ash travels downwind. With support from the National Science Foundation (NSF), volcanologist Dork Sahagian of Lehigh University in Bethlehem, Pa., and his colleagues are learning more about the aerodynamic properties of ash, and how long different sizes and shapes stay in the atmosphere. They use a wind tunnel to study how ash travels in the atmosphere during and after volcanic eruptions. The researchers want to develop ways to predict when and for how long damaging ash will fill the skies, and when it's safe to fly again. Credit: National Science Foundation
 

Earth From Space: Lake Chad

 
‎08 ‎September ‎2014, ‏‎06:30:01 AMGo to full article
0 Earth from Space is presented by Kelsea Brennan-Wessels from the ESA Web-TV virtual studios. In the one-hundred-fifteenth edition, discover this important water source for over 60 million people in Chad, Cameroon, Niger and Nigeria. Credit: ESA
 

ScienceCasts: Mystery In The Ozone Layer

 
‎08 ‎September ‎2014, ‏‎06:15:48 AMGo to full article
0 Almost 30 years after the Montreal Protocol put the brakes on ozone-depleting chemicals, one compound remains stubbornly and mysteriously abundant in the atmosphere. NASA scientists are tracking down the source and studying its effect on the ozone layer. Credit: NASA > More Information...
 

Scanning A Snow Storm

 
‎08 ‎September ‎2014, ‏‎06:00:32 AMGo to full article
0 On March 17, 2014 the Global Precipitation Measurement (GPM) mission's Core Observatory flew over the East coast's last snow storm of the 2013-2014 winter season. This was also one of the first major snow storms observed by GPM shortly after it was launched on February 27, 2014. The GPM Core Observatory carries two instruments that show the location and intensity of rain and snow, which defines a crucial part of the storm structure - and how it will behave. The GPM Microwave Imager sees through the tops of clouds to observe how much and where precipitation occurs, and the Dual-frequency Precipitation Radar observes precise details of precipitation in 3-dimensions. For forecasters, GPM's microwave and radar data are part of the toolbox of satellite data, including other low Earth orbit and geostationary satellites, that they use to monitor tropical cyclones and hurricanes. Credit: NASA Goddard Space Flight Center > More Information...
 

Cockroach Mystery - Old World Or New World?

 
‎05 ‎September ‎2014, ‏‎07:00:21 AMGo to full article
0 After a 49-million-year hiatus, a cockroach has reappeared in North America. This particular cockroach had been thought to be solely Old World and had a long-standing fossil record in Europe. However, new evidence reveals its origins may be rooted in the New World. Four ancient species of this cockroach were found in Baltic amber deposits in Colorado’s Green River Formation. Researchers aren’t sure why this particular cockroach became extinct in the New World but thrived in the Old World. [ Read the Article: An Old World Cockroach Species May Have Originated In North America ]
 

Dreadnoughtus: A New Dinosaur Discovery

 
‎05 ‎September ‎2014, ‏‎06:30:15 AMGo to full article
0 Drexel University professor Ken Lacovara has recently unveiled a new supermassive dinosaur species he discovered and unearthed with his team between 2005 and 2009. Weighing in at nearly 65 tons, Dreadnoughtus schrani is the largest land animal ever found of calculable mass and also by far one of the most complete skeletons ever found for a dinosaur in this mass range! Credit: Drexel University > More Information...
 

The Data Downpour From The GPM Constellation Of Satellites

 
‎05 ‎September ‎2014, ‏‎06:15:26 AMGo to full article
0 A video describing how the GPM constellation turns observed radiances and reflectivities of global precipitation into data products. Credit: NASA Goddard Space Flight Center

 

 

Beyond Perception - DVD

by Chuck Missler  

 

 

DVD

PRICE R 159.00

 

Media Type: DVD
Published 20-Sep-2010
Published by Koinonia House
KHID#: DVD84
Why do scientists now believe we live in a 10-dimensional universe?

Has physics finally reached the very boundaries of reality?

There seems to be evidence to suggest that our world and everything in it are only ghostly images; projections from a level of reality so beyond our own that the real reality is literally beyond both space and time. The main architect of this astonishing idea is one of the world's most eminent thinkers- physicist David Bohm, a protege of Einstein's. Earlier, he noticed that, in plasmas, particles stopped behaving like individuals and started behaving as if they were part of a larger and inter connected whole. He continued his work in the behavior of oceans of these particles, noting their behaving as if they know what each on the untold trillions of individual particles were doing.

This briefing pack DVD comes with:
-two mp3 audio files
-one notes file in pdf format

This DVD includes notes in PDF format and MP3 files.

Encoding: This DVD will be viewable in other countries WITH the proper DVD player and television set.
Format: Color, Fullscreen
Aspect Ratio: 4:3
Audio Encoding: Dolby Digital 2.0 stereo
Run Time: 2 hour(s)
Number of discs: 1


 
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Genetics Research Confirms Biblical Timeline

Exciting research from the summer of 2012 described DNA variation in the protein coding regions of the human genome linked to population growth. One of the investigation's conclusions was that the human genome began to rapidly diversify not more than 5,000 years ago.1,2 This observation closely agrees with a biblical timeline of post-flood human diversification. Yet another study, this one published in the journal Nature, accessed even more extensive data and unintentionally confirmed the recent human history described in Genesis.3

Differences in human DNA can be characterized across populations and ethnic groups using a variety of techniques. One of the most informative genetic technologies in this regard is the analysis of rare DNA variation in the protein coding regions of the genome. Variability in these regions is less frequent than the more numerous genetic differences that occur in the non-coding regulatory regions. Researchers can statistically combine this information with demographic data derived from population growth across the world to generate time scales related to human genetic diversification.4

What makes this type of research unique is that evolutionary scientists typically incorporate hypothetical deep time scales taken from the authority of paleontologists or other similar deep-time scenarios to calibrate models of genetic change over time. Demographics-based studies using observed world population dynamics do not rely on this bias and are therefore more accurate and realistic.

In a 2012 Science report, geneticists analyzed DNA sequences of 15,585 protein-coding gene regions in the human genome for 1,351 European Americans and 1,088 African Americans for rare DNA variation.1,2 This new study accessed rare coding variation in 15,336 genes from over 6,500 humans—almost three times the amount of data compared to the first study.3 A separate group of researchers performed the new study.

The Nature results convey a second spectacular confirmation of the amazingly biblical conclusions from the first study. These scientists confirmed that the human genome began to rapidly diversify not more than 5,000 years ago. In addition, they found significant levels of  variation to be associated with degradation of the human genome, not forward evolutionary progress. This fits closely with research performed by Cornell University geneticist John Sanford who demonstrated through biologically realistic population genetic modeling that genomes actually devolve over time in a process called genetic entropy.5

According to the Bible, the pre-flood world population was reduced to Noah's three sons and their wives, creating a genetic bottleneck from which all humans descended. Immediately following the global flood event, we would expect to see a rapid diversification continuing up to the present. According to Scripture, this began not more than 5,000 years ago. We would also expect the human genome to devolve or degrade as it accumulates irreversible genetic errors over time. Now, two secular research papers confirm these biblical predictions.

References

  1. Tomkins, J. 2012. Human DNA Variation Linked to Biblical Event Timeline. Creation Science Update. Posted on icr.org July 23, 2012, accessed December 31, 2012.
  2. Tennessen, J. et al. 2012. Evolution and Functional Impact of Rare Coding Variation from Deep Sequencing of Human Exomes. Science. 337 (6090): 64-69.
  3. Fu, W, et al. Analysis of 6,515 exomes reveals the recent origin of most human protein-coding variants. Nature. Published online before print, July 13, 2012.
  4. Keinan, A and A. Clark. 2012. Recent Explosive Human Population Growth Has Resulted in an Excess of Rare Genetic Variants. Science. 336 (6082): 740-743.
  5. Sanford, J. C. 2008. Genetic Entropy and the Mystery of the Genome, 3rd ed. Waterloo, NY: FMS Publications.

* Dr. Tomkins is a Research Associate and received his Ph.D. in Genetics from Clemson University.

 

 

Ciliate Genome Reveals Mind-Bending Complexity

 
‎10 ‎September ‎2014, ‏‎10:00:00 AMGo to full article

Certain types of fungi can be parasitic to both plants and animals. Two new studies show that this has developed, in part, by a loss of genetic information—not a gain as predicted by evolution.

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New Giant Dinosaur from Argentina

 
‎08 ‎September ‎2014, ‏‎10:00:00 AMGo to full article

Scientists described a new and remarkable fossil skeleton of a giant titanosaur, a group that includes the largest creatures ever to have lived on land. Because this specimen is nearly 45 percent complete, it gives more details than any other fossil of its kind, as well as some details that confirm the biblical creation model.

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Fungal Parasitism Marked by Gene Loss, Not Gain

 
‎05 ‎September ‎2014, ‏‎10:00:00 AMGo to full article

Certain types of fungi can be parasitic to both plants and animals. Two new studies show that this has developed, in part, by a loss of genetic information—not a gain as predicted by evolution.

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Decoding Snake-Venom Origins

 
‎03 ‎September ‎2014, ‏‎10:00:00 AMGo to full article

The origin of snake venom has long been a mystery to both creationists and evolutionists. However, by stepping outside the standard research paradigm, scientists recently showed that snake venom proteins may have arisen from existing salivary proteins, supporting the idea that they arose post-Fall through modification of existing features.

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Darwin's Finches: Answers From Epigenetics

 
‎29 ‎August ‎2014, ‏‎10:00:00 AMGo to full article

Authentic speciation is a process whereby organisms diversify within the boundaries of their gene pools, and this can result in variants with specific ecological adaptability. While it was once thought that this process was strictly facilitated by DNA sequence variability, Darwin's classic example of speciation in finches now includes a surprisingly strong epigenetic component as well.

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Octopus Skin Inspires High-Tech Camouflage Fabric

 
‎27 ‎August ‎2014, ‏‎10:00:00 AMGo to full article

An octopus can change the color of its skin at will to mimic any kind of surrounding. It actively camouflages itself with astoundingly complicated biological machinery. Wouldn't it be great if, say, a soldier's uniform or an armored vehicle used similar technology?

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New Finds Reveal Fully-Human Neandertal

 
‎25 ‎August ‎2014, ‏‎10:00:00 AMGo to full article

The case for Neandertals as more primitive members of an evolutionary continuum that spans from apes to modern man continues to weaken. Genetic and archaeological finds are completely reshaping modern concepts of Neandertal men and women.

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There's More to the Story

 
‎22 ‎August ‎2014, ‏‎10:00:00 AMGo to full article

The Dallas Morning News recently reported that a group of Ph.D. scientists is swimming upstream against the scientific community. Instead of believing in millions of years of evolution, the team at the Institute for Creation Research dares to suggest that science confirms biblical creation's view of a world only thousands of years old. And there's more to the story.

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What Is 'Real Scientific Research'?

 
‎20 ‎August ‎2014, ‏‎10:00:00 AMGo to full article

A recent article in The Dallas Morning News and a follow-up NBC interview presented some history and touched on the tenets of the Institute for Creation Research. Both news reports sparked inquiries from readers and viewers. For example, some are now asking, "What defines credible scientific research?"

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DNA Was Created as a Reservoir for the Information of Life

 
‎18 ‎August ‎2014, ‏‎10:00:00 AMGo to full article

Secular scientists claimed in the 1970s that chimp genomes are 98% similar to humans, and it was apparently verified by more modern techniques. But that estimate actually used isolated segments of DNA that we already share with chimps—not the whole genomes. The latest comparison that included all of the two species’ DNA revealed a huge difference from the percentage scientists have been claiming for years.

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ICR Featured in The Dallas Morning News

 
‎15 ‎August ‎2014, ‏‎10:00:00 AMGo to full article

The Institute for Creation Research was featured on the front page of the August 15, 2014, edition of The Dallas Morning News in an article that contrasts the evolutionary story with young-earth creationism.

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Christian Band Rejects Literal Genesis

 
‎15 ‎August ‎2014, ‏‎10:00:00 AMGo to full article

Respected guitarist and talented Christian songwriter Michael Gungor has recently made the news—not with his music, but with his outspoken rejection of a historical Genesis. Gungor cited science and reason for his position on Noah's Ark. How reasonable are his reasons?

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European Spacecraft's Comet Close-up a World First

 
‎13 ‎August ‎2014, ‏‎10:00:00 AMGo to full article

After a ten-year-long flight, the European Space Agency's (ESA) Rosetta spacecraft entered into orbit around a comet. It will soon attempt to actually land a probe on the comet's surface. Though data-gathering has only just begun, the comet is already divulging secrets.

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Does Dinosaur Extinction Encourage Faith?

 
‎11 ‎August ‎2014, ‏‎10:00:00 AMGo to full article

Many professors at private religious universities cling to secular views of the past despite the clear anti-Christian consequences. Theological inferences from a recent study on dinosaur extinction illustrate this dilemma.

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Solar System Geysers—Each a Fountain of Youth

 
‎08 ‎August ‎2014, ‏‎10:00:00 AMGo to full article

Detailed inspection of a Saturn moon now shows not just one, but 101 geysers shooting ice particles into space. If these geysers formed billions of years ago they should be old, cold, and dead—that is, completely inactive. Why aren’t they?

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Solar-Powered Sea Slug Illuminates Evolutionary Weaknesses

 
‎06 ‎August ‎2014, ‏‎10:00:00 AMGo to full article

In an everyday scene so bizarre that science fiction writers might never have imagined it, algae-eating sea slugs actually hijack chloroplasts—those tiny plant structures that perform photosynthesis—and use them as energy producers for themselves. Evolutionists have been trying to explain this complicated and baffling process. Have they?

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Zombie Ant Origins Mystify

 
‎04 ‎August ‎2014, ‏‎10:00:00 AMGo to full article

A fungus turns ants into zombies. Roundworms brainwash insects, forcing them to commit suicide by drowning in order to complete the worm's life cycle. These parasites' complicated life cycles and surgically-precise host interactions leave virtually no doubt that they were intentionally fashioned. But how, when and why could God's originally "very good" creation accommodate such morbid features?

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Four-Winged Dinosaur Definition Doesn't Fly

 
‎30 ‎July ‎2014, ‏‎10:00:00 AMGo to full article

An international team of scientists discovered a new fossil in Chinese sediments famous for their supposed feathered dinosaur specimens. Like a handful of previous finds, this new example apparently had four wings. Fossil impressions show flight feathers extending not only from the front wings of Changyuraptor yangi, but also from a pair of hind wings, making this the largest four-winged creature yet found in fossils.

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Echolocation

 
‎28 ‎July ‎2014, ‏‎10:00:00 AMGo to full article

While bats live in air and dolphins live in water, both use a biological form of sonar technology called echolocation to see with sound! The specifications in dolphin and bat biosonar systems are so many, so well-integrated, and so precise, could they really have developed at random in two completely different environments?

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Fossilized Brain May Give Paleontologists Headache

 
‎25 ‎July ‎2014, ‏‎10:00:00 AMGo to full article

Who has ever heard of a fossilized brain? Few would expect such a discovery, yet it looks like that's what researchers found inside a Stone Age skull from Norway. If so, it would confirm a published creation prediction and challenge many evolutionary timescales.

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NASA's Far-Out Search for Life

 
‎23 ‎July ‎2014, ‏‎10:00:00 AMGo to full article

NASA promoters discussed the hope of discovering life on other planets at a recent meeting in NASA headquarters. Despite billions of dollars spent over the decades-long search and the fact that not one shred of distant life evidence has been found, NASA continues to suggest that life might really be out there and that its discovery is within reach.

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Circular Arguments Punch Holes in Triceratops Study

 
‎21 ‎July ‎2014, ‏‎10:00:00 AMGo to full article

The eleven-year Hell Creek Project involved collecting fossils from the famous Montana Hell Creek Formation, including over fifty Triceratops specimens. The latest report from the project, however, reveals three "logic holes" in its attempts to answer questions about when and how these dinosaurs evolved.

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Second Look Causes Scientist to Reverse Dino-Bird Claim

 
‎18 ‎July ‎2014, ‏‎10:00:00 AMGo to full article

Stephen Czerkas digs dinosaurs. His early advocacy for feathered dinosaurs makes his recent reversal that much more remarkable. His reexamination of a fossil—one that had been known as a feathered dinosaur—reveals the fruits of taking a closer look at spectacular claims.

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Do We Always Believe What Scientists Say?

 
‎16 ‎July ‎2014, ‏‎10:00:00 AMGo to full article

Many Americans are convinced that mainstream narratives are true—like humans descended from ape-like ancestors or that burning fossil fuels causes global warming. But many times large contingents totally disagree with these popular ideas. How can equally intelligent and educated people arrive at such opposing conclusions? Conventional thinkers often assume that those who diverge from mainstream narratives simply need more science education. However, a new study shows why some other factor must be to blame.

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Did Adam Really Live 930 Years?

 
‎14 ‎July ‎2014, ‏‎10:00:00 AMGo to full article

Genesis 5:5 says Adam lived for 930 years. Judging by today’s standards, this sounds impossible. Many contemporary readers of Genesis balk at such numbers and some end up rejecting the whole Bible. But a few researchers have found reasons to believe it.

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Oops! Evolutionists Disproving Evolution

 
‎11 ‎July ‎2014, ‏‎10:00:00 AMGo to full article

For protozoa-to-person evolution to have worked over time, purely natural factors must have conceived, constructed, integrated, and implemented new proteins into old organisms. Brave researchers—already convinced that this somehow occurred—have been investigating this core issue, but their recent discovery refutes their own perspective.

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Clever Clover: Evidence for Evolution?

 
‎09 ‎July ‎2014, ‏‎10:00:00 AMGo to full article

Plant biologists continue to frame interesting clover traits in terms of evolution. However, one clever clover trait in particular keeps showing up—or disappearing—in peculiar patterns. Do these patterns illustrate evolutionary changes or does something entirely different switch off this trait?

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Darwin's 'Special Difficulty' Solved?

 
‎07 ‎July ‎2014, ‏‎10:00:00 AMGo to full article

Darwin's hypothesis of evolution faced enormous scientific challenges from the very outset of its publication. Recently, a group of evolutionists, publishing in the journal Science, claimed to have simplified one of those challenges. Have they?

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Ceremony Becoming the Occasion

 
‎04 ‎July ‎2014, ‏‎10:00:00 AMGo to full article

This Fourth of July we celebrate our precious liberty as a country, but we should not forget the things from which we are truly free, and the Liberator who rescued us from them.

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Human Remains in Spain: Neandertal or Not?

 
‎02 ‎July ‎2014, ‏‎10:00:00 AMGo to full article

A famous fossil cave in Spain yielded human fossils from over two dozen ancient individuals. Investigators analyzed these human head bones and compared them with typical Neandertal skulls. Their findings, published in the journal Science, unwittingly support a biblical creation model for Neandertal origins.

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Oceans of Water Deep Beneath the Earth?

 
‎27 ‎June ‎2014, ‏‎10:00:00 AMGo to full article

We should not imagine subterranean oceans as depicted in Jules Verne’s classic novel Journey to the Center of the Earth, but scientists keep finding evidence for vast amounts of water far below the surface in the form of hydrated minerals. The newfound waters are causing quite a stir.

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Chimp DNA Mutation Study—Selective Yet Surprising

 
‎25 ‎June ‎2014, ‏‎10:00:00 AMGo to full article

A popular evolutionary belief is that humans and chimps shared a common ancestor 2 to 6 million years ago. Apparently, evolutionists still aren't too sure of their own theory: now they've more than doubled that timeline.

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Cyclostratigraphy: Another Round of Circular Reasoning?

 
‎23 ‎June ‎2014, ‏‎10:00:00 AMGo to full article

Secular scientists believe that fossils and rock layers correspond to multi-million-year time scales, but nowhere does the Bible refer to that supposed "deep time." Do these old ages come from genuine observations, or are they somehow maintained as fact no matter what the data show?

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Powerhouse of Scientists Refute Evolution, Part Three

 
‎20 ‎June ‎2014, ‏‎10:00:00 AMGo to full article

The information of life is in a state of gradual decay, not upward evolution, according to at least eight technical papers published in the proceedings of a unique symposium called Biological Information: New Perspectives.

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Human Proteome 'More Complex than Previously Thought'

 
‎18 ‎June ‎2014, ‏‎10:00:00 AMGo to full article

Once again the oft-repeated phrase "More complex than previously thought" has been used to describe new research cataloguing thousands of proteins produced from the human genome. Will a Designer ever be considered?

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Powerhouse of Scientists Refute Evolution, Part Two

 
‎16 ‎June ‎2014, ‏‎10:00:00 AMGo to full article

What does it take to make a language? Researchers recently asked this question of the language encoded inside cells. Whatever it takes to make a human language must have happened to make the information-packed language of life, right?

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Powerhouse of Scientists Refute Evolution, Part One

 
‎13 ‎June ‎2014, ‏‎10:00:00 AMGo to full article

Life science textbooks have long taught that Neo-Darwinism explains how single cells evolved into sentient scientists, but not all scientists agree. Do they disagree because of a blind adherence to religion that opposes Darwinian science, or because they have examined the issues and found the science lacking?

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Comb Jelly Genome Gums Up Evolution

 
‎11 ‎June ‎2014, ‏‎10:00:00 AMGo to full article

Comb jellies look like disco balls with flashing lights that dance and spin as they float around the ocean. These creatures are so fascinating that one neuroscientist likened them to "aliens who've come to earth."

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Brainwashing Children to 'Suppress' Design Intuition

 
‎09 ‎June ‎2014, ‏‎10:00:00 AMGo to full article

The Wall Street Journal is praising psychological interventions on kindergarteners that demonstrate how repeated picture-stories can train them to suppress their intelligent design inferences about the world with natural selection…and this may be permanent.

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'Smoking Gun' Proof of Big Bang Already In Doubt

 
‎06 ‎June ‎2014, ‏‎10:00:00 AMGo to full article

In March 2014, a team of radio astronomers announced purported direct evidence for inflation, an important part of the Big Bang model. But only two months after this “discovery” a number of secular scientists have become increasingly skeptical.

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Saturn's Magnetic Field Auroras: Evidence for Creation

 
‎04 ‎June ‎2014, ‏‎10:00:00 AMGo to full article

New evidence confirms that, like Earth, Saturn's magnetic field helps create its own auroras. This space spectacle attracts a more fundamental question about where its magnetic field came from in the first place.

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Antarctica Rising: Uplift Rate Suppresses Conventional Geology

 
‎30 ‎May ‎2014, ‏‎10:00:00 AMGo to full article

New results show that the continental crust underlying Antarctica is rising rapidly as parts of its massive ice sheet have been melting away. This unexpected bounce might help better position the timing of similar effects that occurred in northern North America near the close of the Ice Age.

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'Simple and Elegant' Insect Design Showcases Creation

 
‎28 ‎May ‎2014, ‏‎10:00:00 AMGo to full article

Symbiosis in tiny creatures very clearly showcases divine creation. How could two unrelated creatures come to fully depend on one another unless they were intentionally crafted that way from the beginning? Otherwise, they would die while waiting for a perfect partner to evolve.

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Transhumanism is an international intellectual and cultural movement supporting the use of science and technology to improve human mental and physical characteristics and capacities.

by Dr. Martin Erdmann


The human species can, if it wishes, transcend itself. We need a name for this new belief. Perhaps transhumanism will serve: man remaining man, but transcending himself, by realizing new possibilities of and for his human nature.
Julian Huxley
1st director of the United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization (UNESCO) (wrote nearly fifty years ago)
Transhumanism is a word that is beginning to bubble to the top of our prophetic studies and horizon. Simply described, transhumanism is an international intellectual and cultural movement supporting the use of science and technology to improve human mental and physical characteristics and capacities - in essence, to create a "posthuman" society.
This is not a passing fad. Transhumanist programs are sponsored in institutions such as Oxford, Standford, and Caltech. Sponsorships come from organizations such as Ford, Apple, Intel, Xerox, Sun Microsystems, and others. DARPA, Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency, a technical department within the U.S. Department of Defense is also involved in transhumanist projects.
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The Origins of Information: Exploring and Explaining Biological Information


 

In the 21st century, the information age has finally come to biology. We now know that biology at its root is comprised of information rich systems, such as the complex digital code encoded in DNA. Groundbreaking discoveries of the past decade are revealing the information bearing properties of biological systems.

Dr. Stephen C. Meyer, a Cambridge trained philosopher of science is examining and explaining the amazing depth of digital technology found in each and every living cell such as nested coding, digital processing, distributive retrieval and storage systems, and genomic operating systems.

Meyer is developing a more fundamental argument for intelligent design that is based not on a single feature like the bacterial flagellum, but rather on a pervasive feature of all living systems. Alongside matter and energy, Dr. Meyer shows that there is a third fundamental entity in the universe needed for life: information.

 

http://www.stephencmeyer.org/

Got Science? Genesis 1 and Evidence

 

 

 
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Many scientists say complex life just randomly happened.
Primordial soup + lightning strike = Bingo! Is there any shred of scientific evidence that life was CREATED as Genesis 1 claims? Dr. Stephen Meyer, author of SIGNATURE IN THE CELL, says not a shred. Rather, a ton. Learn good reasoning techniques here.
 
08 June 2012, 08:09:11 PM
 

Intelligent Design is not Creationism

 
08 June 2012, 08:09:11 PM | Robert CrowtherGo to full article

This article was originally published in the Daily Telegraph (UK) on January 29. Original Article In 2004, the distinguished philosopher Antony Flew of the University of Reading made worldwide news when he repudiated a lifelong commitment to atheism and affirmed the reality of some kind of a creator. Flew cited evidence of intelligent design in DNA and the arguments of "American [intelligent] design theorists" as important reasons for this shift. Since then, British readers have learnt about the theory of intelligent design (ID) mainly from media reports about United States court battles over the legality of teaching students about it. According to most reports, ID is a "faith-based" alternative to evolution based solely on religion. But is this accurate? As one of the architects of the theory, I know it isn't. Contrary to media reports, ID is not a religious-based idea, but an evidence-based scientific theory about life's origins. According to Darwinian biologists such as Oxford University's Richard Dawkins, living systems "give the appearance of having been designed for a purpose". But, for modern Darwinists, that appearance of design is illusory, because the purely undirected process of natural selection acting on random mutations is entirely sufficient to produce the intricate designed-like structures found in living organisms. By contrast, ID holds that there are tell-tale features of living systems and the universe that are best explained by a designing intelligence. The theory does not challenge the idea of evolution defined as change over time, or even common ancestry, but it disputes Darwin's idea that the cause of biological change is wholly blind and undirected. What signs of intelligence do design advocates see? In recent years, biologists have discovered an exquisite world of nanotechnology within living cells - complex circuits, sliding clamps, energy-generating turbines and miniature machines. For example, bacterial cells are propelled by rotary engines called flagellar motors that rotate at 100,000rpm. These engines look like they were designed by engineers, with many distinct mechanical parts (made of proteins), including rotors, stators, O-rings, bushings, U-joints and drive shafts. The biochemist Michael Behe points out that the flagellar motor depends on the co-ordinated function of 30 protein parts. Remove one of these proteins and the rotary motor doesn't work. The motor is, in Behe's words, "irreducibly complex". This creates a problem for the Darwinian mechanism. Natural selection preserves or "selects" functional advantages as they arise by random mutation. Yet the flagellar motor does not function unless all its 30 parts are present. Thus, natural selection can "select" the motor once it has arisen as a functioning whole, but it cannot produce the motor in a step-by-step Darwinian fashion. Natural selection purportedly builds complex systems from simpler structures by preserving a series of intermediates, each of which must perform some function. With the flagellar motor, most of the critical intermediate structures perform no function for selection to preserve. This leaves the origin of the flagellar motor unexplained by the mechanism - natural selection - that Darwin specifically proposed to replace the design hypothesis. Is there a better explanation? Based on our uniform experience, we know of only one type of cause that produces irreducibly complex systems: intelligence. Whenever we encounter complex systems - whether integrated circuits or internal combustion engines - and we know how they arose, invariably a designing intelligence played a role. Consider an even more fundamental argument for design. In 1953, when Watson and Crick elucidated the structure of the DNA molecule, they made a startling discovery. Strings of precisely sequenced chemicals called nucleotides in DNA store and transmit the assembly instructions - the information - in a four-character digital code for building the protein molecules the cell needs to survive. Crick then developed his "sequence hypothesis", in which the chemical bases in DNA function like letters in a written language or symbols in a computer code. As Dawkins has noted, "the machine code of the genes is uncannily computer-like". The informational features of the cell at least appear designed. Yet, to date, no theory of undirected chemical evolution has explained the origin of the digital information needed to build the first living cell. Why? There is simply too much information in the cell to be explained by chance alone. The information in DNA (and RNA) has also been shown to defy explanation by forces of chemical necessity. Saying otherwise would be like saying a headline arose as the result of chemical attraction between ink and paper. Clearly, something else is at work. DNA functions like a software program. We know from experience that software comes from programmers. We know that information - whether, say, in hieroglyphics or radio signals - always arises from an intelligent source. As the pioneering information theorist Henry Quastler observed: "Information habitually arises from conscious activity." So the discovery of digital information in DNA provides strong grounds for inferring that intelligence played a causal role in its origin. Thus, ID is not based on religion, but on scientific discoveries and our experience of cause and effect, the basis of all scientific reasoning about the past. Unlike creationism, ID is an inference from biological data. Even so, ID may provide support for theistic belief. But that is not grounds for dismissing it. Those who do confuse the evidence for the theory with its possible implications. Many astrophysicists initially rejected the Big Bang theory because it seemed to point to the need for a transcendent cause of matter, space and time. But science eventually accepted it because the evidence strongly supported it. Today, a similar prejudice confronts ID. Nevertheless, this new theory must also be evaluated on the basis of the evidence, not philosophical preferences. As Professor Flew advises: "We must follow the evidence, wherever it leads." Stephen C Meyer edited 'Darwinism, Design and Public Education' (Michigan State University Press). He has a PhD in philosophy of science from Cambridge University and is a senior fellow at the Discovery Institute in Seattle.

 

09 December 2011, 11:13:24 PM

New Research Supports Meyer's Discussion of Pre-Biotic Chemistry in Signature in the Cell

 
09 December 2011, 11:13:24 PM | Andrew McDiarmidGo to full article
A recent Nature publication reports a new technique for measuring the oxygen levels in Earth's atmosphere some 4.4 billion years ago. The authors found that by studying cerium oxidation states in zircon, a compound formed from volcanic magma, they could ascertain the oxidation levels in the early earth. Their findings suggest that the early Earth's oxygen levels were very close to current levels. This research supports Dr. Meyer's discussion in Signature in the Cell. On pgs. 224-226 of Ch. 10: Beyond the Reach of Chance, Meyer states that when Stanley Miller conducted his famous 1953 experiment simulating early Earth's atmosphere, he "assumed that the earth's atmosphere contained virtually no free oxygen." Meyer reveals that new geochemical evidence showed that the assumptions Miller had made about the early atmosphere were incorrect. This new research is additional confirmation that oxygen was present in significant quantities. Because oxygen quenches organic reactions necessary to produce essential building blocks of life, the ability of inorganic materials to produce organic life, as chemical evolutionary theory assumes, is not possible. Read the complete article at ENV.

 

Dr. Meyer Debates Signature in the Cell Arguments with Keith Fox on Premier Radio UK

24 November 2011, 12:37:19 AM | Andrew McDiarmidGo to full article
During a recent visit to London, Dr. Stephen Meyer debated Keith Fox on Premier Radio UK's "Unbelievable" program. Fox is a professor of biochemistry at Southampton University and Chair of the UK's Christians in Science network. Two years after its publication, Meyer's Signature in the Cell continues to make an impact with its powerful argument for design in DNA. In this lively conversation, Meyer and Fox discuss origins of life and the design inference in science.

 

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