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This page is dedicated to My Grandson Brandon.

(Branstein)

***IN STOCK***
 HOLOGRAPHIC

UNIVERSE

by Chuck Missler

DVD

PRICE R 159.00

 

 

 

 

This DVD includes notes in PDF format and M4A files.


This briefing pack contains 2 hours of teachings

Available in the following formats

Session 1

• Epistemology 101: How do we “know”?

– Scientific Myths of the Past

– Scientific Myths of the Present

• The Macrocosm: The Plasma Universe: Gravitational Presumption?

• The Microcosm: The Planck Wall

• The Metacosm: Fracture of Hyperspace?

Session 2


• The Holographic Model: David Bohm

• GEO 600 “Noise”

• The Black Hole Paradox

– String Theorists examine the elephant

• A Holographic Universe:

– Distances are synthetic (virtual) images

– A Geocentric Cosmology?

– Some Scriptural Perspective(s)

 

 

“One can’t believe impossible things,”

Alice laughed.

“I daresay you haven’t had much practice,”

said the Queen.

“When I was your age, I always did it for

half-an-hour a day.

Why, sometimes I’ve believed as many

as six impossible things before breakfast.”

Through the Looking Glass

Lewis Carroll (Charles Lutwidge Dodgson)
 

DVD:

1 Disc
2 M4A Files
Color, Fullscreen 16:9, Dolby Digital 2.0 stereo, Region  This DVD will be viewable in other countries WITH the proper DVD player and television set.)
 

M4A File Video

Can be burned to disc and played on MP4 compatible DVD players.
Playable on iPod, iPhone, iPod Touch
Playable on any MP4 player
1 PDF Notes File
2 MP3 Files


 

 

 

 

 

 

Featured Briefing

A Holographic Universe?

by Dr. Chuck Missler

Are we actually living in a holographic universe? Are the distant galaxies only a virtual illusion? In a hologram, distances are synthetic! How does this impact our concepts of time and space?

There seems to be growing evidence to suggest that our world and everything in it may be only ghostly images, projections from a level of reality so beyond our own that the real reality is literally beyond both space and time.1

The Cosmos As a Super-Hologram?

An initiating architect of this astonishing idea was one of the world’s most eminent thinkers: University of London physicist David Bohm, a protégé of Einstein’s and one of the world’s most respected quantum physicists. Bohm’s work in plasma physics in the 1950s is considered a landmark. Earlier, at the Lawrence Radiation Laboratory, he noticed that in plasmas (ionized gases) the particles stopped behaving as individuals and started behaving as if they were part of a larger and interconnected whole. Moving to Princeton University in 1947, there, too, he continued his work in the behavior of oceans of ionized particles, noting their highly organized overall effects and their behavior, as if they knew what each of the untold trillions of individual particles was doing.

One of the implications of Bohm’s view has to do with the nature of location. Bohm’s interpretation of quantum physics indicated that at the subquantum level location ceased to exist. All points in space become equal to all other points in space, and it was meaningless to speak of anything as being separate from anything else. Physicists call this property “nonlocality”. The web of subatomic particles that compose our physical universe—the very fabric of “reality” itself—possesses what appears to be an undeniable “holographic” property. Paul Davis of the University of Newcastle upon Tyne, England, observed that since all particles are continually interacting and separating, “the nonlocal aspects of quantum systems is therefore a general property of nature.”2

The Nature of Reality

One of Bohm’s most startling suggestions was that the tangible reality of our everyday lives is really a kind of illusion, like a holographic image. Underlying it is a deeper order of existence, a vast and more primary level of reality that gives birth to all the objects and appearances of our physical world in much the same way that a piece of holographic film gives birth to a hologram. Bohm calls this deeper level of reality the implicate (“enfolded”) order and he refers to our level of existence the explicate (unfolded) order.3 This view is not inconsistent with the Biblical presentation of the physical (“explicate”) world as being subordinate to the spiritual (“implicate”) world as the superior reality.4

The Search for Gravity Waves

Gravitational waves are extremely small ripples in the structure of spacetime caused by astrophysical events like supernovae or coalescing massive binaries (neutron stars, black holes). They had been predicted by Albert Einstein in 1916, but not yet directly observed.

GEO 600 is a gravitational wave detector located near Sarstedt, Germany, which seeks to detect gravitational waves by means of a laser interferometer of 600 meter arms’ length. This instrument, and its sister interferometric detectors, are some of the most sensitive gravitational wave detectors ever designed. They are designed to detect relative changes in distance of the order of 10-21, about the size of a single atom compared to the distance from the Earth to the Sun! Construction on the project began in 1995.

Mystery Noise

On January 15, 2009, it was reported in New Scientist that some yet unidentified noise that was present in the GEO 600 detector measurements might be because the instrument is sensitive to extremely small quantum fluctuations of space-time affecting the positions of parts of the detector. This claim was made by Craig Hogan, a scientist from Fermilab, on the basis of his theory of how such fluctuations should occur motivated by the holographic principle.5 Apparently, the gravitational wave detector in Hannover may have detected evidence for a holographic Universe!

Gravitational Wave Observatories Join Forces

A number of major projects will now pool their data to analyze it, jointly boosting their chances of spotting a faint signal that might otherwise be hidden by detector noise. Using lasers, they measure the length between mirrored test masses hung inside tunnels at right angles to each other. Gravitational waves decrease the distance between the masses in one tunnel and increase it in the other by a tiny, but detectable amount. Combining the data will also make it possible to triangulate to find the source of any gravitational waves detected. These include: Laser Interferometer Gravitational Observatory based in Hanford, Washington and Livingston, Louisiana; Virgo Observatory, Pisa Italy; and, of course, the GEO 600 Observatory near Hanover, Germany.

The most ambitious of them is the Laser Interferometer Space Antenna (LISA), a joint mission between NASA and the European Space Agency to develop and operate a space-based gravitational wave detector sensitive at frequencies between 0.03 mHz and 0.1 Hz. LISA seeks to detect gravitational-wave induced strains in space-time by measuring changes of the separation between fiducial masses in three spacecraft 5 million kilometers apart.

Cosmic Implications

Are we actually living in a holographic universe? Are the distant galaxies only a virtual illusion? In a hologram, distances are synthetic! How does this impact our concepts of time and space?

It gets even worse: Could our universe be geocentric? The implications are too staggering to embrace. The holographic paradigm is still a developing concept and riddled with controversies. For decades, science has chosen to ignore evidences that do not fit their standard theories. However, the volume of evidence has now reached the point that denial is no longer a viable option.

Clearly, 20th-century science has discovered that our “macrocosm”—studies of largeness—is finite, not infinite. Our universe is finite and had a beginning, and that’s what has led to the “big bang” speculations. We also realize that gravity is dramatically eclipsed by electromagnetic considerations when dealing with galaxies, etc. The plasma physicists have been trying to tell astronomers that for decades but no one was listening.

What is even more shocking has been the discoveries in the “microcosm”—studies of smallness—that run up against the “Planck Wall” of the non-location of subatomic particles, and the many strange paradoxes of quantum physics. We now discover that we are in a virtual reality that is a digital, simulated environment. The bizarre realization that the “constants” of physics are changing indicates that our “reality” is “but a shadow of a larger reality,”6 and that’s what the Bible has maintained all along!7

The Bible is, of course, unique in that it has always presented a universe of more than three dimensions,8 and revealed a Creator that is transcendent over His creation. It is the only “holy book” that demonstrates these contemporary insights. It’s time for us to spend more time with the handbook that the Creator has handed to us. It is the ultimate adventure, indeed!

For background information on the Holographic Universe, see our briefing series, The Beyond Collection, available on DVD and other formats, in the Christmas catalog insert in this issue.


Notes

  1. We explore the limitations of the Macrocosm, the Microcosm, and the super-embracing “Metacosm” in our Beyond Series.
  2. Paul Davis, Superforce, Simon & Schuster, New York, 1948, p.48.
  3. This is reminiscent of the Red King’s dream in Through the Looking Glass, in which Alice finds herself in deep metaphysical waters when the Tweedle brothers defend the view that all material objects, including ourselves, are only “sorts of things” in the mind of God.
  4. 2 Corinthians 4:18.
  5. Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory (Fermilab), located just outside Batavia, Illinois, near Chicago, is a US Department of Energy national laboratory specializing in high-energy particle physics. (Craig Hogan was then put in charge…)
  6. Scientific American, June 2005, “The Inconstancy of Constants”.
  7. Hebrews 11:3; John 1:1-3; et al.
  8. Ephesians 3:18. Nachmonides, writing in the 13th century, concluded, from his studies of the Genesis texts, that our universe has ten dimensions, of which only four are directly “knowable”.
 
 
Space News from SpaceDaily.com
Space News From SpaceDaily.Com
 

Orion Parachute Test Hits No Snags

 
‎26 ‎June ‎2014, ‏‎06:15:08 PMGo to full article
Washington DC (SPX) Jun 26, 2014
NASA completed the most complex and flight-like test of the parachute system for the agency's Orion spacecraft on Wednesday. A test version of Orion touched down safely in the Arizona desert after being pulled out of a C-17 aircraft, 35,000 feet above the U.S. Army's Yuma Proving Ground. It was the first time some parachutes in the system had been tested at such a high altitude. Engi
 

Bringing back our spaceplane

 
‎26 ‎June ‎2014, ‏‎06:15:08 PMGo to full article
Paris (ESA) Jun 26, 2014
Yesterday, the ship and crew aiming to recover Europe's unmanned IXV spacecraft in November had a practice run off the coast of Tuscany, Italy. They retrieved a prototype of the suborbital IXV Intermediate eXperimental Vehicle, the same model flown last year in a splashdown test off the east coast of Sardinia. A crane dropped the two-tonne vehicle into the water for the crew to pract
 

Raytheon touts blimp-borne radar system

 
‎26 ‎June ‎2014, ‏‎06:15:08 PMGo to full article
Tewksbury, Mass. (UPI) Jun 25, 2013
Raytheon has announced its blimp-borne radar previously used for testing is now available for operational deployment as a strategic asset. The system is called JLENS - or Joint Land Attack Cruise Missile Defense Elevated Netted Sensor System - which is composed of an integrated radar system on two tethered, 80-yard aerostats. The aerostats fly at altitudes of 10,000 feet above
 

Ariane 5 launcher integration is on the horizon for ATV Georges Lemaitre

 
‎26 ‎June ‎2014, ‏‎06:15:08 PMGo to full article
Kourou, French Guiana (ESA) Jun 26, 2014
Europe's fifth, and final, Automated Transfer Vehicle (ATV) for servicing of the International Space Station is ready for integration on its Ariane 5 launcher as preparations continue for this Arianespace mission from the Spaceport in French Guiana during the second half of July. The ATV - named Georges Lemaitre after the Belgian physicist and father of the Big Bang theory - currently is l
 

Scientists say decaying dark matter might be responsible for x-ray emission

 
‎26 ‎June ‎2014, ‏‎06:15:08 PMGo to full article
Cambridge, Mass. (UPI) Jun 25, 2013
Dark matter is everywhere. According to astronomers, it makes up some 80 percent of all matter in the universe. But since it doesn't absorb or emit light, scientists have never seen dark matter. They don't even know what it is exactly. But a recent spike of x-rays originating from 70 different galaxy clusters has some scientists excited at the off chance it's a signal from decaying dark
 

SSTL announces the successful launch of KazEOSat-2

 
‎26 ‎June ‎2014, ‏‎06:15:08 PMGo to full article
Guildford, UK (SPX) Jun 26, 2014
Surrey Satellite Technology Ltd (SSTL) has announced the successful launch of KazEOSat-2, a medium resolution Earth observation satellite for the Republic of Kazakhstan. The spacecraft was launched into a 630km sun-synchronous orbit on board a DNEPR rocket from Yasny in Russia. Following confirmation of separation from the launch vehicle, the ground station at the newly built satellite ope
 

ADS unveils multi-satellite Direct Receiving Station for GeoNorth

 
‎26 ‎June ‎2014, ‏‎06:15:08 PMGo to full article
Fairbanks, AK (SPX) Jun 26, 2014
Airbus Defense and Space and its client GeoNorth have inaugurated the first commercially available multi-satellite Direct Receiving Station (DRS) in the world, set to give a host of new markets quick access to both high-resolution and very high-resolution optical and radar satellite imagery. The DRS in Fairbanks, Alaska, will give GeoNorth the unparalleled capability of priority tasking th
 

Spitzer Spies an Odd, Tiny Asteroid

 
‎26 ‎June ‎2014, ‏‎06:15:08 PMGo to full article
Pasadena CA (JPL) Jun 26, 2014
Astronomers using NASA's Spitzer Space Telescope have measured the size of an asteroid candidate for NASA's Asteroid Redirect Mission (ARM), a proposed spacecraft concept to capture either a small asteroid, or a boulder from an asteroid. The near-Earth asteroid, called 2011 MD, was found to be roughly 20 feet (6 meters) in size, and its structure appears to contain a lot of empty space, pe
 

Lockheed Martin To Build Next Two SBIRS Missile Defense Satellites

 
‎26 ‎June ‎2014, ‏‎06:15:08 PMGo to full article
Sunnyvale, CA (SPX) Jun 26, 2014
The U.S. Air Force awarded Lockheed Martin a $1.86 billion fixed-price contract to complete the production of the fifth and sixth Geosynchronous Earth Orbit (GEO) satellites, known as GEO-5 and GEO-6, for the Space Based Infrared System (SBIRS). SBIRS provides our nation continuous early warning of ballistic missile launches and other tactical intelligence. The Air Force awarded initial fu
 

NASA to Launch Carbon Observatory

 
‎26 ‎June ‎2014, ‏‎06:15:08 PMGo to full article
Huntsville AL (SPX) Jun 26, 2014
In the lexicon of climate change, one word appears more often than any other: "carbon." Carbon credits, carbon emissions, carbon sequestration.... These terms are on everyone's lips. The reason is carbon dioxide (CO2). According to the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change, CO2 is the most important driver of global warming. At approximately 400 parts per million, atmospheric carbon di
 

O3b Networks cluster takes form for Arianespace Soyuz launch

 
‎26 ‎June ‎2014, ‏‎06:15:08 PMGo to full article
Kourou, French Guiana (ESA) Jun 26, 2014
Payload integration is underway for the four O3b Networks connectivity satellites to be orbited by Arianespace on its next Soyuz mission, scheduled for liftoff on July 10 from the Spaceport in French Guiana. This integration involves a step-by-step installation of the spacecraft on a tube-shaped dispenser system, with the activity taking place inside the Spaceport's S5 payload preparation
 

NASA NOAA Water Vapor Animations Over Oceans

 
‎26 ‎June ‎2014, ‏‎06:15:08 PMGo to full article
Greenbelt, MD (SPX) Jun 26, 2014
Knowing where water vapor is in the atmosphere is one of many factors forecasters use to identify weather features. The NASA/NOAA GOES Project has now created two new types of animations based on satellite data that indicate where water vapor is moving over the Atlantic and Eastern Pacific oceans. Observations from the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration's Geostationary Operati
 

Gilat Utilizes Intelsat To Connect Schools And Communities In Colombia

 
‎26 ‎June ‎2014, ‏‎06:15:08 PMGo to full article
Petah Tikva, Israel
Gilat Satellite Networks Ltd. and Intelsat S.A. have jointly announced a multi-year, multi-transponder agreement under which Gilat Colombia will use Intelsat Ku-band capacity on Intelsat 907 at 332.5 East to support the Kioscos Vive Digital 2 (KVDII) project. KDVII provides connectivity to rural communities and schools in six regions within the framework of the Colombian Ministry's nationa
 

ADS launches Radar Constellation Challenge with HisdeSAT

 
‎26 ‎June ‎2014, ‏‎06:15:08 PMGo to full article
Madrid, Spain (SPX) Jun 26, 2014
Airbus Defence and Space, in partnership with HisdeSAT, has announced a Radar Constellation Challenge, in order to encourage the development of innovative application ideas using radar satellite imagery. The initiative is part of the Earth monitoring Copernicus Masters Competition, which aims to support the development of market-oriented applications based on Earth observation data.
 

High-tech hot air balloon floats to 120,000 feet

 
‎26 ‎June ‎2014, ‏‎06:15:08 PMGo to full article
Roswell, N.M. (UPI) Jun 24, 2013
Forget rockets or airplanes, World View Enterprises wants to take tourists to the edge of space and back via balloon - and they just may do so sooner rather than later. The company tested an early unmanned prototype last week, successfully floating a high-tech hot air balloon to 120,000 feet. Remote controllers then lowered the balloon back to 50,000 feet and released the main console
 

Spaceflight Deploys Dove Constellation From Dnepr Launcher

 
‎25 ‎June ‎2014, ‏‎03:16:52 PMGo to full article
Seattle WA (SPX) Jun 25, 2014
Spaceflight Inc., the company reinventing the model for launching small satellites into space, has successfully deployed 11 Planet Labs Dove earth-imaging spacecraft from an International Space Company (ISC) Kosmotras-operated Dnepr launch vehicle. "SmallSat constellations are a critical, growing piece of the space economy," said Curt Blake, president of Spaceflight. "We are thrilled to ex
 

What If Voyager Had Explored Pluto?

 
‎25 ‎June ‎2014, ‏‎03:16:52 PMGo to full article
Boulder CO (SPX) Jun 25, 2014
As I mentioned in my previous PI Perspective, New Horizons crosses the orbit of Neptune, the outermost planet explored by the Voyager mission, late this August. Voyager's flyby of Neptune was in August 1989, 25 years ago! Across flights launched in 1977 and spanning the entirety of the 1980s, Voyagers 1 and 2 performed the historic, first detailed reconnaissance of our solar system's four
 

NASA has a Problem with Unauthorized Access to it's Technologies

 
‎25 ‎June ‎2014, ‏‎03:16:52 PMGo to full article
Bethesda MD (SPX) Jun 25, 2014
A few days ago the U.S. Government Accountability Office (GAO) released its findings related to unauthorized access to NASA's technologies by foreign entities. Auditors found weaknesses in NASA's export control policy and implementation of foreign-national-access procedures at some centers. While NASA policies allow Center Directors wide latitude in implementing export controls at their centers,
 

Dominoes Crush Spacecraft

 
‎25 ‎June ‎2014, ‏‎03:16:52 PMGo to full article
Sydney, Australia (SPX) Jun 23, 2014
We can't ignore the elephant in the room. International spaceflight is in a critical state. Even without tensions over Russia's annexation of Crimea, there is enough trouble to cause much of the overall structure of astronautics to collapse. We have a perfect storm of financial austerity, technical problems, ageing hardware and management failures. Spacewatchers mostly face this stoically,
 

Aluminum-Bearing Site on Mars Draws NASA Visitor

 
‎25 ‎June ‎2014, ‏‎03:16:52 PMGo to full article
Pasadena CA (JPL) Jun 25, 2014
With its solar panels their cleanest in years, NASA's decade-old Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity is inspecting a section of crater-rim ridgeline chosen as a priority target due to evidence of a water-related mineral. Orbital observations of the site by another NASA spacecraft, Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter, found a spectrum with the signature of aluminum bound to oxygen and hydrogen. Rese
 

Mars Curiosity Rover Marks First Martian Year with Mission Successes

 
‎25 ‎June ‎2014, ‏‎03:16:52 PMGo to full article
Pasadena CA (JPL) Jun 25, 2014
NASA's Mars Curiosity rover will complete a Martian year - 687 Earth days - on June 24, having accomplished the mission's main goal of determining whether Mars once offered environmental conditions favorable for microbial life. One of Curiosity's first major findings after landing on the Red Planet in August 2012 was an ancient riverbed at its landing site. Nearby, at an area known as Ye
 

Why Species Matter

 
‎25 ‎June ‎2014, ‏‎03:16:52 PMGo to full article
Santa Barbara CA (SPX) Jun 24, 2014
UC Santa Barbara doctoral candidate Caitlin Fong travels to French Polynesia often but not for vacation. She goes there to study a coral reef ecosystem influenced by human impacts such as overfishing and nutrient pollution. Her work focuses not only on biological changes but also methods scientists use to determine within-group group responses to ecological processes. The findings are publ
 

Strange physics turns off laser

 
‎25 ‎June ‎2014, ‏‎03:16:52 PMGo to full article
Princeton NJ (SPX) Jun 24, 2014
Inspired by anomalies that arise in certain mathematical equations, researchers have demonstrated a laser system that paradoxically turns off when more power is added rather than becoming continuously brighter. The finding by a team of researchers at Vienna University of Technology and Princeton University, could lead to new ways to manipulate the interaction of electronics and light, an i
 

US missile defense system strikes target in test

 
‎25 ‎June ‎2014, ‏‎03:16:52 PMGo to full article
Washington (AFP) June 23, 2014
The Boeing-managed ground-based system intended to shield the continental United States successfully intercepted a simulated incoming missile over the Pacific Ocean for the first time Sunday, the Pentagon said. The Ground-based Midcourse Defense (GMD) system, with a $40 billion price tag, aims to protect against long-range ballistic missiles from so-called rogue states such as North Korea an
 

European Space Agency says magnetic north is drifting southward

 
‎25 ‎June ‎2014, ‏‎03:16:52 PMGo to full article
London (UPI) Jun 23, 2013
The Earth's magnetic north pole is drifting southward towards Siberia, according to researchers at the European Space Agency (ESA). As part of ESA's Swarm mission, scientists have been mapping the planet's magnetic field with the help three satellites. Each satellite is equipped with several Earth-studying tools - including magnetometers, which measure the magnetic field's strength and
 

Researchers develop new ultralight, ultrastiff 3D printed materials

 
‎25 ‎June ‎2014, ‏‎03:16:52 PMGo to full article
Livermore CA (SPX) Jun 24, 2014
Imagine a material with the same weight and density as aerogel - a material so light it's called 'frozen smoke' - but with 10,000 times more stiffness. This material could have a profound impact on the aerospace and automotive industries as well as other applications where lightweight, high-stiffness and high-strength materials are needed. Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) an
 

New ultrastiff, ultralight material developed

 
‎25 ‎June ‎2014, ‏‎03:16:52 PMGo to full article
Boston MA (SPX) Jun 24, 2014
What's the difference between the Eiffel Tower and the Washington Monument? Both structures soar to impressive heights, and each was the world's tallest building when completed. But the Washington Monument is a massive stone structure, while the Eiffel Tower achieves similar strength using a lattice of steel beams and struts that is mostly open air, gaining its strength from the geometric arrang
 

Japan unveils 'world's first' android newscaster

 
‎25 ‎June ‎2014, ‏‎03:16:52 PMGo to full article
Tokyo (AFP) June 24, 2014
Japanese scientists on Tuesday unveiled what they said was the world's first news-reading android, eerily lifelike and possessing a sense of humour to match her perfect language skills. The adolescent-looking "Kodomoroid" - an amalgamation of the Japanese word "kodomo" (child) and "android" - delivered news of an earthquake and an FBI raid to amazed reporters in Tokyo. She even poked f
 

Thales enhancing communications of EU peacekeepers

 
‎25 ‎June ‎2014, ‏‎03:16:52 PMGo to full article
Paris (UPI) Jun 20, 2013
European Union peacekeepers in the Central African Republic are receiving a new secure communications and information capability from Thales. The company said that under a second phase of a project, it is equipping EUFOR troops in Bangui, the country's capital, with the European command headquarters in Larissa, Greece, via a satellite communications link that is supplied and operated by
 

Rosetta's comet: expect the unexpected

 
‎24 ‎June ‎2014, ‏‎11:23:06 AMGo to full article
Paris (ESA) Jun 24, 2014
An image snapped earlier this month by ESA's Rosetta spacecraft shows its target comet has quietened, demonstrating the unpredictable nature of these enigmatic objects. The picture was captured on 4 June by Rosetta's scientific camera, and is the most recent full-resolution image from the narrow-angle sensor. It has been used to help fine-tune Rosetta's navigation towards comet 67P/Churyumov-Ger
 

NASA's Science Mission Directorate Cubesat Initiative

 
‎24 ‎June ‎2014, ‏‎11:23:06 AMGo to full article
Washington DC (SPX) Jun 24, 2014
Beginning in October 2013, the NASA Science Mission Directorate, or SMD, started a new CubeSat Initiative - a cross divisional project to develop scientific CubeSats for all four science divisions within SMD. CubeSats offer a low-cost option for enabling scientific discovery related to astrophysics, heliophysics, Earth and planetary sciences, addressing space technology and exploration sy
 

Moon to see first tourists by 2017, single roundtrip ticket costs $150 mln

 
‎24 ‎June ‎2014, ‏‎11:23:06 AMGo to full article
Moscow (Voice of Russia) Jun 24, 2014
The moon will welcome its first tourists as early as 2017, Space Adventures, a US-based space tourism company, said Wednesday. According to Space Adventures' head Tom Shelley, two brave folks have agreed to spend a fortune on the tickets, the MIT Technological Review reported. The company did not disclose the customers' names. The two will pay 150 million dollars each for a one-day tour ar
 

Gilat's Low-profile Maritime Terminals Deployed

 
‎24 ‎June ‎2014, ‏‎11:23:06 AMGo to full article
Petah Tikva, Israel (SPX) Jun 24, 2014
Gilat Satellite Networks has provided its low-profile maritime terminals for various naval vessels of an unnamed Asian country. The terminals, capable of operating in the harsh maritime environment, provide secure Command-and-Control communications in combat operations. The terminals have been deployed on various vessels, such as missile boats and fast attack craft, in both Ka- and Ku-band
 

Nuanced account of stunning patterns in the microwave sky published

 
‎24 ‎June ‎2014, ‏‎11:23:06 AMGo to full article
Washington DC (SPX) Jun 24, 2014
Following a thorough peer-review process, the researchers who previously announced the detection of B-mode polarization in a patch of the microwave sky have published their findings in the journal Physical Review Letters. The researchers provide some evidence that the signals they have found may be the result of gravitational waves from the earliest moments of the universe's existence and
 

US firm scrambles to replace Russian-made engine for Atlas rockets

 
‎24 ‎June ‎2014, ‏‎11:23:06 AMGo to full article
Moscow (Voice of Russia) Jun 24, 2014
United Launch Alliance (ULA), the US joint venture providing space launch services in the US, has signed a number of contracts to find a replacement for the Russian-made RD-180 rocket engine, which is used in the Atlas family of rockets. The announcement came after SpaceX, ULA's competitor, sued the United States Air Force (USAF) to challenge what the firm's CEO Elon Musk called a ULA mono
 

Scientists work on 'quantum superclock' to reveal mysteries of time itself

 
‎24 ‎June ‎2014, ‏‎11:23:06 AMGo to full article
Moscow (RIA Novosti) Jun 24, 2014
Physicists say they believe they're on track to creating a "quantum superclock" that would revolutionize the way the world tells time. If the work proves to be a success, than the concept of time as it's currently understood could be changed drastically and allow a whole new idea of accuracy to prevail. According to a study published by the researchers this week in the Nature Physics schol
 

Boeing and Global Eagle Entertainment Offer Line-Fit Satellite Connectivity

 
‎24 ‎June ‎2014, ‏‎11:23:06 AMGo to full article
Los Angeles CA (SPX) Jun 24, 2014
Boeing (BA) and Global Eagle Entertainment have signed a new technical services agreement (TSA) to evaluate Global Eagle Entertainment's (GEE) satellite-based connectivity solution for line-fit offerability to airlines worldwide. The TSA is an important milestone in offering airline customers the option to purchase the GEE connectivity system pre-installed on new delivery Boeing 737 and 78
 

Can we see the arrow of time?

 
‎24 ‎June ‎2014, ‏‎11:23:06 AMGo to full article
Boston MA (SPX) Jun 24, 2014
Einstein's theory of relativity envisions time as a spatial dimension, like height, width, and depth. But unlike those other dimensions, time seems to permit motion in only one direction: forward. This directional asymmetry - the "arrow of time" - is something of a conundrum for theoretical physics. But is it something we can see? An international group of computer scientists believes that
 

US tightens export regime against five Russian companies and organizations

 
‎24 ‎June ‎2014, ‏‎11:23:06 AMGo to full article
Washington DC (SPX) Jun 24, 2014
Russian legal entities were on the list of 29 companies included in the list of so-called unverified suppliers in respect of which preferential export control regulations will not work and more stringent licensing rules will be introduced. The telecommunications holding company "Voentelekom" was included in the list. The company deals with construction projects, networks and communications
 

NASA considers sending quadcopter drone to look for life on Titan

 
‎24 ‎June ‎2014, ‏‎11:23:06 AMGo to full article
Moscow (RIA Novosti) Jun 23, 2014
While one NASA probe whizzes by Saturn's moon Titan on Thursday to analyze its atmosphere, the American space agency is also considering a plan to send a quadcopter drone capable of searching for life. The ambitious idea was outlined by Larry Matthies, a research scientist and supervisor at NASA's Jet Propulsion Lab in California, and involves a drone that would be capable of flying out of
 

First test launch of Russia's Angara rocket may be conducted on June 27

 
‎24 ‎June ‎2014, ‏‎11:23:06 AMGo to full article
Moscow (Voice of Russia) Jun 23, 2014
The first test launch of Russia's Angara light-weight rocket, initially set for June 25, may be conducted from the Plesetsk Cosmodrone in the Arkhangelsk region on June 27, a Russian space rocket industry source told Interfax-AVN. "Tomorrow the state commission is supposed to make a final decision concerning a date for the Angara launch. It is expected to set the launch for June 27, instea
 

SpaceX to launch six satellites all at once

 
‎24 ‎June ‎2014, ‏‎11:23:06 AMGo to full article
Cape Canaveral, Fla. (UPI) Jun 20, 2013
Tonight, private aeronautics company SpaceX is planning to launch six satellites into orbit via its Falcon 9 rocket. The rocket is set to blast off at 6:08 p.m. from its launch pad at the Cape Canaveral Air Force Station in Florida. Orbcomm has had to remain patient, as the company's latest Orbcomm Generation 2, or OG2, satellites should be miles above Earth's surface already. The launc
 

Companies to merge expertise for space program products

 
‎24 ‎June ‎2014, ‏‎11:23:06 AMGo to full article
Sparks, Nev. (UPI) Jun 20, 2013
Sierra Nevada Corporation plans to acquire Orbital Technologies Corporation, a sub-systems integrator and high-tech company. Under a definitive agreement, ORBITEC will become a wholly-owned subsidiary of SNC once the transaction is completed and its technologies will be integrated into SNC's Space Systems. Those technologies relate to liquid rocket propulsion and life science and
 

Elon Musk plans to take people to Mars within 10 years

 
‎24 ‎June ‎2014, ‏‎11:23:05 AMGo to full article
Moscow (RIA Novosti) Jun 24, 2014
Entrepreneur and inventor Elon Musk has some travel suggestions that are out of this world. The SpaceX CEO known as the brains behind the Tesla electric car says he wants to take humans to Mars during the next decade. Speaking to CNBC this week, the South African-born billionaire said that his main goal at this moment is to perfect technology that would make space travel possible in the not-so-d
 

A Laser Message from Space

 
‎23 ‎June ‎2014, ‏‎11:27:33 AMGo to full article
Washington DC (SPX) Jun 23, 2014
Anyone who remembers dialup internet can sympathize with the plight of NASA mission controllers. Waiting for images to arrive from deep space, slowly downloading line by line, can be a little like the World Wide Web of the 1990s. Patience is required. A laser on the International Space Station (ISS) could change all that. On June 5th, 2014, the ISS passed over the Table Mountain Observator
 

Astronomers pierce galactic clouds to shine light on black hole development

 
‎23 ‎June ‎2014, ‏‎11:27:33 AMGo to full article
Blacksburg VA (SPX) Jun 23, 2014
An international team of scientists including a Virginia Tech physicist have discovered that winds blowing from a supermassive black hole in a nearby galaxy work to obscure observations and x-rays. The discovery in Science Express sheds light on the unexpected behavior of black holes, which emit large amounts of matter through powerful, galactic winds. Using a large array of satellites and
 

Airbags Take the Weight in ACTE G-III Loads Tests

 
‎23 ‎June ‎2014, ‏‎11:27:33 AMGo to full article
Edwards AFB CA (SPX) Jun 23, 2014
Technicians at NASA Armstrong Flight Research Center's Flight Loads Laboratory recently completed structural evaluations on a modified Gulfstream G-III aircraft that will serve as a test bed for the Adaptive Compliant Trailing Edge (ACTE) project. The loads tests assisted engineers in predicting the levels of structural stress the airplane will likely experience during ACTE research flight
 

Groundbreaking for the E-ELT

 
‎23 ‎June ‎2014, ‏‎11:27:33 AMGo to full article
Munich, Germany (SPX) Jun 23, 2014
A groundbreaking ceremony took place [last week] to mark the next major milestone towards ESO's European Extremely Large Telescope (E-ELT). Part of the 3000-metre peak of Cerro Armazones was blasted away as a step towards levelling the summit in preparation for the construction of the largest optical/infrared telescope in the world. The groundbreaking ceremony at Paranal Observatory, 20 ki
 

Russia to consider space cooperation bill with Cuba

 
‎23 ‎June ‎2014, ‏‎11:27:33 AMGo to full article
Moscow (Voice of Russia) Jun 23, 2014
The Russian government has introduced a bill that stipulates a ratification of an agreement signed between Russia and Cuba in the sphere of space investigations, the statement on the government's website says. "This is a framework agreement that defines the necessary principles, regulations and conditions for the development of bilateral relations in space domain; it also includes the issu
 

Far more accurate satellite images on the way as US lifts restrictions

 
‎23 ‎June ‎2014, ‏‎11:27:33 AMGo to full article
Moscow (RIA Novosti) Jun 23, 2014
Satellite images have always been a bit fuzzy, thanks to the US government. But now the agency in charge is relaxing its rules, allowing mapping services like Google Maps or Bing Maps bring crystal clear pictures to their users. DigitalGlobe, currently the only provider of commercial satellite imagery in the US, appealed to the Department of Commerce last year to lift its resolution restri

 

 
News About Time And Space
 

Scientists work on 'quantum superclock' to reveal mysteries of time itself

 
‎26 ‎June ‎2014, ‏‎09:31:42 PMGo to full article
Moscow (RIA Novosti) Jun 24, 2014 - Physicists say they believe they're on track to creating a "quantum superclock" that would revolutionize the way the world tells time. If the work proves to be a success, than the concept of time as it's currently understood could be changed drastically and allow a whole new idea of accuracy to prevail.

According to a study published by the researchers this week in the Nature Physics scholarly journal, it might soon be possible to harness the power of a global quantum network of clocks to "allow construction of a real-time single international time scale (world clock) with unprecedented stability and accuracy."

The study - "A quantum network of clocks" - calls for "a quantum, cooperative protocol for operating a network of geographically remote optical atomic clocks."

"Using nonlocal entangled states, we demonstrate an optimal utilization of global resources, and show that such a network can be operated near the fundamental precision limit set by quantum theory," reads an abstract of their report. "Furthermore, the internal structure of the network, combined with quantum communication techniques, guarantees security both from internal and external threats."

Broken down, the scientists' project isn't all that complicated. Alexandra Witze wrote for the Nature website that, essentially, the researchers are relying on two ideas that are already major points of focus for physicists: atomic clocks as they currently exist, and quantum entanglement, "in which pairs of particles become linked in such a way that measuring a property of one of them instantaneously determines the same property for the other," she wrote.

By linking a network of orbiting, atomic clocks, those two schools of study may be able to be merged and provide physicists with what would unarguably be the most precise clock in existence. The scientists' response for the Nature Physics story says linking 10 such atomic clocks and putting them into satellite may be the way to proceed.

"One satellite, as the network's center, would start by preparing its clock particles in an entangled state. It would then communicate with a neighboring satellite to extend the entanglement there. The linking would eventually spread through the whole fleet, joining the satellites in one quantum network," Witze wrote.

"You'd be able to see someone digging a tunnel under the US-Mexico border from space," Chris Monroe, a physicist at the Joint Quantum Institute at the University of Maryland in College Park, told Science News this week.

Eric Kessler, a co-author of the paper, told Nature that his colleagues' proposal, while still in the planning stages, is admittedly "a little bit visionary." Nevertheless, the researchers believe the blueprint does exist to take the theory behind quantum physics and create a network of atomic clocks that would be more accurate than anything ever available.

"All the building blocks have been demonstrated in principle, and we want to show what might lie ahead if all these fields merge together," Kessler said.

"There's no doubt this is a very futuristic proposal,"said Kessler. "We've got a long way to go."

 

Source: RIA Novosti

 

 

Can we see the arrow of time?

 
‎26 ‎June ‎2014, ‏‎09:31:42 PMGo to full article
Boston MA (SPX) Jun 24, 2014 - Einstein's theory of relativity envisions time as a spatial dimension, like height, width, and depth. But unlike those other dimensions, time seems to permit motion in only one direction: forward. This directional asymmetry - the "arrow of time" - is something of a conundrum for theoretical physics. But is it something we can see?

An international group of computer scientists believes that the answer is yes. At the IEEE Conference on Computer Vision and Pattern Recognition this month, they'll present a new algorithm that can, with roughly 80 percent accuracy, determine whether a given snippet of video is playing backward or forward.

"If you see that a clock in a movie is going backward, that requires a high-level understanding of how clocks normally move," says William Freeman, a professor of computer science and engineering at MIT and one of the paper's authors. "But we were interested in whether we could tell the direction of time from low-level cues, just watching the way the world behaves."

By identifying subtle but intrinsic characteristics of visual experience, the research could lead to more realistic graphics in gaming and film. But Freeman says that that wasn't the researchers' primary motivation.

"It's kind of like learning what the structure of the visual world is," he says.

"To study shape perception, you might invert a photograph to make everything that's black white, and white black, and then check what you can still see and what you can't. Here we're doing a similar thing, by reversing time, then seeing what it takes to detect that change. We're trying to understand the nature of the temporal signal."

Word perfect
Freeman and his collaborators - his students Donglai Wei and YiChang Shih; Lyndsey Pickup and Andrew Zisserman from Oxford University; Changshui Zhang and Zheng Pan of Tsinghua University; and Bernhard Scholkopf of the Max Planck Institute for Intelligent Systems in Tubingen, Germany - designed candidate algorithms that approached the problem in three different ways.

All three algorithms were trained on a set of short videos that had been identified in advance as running either forward or backward.

The algorithm that performed best begins by dividing a frame of video into a grid of hundreds of thousands of squares; then it divides each of those squares into a smaller, four-by-four grid. For each square in the smaller grid, it determines the direction and distance that clusters of pixels move from one frame to the next.

The algorithm then generates a "dictionary" of roughly 4,000 four-by-four grids, where each square in a grid represents particular directions and degrees of motion. The 4,000-odd "words" in the dictionary are chosen to offer a good approximation of all the grids in the training data. Finally, the algorithm combs through the labeled examples to determine whether particular combinations of "words" tend to indicate forward or backward motion.

Following standard practice in the field, the researchers divided their training data into three sets, sequentially training the algorithm on two of the sets and testing its performance against the third. The algorithm's success rates were 74 percent, 77 percent, and 90 percent.

One vital aspect of the algorithm is that it can identify the specific regions of a frame that it is using to make its judgments. Examining the words that characterize those regions could reveal the types of visual cues that the algorithm is using - and perhaps the types of cues that the human visual system uses as well.

The next-best-performing algorithm was about 70 percent accurate. It was based on the assumption that, in forward-moving video, motion tends to propagate outward rather than contracting inward. In video of a break in pool, for instance, the cue ball is, initially, the only moving object. After it strikes the racked balls, motion begins to appear in a wider and wider radius from the point of contact.

Probable cause
The third algorithm was the least accurate, but it may be the most philosophically interesting. It attempts to offer a statistical definition of the direction of causation.

"There's a research area on causality," Freeman says.

"And that's actually really quite important, medically even, because in epidemiology, you can't afford to run the experiment twice, to have people experience this problem and see if they get it and have people do that and see if they don't. But you see things that happen together and you want to figure out: 'Did one cause the other?' There's this whole area of study within statistics on, 'How can you figure out when something did cause something else?' And that relates in an indirect way to this study as well."

Suppose that, in a video, a ball is rolling down a ramp and strikes a bump that briefly launches it into the air. When the video is playing in the forward direction, the sudden change in the ball's trajectory coincides with a visual artifact: the bump. When it's playing in reverse, the ball suddenly leaps for no reason.

The researchers were able to model that intuitive distinction as a statistical relationship between a mathematical model of an object's motion and the "noise," or error, in the visual signal.

Unfortunately, the approach works only if the object's motion can be described by a linear equation, and that's rarely the case with motions involving human agency. The algorithm can determine, however, whether the video it's being applied to meets that criterion. And in those cases, its performance is much better.

 

 

Astronomers pierce galactic clouds to shine light on black hole development

 
‎26 ‎June ‎2014, ‏‎09:31:42 PMGo to full article
Blacksburg VA (SPX) Jun 23, 2014 - An international team of scientists including a Virginia Tech physicist have discovered that winds blowing from a supermassive black hole in a nearby galaxy work to obscure observations and x-rays. The discovery in Science Express sheds light on the unexpected behavior of black holes, which emit large amounts of matter through powerful, galactic winds.

Using a large array of satellites and space observatories, the team spent more than a year training their instruments on the brightest and most studied of the "local" black holes - the one situated at the core of Type I Seyfert Galaxy NGC 5548.

What they found was a bit of a surprise.

The researchers discovered much colder gas than expected based on past observations, showing that the wind had cooled and that a stream of gas moved quickly outward and blocked 90 percent of x-rays. The observation was the first direct evidence of an obscuration process that - in more luminous galaxies - has been shown to regulate growth of black holes.

By looking at data from different sources, scientists found that a thick layer of gas lay between the galactic nucleus and the Earth blocked the lower energy x-rays often used to study the system, but allowed more energetic x-rays to get through.

Data from Hubble Space Telescope also showed ultraviolet emissions being partially absorbed by a stream of gas.

A multi-wavelength observational campaign simultaneously looking at an object to decipher its secrets is rare, the researchers said.

"I don't think anyone has trained so many scopes and put in so much time on a single object like this," said Nahum Arav, an associate professor of physics with Virginia Tech's College of Science.

"The result is quite spectacular. We saw something that was never studied well before and we also deciphered the outflow in the object. We know far more about this outflow than any studied previously as to where it is and how it behaves in time. We have a physical model that explains all the data we've taken of the outflow over 16 years."

The discovery was made by an international team led by SRON Netherlands Institute for Space Research scientist Jelle Kaastra using the major space observatories of the European Space Agency, NASA, the Hubble Space Telescope, Swift, NuSTAR, Chandra, INTREGRAL, and other satellites and observation platforms.

"These outflows are thought to be a major player in the structure formation of the universe," Arav said "This particular outflow is comparatively small but because it's so close we can study it very well and then create a better understanding of how the phenomenon will work in very large objects that do affect the structure formation in the universe."

"Shadowing" of light from a black hole had not been seen before. With the discovery, scientists were able to decipher the outflow.

"Until now our knowledge of these characteristics was very limited," Arav said. "Before we were making educated inferences - but now we know. We know the distance of outflow from the center of source, we know the mass of outflow, and we know what causes its observed changes. The shadowing was definitely a surprise -a beautiful phenomenon we were lucky to catch."

Arav said luck played a part because the effect hadn't existed before last year.

Over the past two years the shadowing has built up and Arav believes it won't last much longer than another year or two, but concedes scientists don't have a full enough observation to say how the shadowing feature is changing in time.

 

 

Laser Physics upside down

 
‎26 ‎June ‎2014, ‏‎09:31:42 PMGo to full article
Vienna, Austria (SPX) Jun 20, 2014 - At the Vienna University of Technology a system of coupled lasers has been created which exhibits truly paradoxical behaviour: An increase in energy supply switches the lasers off, reducing the energy can switch them on.

Sound waves fade, water waves ebb, light waves are dissipated by a wall. The absorption of waves is a very common phenomenon. But only recently have physicists realized that amazing new possibilities are opened up, when this energy loss, rather than being seen as an annoying nuisance, is actually considered a desired effect.

At the Vienna University of Technology, a system of two coupled lasers has been created, in which wave dissipation leads to a behaviour completely contrary to intuition: additional energy can switch it off; a reduction of energy may switch it on. This way, logical circuits can be built using light. The experiment has now been presented in the journal "Nature Communications".

Standard Lasers and Paradoxical Lasers
"Usually, there is a simple relationship between the amount of energy which is pumped into a laser and the brightness of the beam emitted by it", says Professor Stefan Rotter (TU Wien). "If the energy supply is too small, nothing happens. Once a critical threshold is reached, the laser starts to emit light, and the more energy is put in, the brighter the laser beam gets."

But things are not always that simple. When coupling two small circular lasers to a joint system, the delicate balance of energy gain and loss leads to intriguing physical effects.

Two lasers, which would emit light individually, can switch each other off, if they are coupled. More energy does not lead to more light, but to complete darkness. Inversely, a reduction of energy supply can switch on the light.

"We were puzzled when we first discovered the effect in computer simulations", says Stefan Rotter. Now the phenomenon, which had been predicted two years ago, could be experimentally realized in a joint effort of the faculties for physics, electrical engineering and mathematics of TU Wien and of the Princeton engineering faculty. For the experiment, so-called quantum cascade lasers were used, emitting at terahertz frequencies, with a diameter of less than a tenth of a millimeter.

"These micro lasers are perfectly suited for the experiments, because their optical properties can be finely tuned and their wavelength is rather large", says Martin Brandstetter (also TU Wien). This makes it easier for the light wave to pass from one laser into the other.

Desired Imperfections
In physics, the absorption of waves is usually seen as an unwanted side effect. "For simplicity, theoretical calculations often describe an optimal situation with zero dissipation", says Stefan Rotter. Mirrors with 100% reflectivity, optical fibres which transmit 100% of the incoming light or sound waves which do not lose any of their energy are just easier to describe mathematically.

But sometimes perfection is boring. The interesting coupling effects in the laser can only be generated when a special absorbing layer is placed on the lasers, which dissipates part of the light.

A complicated mathematical phenomenon is responsible for the behaviour of the lasers: so called "exceptional points" emerge - special intersection points of surfaces in complex spaces, which tend to show up in the calculations. Whenever the mathematical equations lead to such exceptional points, remarkable physical phenomena arise.

Such laser coupling can lead to new electro-optical switches. In the future, optical elements could be used to process information, similar to electronic elements we are using today. Coupled micro lasers would be ideally suited for this purpose: they can easily fit on a chip, and, as demonstrated through this work, they can be used as switches in highly non-trivial ways.

 

 

New quantum mechanism to trigger the emission of tunable light at terahertz frequencies

 
‎26 ‎June ‎2014, ‏‎09:31:42 PMGo to full article
Southampton, UK (SPX) Jun 20, 2014 - Scientists have found that two-dimensional (2D) nanostructures with asymmetric design enable a new quantum mechanism, triggering the emission of tunable light at terahertz frequencies-with unprecedented efficiency.

The researchers, from the University of Southampton and Imperial College London, found that quantum wells, 2D nanostructures formed of several layers of semi-conductor alloys placed on top of each other like a sandwich, can enhance light emission in a technological challenging spectral range.

It is hoped that the findings will have an impact on photonic and optoelectronic devices across a broad range of applications, including harmless medical imaging and security scanning.

Electrons are trapped in the structure and this confinement can be exploited to enhance their capacity to interact with light at given frequencies much lower than the laser frequency at which they are excited: the system emits light by interacting with "vacuum fluctuations" that permeate space, according to quantum theory.

Nathan Shammah, from the University's Quantum Light and Matter (QLM) group and co-author of the study says: "As the 2D nanostructures can be manufactured with an asymmetric design, this allows light to interact with trapped electrons in a way that is not otherwise allowed. This interaction process, leading to the emission of light at lower frequencies, has not been observed in atoms because those are very symmetrical systems and symmetry rules prevent the transitions that trigger this light emission from happening."

In the paper, which is published in Physical Review B, the researchers predict that by shining light on a 2D asymmetric nanostructure with a laser that is tuned at resonance with the electronic transitions that can occur in the nanostructure, in addition to the scattered laser light, this 2D device would emit light at other frequencies, which can be tuned simply by changing the laser power.

Nathan, who co-authored the paper with Dr Simone De Liberato, from the QLM group, and Professor Chris Phillips from Imperial College London, adds: "Due to the large oscillating dipole and high density of electrons that characterise these "artificial atoms" formed of asymmetric 2D structures, the control of light-matter coupling can be greatly enhanced, triggering spontaneous light emission, similar to what occurs in LEDs lamps.

"This new mechanism is perfectly suited for the terahertz frequency range, which spans from above the current wi-fi bandwidth to below the visible light spectrum, where the lack of practical light emitters constitutes a serious technological gap."

The high efficiency shown by the simulations suggests that this theoretical result could be exploited in the near future for a broad range of optoelectronic applications-from harmless medical imaging and security scanners, to short-range, ultra-fast wireless communication.

 

 

With light echoes, the invisible becomes visible

 
‎26 ‎June ‎2014, ‏‎09:31:42 PMGo to full article
Bonn, Germany (SPX) Jun 20, 2014 - Scientists at the University of Bonn and the University of British Columbia (Vancouver, Canada) have developed a novel camera system which can see around the corner without using a mirror. Using diffusely reflected light, it reconstructs the shape of objects outside of the field of view. The researchers will be reporting their results at the international Conference for Computer Vision and Pattern Recognition (CVPR) from June 24-27 in Columbus (Ohio, USA).

A laser shines on the wall; a camera watches the scene. Nothing more than white ingrain wallpaper with a bright spot of light can be seen through the lens. A computer records these initially unremarkable images and as the data is processed further, little by little, the outlines of an object appear on a screen. Yet, this object is behind a partition and the camera cannot possibly have seen it - we have apparently looked around the corner.

A magic trick? "No," says Prof. Dr.-Ing. Matthias B. Hullin from the Institute of Computer Science II at the University of Bonn. "This is an actual reconstruction from diffusely scattered light. Our camera, combined with a mathematical procedure, enables us to virtually transform this wall into a mirror."

Scattered light is used as a source of information
The laser dot on the wall is by itself a source of scattered light, which serves as the crucial source of information. Some of this light, in a roundabout way, falls back onto the wall and finally into the camera. "We are recording a kind of light echo, that is, time-resolved data, from which we can reconstruct the object," explains the Bonn computer scientist.

"Part of the light has also come into contact with the unknown object and it thus brings valuable information with it about its shape and appearance." To be able to measure such echoes, a special camera system is required which Prof. Hullin has developed together with his colleagues at the University of British Columbia (Vancouver, Canada) and further refined after his return to Bonn.

In contrast to conventional cameras, it records not just the direction from which the light is coming but also how long it took the light to get from the source to the camera.

The technical complexity for this is comparatively low - suitable image sensors came onto the mass market long ago. They are mainly found in depth image cameras as they are used, for instance, as video game controllers or for range measurements in the automotive field.

The actual challenge is to elicit the desired information from such time-of-flight measurements. Hullin compares the situation to a room which reverberates so greatly that one can no longer have a conversation with one's partner.

"In principle, we are measuring nothing other than the sum of numerous light reflections which reached the camera through many different paths and which are superimposed on each other on the image sensor."

This problem, known as multipath interference, has been giving engineers headaches for a long time. Traditionally, one would attempt to remove the undesired multipath scatter and only use the direct portion of the signal. Based on an advanced mathematical model, Hullin and his colleagues, however, developed a method which can obtain the desired information exclusively from what would usually be considered noise rather than signal.

Since multipath light also originates from objects which are not at all in the field of view, the researchers can thus make visible what is virtually invisible.

Minimal technical complexity and intelligent programming
"The accuracy of our method has its limits, of course," says Prof. Hullin - the results are still limited to rough outlines. However, the researchers assume that based on the rapid development of technical components and mathematical models, an even higher resolution can be achieved soon.

Together with his colleagues, he will present the method at the international Conference for Computer Vision and Pattern Recognition (CVPR) from June 24 to 27 in Columbus (Ohio, USA). The new technology is received with great interest - Hullin hopes that similar approaches can be used, for example, in telecommunications, remote sensing and medical imaging.

Felix Heide, Lei Xiao, Wolfgang Heidrich und Matthias B. Hullin, "Diffuse Mirrors: 3D Reconstruction from Diffuse Indirect Illumination Using Inexpensive Time-of-Flight Sensors".

 

 

Horizontal levitation: the ultimate solution to particle separation

 
‎26 ‎June ‎2014, ‏‎09:31:42 PMGo to full article
Nottingham, UK (SPX) Jun 20, 2014 - Magnetic separators exploit the difference in magnetic properties between minerals, for example when separating magnetite from quartz. But this exercise becomes considerably more complex when the particles are not magnetic.

In the wake of previous particle levitation experiments under high-power magnetic fields, a new study reveals that particles are deflected away from the magnet's round-shaped bore centre in a horizontal direction.

Previous studies had observed the vertical levitation of the particles. These findings are presented by Shixiao Liu from the Faculty of Engineering, University of Nottingham, UK and colleagues, in a paper recently published in EPJ E, and could led to a new concept in particles and minerals separation technologies.

The authors analysed video frames covering 0.1 second each of the movement of glass and pyrite particles of roughly one millimetre diameter in a solution that was subjected to a strong non-uniform magnetic field created by a superconducting magnet.

The authors show that pyrite and glass particles were deflected and settled at certain positions in a specially designed container. They explain that this pattern is due to differences in the particles' densities and magnetic susceptibilities.

The gradient in the magnetic field gives rise to a radial force-defined by the particles' magnetic properties-capable of separating the glass from pyrite particles.

At the same time, the magnetic field gradient also induces the so-called Magneto-Archimedes force, which compensates for the force of gravity. Surprisingly, the particle size seems to have little influence on the results, at least for the limited size range examined in these experiments.

The authors then confirmed their experimental findings using mathematical simulations of the particle displacement.

 

 

Big Bang breakthrough team allows they may be wrong

 
‎26 ‎June ‎2014, ‏‎09:31:42 PMGo to full article
Washington (AFP) June 20, 2014 - American astrophysicists who announced just months ago what they deemed a breakthrough in confirming how the universe was born now admit they may have got it wrong.

The team said it had identified gravitational waves that apparently rippled through space right after the Big Bang.

If proven to be correctly identified, these waves -- predicted in Albert Einstein's theory of relativity -- would confirm the rapid and violent growth spurt of the universe in the first fraction of a second marking its existence, 13.8 billion years ago.

The apparent first direct evidence of such so-called cosmic inflation -- a theory that the universe expanded by 100 trillion trillion times in barely the blink of an eye -- was announced in March by experts at the Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics.

The detection was made with the help of a telescope called BICEP2, stationed at the South Pole.

After weeks in which they avoided the media, the team published its work Thursday in the US journal Physical Review Letters.

In a summary, the team said their models "are not sufficiently constrained by external public data to exclude the possibility of dust emission bright enough to explain the entire excess signal," as stated by other scientists who questioned their conclusion.

The team was led by astrophysicist John Kovac of Harvard.

BICEP2 stands for Background Imaging of Cosmic Extragalactic Polarization.

"Detecting this signal is one of the most important goals in cosmology today," Kovac, leader of the BICEP2 collaboration at the Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, said back in March.

By observing the cosmic microwave background, or a faint glow left over from the Big Bang, the scientists said small fluctuations gave them new clues about the conditions in the early universe.

The gravitational waves rippled through the universe 380,000 years after the Big Bang, and these images were captured by the telescope, they claimed.

For weeks, some scientists have expressed doubts about the findings of the BICEP2 team.

David Spergel, a theoretical astrophysicist at Princeton University, queried whether what the BICEP2 telescope picked up really came from the first moments of the universe's existence.

"We know that galactic dust emits polarized radiations. We see that in many areas of the sky, and what we pointed out in our paper is that pattern they have seen is just as consistent with the galactic dust radiations as with gravitational waves," Spergel told AFP last week.

He said the question will likely be settled in the coming months when another, competing group, working with the European Space Agency's Planck telescope, publishes its results.

That telescope observes a large part of the sky -- versus the BICEP2's two percent -- and carries out measurements in six frequencies, compared to just one for BICEP2, according to Spergel.

"I think in retrospect, they should have been more careful about making a big announcement," he said.

 

 

Swiftly Moving Gas Streamer Eclipses Supermassive Black Hole

 
‎26 ‎June ‎2014, ‏‎09:31:42 PMGo to full article
Washington DC (SPX) Jun 20, 2014 - An international team of astronomers, using data from several NASA and European Space Agency (ESA) space observatories, has discovered unexpected behavior from the supermassive black hole at the heart of the galaxy NGC 5548, located 244.6 million light-years from Earth. This behavior may provide new insights into how supermassive black holes interact with their host galaxies.

Immediately after NASA's Hubble Space Telescope observed NGC 5548 in June 2013, this international research team discovered unexpected features in the data. They detected a stream of gas flowing rapidly outward from the galaxy's supermassive black hole, blocking 90 percent of its emitted X-rays.

"The data represented dramatic changes since the last observation with Hubble in 2011," said Gerard Kriss of the Space Telescope Science Institute (STScI) in Baltimore, Maryland.

"I saw signatures of much colder gas than was present before, indicating that the wind had cooled down due to a significant decrease in X-ray radiation from the galaxy's nucleus."

The discovery was made during an intensive observing campaign that also included data from NASA's Swift spacecraft, Nuclear Spectroscopic Telescope Array (NuSTAR) and Chandra X-ray Observatory, as well as ESA's X-ray Multi-Mirror Mission (XMM-Newton) and Integral gamma-ray observatory (INTEGRAL).

After combining and analyzing data from all six sources, the team was able to put together the pieces of the puzzle. Supermassive black holes in the nuclei of active galaxies, such as NGC 5548, expel large amounts of matter through powerful winds of ionized gas. For instance, the persistent wind of NGC 5548 reaches velocities exceeding 621 miles (approximately 1,000 kilometers) a second. But now a new wind has arisen, much stronger and faster than the persistent wind.

"These new winds reach speeds of up to 3,107 miles (5,000 kilometers) per second, but is much closer to the nucleus than the persistent wind," said lead scientist Jelle Kaastra of the SRON Netherlands Institute for Space Research. "The new gas outflow blocks 90 percent of the low-energy X-rays that come from very close to the black hole, and it obscures up to a third of the region that emits the ultraviolet radiation at a few light-days distance from the black hole."

The newly discovered gas stream in NGC 5548 -- one of the best-studied of the type of galaxy know as Type I Seyfert -- provides the first direct evidence of a shielding process that accelerates the powerful gas streams, or winds, to high speeds. These winds only occur if their starting point is shielded from X-rays.

It appears the shielding in NGC 5548 has been going on for at least three years, but just recently began crossing their line of sight.

"There are other galaxies with similar streams of gas flowing outward from the direction of its central black hole, but we've never before found evidence that the stream of gas changed its position as dramatically as this one has," said Kriss.

"This is the first time we've seen a stream like this move into our line of sight. We got lucky."

Researchers also deduced that in more luminous quasars, the winds may be strong enough to blow off gas that otherwise would have become "food" for the black hole, thereby regulating both the growth of the black hole and that of its host galaxy.

These results are being published online in the Thursday issue of Science Express.

 

 

Experts cast doubt on Big Bang bolstering discovery

 
‎26 ‎June ‎2014, ‏‎09:31:42 PMGo to full article
Washington (AFP) June 14, 2014 - Astrophysicists are casting doubt on what just recently was deemed a breakthrough in confirming how the universe was born: the observation of gravitational waves that apparently rippled through space right after the Big Bang.

If proven to be correctly identified, these waves -- predicted in Albert Einstein's theory of relativity -- would confirm the rapid and violent growth spurt of the universe in the first fraction of a second marking its existence, 13.8 billion years ago.

The apparent first direct evidence of such so-called cosmic inflation -- a theory that the universe expanded by 100 trillion trillion times in barely the blink of an eye -- was announced in March by experts at the Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics.

The detection was made with the help of a telescope called BICEP2, stationed at the South Pole.

"Detecting this signal is one of the most important goals in cosmology today," John Kovac, leader of the BICEP2 collaboration at the Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, said at the time.

The telescope targeted a specific area known as the "Southern Hole" outside the galaxy where there is little dust or extra galactic material to interfere with what humans could see.

By observing the cosmic microwave background, or a faint glow left over from the Big Bang, the scientists said small fluctuations gave them new clues about the conditions in the early universe.

The gravitational waves rippled through the universe 380,000 years after the Big Bang, and these images were captured by the telescope, they claimed.

If confirmed by other experts, some said the work could be a contender for the Nobel Prize.

- 'Serious flaws' -

But not everyone is convinced of the findings, with skepticism surfacing recently on blogs and scientific US journals such as Science and New Scientist.

Paul Steinhardt, director of Princeton University's Center for Theoretical Science, addressed the issue in the prestigious British journal Nature in early June.

"Serious flaws in the analysis have been revealed that transform the sure detection into no detection," Steinhardt wrote, citing an independent analysis of the BICEP2 findings.

That analysis was carried out by David Spergel, a theoretical astrophysicist who is also at Princeton.

Spergel queried whether what the BICEP2 telescope picked up really came from the first moments of the universe's existence.

"What I think, it is not certain whether polarized emissions come from galactic dust or from the early universe," he told AFP.

"We know that galactic dust emits polarized radiations, we see that in many areas of the sky, and what we pointed out in our paper is that pattern they have seen is just as consistent with the galactic dust radiations as with gravitational waves."

When using just one frequency, as these scientists did, it is impossible to distinguish between gravitational waves and galactic emissions, Spergel added.

The question will likely be settled in the coming months when another, competing group, working with the European Space Agency's Planck telescope, publishes its results.

That telescope observes a large part of the sky -- versus the BICEP2's two percent -- and carries out measurements in six frequencies, according to Spergel.

"They should revise their claim," he said of the BICEP2 team. "I think in retrospect, they should have been more careful about making a big announcement."

He went on to say that, contrary to normal procedure, there was no external check of the data before it was made public.

Philipp Mertsch of the Kavli Institute for Particle Astrophysics and Cosmology at Stanford University said data from Planck and another team should be able to "shed more light on whether it is primordial gravitational waves or dust in the Milky Way."

"Let me stress, however, that what is leaving me (and many of my colleagues) unsatisfied with the state of affairs: If it is polarized dust emission, where is it coming from?" he said in an email.

Kovac, an associate professor of astronomy and physics at Harvard, declined to respond to requests for comment.

Another member of the team, Jamie Bock of the California Institute of Technology, also declined to be interviewed.

At the time of their announcement in March, the scientists said they spent three years analyzing their data to rule out any errors.

 

 

Active particles may enhance phase separation

 
‎23 ‎June ‎2014, ‏‎01:35:35 PMGo to full article
Mainz, Germany (SPX) Jun 16, 2014 - Systems containing self-propelling particles, such as bacteria or artificial colloidal particles, are always out of equilibrium but may show interesting transitions between different states, reminiscent of phase transitions in equilibrium.

However, application of analytical and computational methodologies from equilibrium statistical mechanics is questionable to study properties of such active systems.

An international team of researchers - including Dr. Peter Virnau and Professor Kurt Binder of Johannes Gutenberg University Mainz (JGU), Benjamin Trefz of the JGU Graduate School of Excellence "Materials Science in Mainz" (MAINZ), and scientists from India and the U.S. - has studied the phase separation of a mixture of active and passive particles via molecular dynamics simulations and integral equation theoretical calculations.

The distinctive feature of the model used is that the "activity" of the particles is tunable, containing passive particles as a limiting case for which already phase separation occurs.

"Our research results demonstrate that the introduction of activity may not only hamper phase separation as shown previously, but can enhance it as well, based on the coordination among the active particles," explained Dr.

Peter Virnau of the Institute of Physics at Mainz University. Moreover, the researchers provided an approximate mapping of the phase behavior and structural properties of this nonequilibrium problem onto an equilibrium problem. A general validity of this mapping is subject to further careful testing. The confirmation of such validity would be an important step forward in understanding properties of active matter.

 

 

Manipulating and Detecting Ultrahigh Frequency Sound Waves

 
‎23 ‎June ‎2014, ‏‎01:35:35 PMGo to full article
Berkeley CA (SPX) Jun 16, 2014 - An advance has been achieved towards next generation ultrasonic imaging with potentially 1,000 times higher resolution than today's medical ultrasounds. Researchers with the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)'s Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (Berkeley Lab) have demonstrated a technique for producing, detecting and controlling ultrahigh frequency sound waves at the nanometer scale.

Through a combination of subpicosecond laser pulses and unique nanostructures, a team led by Xiang Zhang, a faculty scientist with Berkeley Lab's Materials Sciences Division, produced acoustic phonons - quasi-particles of vibrational energy that move through an atomic lattice as sound waves - at a frequency of 10 gigahertz (10 billion cycles per second).

By comparison, medical ultrasounds today typically reach a frequency of only about 20 megahertz (20 million cycles per second.) The 10GHz phonons not only promise unprecedented resolution for acoustic imaging, they also can be used to "see" subsurface structures in nanoscale systems that optical and electron microscopes cannot.

"We have demonstrated optical coherent manipulation and detection of the acoustic phonons in nanostructures that offer new possibilities in the development of coherent phonon sources and nano-phononic devices for chemical sensing, thermal energy management and communications," says Zhang, who also holds the Ernest S. Kuh Endowed Chair Professor at the University of California (UC) Berkeley.

In addition, he directs the National Science Foundation's Nano-scale Science and Engineering Center, and is a member of the Kavli Energy NanoSciences Institute at Berkeley.

Zhang is the corresponding author of a paper describing this research in Nature Communications. The paper is titled "Ultrafast Acousto-plasmonic Control and Sensing in Complex Nanostructures."

The lead authors are Kevin O'Brien and Norberto Daniel Lanzillotti-Kimura, members of Zhang's research group. Other co-authors are Junsuk Rho, Haim Suchowski and Xiaobo Yin.

Acoustic imaging offers certain advantages over optical imaging. The ability of sound waves to safely pass through biological tissue has made sonograms a popular medical diagnostic tool. Sound waves have also become a valuable tool for the non-destructive testing of materials.

In recent years, ultrahigh frequency sound waves have been the subject of intense scientific study. Phonons at GHz frequencies can pass through materials that are opaque to photons, the particles that carry light. Ultrahigh frequency phonons also travel at the small wavelengths that yield a sharper resolution in ultrasound imaging.

The biggest challenge has been to find effective ways of generating, detecting and controlling ultrahigh frequency sound waves. Zhang, O'Brien, Lanzillotti-Kimura and their colleagues were able to meet this challenge through the design of nanostructures that support multiple modes of both phonons and plasmons. A plasmon is a wave that rolls through the conduction electrons on the surface of a metal.

"Through the interplay between phonons and localized surface plasmons, we can detect the spatial properties of complex phonon modes below the optical wavelength," O'Brien says. "This allows us to detect complex nanomechanical dynamics using polarization-resolved transient absorption spectroscopy."

Plasmons can be used to confine light in subwavelength dimensions and are considered to be good candidates for manipulating nanoscale mechanical motion because of their large absorption cross-sections, subwavelength field localization, and high sensitivity to geometry and refractive index changes.

"To generate 10 GHz acoustic frequencies in our plasmonic nanostructures we use a technique known as picosecond ultrasonics," O'Brien says.

"Sub-picosecond pulses of laser light excite plasmons which dissipate their energy as heat. The nanostructure rapidly expands and generates coherent acoustic phonons. This process transduces photons from the laser into coherent phonons."

To detect these coherent phonons, a second laser pulse is used to excite probe surface plasmons. As these plasmons move across the surface of the nanostructure, their resonance frequency shifts as the nanostructure geometry becomes distorted by the phonons. This enables the researchers to optically detect mechanical motion on the nanoscale.

"We're able to sense ultrafast motion along the different axes of our nanostructures simply by rotating the polarization of the probe pulse," says Lanzillotti-Kimura.

"Since we've shown that the polarization of the pump pulse doesn't make a difference in our nanostructures due to hot electron diffusion, we can tailor the phonon modes which are excited by designing the symmetry of the nanostructure."

The plasmonic nanostructures that Zhang, O'Brien, Lanzillotti-Kimura and their colleagues designed are made of gold and shaped like a Swiss-cross. Each cross is 35 nanometers thick with horizontal and vertical arm lengths of 120 and 90 nanometers, respectively. When the two arms oscillate in phase, the crosses generate symmetric phonons. When the arms oscillate out of phase, anti-symmetric phonons are generated.

"The phase differences in the phonon modes produce an interference effect that allow us to distinguish between symmetric and anti-symmetric phonon modes using localized surface plasmons," O'Brien says.

"Being able to generate and detect phonon modes with different symmetries or spatial distributions in a structure improves our ability to detect nanoscale motion and is a step towards some potential applications of ultrahigh frequency acoustic phonons."

By allowing researchers to selectively excite and detect GHz mechanical motion, the Swiss-cross design of the plasmonic nanostructures provides the control and sensing capabilities needed for ultrahigh frequency acoustic imaging.

For the material sciences, the acoustic vibrations can be used as nanoscale "hammers" to impose physical strains along different axes at ultrahigh frequencies. This strain can then be detected by observing the plasmonic response. Zhang and his research group are planning to use these nanoscale hammers to generate and detect ultrafast vibrations in other systems such as two-dimensional materials.

 

 

Long-range tunneling of quantum particles

 
‎18 ‎June ‎2014, ‏‎04:33:41 PMGo to full article
Innsbruck, Austria (SPX) Jun 13, 2014 - One of the most remarkable consequences of the rules in quantum mechanics is the capability of a quantum particle to penetrate through a potential barrier even though its energy would not allow for the corresponding classical trajectory. This is known as the quantum tunnel effect and manifests itself in a multitude of well-known phenomena.

For example, it explains nuclear radioactive decay, fusion reactions in the interior of stars, and electron transport through quantum dots. Tunneling also is at the heart of many technical applications, for instance it allows for imaging of surfaces on the atomic length scale in scanning tunneling microscopes.

All the above systems have in common that they essentially represent the very fundamental paradigm of the tunnel effect: a single particle that penetrates through a single barrier. Now, the team of Hanns-Christoph Nagerl, Institute for Experimental Physics of the University of Innsbruck, Austria, has directly observed tunneling dynamics in a much more intriguing system: They see quantum particles transmitting through a whole series of up to five potential barriers under conditions where a single particle could not do the move.

Instead the particles need to help each other via their strong mutual interactions and via an effect known as Bose enhancement.

In their experiment the scientists place a gas of Cesium atoms at extremely low temperatures just above absolute zero temperature into a potential landscape that is deliberately engineered by laser light.

This so-called optical lattice forms a regular and perfect structure constituting the multiple tunneling barriers, similar to a washboard. As temperatures are so low and thus the atoms' kinetic energies are so tiny, the only way to move across the washboard is via tunneling through the barriers.

The tunneling motion is initiated by applying a directed force onto the atoms along one of the lattice axes, that is, by tilting the washboard. It is now one of the crucial points in the experiment that the physicists control through how many barriers the particles penetrate by the interplay between the interaction and the strength of the force in conjunction with Bose enhancement as a result of the particles' quantum indistinguishability.

Very similar to a massive object moving in the earth's gravitational field, the tunneling atoms should loose potential energy when they move down the washboard. But where can they deposit this energy in such a perfect and frictionless environment? It's the interaction energy between the atoms when they share the same site of the lattice that compensates for the potential energy.

As a result, the physicists found that the tunneling motion leads to discrete resonances corresponding to the number of barriers the particles penetrate through.

It is left for the future to explore the role of such long-range tunneling processes for lattice systems with ultracold atoms in the context of quantum simulation and quantum information processing, or for different physical settings, for instance electronic quantum devices, molecular or even biological systems.

 

 

Viewing deeper into the quantum world

 
‎18 ‎June ‎2014, ‏‎04:33:41 PMGo to full article
Barcelona, Spain (SPX) Jun 13, 2014 - One of the important tasks for quantum physics researchers and engineers is designing more sensitive instruments to study the tiny fields and forces that govern the world we live in. The most precise measuring instruments devised to date, such as atomic clocks or gravitational wave detectors, are interferometric in nature and operate according to the laws of quantum mechanics.

As with all quantum objects, photons - the basic building blocks of light - display a "wave-particle" duality. Interferometers exploit the wave-like behaviour of photons to measure a signal, known as a phase shift, affected by tiny forces acting on the interferometer. However, the particle-like behaviour of the same photons introduces noise into the measurement, reducing the quality of the results and limiting the sensitivity of these instruments.

This limitation is an expression of Heisenberg's famous Uncertainty Principle, which, in this context, states that the more precisely we know the phase of an interferometer signal, the less precisely we know the number of particles that are being measured, and vice versa.

The standard approach for overcoming this sensitivity limit is to use quantum-entanglement among the photons, meaning that individual photons become correlated at the quantum level. The noise introduced by a quantum fluctuation associated with one photon can be cancelled by an equivalent and opposite fluctuation from another photon.

An alternative approach exploits interactions between particles in a nonlinear interferometer to enhance the signal that is being measured. Theorists have predicted that such nonlinear interferometers should outperform their linear counterparts when a sufficiently large number of photons are used in the measurement.

So what is the difference between these two types of interferometers? In a linear interferometer, the photons do not interact amongst each other within the device - instead, researchers must first create a fragile entangled state and then send them through the interferometer.

In contrast, in a nonlinear interferometer all interactions between photons take place within the device itself. Even without generating entanglement among the photons, the signal of the interferometer is enhanced because the response of one photon is increased by the presence of other photons within the device.

In a pioneering experiment that took place three years ago, ICFO researchers led by ICREA Prof at ICFO Morgan Mitchell were able to experimentally demonstrate a proof-of-principle nonlinear interferometer that exploited interactions between photons to measure the tiny magnetization of a cloud of laser-cooled atoms.

Now the same group has gone further with a new study, recently published in Physical Review X, which, for the first time, demonstrates that such a nonlinear interferometer can outperform an equivalent linear measurement, confirming the proposed theoretical predictions.

Robert Sewell, researcher in the group and first author of the article, explains that "this discovery is important because it demonstrates that a nonlinear quantum measurement can actually be better than a linear one. Moreover, we demonstrate this by measuring a quantity of real interest - a magnetic field. "

Morgan Mitchell comments "This is quantum physics in the age of social networks, blogging, and Wikipedia. A group of quantum particles acting together can tell us more about the world than the most perfect group of lonely, isolated particles. This will come as no surprise to a modern teenager, but until very recently it was considered impossible by most physicists. I can't wait to see how this will change our approach to detecting, for example, the magnetic fields of the brain."

 

 

Exotic Particle Confirmed

 
‎18 ‎June ‎2014, ‏‎04:33:41 PMGo to full article
Julich, Germany (SPX) Jun 10, 2014 - or decades, physicists have searched in vain for exotic bound states comprising more than three quarks. Experiments performed at Julich's accelerator COSY have now shown that, in fact, such complex particles do exist in nature. This discovery by the WASA-at-COSY collaboration has been published in the journal Physical Review Letters.

The measurements confirm results from 2011, when the more than 120 scientists from eight countries discovered for the first time strong indications for the existence of an exotic dibaryon made up of six quarks.

For a long time, physicists were only able to reliably verify two different classes of hadrons: volatile mesons comprising one quark and one antiquark and baryons consisting of three quarks. Protons and neutrons, which make up atomic nuclei, are examples of the latter. In recent years, however, there has been growing evidence for the existence of additional types of hadrons, for example, hybrids, glueballs, and multiquarks.

In 1964, the physicist Freeman Dyson was the first to predict such more complex states. But any reliable verification proved impossible for many years because almost no measurements could be reproduced.

Only recently, other research groups - independently of each other - found strong indications for short-lived, exotic particles comprising four quarks, so called "tetraquarks".

The new bound state, which has now been verified at COSY, means that yet another class of exotic particles has been identified. "The new resonance that we observed confirms that quarks really do exist in six-packs. This discovery could open the door to new physical phenomena," says group spokesman Prof. Heinz Clement from the University of Tubingen.

The structure that was first discovered in 2011 is extremely short-lived and could only be detected via its decay products. The transient intermediate state - technical term: resonance - exists for a mere hundred-sextillionth (10 to the power of -23) of a second before it decays. This time span is so short that, for example, light can travel just a distance equivalent to the diameter of a small atomic nucleus.

Whether all six quarks form a single compact entity or rather a "hadronic molecule" has yet to be clarified. The latter would be composed of several nuclear building blocks - for example of excited protons and neutrons bound to each other - yet much more strongly than inside an atomic nucleus.

"The measurements that we performed at COSY in 2011 were already very precise. But because the experiments could not be repeated at any other accelerator worldwide, we had to come up with another experiment to verify the results," explains Prof. Hans Stroher, director at the Nuclear Physics Institute (IKP-2) in Julich.

In order to gain further unequivocal evidence of the exotic resonance named d*(2380), the scientists scanned the relevant energy range in an elastic scattering experiment.

They bombarded a proton target with polarized, heavy hydrogen nuclei known as deuterons. The exotic bound state formed during the collision influenced the angle with which the particles moved away from each other after the collision, thus allowing it to be identified .

"The findings are part of a bigger picture. If this particle exists, then theoretically a whole range of other exotic states can be expected," says director at Julich's IKP-1 Prof. James Ritman. The nuclear physicist is in charge of Julich's contribution to the PANDA detector at the international accelerator complex FAIR in Darmstadt, where such exotic structures will be explored in more detail.

 

 

Turbulent Black Holes

 
‎18 ‎June ‎2014, ‏‎04:33:41 PMGo to full article
Waterloo, Canada (SPX) Jun 09, 2014 - Fasten your seatbelts - gravity is about to get bumpy. Of course, if you're flying in the vicinity of a black hole, a bit of extra bumpiness is the least of your worries. But it's still surprising. The accepted wisdom among gravitational researchers has been that spacetime cannot become turbulent. New research from Perimeter, though, shows that the accepted wisdom might be wrong.

The researchers followed this line of thought: Gravity, it's thought, can behave as a fluid. One of the characteristic behaviours of fluids is turbulence - that is, under certain conditions, they don't move smoothly, but eddy and swirl. Can gravity do that too?

Perimeter Faculty member Luis Lehner explains why it might make sense to treat gravity as a fluid. "There's a conjecture in physics - the holographic conjecture - which says gravity can be described as a field theory," he says. "And we also know that at high energies, field theories can be described with the mathematical tools we use to describe fluids. So it's a two-step dance: gravity equals field theory, and field theory equals fluids, so gravity equals fields equals fluids. That's called the gravity/fluids duality."

The gravity/fluids duality is not new work - it's been developing over the past six years. But hidden at the heart of it is a tension. If gravity can be treated as a fluid, then what about turbulence?

"For many years, the folklore among physicists was that gravity could not be turbulent," notes Lehner. The belief was that gravity is described by a set of equations that are sufficiently different from fluid dynamics equations, such that there would not be turbulence under any circumstances.

Lehner highlights the emerging paradox: "Either there was a problem with the duality and gravity really can't be fully captured by a fluid description, or there was a new phenomenon in gravity and turbulent gravity really can exist." A team of researchers - Lehner, Huan Yang (Perimeter and the Institute for Quantum Computing), and Aaron Zimmerman (Canadian Institute for Theoretical Astrophysics) - set out to find out which.

They had hints about what directions to go. Previous simulations at Perimeter, and independent work out of MIT, had hinted that there could be turbulence around the non-realistic case of black holes confined in anti-de Sitter space.

"There might be turbulence if you confine gravity in a box, essentially," says Lehner. "The deeper question is whether this can happen in a realistic situation."

The team decided to study fast-spinning black holes, because a fluid-dynamics description of such holes hints that the spacetime around them is less viscous than the spacetime around other kinds of black holes. Low viscosity increases the chance of turbulence - think of the way water is more swirly than molasses.

The team also decided to study non-linear perturbations of the black holes. Gravitational systems are rarely analyzed at this level of detail, as the equations are fiendishly complex. But, knowing that turbulence is fundamentally non-linear, the team decided a non-linear perturbation analysis was exactly what was called for.

They were stunned when their analysis showed that spacetime did become turbulent.

"I was quite surprised," says Yang, who has been studying general relativity (GR) - Einstein's theory of gravity - since his PhD. "I never believed in turbulent behaviour in GR, and for good reason. No one had ever seen it in numerical simulations, even of dramatic things like binary black holes."

"Over the past few years, we have gone from a serious doubt about whether gravity can ever go turbulent, to pretty high confidence that it can," says Lehner.

How did this behaviour hide until now? "It was hidden because the analysis needed to see it has to go to non-linear orders," says Yang. "People didn't have enough motivation to do a non-linear study. But, this time, we knew what we were looking for. It gave us the motivation to do a more in-depth study. We had a target and we hit it."

This is theoretical work, but it might not stay that way. There are next-generation detectors about to come online which might soon be able to detect gravitational waves - ripples in the gravitational "fluid" that result from big events like the collision of two black holes.

If gravitation can be turbulent, then those ripples might be a bit different than previous models suggest. Knowing about these differences may make gravitational waves easier to spot. And, of course, actually detecting these differences would be direct evidence of gravitational turbulence.

"There are potential observational consequences of this discovery," says Lehner. "LIGO or LISA or some future gravitational wave experiment may be able to detect them."

But one of the most exciting consequences of this research relates not to gravity, but to ordinary, Earth-bound turbulence. From hurricanes to cream stirred into coffee, from the bumblebee's impossible flight to the vortices shearing off the end of airplane wings, turbulence is all around us. Yet we don't fully understand it. It's considered one of the greatest unsolved problems in classical physics.

This research strengthens the idea that gravity can be treated as a fluid - which also means that fluids can be treated gravitationally.

"We've been stuck for over 500 years on achieving a full understanding of turbulence," says Lehner. "This gravity/fluid correspondence tells us that there is a way to use gravitational tools and gravitational intuition to take a fresh look at turbulence. We may end up as stuck as we are in our standard approach, or we may end up shedding completely new light that helps the field go forward. It's very exciting."

Read the original paper on arXiv.

 

 

Black Hole 'Batteries' Keep Blazars Going and Going

 
‎18 ‎June ‎2014, ‏‎04:33:41 PMGo to full article
Greenbelt MD (SPX) Jun 05, 2014 - Astronomers studying two classes of black-hole-powered galaxies monitored by NASA's Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope have found evidence that they represent different sides of the same cosmic coin. By unraveling how these objects, called blazars, are distributed throughout the universe, the scientists suggest that apparently distinctive properties defining each class more likely reflect a change in the way the galaxies extract energy from their central black holes.

"We can think of one blazar class as a gas-guzzling car and the other as an energy-efficient electric vehicle," said lead researcher Marco Ajello, an astrophysicist at Clemson University in South Carolina. "Our results suggest that we're actually seeing hybrids, which tap into the energy of their black holes in different ways as they age."

Active galaxies possess extraordinarily luminous cores powered by black holes containing millions or even billions of times the mass of the sun. As gas falls toward these supermassive black holes, it settles into an accretion disk and heats up. Near the brink of the black hole, through processes not yet well understood, some of the gas blasts out of the disk in jets moving in opposite directions at nearly the speed of light.

Blazars are the highest-energy type of active galaxy and emit light across the spectrum, from radio to gamma rays. They make up more than half of the discrete gamma-ray sources cataloged by Fermi's Large Area Telescope, which has detected more than 1,000 to date.

Astronomers think blazars appear so intense because they happen to tip our way, bringing one jet nearly into our line of sight. Looking almost directly down the barrel of a particle jet moving near the speed of light, emissions from the jet and the region producing it dominate our view.

To be considered a blazar, an active galaxy must show either rapid changes in visible light on timescales as short as a few days, strong optical polarization, or glow brightly at radio wavelengths with a "flat spectrum" - that is, one exhibiting relatively little change in brightness among neighboring frequencies.

Astronomers have identified two models in the blazar line. One, known as flat-spectrum radio quasars (FSRQs), show strong emission from an active accretion disk, much higher luminosities, smaller black hole masses and lower particle acceleration in the jets. The other, called BL Lacs, are totally dominated by the jet emission, with the jet particles reaching much higher energy and the accretion disk emission either weak or absent.

Speaking at the American Astronomical Society meeting in Boston on Tuesday, Ajello said he and his team wanted to probe how the distribution of these objects changed over the course of cosmic history, but solid distance information for large numbers of gamma-ray-producing BL Lac objects was hard to come by.

"One of our most important tools for determining distance is the movement of spectral lines toward redder wavelengths as we look deeper into the cosmos," explained team member Dario Gasparrini, an astronomer at the Italian Space Agency's Science Data Center in Rome. "The weak disk emission from BL Lacs makes it extremely difficult to measure their redshift and therefore to establish a distance."

So the team undertook an extensive program of optical observations to measure the redshifts of BL Lac objects detected by Fermi.

"This project has taken several years and simply wouldn't have been possible without the extensive use of many ground-based observatories by our colleagues," said team member Roger Romani, an astrophysicist at the Kavli Institute for Particle Astrophysics and Cosmology, a facility run jointly by Stanford University and the SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory in Menlo Park, California.

The redshift survey included 25 nights on the Hobby-Eberly Telescope at McDonald Observatory in Texas, led by Romani; eight nights on the 200-inch telescope at Palomar Observatory and nine nights on the 10-meter Keck Telescope in Hawaii, led by Anthony Readhead at Caltech in Pasadena, California; and nine nights on telescopes at the European Southern Observatory in Chile, led by Garret Cotter at the University of Oxford in England.

In addition, important observations were provided by the Chile-based GROND camera, led by Jochen Greiner at the Max Planck Institute for Extraterrestrial Physics in Garching, Germany, and the Ultraviolet/Optical Telescope on NASA's Swift satellite, led by Neil Gehrels at Goddard Space Flight Center in Greenbelt, Maryland.

With distances for about 200 BL Lacs in hand -- the largest and most comprehensive sample available to date -- the astronomers could compare their distribution across cosmic time with a similar sample of FSRQs. What emerged suggests that, starting around 5.6 billion years ago, FSRQs began to decline while BL Lacs underwent a steady increase in numbers. The rise is particularly noticeable among BL Lacs with the most extreme energies, which are known as high-synchrotron-peaked blazars based on a particular type of emission.

"What we think we're seeing here is a changeover from one style of extracting energy from the central black hole to another," adds Romani. Large galaxies grew out of collisions and mergers with many smaller galaxies, and this process occurs with greater frequency as we look back in time.

These collisions provided plentiful gas to the growing galaxy and kept the gas stirred up so it could more easily reach the central black hole, where it piled up into a vast, hot, and bright accretion disk like those seen in "gas-guzzling" FSRQs. Some of the gas near the hole powers a jet while the rest falls in and gradually increases the black hole's spin.

As the universe expands and the density of galaxies decreases, so do galaxy collisions and the fresh supply of gas they provide to the black hole. The accretion disk becomes depleted over time, but what's left is orbiting a faster-spinning and more massive black hole. These properties allow BL Lac objects to maintain a powerful jet even though relatively meager amounts of material are spiraling toward the black hole.

In effect, the energy of accretion from the galaxy's days as an FSRQ becomes stored in the increasing rotation and mass of its black hole, which acts much like a battery. When the gas-rich accretion disk all but disappears, the blazar taps into the black hole's stored energy that, despite a lower accretion rate, allows it to continue operating its particle jet and producing high-energy emissions as a BL Lac object.

One observational consequence of the hybrid blazar notion is that the luminosity of BL Lacs should decrease over time as the black hole loses energy and spins down.

The astronomers say they are eager to test this idea with larger blazar samples provided in part by Fermi's continuing all-sky survey. Understanding the details of this transition also will require better knowledge of the jet, the black hole mass and the galaxy environment for both blazar classes.

Paper: "The Cosmic Evolution of Fermi BL Lacertae Objects"

 

 

Quantum criticality observed in new class of materials

 
‎18 ‎June ‎2014, ‏‎04:33:41 PMGo to full article
Houston TX (SPX) Jun 05, 2014 - Quantum criticality, the strange electronic state that may be intimately related to high-temperature superconductivity, is notoriously difficult to study. But a new discovery of "quantum critical points" could allow physicists to develop a classification scheme for quantum criticality - the first step toward a broader explanation.

Quantum criticality occurs in only a few composite crystalline materials and happens at absolute zero - the lowest possible temperature in the universe. The paucity of experimental observations of quantum criticality has left theorists wanting in their quest for evidence of possible causes.

The new finding of "quantum critical points" is in a class of iron superconductors known as "oxypnictides" (pronounced OXEE-nick-tydes). The research by physicists at Rice University, Princeton University, China's Zhejiang University and Hangzhou Normal University, France's Ecole Polytechnique and Sweden's Linkoping University appears in this month's issue of Nature Materials.

"One of the challenges of studying quantum criticality is trying to completely classify the quantum critical points that have been observed so far," said Rice physicist Qimiao Si, a co-author of the new study. "There are indications that there's more than one type, but do we stop at two? As theorists, we are not yet at the point where we can enumerate all of the possibilities.

"Another challenge is that there are still very few materials where we can say, with certainty, that a quantum critical point exists," Si said. "There's a very strong need, on these general grounds, for extending the materials basis of quantum criticality."

In 2001, Si and colleagues advanced a theory to explain how quantum critical points could give seemingly conventional metals unconventional properties. High-temperature superconductors are one such material, and another is "heavy fermion" metals, so-called because the electrons inside them can appear to be thousands of times more massive than normal.

Heavy fermion metals are prototype systems for quantum criticality. When these metals reach their quantum critical point, the electrons within them act in unison and the effects of even one electron moving through the system have widespread results throughout. This is very different from the electron interactions in a common wiring material like copper. It is these collective effects that have increasingly convinced physicists of a possible link between superconductivity and quantum criticality.

"The quantum critical point is the point at which a material undergoes a transition from one phase to another at absolute zero," said Si, Rice's Harry C. and Olga K. Wiess Professor of Physics and Astronomy. "Unlike the classical phase transition of ice melting into water, which occurs when heat is provided to the system, the quantum phase transition results from quantum-mechanical forces. The effects are so powerful that they can be detected throughout the space inside the system and over a long time."

To observe quantum critical points in the lab, physicists cool their samples - be they heavy fermion metals or high-temperature superconductors - to extremely cold temperatures. Though it is impossible to chill anything to absolute zero, physicists can drive the phase transition temperatures to attainable low temperatures by applying pressure, magnetic fields or by "doping" the samples to slightly alter the spacing between atoms.

Si and colleagues have been at the forefront of studying quantum critical points for more than a decade. In 2003, they developed the first thermodynamic method for systematically measuring and classifying quantum critical points. In 2004 and again in 2007, they used tests on heavy fermion metals to show how the quantum critical phenomena violated the standard theory of metals - Landau's Fermi-liquid theory.

In 2008, following the groundbreaking discovery of iron-based pnictide superconductors in Japan and China, Si and colleagues advanced the first theory that explained how superconductivity develops out of a bad-metal normal state in terms of magnetic quantum fluctuations. Also that year, Si co-founded the International Collaborative Center on Quantum Matter (ICC-QM), a joint effort by Rice, Zhejiang University, the London Centre for Nanotechnology and the Max Planck Institute for Chemical Physics of Solids in Dresden, Germany.

In 2009, Si and co-authors offered a theoretical framework to predict how the pnictides would behave at or near a quantum critical point. Several of these predictions were borne out in a series of studies the following year.

In the current Nature Materials study, Si and ICC-QM colleagues Zhu'an Xu, an experimentalist at Zhejiang, and Jianhui Dai, a theorist at Hangzhou, worked with Antoine Georges of Ecole Polytechnique, Nai Phuan Ong of Princeton and others to look for evidence of quantum critical points in an iron-based heavy fermion metallic compound made of cerium, nickel, arsenic and oxygen. The material is related to the family of iron-based pnictide superconductors.

"Heavy fermions are the canonical system for the in-depth study of quantum criticality," Si said. "We have considered heavy fermion physics in the iron pnictides before, but in those compounds the electrons of the iron elements are ordered in such a way that it makes it more difficult to precisely study quantum criticality.

"The compound that we studied here is the first one among the pnictide family that turned out to feature clear-cut heavy fermion physics. That was a pleasant surprise for me," Si said.

Through measurements of electrical transport properties in the presence of a magnetic field, the study provided evidence that the quantum critical point belongs to an unconventional type proposed in the 2001 work of Si and colleagues.

"Our work in this new heavy fermion pnictide suggests that the type of quantum critical point that has been theoretically advanced is robust," Si said. "This bodes well with the notion that quantum criticality can eventually be classified."

He said it is important to note that other homologues - similar iron-based materials - may now be studied to look for quantum critical points.

"Our results imply that the enormous materials basis for the oxypnictides, which has been so crucial to the search for high-temperature superconductivity, will also play a vital role in the effort to establish the universality classes of quantum criticality," Si said.

Additional co-authors include Yongkang Lou, Yuke Li, Chunmu Feng and Guanghan Cao, all of Zhejiang University; Leonid Pourovskii of both Ecole Polytechnique and Linkoping University; and S.E. Rowley of Princeton University.

The research was supported by the National Basic Research Program of China, the National Science Foundation of China, the NSF of Zhejiang Province, the Fundamental Research Funds for the Central Universities of China, the National Science Foundation, the Nano Electronics Research Corporation, the Robert A. Welch Foundation, the China Scholarship Council and the Swedish National Infrastructure for Computing.

 

 

WSU researchers confirm 60-year-old prediction of atomic behavior

 
‎18 ‎June ‎2014, ‏‎04:33:41 PMGo to full article
Pullman WA (SPX) Jun 04, 2014 - Researchers at Washington State University have used a super-cold cloud of atoms that behaves like a single atom to see a phenomenon predicted 60 years ago and witnessed only once since. The phenomenon takes place in the seemingly otherworldly realm of quantum physics and opens a new experimental path to potentially powerful quantum computing.

Working out of a lab in WSU's Webster Hall, physicist Peter Engels and his colleagues cooled about one million atoms of rubidium to 100 billionths of a degree above absolute zero. There was no colder place in the universe, said Engels, unless someone was doing a similar experiment elsewhere on Earth or on another planet.

At that point, the cluster of atoms formed a Bose-Einstein condensate - a rare physical state predicted by Albert Einstein and Indian theorist Satyendra Nath Bose - after undergoing a phase change similar to a gas becoming a liquid or a liquid becoming a solid. Once the atoms acted in unison, they could be induced to exhibit coherent "superradiant" behavior predicted by Princeton University physicist Robert Dicke in 1954.

"This large group of atoms does not behave like a bunch of balls in a bucket," said Engels. "It behaves as one big super-atom. Therefore it magnifies the effects of quantum mechanics."

Engels' findings appear in the journal Nature Communications. Co-author and collaborator Chuanwei Zhang, a former WSU physicist now at the University of Texas at Dallas, led the theoretical aspects of the work.

Funders include the National Science Foundation, the Army Research Office and the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency, the cutting-edge research agency known as DARPA.

Researchers using these super-cold dilute gases have created the superradiant state in only one other situation, said Engels, using a far more complicated experiment involving coupling to photon fields. Because the coupling of atoms and photons is usually very weak, their behavior was extremely hard to observe, he said.

"What our colleague Chuanwei Zhang realized is, if you replaced the light with the motion of the particles, you got exactly the same physics," said Engels. Moreover, it's easier to observe. So while their cloud of atoms measures less than half a millimeter across, it is large enough to be photographed and measured. This gives experimenters a key tool for testing assumptions and changes in the atomic realm of quantum physics.

"We have found an implementation of the system that allows us to go in the lab and actually test the predictions of the Dicke model, and some extensions of it as well, in a system that is not nearly as complicated as people always thought it has to be for the Dicke physics," Engels said.

Ordinary physical properties change so dramatically in quantum mechanics that it can seem like a drawing by M.C. Escher. Photons can be both waves and particles. A particle can go through two spaces at the same time and, paradoxically, interfere with itself. Electrons can be oriented up or down at the same time.

This concurrent duality can be exploited by quantum computing. So where a conventional computer uses 1s and 0s to make calculations, the fundamental units of a quantum computer could be 1s and 0s at the same time. As Wired magazine recently noted, "It's a mind-bending, late-night-in-the-dorm-room concept that lets a quantum computer calculate at ridiculously fast speeds."

 

 

No evidence of the double nature of neutrinos

 
‎15 ‎June ‎2014, ‏‎08:48:21 PMGo to full article
Munich, Germany (SPX) Jun 05, 2014 - Neutrinos are tiny, neutral elementary particles that, contrary to the standard model of physics, have been proven to have mass. One possible explanation for this mass could be that neutrinos are their own antiparticles, so-called Majorana particles.

Though experimental evidence for this is still lacking, many theoretical extensions of the standard model of physics predict the Majorana nature of neutrinos. If this hypothesis proves to be true, many previously unanswered questions about the origin of our universe and the origin of matter could be answered.

650 meters of shielding
In the EXO-200 experiment (Enriched Xenon Observatory), which is operated in the U.S. state of New Mexico, 650 meters below the earth's surface, scientists are looking for the evidence. Physicists from the research group of Professor Peter Fierlinger of the Excellence Cluster Universe at the Technische Universitaet Muenchen are major contributors to this experiment.

The most sensitive method to experimentally verify the Majorana question is the search for a process called "neutrinoless double-beta decay". This process is a special radioactive decay that may only occur if neutrinos are their own antiparticles.

Unprecedented accuracy
The EXO-200 experiment has searched for these decays over several years. From the fact that not one of these decays has been detected, the scientists can now deduce a lower limit for the half-life of the decay of at least 1025 years - around one million-billion years more than the age of the universe.

"Although this measurement attains unprecedented accuracy, the question about the nature of neutrinos can still not be answered," says Dr. Michael Marino, member of the research group of Professor Peter Fierlinger and responsible for the analysis of the now published data. "That's why this open issue remains one of the most exciting questions in physics."

This result demonstrates the high sensitivity of the detector and also the future potential of this method. Hence the EXO-200 measurements are also the basis for a much larger future experiment that finally could confirm or refute the Majorana nature of neutrinos."

International cooperation
The EXO-200 experiment uses liquid xenon that was enriched to 80.6 percent of xenon-136 in Russian centrifuges. Xenon-136 is an isotope that is allowed by theory to undergo neutrinoless double-beta decay. The experiment's location in the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) 650 meters below ground provides shielding against radioactive decays and cosmic radiation.

EXO-200 is a collaboration of research groups from Canada, Switzerland, South Korea, Russia and the USA; the Technische Universitaet Muenchen is the only German partner.

J. B. Albert, et.al., The EXO-200 Collaboration: Search for Majorana neutrinos with the first two years of EXO-200 data, Nature, Adv. online publication, June 5, 2014

 

 

University of Toronto physicists take quantum leap toward ultra-precise measurement

 
‎15 ‎June ‎2014, ‏‎08:48:21 PMGo to full article
Toronto, Canada (SPX) Jun 03, 2014 - For the first time, physicists at the University of Toronto (U of T) have overcome a major challenge in the science of measurement using quantum mechanics. Their work paves the way for great advances in using quantum states to enable the next generation of ultra-precise measurement technologies.

"We've been able to conduct measurements using photons - individual particles of light - at a resolution unattainable according to classical physics," says Lee Rozema, a Ph.D. candidate in Professor Aephraim Steinberg's quantum optics research group in U of T's Department of Physics, and one of the lead authors along with M.Sc. candidate James Bateman of a report on the discovery published online in Physical Review Letters. "This work opens up a path for using entangled states of light to carry out ultra-precise measurements."

Many of the most sensitive measurement techniques in existence, from ultra-precise atomic clocks to the world's largest telescopes, rely on detecting interference between waves - which occurs, for example, when two or more beams of light collide in the same space.

Manipulating interference by producing photons in a special quantum state known as an "entangled" state - the sort of state famously dismissed by a skeptical Albert Einstein as implying "spooky action at a distance" - provided the result Rozema and his colleagues were looking for.

The entangled state they used contains N photons which are all guaranteed to take the same path in an interferometer - either all N take the left-hand path or all N take the right-hand path, but no photons leave the pack.

The effects of interference are measured in devices known as "interferometers." It is well known that the resolution of such a device can be improved by sending more photons through it - when classical light beams are used, increasing the number of photons (the intensity of the light) by a factor of 100 can improve the resolution of an interferometer by a factor of 10.

However, if the photons are prepared in a quantum-entangled state, an increase by a factor of 100 should improve the resolution by that same full factor of 100.

The scientific community already knew resolution could be improved by using entangled photons. Once scientists figured out how to entangle multiple photons the theory was proved correct but only up to a point. As the number of entangled photons rose, the odds of all photons reaching the same detector and at the same time became astronomically small, rendering the technique useless in practice.

So Rozema and his colleagues developed a way to employ multiple detectors in order to measure photons in entangled states. They designed an experimental apparatus that uses a "fibre ribbon" to collect photons and send them to an array of 11 single-photon detectors.

"This allowed us to capture nearly all of the multi-photons originally sent," says Rozema. "Sending single photons as well as two, three and four entangled photons at a time into our device produced dramatically improved resolution."

The U of T experiment built on a proposal by National University of Singapore physicist Mankei Tsang. In 2009, Tsang posited the idea of placing detectors at every possible position a photon could reach so that every possible event could be recorded, whether or not multiple photons hit the same detector.

This would enable the calculation of the average position of all the detected photons, and could be done without having to discard any of them. The theory was quickly tested with two photons and two detectors by University of Ottawa physicist Robert Boyd.

"While two photons are better than one, we've shown that 11 detectors are far better than two," says Steinberg, summarising their advancement on Boyd's results. "As technology progresses, using high-efficiency detector arrays and on-demand entangled-photons sources, our techniques could be used to measure increasingly higher numbers of photons with higher resolution."

The discovery is reported in a study titled "Scalable spatial superresolution using entangled photons" published in the June 6 issue of Physical Review Letters. It is recommended as an Editor's Suggestion, and is accompanied by a commentary in the journal Physics which describes the work as a viable approach to efficiently observing superresolved spatial interference fringes that could improve the precision of imaging and lithography systems.

In addition to Steinberg, Rozema and Bateman's collaborators on the research included Dylan Mahler, Ryo Okamoto of Hokkaido and Osaka Universities, Amir Feizpour, and Alex Hayat, now at the Technion - Israel Institute of Technology. Support for the research was provided by the Natural Sciences and Engineering Research Council of Canada and the Canadian Institute for Advanced Research, as well as the Yamada Science Foundation.

 

 

Smaller accelerators for particle physics

 
‎03 ‎June ‎2014, ‏‎10:43:52 PMGo to full article
Washington DC (SPX) May 28, 2014 - It took every inch of the Large Hadron Collider's 17-mile length to accelerate particles to energies high enough to discover the Higgs boson. Now, imagine an accelerator that could do the same thing in, say, the length of a football field. Or less.

That is the promise of laser-plasma accelerators, which use lasers instead of high-power radio-frequency waves to energize electrons in very short distances. Scientists have grappled with building these devices for two decades, and a new theoretical study predicts that this may be easier than previously thought.

The authors are Carlo Benedetti, Carl Schroeder, Eric Esarey, and Wim Leemans, physicists at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory's Berkeley Lab Laser Accelerator (BELLA) Center. Their paper, "Plasma wakefields driven by an incoherent combination of laser pulses: A path towards high-average power laser-plasma accelerators," appears in the May Special Issue of Physics of Plasmas, from AIP Publishing.

If their models prove correct, they could help lower the cost of high-energy physics research -- the Large Hadron Collider cost $9 billion -- as well as many other industrial and medical applications of accelerators.

Laser-plasma accelerators work by blasting a powerful laser beam into a plasma, a cloud of unattached electrons and ions.

"The effect is like the wake of boat speeding down a lake. If the wake was big enough, a surfer could ride it," Leemans, who heads the BELLA Center, explained.

"Imagine that the plasma is the lake and the laser is the motorboat. When the laser plows through the plasma, the pressure created by its photons pushes the electrons out of the way. They wind up surfing the wake, or wakefield, created by the laser as it moves down the accelerator," he said.

The fast moving electrons leave the heavy ions behind. As they separate, they create gigantic electric fields, 100 to 1,000 times larger than those in conventional accelerators.

This is how they accelerate electrons so rapidly. For example, Stanford's Linear Accelerator Center takes two miles to drive an electron to 50 billion electron volts (GeV). Leemans' experimental laser-plasma accelerator takes electrons to more than 1 GeV in slightly more than 1 inch.

It takes a lot of laser power to generate a wakefield. For example, BELLA's petawatt (1 quadrillion watts) laser has a 10 meter x 10 meter footprint. It generates 400 times more power than all the world's power plants combined, though only for 40 femtoseconds (40 quadrillionths of a second).

Unfortunately, it takes BELLA's laser a full second to recharge and send a second pulse. High-energy physics research requires tens of thousands of pulses per second. Many other applications would benefit from multiple pulses per second.

BELLA's laser has the highest repetition rate of any petawatt laser in the world. Building a faster petawatt laser would require a heroic feat of engineering.

Several European researchers have suggested using an array of smaller lasers to produce one enormous pulse. Since less powerful lasers recharge faster, they could produce hundreds or even thousands of pulses per second and sustain a wakefield over many meters.

The hurdle they needed to overcome was how to synchronize hundreds of lasers so they all pulsed within less than a femtosecond of one another.

Such precision would be expensive and presents serious technical problems. But the concept of combining lasers got Leemans' team thinking.

What if the beam was not perfect? What if it were just good enough to rapidly raise the photon pressure on the electrons? Could we get away with it, they wondered.

According to the model presented in Physics of Plasmas, they could. Leemans compares it to pushing a swing.

"Instead of one big push, we would give it many smaller pushes at roughly the same time. It's not quite perfect, but the swing doesn't really care. It averages over all these little pushes and up it goes."

Laxer timing would make larger and more sustainable accelerators practical. Leemans hopes to power them with a new technology based on highly-efficient fiber lasers. The power that off-the-shelf welding lasers offer demonstrates multi-kW capabilities but much work is needed to pack the power into ultrashort pulses needed for laser plasma accelerators. The paper offers an approach that gets us a step closer.

The new accelerators would offer new options to physicists trying to unravel how the universe is put together. It could lower the cost of industrial uses, and make high-energy accelerators more affordable for hospitals.

Just think of it as dreaming big by thinking small.

The article "Plasma wakefields driven by an incoherent combination of laser pulses: a path towards high-average power laser-plasma accelerators" is authored by C. Benedetti, C. B. Schroeder, E. Esarey, and W. P. Leemans. Published in the journal Physics of Plasmas on May 27, 2014.

 

 

Zeroing in on the proton's magnetic moment

 
‎03 ‎June ‎2014, ‏‎10:43:52 PMGo to full article
Saitama, Japan (SPX) May 30, 2014 - As part of a series of experiments designed to resolve one of the deepest mysteries of physics today, researchers from RIKEN, in collaboration with the University of Mainz, GSI Darmstadt and the Max Planck Institute for Physics at Heidelberg, have made the most precise ever direct measurement of the magnetic moment of a proton.

The work, published in Nature, seeks to answer the fundamental question of why we exist at all. It is believed that the Big Bang some 13 billion years ago generated equal amounts of matter and antimatter-which annihilate when they collide-and yet the universe today seems to contain only matter.

Work is being carried out from many fronts to detect differences that would explain this, and one promising route is to compare the magnetic moments of particles and their antimatter conjugates, as even a tiny difference could explain the matter-antimatter asymmetry. The research collaboration is working to measure the magnetic moment of the proton and antiproton to unprecedented precision, and determine if there is any difference.

In the study published, the researchers reached an important milestone by directly measuring the moment of a single proton to enormous precision, based on spectroscopy of a single particle in a Penning trap.

Andreas Mooser, first author of the paper, explains that "this important quantity has never been measured directly and is so far only known at a relative precision of about 10 parts per billion, based on hyperfine spectroscopy of a MASER in a magnetic field. However, this required significant theoretical corrections to extract the proton's magnetic moment from the measurement."

In the new paper the researchers report the first direct high precision measurement of the proton magnetic moment at a fractional precision of 3 parts per billion, improving the 42-year-old "fundamental constant" by a factor of three.

The new method using a single particle in a Penning trap can now be directly applied to measure the magnetic moment of the antiproton, which is currently known at a relative precision of only 4 parts per million.

According to RIKEN researcher Stefan Ulmer, second author of the paper and spokesperson of the BASE collaboration at CERN which aims at the high precision measurement of the antiproton moment, "Using the new method will allow this value to be improved by at least a factor of thousand, providing a stringent test of matter -antimatter symmetry."

 

 

Universe breaks its fever

 
‎03 ‎June ‎2014, ‏‎10:43:52 PMGo to full article
Melbourne, Australia (SPX) May 22, 2014 - An international team, led by researchers from Swinburne University of Technology, has found evidence that the Universe broke its rising 'fever' about 11 billion years ago. They measured the temperature of the Universe when it was 3 to 4 billion years old by studying the gas in between galaxies - the intergalactic medium. During these early years of the Universe's development, many extremely active galaxies were 'switching on' for the first time and heating their surroundings.

"However, 11 billion years ago, this fever seems to have broken and the Universe began cooling down again," lead researcher Elisa Boera, a PhD student from Swinburne's Centre for Astrophysics and Supercomputing, said.

"The intergalactic medium is an excellent recorder of the Universe's history. It retains memory of the big events that affected its properties, such as temperature and composition, during its different phases of evolution."

An earlier study found that the Universe caught this fever early in its history. Its authors used a new 'thermometer' - the imprint left on the light by the intergalactic medium as it travelled to Earth from distant, extremely bright objects called quasars.

In the new study, Ms Boera collected the bluest light that Earth's atmosphere transmits - harsh ultraviolet (UV) light from 60 quasars - and used the same method as the earlier study. This UV light comes from slightly later in the Universe's development, allowing the new temperature measurement.

"The quasar light suggests that the Universe had cooled by about 1000 degrees C within 1 billion years after reaching its maximum of 13,000 degrees," Ms Boera said.

"This cooling trend has probably continued to the present day."

Why did the Universe's fever break?
"We think the answer is helium," co-author of the new study Swinburne Associate Professor Michael Murphy said.

"Fourteen per cent of the intergalactic gas is helium and, 12 billion years ago, it was absorbing the intense radiation from active galaxies, losing electrons in the process.

"The electrons whizz around, heating up the gas. It's similar to the greenhouse effect on Earth: Carbon dioxide gas absorbs infrared radiation and heats our atmosphere.

"Once all the helium was ionized, the radiation would simply pass through the gas without heating it.

"Then, as the Universe expands the gas cools down, just like the cold gas sprayed from an aerosol can - it quickly cools as it expands out of the can."

The study has been published in the Monthly Notices of the Royal Astronomical Society.

 

 

Particles near absolute zero do not break the laws of physics after all

 
‎03 ‎June ‎2014, ‏‎10:43:52 PMGo to full article
Heidelberg, Germany (SPX) May 22, 2014 - In theory, the laws of physics are absolute. However, when it comes to the laws of thermodynamics - the science that studies how heat and temperature relate to energy - there are times where they no longer seem to apply.

In a paper recently published in EPJ B, Robert Adamietz from the University of Augsburg, Germany, and colleagues have demonstrated that a theoretical model of the environment's influence on a particle does not violate the third law of thermodynamics, despite appearances to the contrary.

These findings are relevant for systems at the micro or nanometer scale that are difficult to decouple from the heat or the quantum effects exerted by their environment.

The authors focused on a model system favored by thermodynamics experts that consists of a free particle strongly coupled to a heat bath, representing the effect of its environment.

Studies of such systems typically focus on how much energy is needed to raise their temperature by a certain amount, or so-called specific heat.

Previous theoretical predictions suggested that, under certain circumstances, the specific heat can decrease below zero at a temperature of strictly zero (-273.15 C). This prediction appears to breach the third law of thermodynamics, which states that the specific heat must drop to zero value at strictly zero temperature.

The authors demonstrated that the third law of thermodynamics is not actually violated. In fact, a real particle will always be confined to a finite volume-even if that volume may be extremely large.

Therefore, they discovered that previous studies need to be modified in order to account for a spatial confinement of the particle. The new model demonstrates how the negative specific heat for a truly free particle is related to a dip in the specific heat, which should be observable in the presence of a confinement.

R. Adamietz, G.-L. Ingold, and U. Weiss (2014), Thermodynamic anomalies in the presence of general linear dissipation: from the free particle to the harmonic oscillator, European Physical Journal B, DOI 10.1140/epjb/e2014-50125-2

 

 

 

 

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Untangling The Brain Circuits In Mental Illness

 
‎28 ‎May ‎2014, ‏‎10:07:55 AMGo to full article
0 Funded through President Obama's Brain Initiative, a team of scientists and physicians is embarking on a $26 million project to develop a revolutionary and long-lasting treatment for depression, anxiety disorders, addiction and other neuropsychiatric disorders.

The ambitious program led by UCSF also involves UC Berkeley, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Cornell University and New York University, as well as industry partners Posit Science and Cortera Neurotechnologies.

Credit: UC San Francisco
 

Space Station Live: Exploration Flight Test 1 Operations

 
‎28 ‎May ‎2014, ‏‎07:55:57 AMGo to full article
0 Public Affairs Officer Dan Huot interviews Flight Director Mike Sarafin about EFT-1, or Exploration Flight Test 1. The flight test of the Orion crew module will go from low-Earth orbit to high-Earth orbit on its second orbit and test a high energy re-entry into Earth's atmosphere.

Credit: NASA
 

ScienceCasts: The Milky Way Is Not Just A Refrigerator Magnet

 
‎28 ‎May ‎2014, ‏‎07:51:23 AMGo to full article
0 A new map of the galaxy by ESA's Planck spacecraft has revealed gigantic loops of magnetism and other structures that point to a magnetic dynamo at work in the Milky Way.

Credit: NASA
 

What's That Smell? Lady Goats Love It At Least

 
‎28 ‎May ‎2014, ‏‎07:00:16 AMGo to full article
0 It turns out lady goats go ga-ga over males' hairy stench! This smell may be pretty repulsive to us humans, but researchers at the University of Tokyo say that this particular pheromone activates the central reproductive axis in female goats. They found that this pheromone released by male goats' head skin has the power to turn on a hormone in the female goats' brains that governs the reproductive endocrine system. They say that this new knowledge may one day help farmers to more precisely control the reproduction of their herds. And they say that it's likely this type of pheromonal effect is present in other livestock and maybe even humans.

[ Read the Article: Female Goats Go GaGa Over Males’ Hairy Head Stench ]
 

LDSD: We Brake for Mars: Part 2

 
‎28 ‎May ‎2014, ‏‎06:45:34 AMGo to full article
0 In part 2, JPL engineer Mike Meacham explains how an inflatable decelerator will help larger spacecraft land on Mars. The device will be tested at the Pacific Missile Range Facility in Hawaii in June, 2014.

Credit: NASA Jet Propulsion Laboratory
 

Seeing E-Cigarette Use Encourages Young Adult Tobacco Users To Light Up

 
‎28 ‎May ‎2014, ‏‎06:30:07 AMGo to full article
0 [ Read the Article: Visual Effects Of E-Cigarette Use Carry Over To Regular Smokers ]

"Whether participants were exposed to someone smoking a combustible or an e-cigarette, the urge to smoke a combustible cigarette was just as high in either condition," King said. "If the results do generalize and we show this in other groups, it's important to consider policy going forward in terms of reducing harm for both users and observers of e-cigarettes."

Credit: University of Chicago / Kevin Jiang
 

Classroom Decorations Disrupt Attention And Learning In Young Children

 
‎28 ‎May ‎2014, ‏‎06:15:57 AMGo to full article
0 [ Read the Article: Too Many Decorations In A Classroom Can Disrupt Attention And Learning In Young Children ]

Maps, number lines, shapes, artwork and other materials tend to cover elementary classroom walls. However, new research from Carnegie Mellon University shows that too much of a good thing may end up disrupting attention and learning in young children. Published in Psychological Science, Carnegie Mellon's Anna V. Fisher, Karrie E. Godwin and Howard Seltman looked at whether classroom displays affected children's ability to maintain focus during instruction and to learn the lesson content. They found that children in highly decorated classrooms were more distracted, spent more time off-task and demonstrated smaller learning gains than when the decorations were removed.

Credit: Carnegie Mellon University
 

ISS Mailbag - The Games People Play, Not Like In The Movies

 
‎28 ‎May ‎2014, ‏‎06:00:05 AMGo to full article
0 NASA astronauts Don Pettit and Mike Massimino answer more questions submitted via Twitter.

Credit: NASA
 

Memory Enhancement From Coffee Consumption

 
‎27 ‎May ‎2014, ‏‎07:00:10 AMGo to full article
0 Researchers recently reported that caffeine has a positive impact on long-term recollection in humans, enhancing some memories for roughly one full day after consumption. In the study, participants who drank coffee performed better on a memory test conducted the day after drinking coffee than those who drank water or a had a placebo. However, researchers aren’t sure whether this enhancement is due to caffeine’s effects on attention, vigilance, focus, or other factors.

[ Read the Article: Study Finds Link Between Caffeine And Long-Term Memory Enhancement ]
 

Robots Transform Into Furniture At EPFL

 
‎27 ‎May ‎2014, ‏‎06:45:42 AMGo to full article
0 [ Read the Article: Researchers Develop Lego-Like Robots That Can Transform Into Furniture ]

EPFL scientists are creating futuristic furniture that can move around and autonomously change its shape. This innovation may prove useful to support disabled individuals.

Credit: EPFL
 

To Our Pet Cats, We're Just Giant Versions Of Them

 
‎27 ‎May ‎2014, ‏‎06:30:51 AMGo to full article
0 According to a new book called Cat Sense from a professor from the Anthrozoology Institute at the University of Bristol, your furry little feline friend thinks you’re just a larger, non-hostile version of itself. Researchers say that your cat is just treating you as another cat. And when you’re cat brings home that prize-wining dead rat to your doorstep as a gift, they say it’s not actually a gift. Researchers at this school say the cat simply remembers it likes tinned food once it walks through the door and leaves its prey laying there. Why study this view of cats? Because the researcher at this school says that in actuality cats aren’t really very domesticated, that they are still wild, and that we must take that into consideration in the damage he says he’s seeing done by pedigree breeders.

[ Read the Article: Aren’t We All Just Giant Versions Of Our Domestic Feline Friends? ]
 

Space Station Live: 3D Printing In Space

 
‎27 ‎May ‎2014, ‏‎06:15:36 AMGo to full article
0 NASA and Made in Space, Inc., are working to send a 3-D printer to the International Space Station. The 3-D printing in Zero-G technology demonstration experiment will show that a 3-D printer can work normally in space. A 3-D printer extrudes streams of heated plastic, metal or other material, building layer on top of layer to create three-dimensional objects. Testing a 3-D printer on the space station is the first step towards establishing a working machine shop in space, a critical component for astronaut missions and in-space manufacturing. This is the weekly Payload Operations Integration Center segment from Marshall Space Flight Center in Huntsville, Alabama, and aired during Space Station Live on May 22, 2014.

Credit: NASA
 

Space Station Live: Short, High-Intensity Exercise To Stay In Space Shape

 
‎27 ‎May ‎2014, ‏‎06:00:24 AMGo to full article
0 Public Affairs Office Amiko Kauderer interviews Lori L. Ploutz-Snyder, lead investigator of the long-running Sprint VO2 exercise experiment. That study investigates high-intensity, low duration exercise techniques on the space s

Credit: NASA
 

Surviving An Acid Attack: Healing With Lasers

 
‎26 ‎May ‎2014, ‏‎09:12:03 AMGo to full article
0 An acid attack left her suffering with burns on most of her body.  Now, new advances in lasers are melting away her scars and giving her her life back.

Credit: Ivanhoe Broadcast News
 

Benefits Of Transcendental Meditation

 
‎26 ‎May ‎2014, ‏‎07:00:10 AMGo to full article
0 A new report from the Center for Brain, Consciousness, and Cognition at Maharishi University of Management details how transcendental meditation is the only type of meditation that is accompanied by physiological measure and descriptions of transcendental experiences. In the study of 52 subjects, they describe their transcendental meditation practice as a “state where thinking, feeling, and individual intention were missing, but Self-awareness remained.” The researcher noted physiological changes with the practice like a shift in breathing rate, skin conductance and EEG patterns. The researchers said regular meditation allows a person to become more self-aware and able to handle the challenges of everyday life.

[ Read the Article: Study Points To Benefits Of Transcendental Meditation ]
 

Mars Weathercam Helps Find Big, New Crater

 
‎26 ‎May ‎2014, ‏‎06:45:14 AMGo to full article
0 [ Read the Article: NASA’s Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter Captures Images Of Big New Crater ]

How before-and-after pictures led to the discovery of a fresh meteor impact crater on Mars.

Credit: NASA Jet Propulsion Laboratory
 

Developing Low-Earth Orbit Spacecraft

 
‎26 ‎May ‎2014, ‏‎06:30:09 AMGo to full article
0 NASA's Commercial Crew Program is working with aerospace industry partners in new ways to develop spacecraft for low-Earth orbit.

Credit: NASA Kennedy Space Center
 

Earth From Space: Jordanian Camp

 
‎26 ‎May ‎2014, ‏‎06:15:44 AMGo to full article
0 Earth from Space is presented by Kelsea Brennan-Wessels from the ESA Web-TV virtual studios. Learn how imagery from Earth-observing satellites can assist in humanitarian operations in the one-hundred-sixth edition.

Credit: ESA
 

This Week At NASA - May 23, 2014

 
‎24 ‎May ‎2014, ‏‎10:50:02 AMGo to full article
0 The Morpheus prototype lander took to the skies above the Kennedy Space Center to test a suite of landing and hazard avoidance technology and self-navigate to a safe landing. Over in Hawaii, NASA's Low-Density Supersonic Decelerator, a rocket-powered, saucer-shaped test vehicle, has completed final assembly and will be flown in an experimental flight test is planned for June. And, NASA is moving ahead with construction of the lander for the InSight mission to Mars where it will probe the Martian sub-surface. An ISS Science Forum took place Wednesday at Johnson Space Center, a Spacex Dragon Cargo craft departed the space station while a new expedition crew trains in Russia and students launch rockets that reach nearly 20,000 feet this week on This Week at NASA!
 

NASA's Moon As Art Campaign

 
‎23 ‎May ‎2014, ‏‎12:52:38 PMGo to full article
0 [ Read the Article: NASA Invites You To Select Favorite Moon Image For Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter Anniversary Collection ]

To celebrate its 5th Anniversary, the Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter mission presents Moon As Art! The images in the collection were created using data gathered by LRO over the first 4.5 years of operations. These top 5 images are presented to you, the public, to decide which will be the cover of the Moon As Art collection. Voting is open from May 23 -- June 6th. The winner will be announced with the release of the full collection on June 18, 2014, the 5th anniversary of LRO launch.

Credit: NASA
 

Microneurosurgical Clipping Of An Unruptured Intracranial Aneurysm

 
‎23 ‎May ‎2014, ‏‎10:30:49 AMGo to full article
0 [ Read the Article: One-third Of All Brain Aneurysms Rupture Regardless Of Size ]

This video depicts microneurosurgical clipping of an unruptured intracranial aneurysm, which is arising from the bifurcation i.e. branching point of two right middle cerebral arteries. In brief, the aneurysm locates in this case between the frontal and temporal brain lobes, and therefore it can be reached by sharply cutting normal membranes between the frontal and temporal lobes. This microneurosurgical dissection opens a natural corridor leading to the aneurysm. One aneurysm clip occludes the neck of the aneurysm and the aneurysm cannot rupture anymore. The normal brain arteries are left patent. Operated by neurosurgeon, Associate Professor Miikka Korja

Credit: Miikka Korja / University of Helsinki
 

Do You Prefer E-Books Or An Old-Fashioned Book?

 
‎23 ‎May ‎2014, ‏‎07:00:25 AMGo to full article
0 New Pew Research reveals, that although the number of Americans who read e-books are on the rise, printed books still remain the foundation of American reading habits. A survey of over a thousand people revealed that 28% have read an e-book in the past year but 70% of Americans reported reading a conventional book in print. Only four percent of readers classified themselves as solely e-book readers.

[ Read the Article: E-Reading Americans On The Rise, Yet Print Books Remain Most Popular ]
 

#GlobalSelfie: Photos Of Our Beautiful World

 
‎23 ‎May ‎2014, ‏‎06:45:19 AMGo to full article
0 [ Read the Article: NASA Releases “Global Selfie” Finished Product ]

People from over 100 countries participated in NASA's #GlobalSelfie campaign on Earth Day, April 22, 2014, by sending photographs from some of the most beautiful spots on our planet. Here are a few.

Credit: NASA
 

How To Build Your Own Bed Bug Trap

 
‎23 ‎May ‎2014, ‏‎06:30:11 AMGo to full article
0 [ Read the Article: New Bedbug Trap Offers Safe, Effective, Inexpensive Way To Deal With Parasites ]

UF/IFAS Entomologist Dr. Rebecca Baldwin demonstrates how to build a bed bug trap using household items.

Credit: University of Florida
 

Star Catcher: Behind The Webb

 
‎23 ‎May ‎2014, ‏‎06:15:53 AMGo to full article
0 The James Webb Space Telescope will have four "cameras" at its disposal to explore the universe. The Near-Infrared Camera, or NIRCAM, will focus its attention on distant galaxies and help us learn more about planets around other stars. But NIRCAM is unique. Its vision will also be used to help align the telescope, a critical step in making the observatory function properly. Join "Behind the Webb" Host Mary Estacion as she visits the Lockheed Martin facility in Palo Alto, California to find out more about the making of NIRCAM.

"Behind the Webb" is an ongoing series that follows the construction of the Webb Space Telescope, Hubble's successor.

Credit: NASA
 

Never Give Up! Low IQ Students Learn To Read

 
‎23 ‎May ‎2014, ‏‎06:00:17 AMGo to full article
0 [ Read the Article: Students With Low IQ Learn To Read At 1st-grade Level After Persistent, Intensive Instruction ]

Children identified as intellectually disabled or low IQ learned to read at a first-grade level after persistent, intensive instruction from a scientifically based curriculum. The findings of the pioneering four-year study from Southern Methodist University, Dallas, raise expectations for all struggling readers, said lead author Jill Allor. "We shouldn't give up on anybody," Allor said. "These children can learn not only functional skills, but reading as well, giving each one a shot at a more independent life."

Credit: Southern Methodist University
 

Protein May Lead To Malaria Vaccine

 
‎22 ‎May ‎2014, ‏‎03:36:14 PMGo to full article
0 Jonathan Kurtis, M.D., Ph.D., director of the Center for International Health Research at Rhode Island Hospital, talks about the latest findings in their research to find a vaccine for malaria, which kills one child every 15 seconds in Sub-Saharan Africa and Southeast Asia.

Credit: LIFESPAN
 

Bees On Dandelions

 
‎22 ‎May ‎2014, ‏‎01:52:55 PMGo to full article
0 [ Read the Article: Dancing Bees Show Researchers The Way To The Best Environmental Schemes ]

This video shows bees on dandelions.

Credit: Dr. Margaret Couvillon and Dr. Roger Schürch
 

ISS Expedition Crews 40 And 41 Practice For Space Launch In Baikonur, Kazakhstan

 
‎22 ‎May ‎2014, ‏‎01:32:07 PMGo to full article
0 At the Baikonur Cosmodrome in Kazakhstan, Expedition 40/41 Soyuz Commander Max Suraev of the Russian Federal Space Agency (Roscosmos), NASA Flight Engineer Reid Wiseman and Flight Engineer Alexander Gerst of the European Space Agency and their backups, Anton Shkaplerov of Roscosmos, Terry Virts of NASA and Samantha Cristoforetti of the European Space Agency participated in a variety of activities from May 15-22 as they prepared for the launch of Suraev, Wiseman and Gerst to the International Space Station on May 29, Kazakh time, in the Soyuz TMA-13M spacecraft. The footage includes the crew's arrival in Baikonur, a dress rehearsal fit check in their Soyuz spacecraft and other crew-related activities.

Credit: NASA
 

Expedition 40/41 Pre-Launch Activities At Baikonur Cosmodrome

 
‎22 ‎May ‎2014, ‏‎12:58:20 PMGo to full article
0 At the Baikonur Cosmodrome in Kazakhstan, Expedition 40/41 Soyuz Commander Max Suraev of the Russian Federal Space Agency (Roscosmos), NASA Flight Engineer Reid Wiseman and Flight Engineer Alexander Gerst of the European Space Agency participated in a variety of activities from May 15-21 as they prepared for their launch to the International Space Station on May 29, Kazakh time, in the Soyuz TMA-13M spacecraft.

Credit: NASA
 

RTS Used On Subject

 
‎22 ‎May ‎2014, ‏‎11:45:47 AMGo to full article
0 [ Read the Article: How Does Touch Trigger Our Emotions, And How Does It Affect Those With Autism? ]

This is the RTS being used in a psychophysical study where the subject is rating how pleasant/unpleasant the stroking touch is when delivered to different body sites. There is great heterogeneity across the body, which probably reflects the differential innervation by CTs of the body.

Credit: Neuron, McGlone et al.
 

Atmospheric General Circulation Changes Due To Increased Greenhouse Gases

 
‎22 ‎May ‎2014, ‏‎11:41:50 AMGo to full article
0 [ Read the Article: Unclouding Our Future View Of Climate ]

The animation shows how the atmosphere's general circulation is expected to change in 50 or 60 years as a result of increasing greenhouse gases. Air currents rise on both sides of the equator, flow toward both poles and sink, then return to the equator at lower altitudes. In the future, the currents near the equator will strengthen and loft clouds higher into the atmosphere. In the mid-latitudes, clouds will be more sparse, making the air drier and hotter. The sinking air flow will shift farther toward the poles, with more clouds building up closer to the polar regions.

Credit: NASA Jet Propulsion Laboratory
 

How Can A Snake Fly?

 
‎22 ‎May ‎2014, ‏‎07:00:58 AMGo to full article
0 New research from a team of American scientists found that the Paradise tree snake “flies” from tree to tree. These snakes shape their body into an aerofoil mid-flight in order to glide around 100 feet from the top of a tree. Scientists used a 3D printed model to simulate the snake. They found that the snake flexes it’s ribs as it launches, then flattens to change from a circular tube into an arched semi-circle to make itself more aerodynamic. Scientists say “it looks like someone’s version of a UFO.”

[ Read the Article: The Aerodynamics Of Flying Snakes ]
 

Orbiting Carbon Observatory 2: NASA's New Carbon Sleuth

 
‎22 ‎May ‎2014, ‏‎06:45:47 AMGo to full article
0 [ Read the Article: Social Media Accreditation Opens For Launch Of OCO-2 Earth Science Mission ]

NASA's OCO-2 mission, scheduled to launch July 1 from Vandenberg AFB, California, will make precise measurements of carbon dioxide in Earth's atmosphere. The orbiting observatory is NASA's first satellite mission dedicated to studying carbon dioxide, a critical component of Earth's carbon cycle that is the leading human-produced greenhouse gas driving changes in Earth's climate. OCO-2 will provide a better understanding of the sources of carbon dioxide emissions and the natural processes that remove carbon dioxide from the atmosphere, and how they are changing over time.

Credit: NASA
 

ScienceCasts: El Niño - Is 2014 The New 1997?

 
‎22 ‎May ‎2014, ‏‎06:30:31 AMGo to full article
0 [ Read the Article: El Niño: 2014 Resembling 1997 ]

The Jason-2 satellite sees something brewing in the Pacific. Researchers say it could be a significant El Niño with implications for global weather and climate.

Credit: NASA
 

The Assembly Line Of The Future

 
‎22 ‎May ‎2014, ‏‎06:15:14 AMGo to full article
0 [ Read the Article: Making Nanotechnology More Practical For Industrial-scale Manufacturing ]

There's no shortage of ideas about how to use nanotechnology, but one of the major hurdles is how to manufacture some of the new products on a large scale. With support from the National Science Foundation (NSF), University of Massachusetts (UMass) Amherst chemical engineer Jim Watkins and his team are working to make nanotechnology more practical for industrial-scale manufacturing.

Image Credit: NSF
 

Astronomers Identify Signature Of Earth-Eating Stars

 
‎22 ‎May ‎2014, ‏‎06:00:51 AMGo to full article
0 [ Read the Article: Astronomers Use Stellar Composition To Reveal Solar System Formation ]

Some Sun-like stars are 'Earth-eaters.' During their development they ingest large amounts of the rocky material from which 'terrestrial' planets like Earth, Mars and Venus are made.

Credit: Vanderbilt University
 

Panning Across The Colorful Star Cluster NGC 3590

 
‎21 ‎May ‎2014, ‏‎10:33:19 AMGo to full article
0 [ Read the Article: Studying A Star Cluster In Carina ]

This pan video gives a close-up look at a colorful new image from the MPG/ESO 2.2-metre telescope at ESO's La Silla Observatory in Chile showing the star cluster NGC 3590. These stars shine brightly in front of a dramatic landscape of dark patches of dust and richly hued clouds of glowing gas. This small stellar gathering gives astronomers clues about how these stars form and evolve — as well as giving hints about the structure of our galaxy's pinwheeling arms.

Credit: ESO / G. Beccari. Music: movetwo
 

Neck Joint The Key To An Ant's Strength

 
‎20 ‎May ‎2014, ‏‎07:00:43 AMGo to full article
0 Researchers at Ohio State University revealed that an ant’s strength may come from its tiny neck joint. They wanted to see how the mechanics of the ant could be applied to robotic technology so robots can carry heavier payloads in space and on Earth. In their study they were shocked to find that the ant is even stronger than previously thought, able to withstand pressures up to 5,000 times its weight. They think it’s the graded and gradual transition between the hard head and the soft-tissue neck that provides enhanced performance. I’ll spare you the details on how exactly they came to this conclusion, but this is what one researcher had to say, “If you want to understand something you take it apart, that might sound kind of cruel, but we did anesthetize them first.”

[ Read the Article: Ants Depend On A Tiny Neck Joint To Do Heavy Lifting: Study ]
 

ESA's Venus Express Aerobraking Maneuver

 
‎20 ‎May ‎2014, ‏‎06:45:33 AMGo to full article
0 [ Read the Article: Venus Express Preparing To Take The Plunge ]

Visualization of the Venus Express aerobraking maneuver, which will see the spacecraft orbiting Venus at an altitude of around 130 km from 18 June to 11 July. In the month before, the altitude will gradually be reduced from around 200 km to 130 km. If the spacecraft survives and fuel permits, the elevation of the orbit will be raised back up to approximately 450 km, allowing operations to continue for a further few months. Eventually, however, the spacecraft will plunge back into the atmosphere and the mission will end.
 
 

RedOrbit Videos Science

 

What's That Smell? Lady Goats Love It At Least

 
‎28 ‎May ‎2014, ‏‎07:00:16 AMGo to full article
0 It turns out lady goats go ga-ga over males' hairy stench! This smell may be pretty repulsive to us humans, but researchers at the University of Tokyo say that this particular pheromone activates the central reproductive axis in female goats. They found that this pheromone released by male goats' head skin has the power to turn on a hormone in the female goats' brains that governs the reproductive endocrine system. They say that this new knowledge may one day help farmers to more precisely control the reproduction of their herds. And they say that it's likely this type of pheromonal effect is present in other livestock and maybe even humans. [ Read the Article: Female Goats Go GaGa Over Males’ Hairy Head Stench ]
 

Classroom Decorations Disrupt Attention And Learning In Young Children

 
‎28 ‎May ‎2014, ‏‎06:15:57 AMGo to full article
0 [ Read the Article: Too Many Decorations In A Classroom Can Disrupt Attention And Learning In Young Children ] Maps, number lines, shapes, artwork and other materials tend to cover elementary classroom walls. However, new research from Carnegie Mellon University shows that too much of a good thing may end up disrupting attention and learning in young children. Published in Psychological Science, Carnegie Mellon's Anna V. Fisher, Karrie E. Godwin and Howard Seltman looked at whether classroom displays affected children's ability to maintain focus during instruction and to learn the lesson content. They found that children in highly decorated classrooms were more distracted, spent more time off-task and demonstrated smaller learning gains than when the decorations were removed. Credit: Carnegie Mellon University
 

Memory Enhancement From Coffee Consumption

 
‎27 ‎May ‎2014, ‏‎07:00:10 AMGo to full article
0 Researchers recently reported that caffeine has a positive impact on long-term recollection in humans, enhancing some memories for roughly one full day after consumption. In the study, participants who drank coffee performed better on a memory test conducted the day after drinking coffee than those who drank water or a had a placebo. However, researchers aren’t sure whether this enhancement is due to caffeine’s effects on attention, vigilance, focus, or other factors. [ Read the Article: Study Finds Link Between Caffeine And Long-Term Memory Enhancement ]
 

To Our Pet Cats, We're Just Giant Versions Of Them

 
‎27 ‎May ‎2014, ‏‎06:30:51 AMGo to full article
0 According to a new book called Cat Sense from a professor from the Anthrozoology Institute at the University of Bristol, your furry little feline friend thinks you’re just a larger, non-hostile version of itself. Researchers say that your cat is just treating you as another cat. And when you’re cat brings home that prize-wining dead rat to your doorstep as a gift, they say it’s not actually a gift. Researchers at this school say the cat simply remembers it likes tinned food once it walks through the door and leaves its prey laying there. Why study this view of cats? Because the researcher at this school says that in actuality cats aren’t really very domesticated, that they are still wild, and that we must take that into consideration in the damage he says he’s seeing done by pedigree breeders. [ Read the Article: Aren’t We All Just Giant Versions Of Our Domestic Feline Friends? ]
 

Benefits Of Transcendental Meditation

 
‎26 ‎May ‎2014, ‏‎07:00:10 AMGo to full article
0 A new report from the Center for Brain, Consciousness, and Cognition at Maharishi University of Management details how transcendental meditation is the only type of meditation that is accompanied by physiological measure and descriptions of transcendental experiences. In the study of 52 subjects, they describe their transcendental meditation practice as a “state where thinking, feeling, and individual intention were missing, but Self-awareness remained.” The researcher noted physiological changes with the practice like a shift in breathing rate, skin conductance and EEG patterns. The researchers said regular meditation allows a person to become more self-aware and able to handle the challenges of everyday life. [ Read the Article: Study Points To Benefits Of Transcendental Meditation ]
 

Earth From Space: Jordanian Camp

 
‎26 ‎May ‎2014, ‏‎06:15:44 AMGo to full article
0 Earth from Space is presented by Kelsea Brennan-Wessels from the ESA Web-TV virtual studios. Learn how imagery from Earth-observing satellites can assist in humanitarian operations in the one-hundred-sixth edition. Credit: ESA
 

#GlobalSelfie: Photos Of Our Beautiful World

 
‎23 ‎May ‎2014, ‏‎06:45:19 AMGo to full article
0 [ Read the Article: NASA Releases “Global Selfie” Finished Product ] People from over 100 countries participated in NASA's #GlobalSelfie campaign on Earth Day, April 22, 2014, by sending photographs from some of the most beautiful spots on our planet. Here are a few. Credit: NASA
 

How To Build Your Own Bed Bug Trap

 
‎23 ‎May ‎2014, ‏‎06:30:11 AMGo to full article
0 [ Read the Article: New Bedbug Trap Offers Safe, Effective, Inexpensive Way To Deal With Parasites ] UF/IFAS Entomologist Dr. Rebecca Baldwin demonstrates how to build a bed bug trap using household items. Credit: University of Florida
 

Never Give Up! Low IQ Students Learn To Read

 
‎23 ‎May ‎2014, ‏‎06:00:17 AMGo to full article
0 [ Read the Article: Students With Low IQ Learn To Read At 1st-grade Level After Persistent, Intensive Instruction ] Children identified as intellectually disabled or low IQ learned to read at a first-grade level after persistent, intensive instruction from a scientifically based curriculum. The findings of the pioneering four-year study from Southern Methodist University, Dallas, raise expectations for all struggling readers, said lead author Jill Allor. "We shouldn't give up on anybody," Allor said. "These children can learn not only functional skills, but reading as well, giving each one a shot at a more independent life." Credit: Southern Methodist University
 

Bees On Dandelions

 
‎22 ‎May ‎2014, ‏‎01:52:55 PMGo to full article
0 [ Read the Article: Dancing Bees Show Researchers The Way To The Best Environmental Schemes ] This video shows bees on dandelions. Credit: Dr. Margaret Couvillon and Dr. Roger Schürch
 

RTS Used On Subject

 
‎22 ‎May ‎2014, ‏‎11:45:47 AMGo to full article
0 [ Read the Article: How Does Touch Trigger Our Emotions, And How Does It Affect Those With Autism? ] This is the RTS being used in a psychophysical study where the subject is rating how pleasant/unpleasant the stroking touch is when delivered to different body sites. There is great heterogeneity across the body, which probably reflects the differential innervation by CTs of the body. Credit: Neuron, McGlone et al.
 

Atmospheric General Circulation Changes Due To Increased Greenhouse Gases

 
‎22 ‎May ‎2014, ‏‎11:41:50 AMGo to full article
0 [ Read the Article: Unclouding Our Future View Of Climate ] The animation shows how the atmosphere's general circulation is expected to change in 50 or 60 years as a result of increasing greenhouse gases. Air currents rise on both sides of the equator, flow toward both poles and sink, then return to the equator at lower altitudes. In the future, the currents near the equator will strengthen and loft clouds higher into the atmosphere. In the mid-latitudes, clouds will be more sparse, making the air drier and hotter. The sinking air flow will shift farther toward the poles, with more clouds building up closer to the polar regions. Credit: NASA Jet Propulsion Laboratory
 

How Can A Snake Fly?

 
‎22 ‎May ‎2014, ‏‎07:00:58 AMGo to full article
0 New research from a team of American scientists found that the Paradise tree snake “flies” from tree to tree. These snakes shape their body into an aerofoil mid-flight in order to glide around 100 feet from the top of a tree. Scientists used a 3D printed model to simulate the snake. They found that the snake flexes it’s ribs as it launches, then flattens to change from a circular tube into an arched semi-circle to make itself more aerodynamic. Scientists say “it looks like someone’s version of a UFO.” [ Read the Article: The Aerodynamics Of Flying Snakes ]
 

Orbiting Carbon Observatory 2: NASA's New Carbon Sleuth

 
‎22 ‎May ‎2014, ‏‎06:45:47 AMGo to full article
0 [ Read the Article: Social Media Accreditation Opens For Launch Of OCO-2 Earth Science Mission ] NASA's OCO-2 mission, scheduled to launch July 1 from Vandenberg AFB, California, will make precise measurements of carbon dioxide in Earth's atmosphere. The orbiting observatory is NASA's first satellite mission dedicated to studying carbon dioxide, a critical component of Earth's carbon cycle that is the leading human-produced greenhouse gas driving changes in Earth's climate. OCO-2 will provide a better understanding of the sources of carbon dioxide emissions and the natural processes that remove carbon dioxide from the atmosphere, and how they are changing over time. Credit: NASA
 

ScienceCasts: El Niño - Is 2014 The New 1997?

 
‎22 ‎May ‎2014, ‏‎06:30:31 AMGo to full article
0 [ Read the Article: El Niño: 2014 Resembling 1997 ] The Jason-2 satellite sees something brewing in the Pacific. Researchers say it could be a significant El Niño with implications for global weather and climate. Credit: NASA
 

The Assembly Line Of The Future

 
‎22 ‎May ‎2014, ‏‎06:15:14 AMGo to full article
0 [ Read the Article: Making Nanotechnology More Practical For Industrial-scale Manufacturing ] There's no shortage of ideas about how to use nanotechnology, but one of the major hurdles is how to manufacture some of the new products on a large scale. With support from the National Science Foundation (NSF), University of Massachusetts (UMass) Amherst chemical engineer Jim Watkins and his team are working to make nanotechnology more practical for industrial-scale manufacturing. Image Credit: NSF
 

Science Knowledge In America

 
‎21 ‎May ‎2014, ‏‎07:00:53 AMGo to full article
0 A new survey from the National Science Foundation revealed that, while most Americans like learning about recent scientific advancements, only 74% knew that the Earth revolved around the Sun. But 90% of all US residents see the need for scientific research and think scientists are “helping to solve challenging problems” and are “dedicated people who work for the good of humanity. Researchers that helped with study said that it was “important for Americans to maintain a high regard for science and scientists” because these positive attitudes help to ensure future funding and scientists. [ Read the Article: Science Knowledge Lacking In America – Only 74 Percent Know The Earth Revolves Around The Sun ]
 

NASA #GlobalSelfie Photos Of Animal Friends

 
‎21 ‎May ‎2014, ‏‎06:15:24 AMGo to full article
0 Several of the 50,000 images submitted to NASA for its Earth Day #GlobalSelfie campaign included greetings from animal friends with whom we share the planet. The photos were submitted as part of NASA's campaign to produce a mosaic "Global Selfie" to be released on May 21. The event was designed to encourage environmental awareness and remind people of NASA's ongoing work to protect our home planet. Credit: NASA
 

Neck Joint The Key To An Ant's Strength

 
‎20 ‎May ‎2014, ‏‎07:00:43 AMGo to full article
0 Researchers at Ohio State University revealed that an ant’s strength may come from its tiny neck joint. They wanted to see how the mechanics of the ant could be applied to robotic technology so robots can carry heavier payloads in space and on Earth. In their study they were shocked to find that the ant is even stronger than previously thought, able to withstand pressures up to 5,000 times its weight. They think it’s the graded and gradual transition between the hard head and the soft-tissue neck that provides enhanced performance. I’ll spare you the details on how exactly they came to this conclusion, but this is what one researcher had to say, “If you want to understand something you take it apart, that might sound kind of cruel, but we did anesthetize them first.” [ Read the Article: Ants Depend On A Tiny Neck Joint To Do Heavy Lifting: Study ]
 

Where Does Lightning Come From?

 
‎20 ‎May ‎2014, ‏‎06:15:45 AMGo to full article
0 [ Read the Article: Lightning Strikes May Be More Intense Due To Solar Wind Activity ] How does lightning travel through the air? New research from the University of Reading suggests that energetic particles from the sun could be part of the answer, adding extra weight to the theory that cosmic rays from space help to trigger lightning strikes. Dr. Chris Scott, from the University of Reading's Department of Meteorology, explains how the sun affects our weather, and how these new findings could lead to long-range lightning forecasts to warn people when there's a greater risk from lightning. Credit: University of Reading
 

Earth From Space: Tropical Snow

 
‎20 ‎May ‎2014, ‏‎06:00:12 AMGo to full article
0 Earth from Space is presented by Kelsea Brennan-Wessels from the ESA Web-TV virtual studios. Discover the mountain that experiences the lowest gravity on the planet in the one-hundred-fifth edition. [ View Image ] Credit: ESA
 

Octopus Treats Other's Amputated Arm As Food

 
‎19 ‎May ‎2014, ‏‎11:39:04 AMGo to full article
0 [ Read the Article: Special Chemical In Skin Keeps Octopus Arms From Entangling ] An octopus is reaching for a freshly amputated arm of another conspecific octopus and pulls it. Since the amputated arm is still alive, it holds the glass firmly, and the octopus has to use two arms in order to pull it. The amputated arm is pulled by the octopus and brought into the mouth and is held in it as a typical food item. Credit: Current Biology, Nesher et al.
 

Octopus Doesn't Treat Its Own Amputated Arm As Food

 
‎19 ‎May ‎2014, ‏‎11:36:20 AMGo to full article
0 [ Read the Article: Special Chemical In Skin Keeps Octopus Arms From Entangling ] An octopus is treating its own freshly amputated arm in a strange and exploratory manner that is not commonly seen with respect to food items. Note the 'startle' response of the amputated arm. The octopus is rubbing its arms over the amputated arm, petting it, but avoids grasping its skin. Eventually, the octopus is grasping the amputated arm only at the amputation site, where the flesh is exposed. After bringing the arm to its mouth, the octopus holds the amputated arm only at the flesh of the amputated arm and only with its beak for a long time. Credit: Current Biology, Nesher et al.
 

Bats Inspire Next-Gen Aircraft

 
‎18 ‎May ‎2014, ‏‎06:55:49 AMGo to full article
0 A team of researchers are deconstructing the way the bat flies to apply to flying vehicles. Over 1,000 bat species have hand membrane wings with “webbed’ fingers connected by a flexible membrane. This configuration allows the bat to expand by 30% on a downward movement to maximize favorable forces but also decreases the area similarly on the way up to minimize unfavorable forces. The forces manipulated by the bat are 2 to 3 times greater than static airfoil wings used for large airplanes. So, they’re going to continue to study the bat wing, break it down into simpler motions, and hopefully apply it to make a bat-inspired flying robot. [ Read the Article: Building Better Aircraft Based On Bat Wing Motions ]
 

The Oldest Rock On Earth

 
‎18 ‎May ‎2014, ‏‎06:45:54 AMGo to full article
0 Zircon gathered from Australia’s Jack Hills region is confirming scientists’ view of how the Earth cooled and became habitable 4.4 billion years ago. Researchers found that the rock is the oldest known material of any kind to have formed on our planet. Using atom-probe tomography and ion mass spectrometry, the team from the University of Wisconsin-Madison concluded from the rock sample that the Earth had a hydrosphere before 4.3 billion years ago. They also found that the planet was indeed a “cool early Earth” with temperatures low enough for liquid water, oceans, and a hydrosphere not long after the planet’s crust congealed from a sea of magma. [ Read the Article: Australian Rock Determined To Be Oldest Material Formed On Earth ]
 

West Antarctica Glaciers: Past The Point Of No Return

 
‎18 ‎May ‎2014, ‏‎06:30:26 AMGo to full article
0 A rapidly disappearing section of the West Antarctic Ice Sheet appears to be on an unstoppable path to complete meltdown. The glaciers contain enough ice to raise global sea level by 4 feet (1.2 meters) Credit: NASA Jet Propulsion Laboratory
 

Earth From Space: Tropical Snow

 
‎16 ‎May ‎2014, ‏‎09:12:35 AMGo to full article
0 Earth from Space is presented by Kelsea Brennan-Wessels from the ESA Web-TV virtual studios. Discover the mountain that experiences the lowest gravity on the planet in the one-hundred-fifth edition. Credit: ESA
 

Earth From Space: Tropical Snow

 
‎16 ‎May ‎2014, ‏‎09:12:35 AMGo to full article
0 Earth from Space is presented by Kelsea Brennan-Wessels from the ESA Web-TV virtual studios. Discover the mountain that experiences the lowest gravity on the planet in the one-hundred-fifth edition. Credit: ESA
 

Octopus Treats Another's Amputated Arm As Food

 
‎16 ‎May ‎2014, ‏‎08:53:09 AMGo to full article
0 An octopus is reaching for a freshly amputated arm of another conspecific octopus and pulls it. Since the amputated arm is still alive, it holds the glass firmly, and the octopus has to use two arms in order to pull it. The amputated arm is pulled by the octopus and brought into the mouth and is held in it as a typical food item. Credit: Current Biology, Nesher et al.
 

Octopus Treats Another's Amputated Arm As Food

 
‎16 ‎May ‎2014, ‏‎08:53:09 AMGo to full article
0 An octopus is reaching for a freshly amputated arm of another conspecific octopus and pulls it. Since the amputated arm is still alive, it holds the glass firmly, and the octopus has to use two arms in order to pull it. The amputated arm is pulled by the octopus and brought into the mouth and is held in it as a typical food item. Credit: Current Biology, Nesher et al.
 

 

Beyond Perception - DVD

by Chuck Missler  

 

 

DVD

PRICE R 159.00

 

Media Type: DVD
Published 20-Sep-2010
Published by Koinonia House
KHID#: DVD84
Why do scientists now believe we live in a 10-dimensional universe?

Has physics finally reached the very boundaries of reality?

There seems to be evidence to suggest that our world and everything in it are only ghostly images; projections from a level of reality so beyond our own that the real reality is literally beyond both space and time. The main architect of this astonishing idea is one of the world's most eminent thinkers- physicist David Bohm, a protege of Einstein's. Earlier, he noticed that, in plasmas, particles stopped behaving like individuals and started behaving as if they were part of a larger and inter connected whole. He continued his work in the behavior of oceans of these particles, noting their behaving as if they know what each on the untold trillions of individual particles were doing.

This briefing pack DVD comes with:
-two mp3 audio files
-one notes file in pdf format

This DVD includes notes in PDF format and MP3 files.

Encoding: This DVD will be viewable in other countries WITH the proper DVD player and television set.
Format: Color, Fullscreen
Aspect Ratio: 4:3
Audio Encoding: Dolby Digital 2.0 stereo
Run Time: 2 hour(s)
Number of discs: 1


 
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Genetics Research Confirms Biblical Timeline

Exciting research from the summer of 2012 described DNA variation in the protein coding regions of the human genome linked to population growth. One of the investigation's conclusions was that the human genome began to rapidly diversify not more than 5,000 years ago.1,2 This observation closely agrees with a biblical timeline of post-flood human diversification. Yet another study, this one published in the journal Nature, accessed even more extensive data and unintentionally confirmed the recent human history described in Genesis.3

Differences in human DNA can be characterized across populations and ethnic groups using a variety of techniques. One of the most informative genetic technologies in this regard is the analysis of rare DNA variation in the protein coding regions of the genome. Variability in these regions is less frequent than the more numerous genetic differences that occur in the non-coding regulatory regions. Researchers can statistically combine this information with demographic data derived from population growth across the world to generate time scales related to human genetic diversification.4

What makes this type of research unique is that evolutionary scientists typically incorporate hypothetical deep time scales taken from the authority of paleontologists or other similar deep-time scenarios to calibrate models of genetic change over time. Demographics-based studies using observed world population dynamics do not rely on this bias and are therefore more accurate and realistic.

In a 2012 Science report, geneticists analyzed DNA sequences of 15,585 protein-coding gene regions in the human genome for 1,351 European Americans and 1,088 African Americans for rare DNA variation.1,2 This new study accessed rare coding variation in 15,336 genes from over 6,500 humans—almost three times the amount of data compared to the first study.3 A separate group of researchers performed the new study.

The Nature results convey a second spectacular confirmation of the amazingly biblical conclusions from the first study. These scientists confirmed that the human genome began to rapidly diversify not more than 5,000 years ago. In addition, they found significant levels of  variation to be associated with degradation of the human genome, not forward evolutionary progress. This fits closely with research performed by Cornell University geneticist John Sanford who demonstrated through biologically realistic population genetic modeling that genomes actually devolve over time in a process called genetic entropy.5

According to the Bible, the pre-flood world population was reduced to Noah's three sons and their wives, creating a genetic bottleneck from which all humans descended. Immediately following the global flood event, we would expect to see a rapid diversification continuing up to the present. According to Scripture, this began not more than 5,000 years ago. We would also expect the human genome to devolve or degrade as it accumulates irreversible genetic errors over time. Now, two secular research papers confirm these biblical predictions.

References

  1. Tomkins, J. 2012. Human DNA Variation Linked to Biblical Event Timeline. Creation Science Update. Posted on icr.org July 23, 2012, accessed December 31, 2012.
  2. Tennessen, J. et al. 2012. Evolution and Functional Impact of Rare Coding Variation from Deep Sequencing of Human Exomes. Science. 337 (6090): 64-69.
  3. Fu, W, et al. Analysis of 6,515 exomes reveals the recent origin of most human protein-coding variants. Nature. Published online before print, July 13, 2012.
  4. Keinan, A and A. Clark. 2012. Recent Explosive Human Population Growth Has Resulted in an Excess of Rare Genetic Variants. Science. 336 (6082): 740-743.
  5. Sanford, J. C. 2008. Genetic Entropy and the Mystery of the Genome, 3rd ed. Waterloo, NY: FMS Publications.

* Dr. Tomkins is a Research Associate and received his Ph.D. in Genetics from Clemson University.

 

Lest Thou Forget

 
‎26 ‎May ‎2014, ‏‎10:00:00 AMGo to full article

With Memorial Day coming up, we all look forward to a day of rest and relaxation. Yet, we cannot forget the reason we celebrate this holiday. The lives of many brave soldiers have been given so that we may be free. Let us always remember that.

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College Clashes over Adam and Eve Statement

 
‎23 ‎May ‎2014, ‏‎10:00:00 AMGo to full article

The trustees over Tennessee's Bryan College altered the school's long-held statement of faith to include "Adam," and some of their faculty didn't like the change. How deeply has evolutionary thought influenced fundamental Christian convictions?

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'Junk' DNA Keeps Your Heart Beating

 
‎21 ‎May ‎2014, ‏‎10:00:00 AMGo to full article

A new research study has shown that large regions of the human genome, once thought to be useless junk, work to keep your heart functioning properly. When these areas of the genome malfunction, cardiovascular failure is often the outcome, showing the importance of every piece of God's handiwork.

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Brazil, Disease and Adam & Eve

 
‎19 ‎May ‎2014, ‏‎10:00:00 AMGo to full article

Only one in a million U.S. Americans suffer from the horrible disease xeroderma pigmentosum, or "XP," but one in 40 from the Brazilian town of Araras has it. Why is the disease so highly concentrated in Araras, and how could answering that question help unravel some confusion about Adam and Eve?

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Pat Robertson: Creationists 'Deaf, Dumb, and Blind'

 
‎16 ‎May ‎2014, ‏‎10:00:00 AMGo to full article

Television minister Pat Robertson said on the May 13 episode of CBN's 700 Club, "The truth is, you have to be deaf, dumb, and blind to think that this earth that we live in only has 6,000 years of existence." The eight staff doctorates at the Institute for Creation Research, and the thousands of other biblical creation scientists who agree with their position, might like to know what they supposedly haven't heard, don't understand, and haven't seen.

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Millions of Years of Evolution Equal Engineering?

 
‎14 ‎May ‎2014, ‏‎10:00:00 AMGo to full article

We know how man-made designs originate— people design them. But what about living designs? Two recent biomimicry research programs let slip the same logic errors when accounting for the origin of the creatures they copy: the seahorse and kangaroo.

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Birds' Built-In Defenses Fend Off Radiation

 
‎12 ‎May ‎2014, ‏‎10:00:00 AMGo to full article

It has been 28 years since Chernobyl's nuclear power plant suffered a catastrophic meltdown in Ukraine. People are still not permitted to live near it, but a new study revealed surprising hints that certain birds' internal biological tactics cope well with the harmful radiation.

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Three's Company, but Two's a Cloud?

 
‎09 ‎May ‎2014, ‏‎10:00:00 AMGo to full article

It's not a planet, nor a comet, but the faraway object named 2012 VP113 now joins Sedna as the second member of what secularists term the "inner Oort cloud." This "cloud" presents a mystery—these objects should not even be there. How could they have traveled there, and what do they really represent?

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Zonkeys, Geeps, and Noah's Ark

 
‎07 ‎May ‎2014, ‏‎10:00:00 AMGo to full article

Zebra + Donkey = Zonkey. Zebras and donkeys actually have different numbers of chromosomes, making fertilization quite challenging, but cellular machinery sometimes somehow finds a way to form a viable offspring.

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Still Soft after Half a Billion Years?

 
‎05 ‎May ‎2014, ‏‎10:00:00 AMGo to full article

Original soft tissue fossils are revolutionizing our understanding of how and when fossils formed. The science of tissue decay does not permit the conventional long ages assigned to them, yet even those ages pale in comparison with the "age" of recently described original, pliable, marine worm tissue in a Pre-Cambrian fossil said to be half a billion years old.

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Neandertal: The Answer Is Epigenetics Not Evolution

 
‎02 ‎May ‎2014, ‏‎10:00:00 AMGo to full article

Recent genome reports show that the Neandertals are essentially fully human, and the unique traits exhibited in their bones are related to epigenetics.

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Designed to Walk on Water

 
‎28 ‎April ‎2014, ‏‎10:00:00 AMGo to full article

Insects called water striders spend their lives gliding gracefully across stream surfaces. Scientists from China have uncovered some specific design specifications that perfectly suit the insects' tiny leg hairs for walking on water.

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Americans Question the Big Bang

 
‎25 ‎April ‎2014, ‏‎10:00:00 AMGo to full article

A new poll revealed that 51 percent of Americans question the Big Bang theory… and mainstream scientists are not happy.

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Wonder Worm

 
‎23 ‎April ‎2014, ‏‎10:00:00 AMGo to full article

Spectacular details in a special worm fossil contradict even the longest age estimates for genetic disintegration. This worm should have gone extinct a thousand times over, but apparently it didn't die off even once.

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How (Not) to Date a Fossil

 
‎21 ‎April ‎2014, ‏‎10:00:00 AMGo to full article

Do rocks and fossils hold clues that demand millions-of-years? Not the fossils from China's Daohugou beds. On the contrary, their clues speak to more recent origins.

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Why It Was a 'Good' Friday

 
‎18 ‎April ‎2014, ‏‎10:00:00 AMGo to full article

The focus of Good Friday is on the crucifixion of our Lord. So, why "Good" Friday? Why not "Sad" Friday? The answer may well lie in the sovereignty of God Himself.

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Fossil Plant Chromosomes Look Modern

 
‎16 ‎April ‎2014, ‏‎10:00:00 AMGo to full article

As mere fragments, most fossils reveal only small hints of ancient life forms. But a fossilized fern's stem recently discovered in Sweden shows its every detail, sending some clear messages about its origin.

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Former Junk DNA Candidate Proves Indispensable

 
‎14 ‎April ‎2014, ‏‎10:00:00 AMGo to full article

Some of the primary candidates for being labeled "Junk DNA" have been the highly repetitive regions of the genome that, after years of study, seemed to have no discernable function. However, new research has shown that the RNAs encoded by these regions are key players in promoting genome stability and function.

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Students Surprised to Find Noah's Ark Feasible

 
‎11 ‎April ‎2014, ‏‎10:00:00 AMGo to full article

Advanced physics students at Leicester University were tasked with determining if the Biblical dimensions of Noah's ark could have supported the weight of 70,000 animals. What did they find?

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Dual-Gene Code Discovery Highlights Designed Biocomplexity

 
‎09 ‎April ‎2014, ‏‎10:00:00 AMGo to full article

Recent evidence of dual codes in the protein-coding sections of genes raised the bar on our understanding of genome complexity, and now a new study is showing that the control regions of genes contain dual codes as well.

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Cells' Molecular Motor Diversity Confounds Evolution

 
‎07 ‎April ‎2014, ‏‎10:00:00 AMGo to full article

Scientists believe that the study of genes that encode the proteins for molecular motors will help solve the mysteries of evolution. However, the result of a recent study has only served to support the predictions of special creation.

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Water Deep in Earth's Mantle

 
‎04 ‎April ‎2014, ‏‎10:00:00 AMGo to full article

An international science team recently found a unique Brazilian diamond inclusion that indicates an abundance of water located as deep as Earth's mantle. Could this find relate to the Bible's description of the early Earth?

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Shale Oil Boom Begs Explanation

 
‎02 ‎April ‎2014, ‏‎10:00:00 AMGo to full article

The U.S. is having an oil boom—made possible by cutting-edge techniques that extract voluminous amounts of petroleum from shale rocks. Where did all this shale oil come from?

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Zircon: Earth's Oldest Crystal?

 
‎28 ‎March ‎2014, ‏‎10:00:00 AMGo to full article

Researchers recently published an article in Nature Geoscience highlighting findings from their analysis of a detrital zircon from Australia. BBC News has cited this mineral as the "oldest scrap of Earth crust"—is this conclusion accurate?

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Mind-Boggling Complexity in the Fruit Fly Transcriptome

 
‎26 ‎March ‎2014, ‏‎10:00:00 AMGo to full article

Using new technology, researchers recently evaluated the diversity of gene expression across the fruit fly genome and discovered incredible complexity and design.

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'Smoking Gun' Evidence of Inflation?

 
‎21 ‎March ‎2014, ‏‎10:00:00 AMGo to full article

On March 17, a team of radio astronomers announced they discovered purportedly direct evidence for cosmic inflation—a critical component of the modern Big Bang model. How solid are the new data and what does the evidence really show?

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IBM's Watson: Designed to Learn Like a Human

 
‎19 ‎March ‎2014, ‏‎10:00:00 AMGo to full article

What would it take to reverse engineer the human brain? The debut of an innovative supercomputer provides a clue to answering that question as well as to the ultimate cause of self-adjusting systems.

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Ancient Lake Bed Merges with Biblical Clues

 
‎17 ‎March ‎2014, ‏‎10:00:00 AMGo to full article

New discoveries in northwestern India indicate lake Kotla Dahar retained more water in the past. When and how did the climate change? Does the history recorded in Genesis provide a useful context?

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Reverse Engineering Reveals Ideal Propulsion Design

 
‎14 ‎March ‎2014, ‏‎10:00:00 AMGo to full article

In a recent analysis of how dozens of species propel their bodies through air and water, a collaborative team found not only ideal design but also common design.

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Black Rocks Red-Flag Uniformitarian Flaws

 
‎12 ‎March ‎2014, ‏‎10:00:00 AMGo to full article

A surprising rock discovery in West Virginia has red-flagged the uniformitarian analysis of sediment deposits previously thought to be non-marine in origin.

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Asteroid Medley Challenges Naturalistic Origins

 
‎10 ‎March ‎2014, ‏‎10:00:00 AMGo to full article

Data from recent spacecraft flybys challenge the prevailing naturalistic perspective on asteroid origins. Secular astronomers assume that natural processes, rather than miracles, created the sun, Earth, planets, and asteroids from ancient, swirling masses of gases, but this new evidence points to something different.

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Europe’s Oldest Human Footprints—Dated in Error?

 
‎07 ‎March ‎2014, ‏‎10:00:00 AMGo to full article

News headlines worldwide recently reported Europe's oldest human footprint discovery. How old are the tracks? It appears the media and researchers answer this question by following the same misleading trends.

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Live Birth Fossil Exposes Evolutionary Enigma

 
‎05 ‎March ‎2014, ‏‎10:00:00 AMGo to full article

One of the latest ephemeral fossils comes from China—a baby ichthyosaur halfway in and halfway out of its mother's body. Though fossilization tragically ended the baby's transition from the womb, could this specimen support the story that a land reptile evolved into the first ichthyosaur?

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Wooly Mammoth Mystery Finally Solved?

 
‎28 ‎February ‎2014, ‏‎10:00:00 AMGo to full article

Researchers claim to potentially have solved the mystery of the wooly mammoth’s mass extinction—the creatures went extinct when grasses began “crowding out” other edible plants these massive animals needed to subsist.

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Human lincRNA Genes Contradict Evolution

 
‎26 ‎February ‎2014, ‏‎10:00:00 AMGo to full article

A research team recently characterized a group of genes in humans and other mammals that not only defies evolutionary models but vindicates the Bible’s prediction of the uniqueness of created kinds with distinct genetic features.

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Genesis Camels: Biblical Error?

 
‎24 ‎February ‎2014, ‏‎10:00:00 AMGo to full article

Tel Aviv University archaeologists recently radiocarbon-dated camel bones from the Aravah Valley and concluded that the first “significant” appearance of domesticated camels in Israel occurred around 900 B.C.—much later than the biblical record. Did they catch the Bible in an error?

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DNA Proof That Neandertals Are Just Humans

 
‎21 ‎February ‎2014, ‏‎10:00:00 AMGo to full article

The study of ancient DNA is currently all the rage in the field of genomics. Despite the fact that many problems still plague the field, several new research papers are claiming that scientists can now detect and study Neandertal genome sequence in modern human DNA databases using only electronic tools.

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Speedy Glaciers Trample Multiple Ice-Age Theories

 
‎19 ‎February ‎2014, ‏‎10:00:00 AMGo to full article

Greenland’s Jakobshavn Isbræ glacier set a new speed record for glacial flow. The ice stream’s calculated average speed for summer 2012 was 46 meters per day—more than 6 feet per hour—the fastest recorded speed for any Antarctica or Greenland ice stream.

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Could Space Dust Help Spark Life?

 
‎17 ‎February ‎2014, ‏‎10:00:00 AMGo to full article

Physicists in California and Hawaiʻi found evidence that solar wind performs curious chemistry on space dust, and they suggested that this will help support a naturalistic origin of life on Earth. But how much help will it really bring?

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Evolutionary Dogma, Not Science, Kicks Out Adam

 
‎14 ‎February ‎2014, ‏‎10:00:00 AMGo to full article

Secular geneticists continue to claim that humans did not come from a literal Adam and Eve. But if clues in the human genome do not reject Adam from our ancestry, then why would scientists insist that he was not real?

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Evidence of Eternity in Our Hearts?

 
‎12 ‎February ‎2014, ‏‎10:00:00 AMGo to full article

We widely believe that some core in each person will somehow live forever, but where does this idea come from? A new research tactic reveals that belief in eternal life is hardwired into each of us, inadvertently confirming the Bible’s message.

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Cuneiform Reed-Ark Story Doesn't Float

 
‎10 ‎February ‎2014, ‏‎10:00:00 AMGo to full article

A cuneiform tablet at the British Museum describes Noah’s Ark as round and built of reeds, but an older tablet supports the Bible’s description. Babylonian or biblical, round or rectangular—which Ark story stays afloat?

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Nye vs. Ham Debate: No True Scotsman

 
‎07 ‎February ‎2014, ‏‎10:00:00 AMGo to full article

Some three million people watched live online February 4 as debaters discussed the topic “Is creation a viable model of origins in today’s modern scientific era?” “Science Guy” Bill Nye kept using the “no true Scotsman” fallacy. Viewers should beware of this debate tactic’s sometimes subtle effects.

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Fossil Skin Pigment Evolved Three Times?

 
‎05 ‎February ‎2014, ‏‎10:00:00 AMGo to full article

Paleontologists recently presented their analysis of original skin leftovers from three marine reptile fossils and inadvertently revealed three clues that darken their evolutionary explanations.

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Most of Venus' History Is Missing?

 
‎31 ‎January ‎2014, ‏‎10:00:00 AMGo to full article

Venus’ tortured surface begs for explanation, but scientists have a trying time reconstructing the planet’s past based on its mysterious features. Secular geologists anticipate that additional measurements may help resolve the vexing Venusian riddles, but satisfactory answers may never come without something more substantial than just new data.

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Spider Webs Attract Scientists' Attention

 
‎29 ‎January ‎2014, ‏‎10:00:00 AMGo to full article

No, it’s not science fiction—it’s real. Spider webs use electricity to snare prey, and researchers recently discovered an added environmental benefit from these arachnids’ masterful constructions.

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Interest in Origins Stays Strong

 
‎27 ‎January ‎2014, ‏‎10:00:00 AMGo to full article

Do Americans really care about where they came from? The results of two recent polls and a surge in interest in an upcoming creation vs. evolution debate suggest they do. This origins conversation has reverberated for generations, and the current controversy is no different.

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Do Foxes Have Magnetic Senses?

 
‎24 ‎January ‎2014, ‏‎10:00:00 AMGo to full article

During winter, red foxes hunt snow-covered mice without even seeing their prey—but how? Foxes may see more than what visible light reveals.

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Elephant Shark Research Team Misses Creation Clues

 
‎22 ‎January ‎2014, ‏‎10:00:00 AMGo to full article

Scientists recently studied the genome of a “living fossil” called the elephant shark. Their report refers to “unique insights” into evolution, but the facts actually reveal something else—clues to creation these researchers overlooked.

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Gecko-Footed Robot Fit for Outer Space

 
‎20 ‎January ‎2014, ‏‎10:00:00 AMGo to full article

Abigaille the robot can climb up smooth walls, but she leaves behind no residue as her feet mimic gecko traction and locomotion. How close did the engineers come to matching the precision capabilities of real gecko feet?

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Amber Flowers Challenge Dinosaur Depictions

 
‎17 ‎January ‎2014, ‏‎10:00:00 AMGo to full article

Dinosaur dioramas don’t display flowers and grasses—supposedly because they had not yet evolved. But amazing amber fossils refute that idea by showing the abrupt appearance of fully-formed flowers.

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Mouse Study Shows 'Junk DNA' Is Actually Required

 
‎15 ‎January ‎2014, ‏‎10:00:00 AMGo to full article

It was once believed that the regions in between the protein-coding genes of the genome were wastelands of alleged nonfunctional “junk DNA.” However, we now know that these previously misunderstood regions are teeming with functional activity—and a new study shows they are actually required for life.

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One-Hour Oil Production?

 
‎13 ‎January ‎2014, ‏‎10:00:00 AMGo to full article

A new technology produces diesel fuel from algae in mere minutes using heat and pressure, thus calling into question the secular claim that fossil fuels have developed over millions of years.

 More...

 

 
 

 
 

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Transhumanism is an international intellectual and cultural movement supporting the use of science and technology to improve human mental and physical characteristics and capacities.

by Dr. Martin Erdmann


The human species can, if it wishes, transcend itself. We need a name for this new belief. Perhaps transhumanism will serve: man remaining man, but transcending himself, by realizing new possibilities of and for his human nature.
Julian Huxley
1st director of the United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization (UNESCO) (wrote nearly fifty years ago)
Transhumanism is a word that is beginning to bubble to the top of our prophetic studies and horizon. Simply described, transhumanism is an international intellectual and cultural movement supporting the use of science and technology to improve human mental and physical characteristics and capacities - in essence, to create a "posthuman" society.
This is not a passing fad. Transhumanist programs are sponsored in institutions such as Oxford, Standford, and Caltech. Sponsorships come from organizations such as Ford, Apple, Intel, Xerox, Sun Microsystems, and others. DARPA, Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency, a technical department within the U.S. Department of Defense is also involved in transhumanist projects.
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The Origins of Information: Exploring and Explaining Biological Information


 

In the 21st century, the information age has finally come to biology. We now know that biology at its root is comprised of information rich systems, such as the complex digital code encoded in DNA. Groundbreaking discoveries of the past decade are revealing the information bearing properties of biological systems.

Dr. Stephen C. Meyer, a Cambridge trained philosopher of science is examining and explaining the amazing depth of digital technology found in each and every living cell such as nested coding, digital processing, distributive retrieval and storage systems, and genomic operating systems.

Meyer is developing a more fundamental argument for intelligent design that is based not on a single feature like the bacterial flagellum, but rather on a pervasive feature of all living systems. Alongside matter and energy, Dr. Meyer shows that there is a third fundamental entity in the universe needed for life: information.

 

http://www.stephencmeyer.org/

Got Science? Genesis 1 and Evidence

 

 

 
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Many scientists say complex life just randomly happened.
Primordial soup + lightning strike = Bingo! Is there any shred of scientific evidence that life was CREATED as Genesis 1 claims? Dr. Stephen Meyer, author of SIGNATURE IN THE CELL, says not a shred. Rather, a ton. Learn good reasoning techniques here.
 
08 June 2012, 08:09:11 PM
 

Intelligent Design is not Creationism

 
08 June 2012, 08:09:11 PM | Robert CrowtherGo to full article

This article was originally published in the Daily Telegraph (UK) on January 29. Original Article In 2004, the distinguished philosopher Antony Flew of the University of Reading made worldwide news when he repudiated a lifelong commitment to atheism and affirmed the reality of some kind of a creator. Flew cited evidence of intelligent design in DNA and the arguments of "American [intelligent] design theorists" as important reasons for this shift. Since then, British readers have learnt about the theory of intelligent design (ID) mainly from media reports about United States court battles over the legality of teaching students about it. According to most reports, ID is a "faith-based" alternative to evolution based solely on religion. But is this accurate? As one of the architects of the theory, I know it isn't. Contrary to media reports, ID is not a religious-based idea, but an evidence-based scientific theory about life's origins. According to Darwinian biologists such as Oxford University's Richard Dawkins, living systems "give the appearance of having been designed for a purpose". But, for modern Darwinists, that appearance of design is illusory, because the purely undirected process of natural selection acting on random mutations is entirely sufficient to produce the intricate designed-like structures found in living organisms. By contrast, ID holds that there are tell-tale features of living systems and the universe that are best explained by a designing intelligence. The theory does not challenge the idea of evolution defined as change over time, or even common ancestry, but it disputes Darwin's idea that the cause of biological change is wholly blind and undirected. What signs of intelligence do design advocates see? In recent years, biologists have discovered an exquisite world of nanotechnology within living cells - complex circuits, sliding clamps, energy-generating turbines and miniature machines. For example, bacterial cells are propelled by rotary engines called flagellar motors that rotate at 100,000rpm. These engines look like they were designed by engineers, with many distinct mechanical parts (made of proteins), including rotors, stators, O-rings, bushings, U-joints and drive shafts. The biochemist Michael Behe points out that the flagellar motor depends on the co-ordinated function of 30 protein parts. Remove one of these proteins and the rotary motor doesn't work. The motor is, in Behe's words, "irreducibly complex". This creates a problem for the Darwinian mechanism. Natural selection preserves or "selects" functional advantages as they arise by random mutation. Yet the flagellar motor does not function unless all its 30 parts are present. Thus, natural selection can "select" the motor once it has arisen as a functioning whole, but it cannot produce the motor in a step-by-step Darwinian fashion. Natural selection purportedly builds complex systems from simpler structures by preserving a series of intermediates, each of which must perform some function. With the flagellar motor, most of the critical intermediate structures perform no function for selection to preserve. This leaves the origin of the flagellar motor unexplained by the mechanism - natural selection - that Darwin specifically proposed to replace the design hypothesis. Is there a better explanation? Based on our uniform experience, we know of only one type of cause that produces irreducibly complex systems: intelligence. Whenever we encounter complex systems - whether integrated circuits or internal combustion engines - and we know how they arose, invariably a designing intelligence played a role. Consider an even more fundamental argument for design. In 1953, when Watson and Crick elucidated the structure of the DNA molecule, they made a startling discovery. Strings of precisely sequenced chemicals called nucleotides in DNA store and transmit the assembly instructions - the information - in a four-character digital code for building the protein molecules the cell needs to survive. Crick then developed his "sequence hypothesis", in which the chemical bases in DNA function like letters in a written language or symbols in a computer code. As Dawkins has noted, "the machine code of the genes is uncannily computer-like". The informational features of the cell at least appear designed. Yet, to date, no theory of undirected chemical evolution has explained the origin of the digital information needed to build the first living cell. Why? There is simply too much information in the cell to be explained by chance alone. The information in DNA (and RNA) has also been shown to defy explanation by forces of chemical necessity. Saying otherwise would be like saying a headline arose as the result of chemical attraction between ink and paper. Clearly, something else is at work. DNA functions like a software program. We know from experience that software comes from programmers. We know that information - whether, say, in hieroglyphics or radio signals - always arises from an intelligent source. As the pioneering information theorist Henry Quastler observed: "Information habitually arises from conscious activity." So the discovery of digital information in DNA provides strong grounds for inferring that intelligence played a causal role in its origin. Thus, ID is not based on religion, but on scientific discoveries and our experience of cause and effect, the basis of all scientific reasoning about the past. Unlike creationism, ID is an inference from biological data. Even so, ID may provide support for theistic belief. But that is not grounds for dismissing it. Those who do confuse the evidence for the theory with its possible implications. Many astrophysicists initially rejected the Big Bang theory because it seemed to point to the need for a transcendent cause of matter, space and time. But science eventually accepted it because the evidence strongly supported it. Today, a similar prejudice confronts ID. Nevertheless, this new theory must also be evaluated on the basis of the evidence, not philosophical preferences. As Professor Flew advises: "We must follow the evidence, wherever it leads." Stephen C Meyer edited 'Darwinism, Design and Public Education' (Michigan State University Press). He has a PhD in philosophy of science from Cambridge University and is a senior fellow at the Discovery Institute in Seattle.

 

09 December 2011, 11:13:24 PM

New Research Supports Meyer's Discussion of Pre-Biotic Chemistry in Signature in the Cell

 
09 December 2011, 11:13:24 PM | Andrew McDiarmidGo to full article
A recent Nature publication reports a new technique for measuring the oxygen levels in Earth's atmosphere some 4.4 billion years ago. The authors found that by studying cerium oxidation states in zircon, a compound formed from volcanic magma, they could ascertain the oxidation levels in the early earth. Their findings suggest that the early Earth's oxygen levels were very close to current levels. This research supports Dr. Meyer's discussion in Signature in the Cell. On pgs. 224-226 of Ch. 10: Beyond the Reach of Chance, Meyer states that when Stanley Miller conducted his famous 1953 experiment simulating early Earth's atmosphere, he "assumed that the earth's atmosphere contained virtually no free oxygen." Meyer reveals that new geochemical evidence showed that the assumptions Miller had made about the early atmosphere were incorrect. This new research is additional confirmation that oxygen was present in significant quantities. Because oxygen quenches organic reactions necessary to produce essential building blocks of life, the ability of inorganic materials to produce organic life, as chemical evolutionary theory assumes, is not possible. Read the complete article at ENV.

 

Dr. Meyer Debates Signature in the Cell Arguments with Keith Fox on Premier Radio UK

24 November 2011, 12:37:19 AM | Andrew McDiarmidGo to full article
During a recent visit to London, Dr. Stephen Meyer debated Keith Fox on Premier Radio UK's "Unbelievable" program. Fox is a professor of biochemistry at Southampton University and Chair of the UK's Christians in Science network. Two years after its publication, Meyer's Signature in the Cell continues to make an impact with its powerful argument for design in DNA. In this lively conversation, Meyer and Fox discuss origins of life and the design inference in science.

 

« Overflowtoday.com asks Stephen Meyer if he's got science | Main

Dr. Meyer Debates Signature in the Cell Arguments with Keith Fox on Premier Radio UK


During a recent visit to London, Dr. Stephen Meyer debated Keith Fox on Premier Radio UK's "Unbelievable" program. Fox is a professor of biochemistry at Southampton University and Chair of the UK's Christians in Science network. Two years after its publication, Meyer's Signature in the Cell continues to make an impact with its powerful argument for design in DNA. In this lively conversation, Meyer and Fox discuss origins of life and the design inference in science.


 

 

July 14, 2010

What is the key thing that needs to be explained in origin of life research?

Dr. Stephen Meyer explains the importance of biological information in origin of life research, as discussed in his groundbreaking intelligent design book Signature in the Cell.

 

 

Watch here in high resolution.

 

Searching For The Truth On Origins
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