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This page is dedicated to My Grandson Brandon.

(Branstein)

***IN STOCK***
 HOLOGRAPHIC

UNIVERSE

by Chuck Missler

DVD

PRICE R 159.00

 

 

 

 

This DVD includes notes in PDF format and M4A files.


This briefing pack contains 2 hours of teachings

Available in the following formats

Session 1

• Epistemology 101: How do we “know”?

– Scientific Myths of the Past

– Scientific Myths of the Present

• The Macrocosm: The Plasma Universe: Gravitational Presumption?

• The Microcosm: The Planck Wall

• The Metacosm: Fracture of Hyperspace?

Session 2


• The Holographic Model: David Bohm

• GEO 600 “Noise”

• The Black Hole Paradox

– String Theorists examine the elephant

• A Holographic Universe:

– Distances are synthetic (virtual) images

– A Geocentric Cosmology?

– Some Scriptural Perspective(s)

 

 

“One can’t believe impossible things,”

Alice laughed.

“I daresay you haven’t had much practice,”

said the Queen.

“When I was your age, I always did it for

half-an-hour a day.

Why, sometimes I’ve believed as many

as six impossible things before breakfast.”

Through the Looking Glass

Lewis Carroll (Charles Lutwidge Dodgson)
 

DVD:

1 Disc
2 M4A Files
Color, Fullscreen 16:9, Dolby Digital 2.0 stereo, Region  This DVD will be viewable in other countries WITH the proper DVD player and television set.)
 

M4A File Video

Can be burned to disc and played on MP4 compatible DVD players.
Playable on iPod, iPhone, iPod Touch
Playable on any MP4 player
1 PDF Notes File
2 MP3 Files


 

 

 

 

 

   

Featured Briefing

A Holographic Universe?

by Dr. Chuck Missler

Are we actually living in a holographic universe? Are the distant galaxies only a virtual illusion? In a hologram, distances are synthetic! How does this impact our concepts of time and space?

There seems to be growing evidence to suggest that our world and everything in it may be only ghostly images, projections from a level of reality so beyond our own that the real reality is literally beyond both space and time.1

The Cosmos As a Super-Hologram?

An initiating architect of this astonishing idea was one of the world’s most eminent thinkers: University of London physicist David Bohm, a protégé of Einstein’s and one of the world’s most respected quantum physicists. Bohm’s work in plasma physics in the 1950s is considered a landmark. Earlier, at the Lawrence Radiation Laboratory, he noticed that in plasmas (ionized gases) the particles stopped behaving as individuals and started behaving as if they were part of a larger and interconnected whole. Moving to Princeton University in 1947, there, too, he continued his work in the behavior of oceans of ionized particles, noting their highly organized overall effects and their behavior, as if they knew what each of the untold trillions of individual particles was doing.

One of the implications of Bohm’s view has to do with the nature of location. Bohm’s interpretation of quantum physics indicated that at the subquantum level location ceased to exist. All points in space become equal to all other points in space, and it was meaningless to speak of anything as being separate from anything else. Physicists call this property “nonlocality”. The web of subatomic particles that compose our physical universe—the very fabric of “reality” itself—possesses what appears to be an undeniable “holographic” property. Paul Davis of the University of Newcastle upon Tyne, England, observed that since all particles are continually interacting and separating, “the nonlocal aspects of quantum systems is therefore a general property of nature.”2

The Nature of Reality

One of Bohm’s most startling suggestions was that the tangible reality of our everyday lives is really a kind of illusion, like a holographic image. Underlying it is a deeper order of existence, a vast and more primary level of reality that gives birth to all the objects and appearances of our physical world in much the same way that a piece of holographic film gives birth to a hologram. Bohm calls this deeper level of reality the implicate (“enfolded”) order and he refers to our level of existence the explicate (unfolded) order.3 This view is not inconsistent with the Biblical presentation of the physical (“explicate”) world as being subordinate to the spiritual (“implicate”) world as the superior reality.4

The Search for Gravity Waves

Gravitational waves are extremely small ripples in the structure of spacetime caused by astrophysical events like supernovae or coalescing massive binaries (neutron stars, black holes). They had been predicted by Albert Einstein in 1916, but not yet directly observed.

GEO 600 is a gravitational wave detector located near Sarstedt, Germany, which seeks to detect gravitational waves by means of a laser interferometer of 600 meter arms’ length. This instrument, and its sister interferometric detectors, are some of the most sensitive gravitational wave detectors ever designed. They are designed to detect relative changes in distance of the order of 10-21, about the size of a single atom compared to the distance from the Earth to the Sun! Construction on the project began in 1995.

Mystery Noise

On January 15, 2009, it was reported in New Scientist that some yet unidentified noise that was present in the GEO 600 detector measurements might be because the instrument is sensitive to extremely small quantum fluctuations of space-time affecting the positions of parts of the detector. This claim was made by Craig Hogan, a scientist from Fermilab, on the basis of his theory of how such fluctuations should occur motivated by the holographic principle.5 Apparently, the gravitational wave detector in Hannover may have detected evidence for a holographic Universe!

Gravitational Wave Observatories Join Forces

A number of major projects will now pool their data to analyze it, jointly boosting their chances of spotting a faint signal that might otherwise be hidden by detector noise. Using lasers, they measure the length between mirrored test masses hung inside tunnels at right angles to each other. Gravitational waves decrease the distance between the masses in one tunnel and increase it in the other by a tiny, but detectable amount. Combining the data will also make it possible to triangulate to find the source of any gravitational waves detected. These include: Laser Interferometer Gravitational Observatory based in Hanford, Washington and Livingston, Louisiana; Virgo Observatory, Pisa Italy; and, of course, the GEO 600 Observatory near Hanover, Germany.

The most ambitious of them is the Laser Interferometer Space Antenna (LISA), a joint mission between NASA and the European Space Agency to develop and operate a space-based gravitational wave detector sensitive at frequencies between 0.03 mHz and 0.1 Hz. LISA seeks to detect gravitational-wave induced strains in space-time by measuring changes of the separation between fiducial masses in three spacecraft 5 million kilometers apart.

Cosmic Implications

Are we actually living in a holographic universe? Are the distant galaxies only a virtual illusion? In a hologram, distances are synthetic! How does this impact our concepts of time and space?

It gets even worse: Could our universe be geocentric? The implications are too staggering to embrace. The holographic paradigm is still a developing concept and riddled with controversies. For decades, science has chosen to ignore evidences that do not fit their standard theories. However, the volume of evidence has now reached the point that denial is no longer a viable option.

Clearly, 20th-century science has discovered that our “macrocosm”—studies of largeness—is finite, not infinite. Our universe is finite and had a beginning, and that’s what has led to the “big bang” speculations. We also realize that gravity is dramatically eclipsed by electromagnetic considerations when dealing with galaxies, etc. The plasma physicists have been trying to tell astronomers that for decades but no one was listening.

What is even more shocking has been the discoveries in the “microcosm”—studies of smallness—that run up against the “Planck Wall” of the non-location of subatomic particles, and the many strange paradoxes of quantum physics. We now discover that we are in a virtual reality that is a digital, simulated environment. The bizarre realization that the “constants” of physics are changing indicates that our “reality” is “but a shadow of a larger reality,”6 and that’s what the Bible has maintained all along!7

The Bible is, of course, unique in that it has always presented a universe of more than three dimensions,8 and revealed a Creator that is transcendent over His creation. It is the only “holy book” that demonstrates these contemporary insights. It’s time for us to spend more time with the handbook that the Creator has handed to us. It is the ultimate adventure, indeed!

For background information on the Holographic Universe, see our briefing series, The Beyond Collection, available on DVD and other formats, in the Christmas catalog insert in this issue.


Notes

  1. We explore the limitations of the Macrocosm, the Microcosm, and the super-embracing “Metacosm” in our Beyond Series.
  2. Paul Davis, Superforce, Simon & Schuster, New York, 1948, p.48.
  3. This is reminiscent of the Red King’s dream in Through the Looking Glass, in which Alice finds herself in deep metaphysical waters when the Tweedle brothers defend the view that all material objects, including ourselves, are only “sorts of things” in the mind of God.
  4. 2 Corinthians 4:18.
  5. Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory (Fermilab), located just outside Batavia, Illinois, near Chicago, is a US Department of Energy national laboratory specializing in high-energy particle physics. (Craig Hogan was then put in charge…)
  6. Scientific American, June 2005, “The Inconstancy of Constants”.
  7. Hebrews 11:3; John 1:1-3; et al.
  8. Ephesians 3:18. Nachmonides, writing in the 13th century, concluded, from his studies of the Genesis texts, that our universe has ten dimensions, of which only four are directly “knowable”.
 
 

The Physics of Immortality

DVD


by Dr. Chuck Missler

Price R 249.00

 

 

The Physics of Immortality

 This is an intensive review of what the Apostle Paul calls the most important chapter in the Bible: 1 Corinthians 15. Without it, “we are of all men most miserable.”
Did Jesus really rise from the dead? How do we know? Do we really believe it?
What kind of body did He have? Why did they have trouble recognizing Him?
How do we now know that we live within a digital virtual environment which is but “a shadow of a larger reality”? What are the implications of that “larger reality”? What is the relationship between “the twinkling of an eye” and Planck’s Constant for time (1043 seconds)?
Do you have your passport for the transit that’s coming? Are you really ready?
Join Dr. Chuck Missler in the Executive Briefing Room of the River Lodge, New Zealand, as he examines the physics of immortality.
This briefing pack contains 2 hours of teachings
Available in the following formats:
 DVD:
•1 Disc
•2 MP3 Files
•1 PDF Notes File
 

Published on Jan 28, 2015

Chuck Missler had the opportunity to sit discuss Zero Point Energy (ZPE) with Barry Setterfield 
 

Space News from SpaceDaily.com

 

 

Space News From SpaceDaily.Com

 

 
 

Europe launches next phase of hi-tech Earth satellites

 
‎23 ‎June ‎2015, ‏‎04:58:31 AMGo to full article
Kourou (AFP) June 23, 2015
The European Space Agency (ESA) has launched the second phase of a 4.3-billion-euro ($4.91-billion) programme to deploy new-generation satellites to monitor environmental damage and aid disaster relief operations, officials said early Monday. Sentinel-2A was hoisted by a lightweight Vega rocket from ESA's base in Kourou, French Guiana, overnight Monday-Tuesday, launch operator Arianespace sa
 

Russia eyes Kazakh cosmonaut as space tourist

 
‎23 ‎June ‎2015, ‏‎04:58:31 AMGo to full article
Moscow (AFP) June 22, 2015
Russia on Monday proposed sending a Kazakh cosmonaut to the International Space Station in place of a space tourist in September after a Japanese candidate formally dropped out. Satoshi Takamatsu, a Japanese businessman, was gearing up to go to space after signing a contract to undergo training but said Monday that he was not ready for the launch expected in early September. "The Russian
 

Russia to Build New Generation Space Surveillance Systems

 
‎23 ‎June ‎2015, ‏‎04:58:31 AMGo to full article
Moscow (Sputnik) Jun 22, 2015
Russian Defense Ministry will construct more than ten complexes of new-generation space surveillance systems, increasing the precision of space observation, the ministry said in a press release Thursday. This would "considerably increase the information capabilities of Russian space surveillance, expand the range of controlled orbits and reduce the minimum size of space objects detected by
 

Study suggests active volcanism on Venus

 
‎23 ‎June ‎2015, ‏‎04:58:31 AMGo to full article
Providence RI (SPX) Jun 22, 2015
An international team of scientists has found some of the best evidence yet that Venus, Earth's nearest neighbor, is volcanically active. In combing through data from the European Space Agency's Venus Express mission, the scientists found transient spikes in temperature at several spots on the planet's surface. The hotspots, which were found to flash and fade over the course of just a few days,
 

Roscosmos to Launch More Satellites, Set up Imaging Center

 
‎23 ‎June ‎2015, ‏‎04:58:31 AMGo to full article
Moscow (Sputnik) Jun 22, 2015
The Russian Federal Space Agency Roscosmos plans to expand its fleet of satellites for taking images of the Earth, as part of a project to create a new center for global imaging, which aims to become a major player in Earth remote sensing services. The existing Research Center for Earth Operative Monitoring, part of the Russian Space Systems holding, will become the core of the new structu
 

From ESA: more than 300 new companies

 
‎23 ‎June ‎2015, ‏‎04:58:31 AMGo to full article
Paris (ESA) Jun 22, 2015
ESA's business incubators hit a milestone this month: they have now fostered 300 start-up companies - and more are joining all the time. Thanks to innovations from the many Business Incubation Centres (BICs) start-ups, leading-edge applications that spring from space are spreading throughout Europe. "Technologies from Europe's space programmes have turned out to be great problem-solvers he
 

Satellites enable coral reef science leap from Darwin to online

 
‎23 ‎June ‎2015, ‏‎04:58:31 AMGo to full article
Greenbelt MD (SPX) Jun 22, 2015
With Earth-observing satellite data, scientists can now monitor the health of coral reefs, even in the most remote regions scattered around the globe where it is otherwise difficult to see changes. Satellites fill a void by providing a more complete view of remote reefs. The information is monitored globally through Coral Reef Watch, an online tool that provides near real-time and long-ter
 

Astronomers create array of Earth-like planet models

 
‎23 ‎June ‎2015, ‏‎04:58:31 AMGo to full article
Ithaca NY (SPX) Jun 22, 2015
To sort out the biological intricacies of Earth-like planets, astronomers have developed computer models that examine how ultraviolet radiation from other planets' nearby suns may affect those worlds, according to new research published June 10 in Astrophysical Journal. "Depending on the intensity, ultraviolet radiation can be both useful and harmful to the origin of life," says Lisa Kalte
 

All Systems Go for NASA's Mission to Jupiter Moon Europa

 
‎23 ‎June ‎2015, ‏‎04:58:31 AMGo to full article
Pasadena CA (JPL) Jun 22, 2015
Beyond Earth, Jupiter's moon Europa is considered one of the most promising places in the solar system to search for signs of present-day life, and a new NASA mission to explore this potential is moving forward from concept review to development. NASA's mission concept - to conduct a detailed survey of Europa and investigate its habitability - has successfully completed its first major rev
 

International Spacecraft Carrying NASA's Aquarius Instrument Ends Operations

 
‎23 ‎June ‎2015, ‏‎04:58:31 AMGo to full article
Pasadena CA (JPL) Jun 22, 2015
An international Earth-observing mission launched in 2011 to study the salinity of the ocean surface ended June 8 when an essential part of the power and attitude control system for the SAC-D spacecraft, which carries NASA's Aquarius instrument, stopped operating. The Aquarius instrument successfully achieved its science objectives and completed its primary three-year mission in November 2014.
 

Lockheed, Raytheon, Bombardier team for JSTARS contract bid

 
‎23 ‎June ‎2015, ‏‎04:58:31 AMGo to full article
Palmdale, Calif. (UPI) Jun 17, 2015
Lockheed Martin has announced it is teaming with Raytheon and Bombardier for the U.S. Air Force's JSTARS Recapitalization program contract. Under the teaming, Lockheed Martin will serve as the lead systems integrator for the program, while Raytheon will bring to the team their experience with ground surveillance, intelligence, surveillance and reconnaissance systems, mission systems int
 

Variations in oxygen levels shaped Earth's climate over eons

 
‎23 ‎June ‎2015, ‏‎04:58:31 AMGo to full article
Ann Arbor MI (SPX) Jun 17, 2015
Variations in the amount of oxygen in Earth's atmosphere significantly altered global climate throughout the planet's history. Efforts to reconstruct past climates must include this previously overlooked factor, a new University of Michigan-led study concludes. Oxygen currently comprises about 21 percent of Earth's atmosphere by volume but has varied between 10 percent and 35 percent over the pa
 

MIPT physicists develop ultrasensitive nanomechanical biosensor

 
‎23 ‎June ‎2015, ‏‎04:58:31 AMGo to full article
Moscow, Russia (SPX) Jun 16, 2015
Two young researchers working at the MIPT Laboratory of Nanooptics and Plasmonics, Dmitry Fedyanin and Yury Stebunov, have developed an ultracompact highly sensitive nanomechanical sensor for analyzing the chemical composition of substances and detecting biological objects, such as viral disease markers, which appear when the immune system responds to incurable or hard-to-cure diseases, includin
 

Ultrafast heat conduction can manipulate nanoscale magnets

 
‎23 ‎June ‎2015, ‏‎04:58:31 AMGo to full article
Urbana IL (SPX) Jun 16, 2015
Researchers at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign have uncovered physical mechanisms allowing the manipulation of magnetic information with heat. These new phenomena rely on the transport of thermal energy, in contrast to the conventional application of magnetic fields, providing a new, and highly desirable way to manipulate magnetization at the nanoscale. "In our study, we mak
 

Oculus out to let people touch virtual worlds

 
‎23 ‎June ‎2015, ‏‎04:58:31 AMGo to full article
Los Angeles (AFP) June 18, 2015
Behind closed doors on the show floor of the world's premier video game show, Facebook-owned Oculus was letting people touch virtual worlds. Oculus provided a select few with an early peek at how it is trying to tackle the challenge of letting people intuitively interact with faux objects in fantasy realms. Prototype Oculus Touch Half Moon controllers that can be gripped as easily as cla
 

NASA Begins Testing Next Mars Lander Insight

 
‎30 ‎May ‎2015, ‏‎10:58:52 AMGo to full article
Denver CO (JPL) May 29, 2015
Testing is underway on NASA's next mission on the journey to Mars, a stationary lander scheduled to launch in March 2016. The lander is called InSight, an abbreviation for Interior Exploration using Seismic Investigations, Geodesy and Heat Transport. It is about the size of a car and will be the first mission devoted to understanding the interior structure of the Red Planet. Examining the
 

Boeing Awarded First Commercial Human Spaceflight Mission

 
‎30 ‎May ‎2015, ‏‎10:58:52 AMGo to full article
Houston TX (SPX) May 29, 2015
NASA issued a task order as part of Boeing's $4.2 billion Commercial Crew Transportation Capability (CCtCap) contract recently to include the company's first-ever service flight to the International Space Station. The award marks the first time in human spaceflight history NASA has contracted with a commercial company for a human spaceflight mission. "This occasion will go in the books of
 

New Horizons team completes first search for Pluto system hazards

 
‎30 ‎May ‎2015, ‏‎10:58:52 AMGo to full article
Laurel MD (SPX) May 29, 2015
NASA's New Horizons team has analyzed the first set of hazard-search images of the Pluto system taken by the approaching spacecraft itself - and so far, all looks clear for the spacecraft's safe passage. The observations were made May 11-12 from a range of 47 million miles (76 million kilometers) using the telescopic Long Range Reconnaissance Imager (LORRI) on New Horizons. For these obser
 

Inverted Velocity Sensors Caused Proton-M Failure in 2013

 
‎30 ‎May ‎2015, ‏‎10:58:52 AMGo to full article
Moscow (Sputnik) May 29, 2015
A Proton-M rocket carrier failure in 2013 was caused by an incorrect velocity sensor installation, Russian Investigative Committee spokesman Vladimir Markin said Wednesday. According to Markin, the investigation found that three employees of Russia's Khrunichev State Research and Production Space Center had installed velocity sensors on the rocket carrier "upside down." "That altered
 

Air Force Certifies SpaceX for National Security Space Missions

 
‎30 ‎May ‎2015, ‏‎10:58:52 AMGo to full article
Los Angeles AFB CA (AFNS) May 29, 2015
Lieutenant General Samuel Greaves, Commander of the Air Force Space and Missile Systems Center (SMC) and Air Force Program Executive Officer for Space, has announced the certification of Space Exploration Technologies Corporation's (SpaceX) Falcon 9 Launch System for national security space missions. SpaceX is now eligible for award of qualified national security space launch missions as o
 

The Supreme Council of Parachute Experts

 
‎30 ‎May ‎2015, ‏‎10:58:52 AMGo to full article
Pasadena CA (JPL) May 29, 2015
It was not your typical NASA meeting. But then again, it would have been difficult to have a typical NASA meeting surrounded by all the hooks, nets, processing tables and other fishy paraphernalia found in a corrugated shack on a pier on the south coast of Kauai, Hawaii. But those assembled there on June 29, 2014, didn't really care about their surroundings, nor the musty, aquatic smell of
 

NASA Begins Major Reconfiguration of International Space Station

 
‎30 ‎May ‎2015, ‏‎10:58:52 AMGo to full article
Moscow (Sputnik) May 29, 2015
NASA plans to relocate a storage module from one node to another in what would be the largest change to the configuration of the International Space Station (ISS) as the agency prepares the ISS for the arrival of commercial spacecraft. The Permanent Multipurpose Module (PMM), named after Leonardo da Vinci, will be remotely transported from the Unity node to the Tranquility module on Wednes
 

Cassini Prepares for Last Up-close Look at Hyperion

 
‎30 ‎May ‎2015, ‏‎10:58:52 AMGo to full article
Pasadena CA (JPL) May 29, 2015
NASA's Cassini spacecraft will make its final close approach to Saturn's large, irregularly shaped moon Hyperion on Sunday, May 31. The Saturn-orbiting spacecraft will pass Hyperion at a distance of about 21,000 miles (34,000 kilometers) at approximately 6:36 a.m. PDT (9:36 a.m. EDT). Mission controllers expect images from the encounter to arrive on Earth within 24 to 48 hours. Mission sci
 

Discovery shows what the solar system looked like as a 'toddler'

 
‎30 ‎May ‎2015, ‏‎10:58:52 AMGo to full article
Cambridge, UK (SPX) May 29, 2015
An international team of astronomers, including researchers from the University of Cambridge, has identified a young planetary system which may aid in understanding how our own solar system formed and developed billions of years ago. Using the Gemini Planet Imager (GPI) at the Gemini South telescope in Chile, the researchers identified a disc-shaped bright ring of dust around a star only s
 

How spacetime is built by quantum entanglement

 
‎30 ‎May ‎2015, ‏‎10:58:52 AMGo to full article
Tokyo, Japan (SPX) May 29, 2015
A collaboration of physicists and a mathematician has made a significant step toward unifying general relativity and quantum mechanics by explaining how spacetime emerges from quantum entanglement in a more fundamental theory. The paper announcing the discovery by Hirosi Ooguri, a Principal Investigator at the University of Tokyo's Kavli IPMU, with Caltech mathematician Matilde Marcolli an
 

Dawn Spirals Closer to Ceres, Returns a New View

 
‎30 ‎May ‎2015, ‏‎10:58:52 AMGo to full article
Pasadena CA (JPL) May 29, 2015
A new view of Ceres, taken by NASA's Dawn spacecraft on May 23, shows finer detail is becoming visible on the dwarf planet. The spacecraft snapped the image at a distance of 3,200 miles (5,100 kilometers) with a resolution of 1,600 feet (480 meters) per pixel. The image is part of a sequence taken for navigational purposes. After transmitting these images to Earth on May 23, Da
 

Livermore scientists one step closer to mimicking gamma-ray bursts

 
‎30 ‎May ‎2015, ‏‎10:58:52 AMGo to full article
Livermore CA (SPX) May 29, 2015
Using ever more energetic lasers, Lawrence Livermore researchers have produced a record high number of electron-positron pairs, opening exciting opportunities to study extreme astrophysical processes, such as black holes and gamma-ray bursts. By performing experiments using three laser systems - Titan at Lawrence Livermore, Omega-EP at the Laboratory for Laser Energetics, and Orion at Atom
 

Deep Web Search May Help Scientists

 
‎30 ‎May ‎2015, ‏‎10:58:52 AMGo to full article
Pasadena CA (JPL) May 27, 2015
When you do a simple Web search on a topic, the results that pop up aren't the whole story. The Internet contains a vast trove of information - sometimes called the "Deep Web" - that isn't indexed by search engines: information that would be useful for tracking criminals, terrorist activities, sex trafficking and the spread of diseases. Scientists could also use it to search for images and data
 

Seoul Divided on Proposed THAAD Introduction

 
‎30 ‎May ‎2015, ‏‎10:58:52 AMGo to full article
Moscow (Sputnik) May 25, 2015
Washington's desire to deploy its advanced missile defense system in South Korea remains a serious cause of concern in Seoul and also in China and Russia, media reported on Thursday. The Pentagon has expressed its willingness to deploy a Terminal High-Altitude Area Defense (THAAD) battery on the Korean Peninsula, home to about 28,500 American troops, to better cope with the perceived threa
 

Russia, Iran talks on S-300 missiles end in 'success'

 
‎30 ‎May ‎2015, ‏‎10:58:52 AMGo to full article
Moscow (AFP) May 26, 2015
Moscow and Tehran have concluded talks on the delivery of Russian S-300 missiles to Iran which should take place "quite" soon, Deputy Foreign Minister Hossein Amir-Abdollahian said Monday. "The negotiations on the subject have ended in success. I estimate that the S-300 delivery will take place in quite a short time," Amir-Abdollahian said in Moscow. "It will be done at the soonest oppor
 

Newly dedicated observatory to search for gravitational waves

 
‎24 ‎May ‎2015, ‏‎06:50:56 PMGo to full article
Washington DC (SPX) May 22, 2015
Seeking to expand how we observe and understand the universe where we live, the National Science Foundation has helped dedicate the Advanced Laser Gravitational Wave Observatories (Advanced LIGO) at the LIGO Hanford facility in Richland, Wash. The California Institute of Technology and Massachusetts Institute of Technology designed the NSF-funded facilities and operate them with the goal o
 

Patent for Navy small space debris tracker

 
‎24 ‎May ‎2015, ‏‎06:50:56 PMGo to full article
Washington (UPI) May 22, 2015
A U.S. Navy device that detects small debris in space and provides data on their trajectory has been granted a U.S. patent. The Optical Orbital Debris Spotter from the Naval Research Laboratory is compact in size, uses low power and can be integrated into larger satellite designs or flown independently onboard nano-satellite platforms, the Navy said. The device concept is the cre
 

Physicist Finds Mysterious Anti-electron Clouds Inside Thunderstorm

 
‎24 ‎May ‎2015, ‏‎06:50:56 PMGo to full article
Durham NH (SPX) May 22, 2015
A terrifying few moments flying into the top of an active thunderstorm in a research aircraft has led to an unexpected discovery that could help explain the longstanding mystery of how lightning gets initiated inside a thunderstorm. University of New Hampshire physicist Joseph Dwyer and lightning science colleagues from the University of California at Santa Cruz and Florida Tech describe t
 

Ceres bright spots: Clearer pictures, but still no answers

 
‎24 ‎May ‎2015, ‏‎06:50:56 PMGo to full article
Pasadena, Calif. (UPI) May 22, 2015
Scientists had hoped sharper images of Ceres and its mysterious bright spots would provide some clarity as to their nature and origin, but they remain befuddled. Researchers are fairly certain something in the bottom of a large crater is reflecting the sun's rays, but they still can't verify exactly what the reflective material is. NASA's Dawn probe has spent the last several wee
 

Initial Ariane 5 assembly completed for July launch of dual payloads

 
‎24 ‎May ‎2015, ‏‎06:50:56 PMGo to full article
Kourou, French Guiana (ESA) May 22, 2015
Another Ariane 5 has completed its initial build-up at the Spaceport in French Guiana, marking a major milestone in preparations for Arianespace's third heavy-lift mission of 2015 - which will orbit the European MSG-4 meteorological satellite and Brazilian Star One C4 telecommunications relay platform during July. As part of regular pre-flight preparations inside the Spaceport's Launcher I
 

ASC Signal wins large multi-antenna order in Asia

 
‎24 ‎May ‎2015, ‏‎06:50:56 PMGo to full article
Plano TX (SPX) May 22, 2015
ASC Signal Corporation was awarded a contract from one of Asia's largest information and communications technology providers for the installation of seven 9.3-meter C-band and one 7.6-meter Ku-band antennas. Included with the antenna purchase are seven of ASC's Next Generation Controller (NGC) and custom feed systems. The new antennas are being installed at a major teleport in Singapore an
 

Superhydrophobic glass coating offers clear benefits

 
‎24 ‎May ‎2015, ‏‎06:50:56 PMGo to full article
Oak Ridge TN (SPX) May 15, 2015
A moth's eye and lotus leaf were the inspirations for an antireflective water-repelling, or superhydrophobic, glass coating that holds significant potential for solar panels, lenses, detectors, windows, weapons systems and many other products. The discovery by researchers at the Department of Energy's Oak Ridge National Laboratory, detailed in a paper published in the Journal of Materials
 

Random nanowire configurations boost conductivity

 
‎24 ‎May ‎2015, ‏‎06:50:56 PMGo to full article
Bethlehem PA (SPX) May 21, 2015
Researchers at Lehigh University have identified for the first time that a performance gain in the electrical conductivity of random metal nanowire networks can be achieved by slightly restricting nanowire orientation. The most surprising result of the study is that heavily ordered configurations do not outperform configurations with some degree of randomness; randomness in the case of metal nan
 

Using a sounding rocket to help calibrate NASA's SDO

 
‎24 ‎May ‎2015, ‏‎06:50:56 PMGo to full article
Greenbelt MD (SPX) May 22, 2015
Watching the sun is dangerous work for a telescope. Solar instruments in space naturally degrade over time, bombarded by a constant stream of solar particles that can cause a film of material to adhere to the optics. Decades of research and engineering skill have improved protecting such optics, but one crucial solution is to regularly recalibrate the instruments to accommodate such changes.
 

Gas arms form giant spiraling molecular cradles of dense molecular cores

 
‎24 ‎May ‎2015, ‏‎06:50:56 PMGo to full article
Taipei, Taiwan (SPX) May 22, 2015
A research team led by Dr. Hauyu Liu at the Institute of Astronomy and Astrophysics, Academia Sinica (ASIAA) observed the luminous OB cluster-forming massive molecular clump G33.92+0.11 with the Atacama Large Millimeter/submillimeter Array (ALMA), and unveiled the fine molecular gas structures deeply embedded at the center of the parent molecular cloud. This finding provides a greatly simp
 

Caltech astronomers observe a supernova colliding with its companion star

 
‎24 ‎May ‎2015, ‏‎06:50:56 PMGo to full article
Pasadena CA (SPX) May 22, 2015
Type Ia supernovae, one of the most dazzling phenomena in the universe, are produced when small dense stars called white dwarfs explode with ferocious intensity. At their peak, these supernovae can outshine an entire galaxy. Although thousands of supernovae of this kind were found in the last decades, the process by which a white dwarf becomes one has been unclear. That began to change on
 

Scientists tackle mystery of thunderstorms that strike at night

 
‎24 ‎May ‎2015, ‏‎06:50:56 PMGo to full article
Boulder CO (SPX) May 22, 2015
Thunderstorms that form at night, without a prod from the Sun's heat, are a mysterious phenomenon. This summer scientists will be staying up late in search of some answers. From June 1 through July 15, researchers from across North America will fan out each evening across the Great Plains, where storms are more common at night than during the day. The research effort, co-organized by the N
 

New options for spintronic devices

 
‎24 ‎May ‎2015, ‏‎06:50:56 PMGo to full article
Berlin, Germany (SPX) May 20, 2015
Scientists from Paris and Helmholtz-Zentrum Berlin have been able to switch ferromagnetic domains on and off with low voltage in a structure made of two different ferroic materials. The switching works slightly above room temperature. Their results, which are published online in Scientific Reports, might inspire future applications in low-power spintronics, for instance for fast and efficient da
 

Exploring a new frontier of cyber-physical systems: The human body

 
‎24 ‎May ‎2015, ‏‎06:50:56 PMGo to full article
Washington DC (SPX) May 21, 2015
The National Science Foundation has announced two, five-year, center-scale awards totaling $8.75 million to advance the state-of-the-art in medical and cyber-physical systems (CPS). One project will develop "Cyberheart"--a platform for virtual, patient-specific human heart models and associated device therapies that can be used to improve and accelerate medical-device development and testi
 

Cheap radio frequency antenna printed with graphene ink

 
‎24 ‎May ‎2015, ‏‎06:50:56 PMGo to full article
Washington DC (SPX) May 21, 2015
Scientists have moved graphene - the incredibly strong and conductive single-atom-thick sheet of carbon - a significant step along the path from lab bench novelty to commercially viable material for new electronic applications. Researchers from the University of Manchester, together with BGT Materials Limited, a graphene manufacturer in the United Kingdom, have printed a radio frequency an
 

NASA: Hang on a Minute, We're NOT Working on Warp-Drive Technology

 
‎13 ‎May ‎2015, ‏‎04:29:45 AMGo to full article
Moscow (Sputnik) May 13, 2015
After overly excitable media outlets reported the creation of "warp-drive" technology, NASA has had to come out and set the record straight about what recent reports about an electromagnetic drive that runs without fuel do and do not mean. An April 29 article on NASASpaceflight.com described the results of a test performed on a prototype engine within a vacuum which appeared to create a sm
 

Fifth Vega takes shape for its flight with Sentinel-2A

 
‎13 ‎May ‎2015, ‏‎04:29:45 AMGo to full article
Kourou, French Guiana (ESA) May 13, 2015
The fifth Vega launcher continues its integration process in French Guiana for a mission this summer to orbit Europe's Sentinel-2A Earth observation satellite. During activity at the Spaceport's ZLV launch site, Vega's Zefiro 23 solid propellant second stage has now been integrated atop the vehicle's P80 first stage, which also uses solid propellant. This vertical assembly process is
 

Europa's Mystery Dark Material Could Be Sea Salt

 
‎13 ‎May ‎2015, ‏‎04:29:45 AMGo to full article
Pasadena CA (JPL) May 13, 2015
NASA laboratory experiments suggest the dark material coating some geological features of Jupiter's moon Europa is likely sea salt from a subsurface ocean, discolored by exposure to radiation. The presence of sea salt on Europa's surface suggests the ocean is interacting with its rocky seafloor - an important consideration in determining whether the icy moon could support life. The study i
 

Proba-V maps world air traffic from space

 
‎13 ‎May ‎2015, ‏‎04:29:45 AMGo to full article
Paris (ESA) May 13, 2015
As ESA's Proba-V works quietly on its main task of monitoring vegetation growth across Earth, the minisatellite is also picking up something from a little higher: signals from thousands of aircraft. Launched two years ago, Proba-V has picked up upwards of 25 million positions from more than 15 000 separate aircraft. This is a technical world-first, demonstrating the feasibility of follow-o
 

NASA's New Horizons Spots Pluto's Faintest Known Moons

 
‎13 ‎May ‎2015, ‏‎04:29:45 AMGo to full article
Boulder CO (SPX) May 13, 2015
It's a complete Pluto family photo - or at least a photo of the family members we've already met. For the first time, NASA's New Horizons spacecraft has photographed Kerberos and Styx - the smallest and faintest of Pluto's five known moons. Following the spacecraft's detection of Pluto's giant moon Charon in July 2013, and Pluto's smaller moons Hydra and Nix in July 2014 and January 2015,
 

NASA funds SwRI instrument to date Moon and Mars rocks

 
‎13 ‎May ‎2015, ‏‎04:29:45 AMGo to full article
San Antonio TX (SPX) May 13, 2015
NASA has approved $2.6 million to advance development of Southwest Research Institute's (SwRI) Chemistry, Organics, and Dating Experiment (CODEX) instrument. The device will allow unmanned rovers to analyze the decay of radioactive elements to determine the age of rocks on the Moon and Mars. "CODEX will provide unprecedented in-situ age information about surface samples, which is not only
 

MESSENGER reveals Mercury's magnetic field secrets

 
‎13 ‎May ‎2015, ‏‎04:29:45 AMGo to full article
Vancouver, Canada (SPX) May 13, 2015
New data from MESSENGER, the spacecraft that orbited Mercury for four years before crashing into the planet a week ago, reveals Mercury's magnetic field is almost four billion years old. The discovery helps scientists piece together the history of Mercury, the closest planet to the sun and one about which we knew very little before MESSENGER. NASA's MESSENGER probe left Earth in 2004, reac
 

Space Launch System Program Moving Forward with Critical Design Review

 
‎13 ‎May ‎2015, ‏‎04:29:45 AMGo to full article
Huntsville AL (SPX) May 13, 2015
NASA's Space Launch System (SLS) Program is kicking off its critical design review May 11 at NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center in Huntsville, Alabama. This new rocket will be the most powerful launch vehicle ever built. It is designed to be sustainable and evolve to carry crew and cargo on deep space missions, including an asteroid and ultimately to Mars. Milestone reviews like the criti
 

Weather forecasts for planets beyond our solar system

 
‎13 ‎May ‎2015, ‏‎04:29:45 AMGo to full article
Toronto, Canada (SPX) May 13, 2015
"Cloudy for the morning, turning to clear with scorching heat in the afternoon." While this might describe a typical late-summer day in many places on Earth, it may also apply to planets outside our solar system, according to a new study by an international team of astrophysicists from the University of Toronto, York University and Queen's University Belfast. Using sensitive observations f
 

SMC awards 7.8 million dollar contract to Georgia Tech Research Institute

 
‎13 ‎May ‎2015, ‏‎04:29:45 AMGo to full article
Los Angeles AFB CA (SPX) May 13, 2015
Georgia Tech Research Institute, Atlanta, Georgia, has been awarded a $7,857,568.00 contract, for combustion stability modeling and design tool development. This contract provides for the development of a suite of software-based design tools for predicting and analyzing stability characteristics of combustion devices based on hydrocarbon-fueled,oxidizer-rich staged combustion rocket engine
 

New program to acquire geospatial applications

 
‎13 ‎May ‎2015, ‏‎04:29:45 AMGo to full article
Chantilly, Va. (UPI) May 11, 2015
A government program to solicit and acquire geospatial applications from commercial developers has been launched by the National Geospatial-Intelligence Agency. The GEOINT App Provider Program, IGAPP, is being managed and operated by TASC, an Engility Holdings company. The program facilitates the delivery of the application creations to the NGA GEOINT App Store, an NGA online store fron
 

Breaking waves perturb Earth's magnetic field

 
‎13 ‎May ‎2015, ‏‎04:29:45 AMGo to full article
Durham NH (SPX) May 12, 2015
The underlying physical process that creates striking "breaking wave" cloud patterns in our atmosphere also frequently opens the gates to high-energy solar wind plasma that perturbs Earth's magnetic field, or magnetosphere, which protects us from cosmic radiation. The discovery was made by two University of New Hampshire space physicists, who published their findings in the online journal Nature
 

ESA and ADS sign deal for new Copernicus Earth observation mission

 
‎13 ‎May ‎2015, ‏‎04:29:45 AMGo to full article
Berlin (SPX) May 12, 2015
At the 36th International Symposium on Remote Sensing of Environment in Berlin, the European Space Agency (ESA) and Airbus Defence and Space, the world's second largest space company, signed the development and production contract for the Jason-CS/Sentinel-6A satellite. Jason-CS/Sentinel-6 is a mission to carry out high-precision measurements of ocean surface topography. The contract is wo
 

Fresh evidence for how water reached Earth found in asteroid debris

 
‎13 ‎May ‎2015, ‏‎04:29:45 AMGo to full article
Warwick, UK (SPX) May 12, 2015
Water delivery via asteroids or comets is likely taking place in many other planetary systems, just as it happened on Earth, new research strongly suggests. Published by the Royal Astronomical Society and led by the University of Warwick, the research finds evidence for numerous planetary bodies, including asteroids and comets, containing large amounts of water. The research findings add f
 

FINDER Search and Rescue Technology Helped Save Lives in Nepal

 
‎13 ‎May ‎2015, ‏‎04:29:45 AMGo to full article
Pasadena CA (JPL) May 12, 2015
In the wreckage of a collapsed textile factory and another building in the Nepalese village of Chautara, four men were rescued, thanks to a NASA technology that was able to find their heartbeats. A small, suitcase-sized device called FINDER helped uncover these survivors - two from each destroyed building - in one of the hardest-hit areas of the 7.8-magnitude earthquake that rattled Nepal
 

NASA pushes back against proposal to slash climate budget

 
‎01 ‎May ‎2015, ‏‎02:42:32 AMGo to full article
Washington (AFP) May 1, 2015
NASA pushed back Thursday against a congressional proposal to slash more than $300 million in funding from its branch focused on climate issues. The proposal would cut funding to NASA's Earth Sciences division, which researches the planet's natural systems and processes - including climate change, severe weather and glaciers. Republican Lamar Smith, who chairs the House of Representativ
 

Telenor satellite begins post-launch maneuvers according to plan

 
‎01 ‎May ‎2015, ‏‎02:42:32 AMGo to full article
Palo Alto CA (SPX) May 01, 2015
Space Systems/Loral reports that a satellite designed and built for Telenor Satellite Broadcasting (TSBc), was successfully launched and is performing post-launch maneuvers according to plan. The satellite, THOR 7, deployed its solar arrays on schedule following its launch aboard an Ariane 5 launch vehicle from the European Spaceport in Kourou, French Guiana. It began firing its main thruster ea
 

Strong Evidence for Coronal Heating by Nanoflares

 
‎01 ‎May ‎2015, ‏‎02:42:32 AMGo to full article
Indianapolis IN (SPX) May 01, 2015
The Sun's surface is blisteringly hot at 6,000 kelvins or 10,340 degrees Fahrenheit - but its atmosphere is another 300 times hotter. This has led to an enduring mystery for those who study the Sun: What heats the atmosphere to such extreme temperatures? Normally when you move away from a hot source the environment gets cooler, but some mechanism is clearly at work in the solar atmosphere, the c
 

Arianespace at the EU-Japan Business Round Table

 
‎01 ‎May ‎2015, ‏‎02:42:32 AMGo to full article
Tokyo, Japan (SPX) May 01, 2015
Arianespace Chairman and CEO Stephane Israel took an active role in this week's meetings of the EU-Japan Business Round Table, which seeks to further strengthen relations between the European Union and Japan - including a focus on launch services. As part of a high-level delegation - which comprises some 50 senior executives from leading Japanese and European companies - Israel discussed w
 

Russia to Create World's First Rocket Engine Manufacturing Holding

 
‎01 ‎May ‎2015, ‏‎02:42:32 AMGo to full article
Moscow (Sputnik) May 01, 2015
Russia's United Rocket and Space Corporation (URSC) is drafting a proposal on creation a unique holding, which is set to unite several manufacturers of engines for rockets and missiles, Russia's daily newspaper Izvestia reports on Tuesday. The exact structure of the holding and its head-enterprise are yet to be defined. "Yes, we are working on the creation of a rocket engine manufact
 

Technologies enable ambitious MMS mission

 
‎01 ‎May ‎2015, ‏‎02:42:32 AMGo to full article
Greenbelt MD (SPX) May 01, 2015
It was unprecedented developing a mission that could fly four identically equipped spacecraft in a tight formation and take measurements 100 times faster than any previous space mission - an achievement enabled in part by four NASA-developed technologies that in some cases took nearly 10 years to mature. "To get to this point in time, we had to overcome a number of engineering challenges,"
 

Seeing Stars Through The Cloud

 
‎01 ‎May ‎2015, ‏‎02:42:32 AMGo to full article
London, UK (SPX) May 01, 2015
SKA Organisation and AWS are launching the AstroCompute in the Cloud grant programme to accelerate the development of innovative tools and techniques for processing, storing and analysing the global astronomy community's vast amounts of astronomic data in the cloud. Grant recipients will have access to credits for AWS cloud services over a two-year period and up to one petabyte (PB) of sto
 

Arianespace to launch HellaSat-4/SGS-1 for Arabsat and KACST

 
‎01 ‎May ‎2015, ‏‎02:42:32 AMGo to full article
Paris (SPX) May 01, 2015
Arianespace, Arabsat and King Abdul-Aziz City for Science and Technology (KACST) have announced the signature of a launch service contract for the Hellasat-4/Saudi Geo Satellite-1 satellite. The satellite will be built by Lockheed Martin as part of a turnkey contract with the operator Arabsat, and for Saudi Arabia-based KASCT. HellaSat-4/Saudi Geo Satellite-1 will be launched in 2018 by an
 

First proton collisions should start in early June

 
‎01 ‎May ‎2015, ‏‎02:42:32 AMGo to full article
Dallas TX (SPX) May 01, 2015
First collisions of protons at the world's largest science experiment are expected to start the first or second week of June, according to a senior research scientist with CERN's Large Hadron Collider in Geneva. "It will be about another six weeks to commission the machine, and many things can still happen on the way," said physicist Albert De Roeck, a staff member at CERN and a professor
 

Turkish firm joins NATO BMD support effort

 
‎01 ‎May ‎2015, ‏‎02:42:32 AMGo to full article
Ankara, Turkey (UPI) Apr 29, 2015
Turkish defense electronics company Aselsan has joined a multinational industry team for engineering support of NATO's Ballistic Missile Defense program. The team, led by Leidos of the United States, will provide engineering and integration support for the NATO BMD capability, including BMD enhancements to NATO command, control and communications systems, and refinement and maintenance
 

Tidal tugs on Teflon faults drive slow-slipping earthquakes

 
‎01 ‎May ‎2015, ‏‎02:42:32 AMGo to full article
Seattle WA (SPX) Apr 30, 2015
Unknown to most people, the Pacific Northwest experiences a magnitude-6.6 earthquake about once a year. The reason nobody notices is that the movement happens slowly and deep underground, in a part of the fault whose behavior, known as slow-slip, was only recently discovered. A University of Washington seismologist who studies slow-slip quakes has looked at how they respond to tidal forces
 

Ascent or no ascent

 
‎01 ‎May ‎2015, ‏‎02:42:32 AMGo to full article
Potsdam, Germany (SPX) Apr 30, 2015
Gigantic volumes of hot material rising from the deep earth's mantle to the base of the lithosphere have shaped the face of our planet. Provided they have a sufficient volume, they can lead to break-up of continents or cause mass extinction events in certain periods of the Earth's history. So far it was assumed that because of their high temperatures those bodies - called mantle plumes - ascend
 

Aerospace Defense Force detects recon sats spying on Russia

 
‎01 ‎May ‎2015, ‏‎02:42:32 AMGo to full article
Moscow (Sputnik) Apr 30, 2015
Russia's Aerospace Defense Force (VKO) has recently detected on the orbit a group of reconnaissance satellites spying on Russia, commander of the Space Command Maj. Gen. Oleg Maidanovich said Sunday. "Recently the staff of the Main Space Intelligence Center detected a group of newly launched satellites. The group was set to collect intelligence on the devices located on the territory of th
 

Rapid Innovation Fund Award to the Remote Sensing Systems Directorate

 
‎01 ‎May ‎2015, ‏‎02:42:32 AMGo to full article
Los Angeles AFB CA (SPX) Apr 30, 2015
The Space and Missile Systems Center Remote Sensing Systems Directorate was recently selected for a Rapid Innovation Fund award of $3 million to support Space Based Infrared System data exploitation innovations. This award will be used to fund the Architecture for Real-time Overhead Persistent Infrared Wideband (ARROW) project, an initiative which enables the detection and tracking of dimm
 

MIPT researchers grow cardiac tissue on 'spider silk' substrate

 
‎01 ‎May ‎2015, ‏‎02:42:32 AMGo to full article
Moscow, Russia (SPX) Apr 12, 2015
Genetically engineered fibers of the protein spidroin, which is the construction material for spider webs, has proven to be a perfect substrate for cultivating heart tissue cells, MIPT researchers found. They discuss their findings in an article that has recently come out in the journal PLOS ONE. The cultivation of organs and tissues from a patient's cells is the bleeding edge of medical r

 

 
 

 

 
 

News About Time And Space

 

 
 

Europe launches next phase of hi-tech Earth satellites

 
‎23 ‎June ‎2015, ‏‎04:58:31 AMGo to full article
Kourou (AFP) June 23, 2015
The European Space Agency (ESA) has launched the second phase of a 4.3-billion-euro ($4.91-billion) programme to deploy new-generation satellites to monitor environmental damage and aid disaster relief operations, officials said early Monday. Sentinel-2A was hoisted by a lightweight Vega rocket from ESA's base in Kourou, French Guiana, overnight Monday-Tuesday, launch operator Arianespace sa
 

Russia eyes Kazakh cosmonaut as space tourist

 
‎23 ‎June ‎2015, ‏‎04:58:31 AMGo to full article
Moscow (AFP) June 22, 2015
Russia on Monday proposed sending a Kazakh cosmonaut to the International Space Station in place of a space tourist in September after a Japanese candidate formally dropped out. Satoshi Takamatsu, a Japanese businessman, was gearing up to go to space after signing a contract to undergo training but said Monday that he was not ready for the launch expected in early September. "The Russian
 

Russia to Build New Generation Space Surveillance Systems

 
‎23 ‎June ‎2015, ‏‎04:58:31 AMGo to full article
Moscow (Sputnik) Jun 22, 2015
Russian Defense Ministry will construct more than ten complexes of new-generation space surveillance systems, increasing the precision of space observation, the ministry said in a press release Thursday. This would "considerably increase the information capabilities of Russian space surveillance, expand the range of controlled orbits and reduce the minimum size of space objects detected by
 

Study suggests active volcanism on Venus

 
‎23 ‎June ‎2015, ‏‎04:58:31 AMGo to full article
Providence RI (SPX) Jun 22, 2015
An international team of scientists has found some of the best evidence yet that Venus, Earth's nearest neighbor, is volcanically active. In combing through data from the European Space Agency's Venus Express mission, the scientists found transient spikes in temperature at several spots on the planet's surface. The hotspots, which were found to flash and fade over the course of just a few days,
 

Roscosmos to Launch More Satellites, Set up Imaging Center

 
‎23 ‎June ‎2015, ‏‎04:58:31 AMGo to full article
Moscow (Sputnik) Jun 22, 2015
The Russian Federal Space Agency Roscosmos plans to expand its fleet of satellites for taking images of the Earth, as part of a project to create a new center for global imaging, which aims to become a major player in Earth remote sensing services. The existing Research Center for Earth Operative Monitoring, part of the Russian Space Systems holding, will become the core of the new structu
 

From ESA: more than 300 new companies

 
‎23 ‎June ‎2015, ‏‎04:58:31 AMGo to full article
Paris (ESA) Jun 22, 2015
ESA's business incubators hit a milestone this month: they have now fostered 300 start-up companies - and more are joining all the time. Thanks to innovations from the many Business Incubation Centres (BICs) start-ups, leading-edge applications that spring from space are spreading throughout Europe. "Technologies from Europe's space programmes have turned out to be great problem-solvers he
 

Satellites enable coral reef science leap from Darwin to online

 
‎23 ‎June ‎2015, ‏‎04:58:31 AMGo to full article
Greenbelt MD (SPX) Jun 22, 2015
With Earth-observing satellite data, scientists can now monitor the health of coral reefs, even in the most remote regions scattered around the globe where it is otherwise difficult to see changes. Satellites fill a void by providing a more complete view of remote reefs. The information is monitored globally through Coral Reef Watch, an online tool that provides near real-time and long-ter
 

Astronomers create array of Earth-like planet models

 
‎23 ‎June ‎2015, ‏‎04:58:31 AMGo to full article
Ithaca NY (SPX) Jun 22, 2015
To sort out the biological intricacies of Earth-like planets, astronomers have developed computer models that examine how ultraviolet radiation from other planets' nearby suns may affect those worlds, according to new research published June 10 in Astrophysical Journal. "Depending on the intensity, ultraviolet radiation can be both useful and harmful to the origin of life," says Lisa Kalte
 

All Systems Go for NASA's Mission to Jupiter Moon Europa

 
‎23 ‎June ‎2015, ‏‎04:58:31 AMGo to full article
Pasadena CA (JPL) Jun 22, 2015
Beyond Earth, Jupiter's moon Europa is considered one of the most promising places in the solar system to search for signs of present-day life, and a new NASA mission to explore this potential is moving forward from concept review to development. NASA's mission concept - to conduct a detailed survey of Europa and investigate its habitability - has successfully completed its first major rev
 

International Spacecraft Carrying NASA's Aquarius Instrument Ends Operations

 
‎23 ‎June ‎2015, ‏‎04:58:31 AMGo to full article
Pasadena CA (JPL) Jun 22, 2015
An international Earth-observing mission launched in 2011 to study the salinity of the ocean surface ended June 8 when an essential part of the power and attitude control system for the SAC-D spacecraft, which carries NASA's Aquarius instrument, stopped operating. The Aquarius instrument successfully achieved its science objectives and completed its primary three-year mission in November 2014.
 

Lockheed, Raytheon, Bombardier team for JSTARS contract bid

 
‎23 ‎June ‎2015, ‏‎04:58:31 AMGo to full article
Palmdale, Calif. (UPI) Jun 17, 2015
Lockheed Martin has announced it is teaming with Raytheon and Bombardier for the U.S. Air Force's JSTARS Recapitalization program contract. Under the teaming, Lockheed Martin will serve as the lead systems integrator for the program, while Raytheon will bring to the team their experience with ground surveillance, intelligence, surveillance and reconnaissance systems, mission systems int
 

Variations in oxygen levels shaped Earth's climate over eons

 
‎23 ‎June ‎2015, ‏‎04:58:31 AMGo to full article
Ann Arbor MI (SPX) Jun 17, 2015
Variations in the amount of oxygen in Earth's atmosphere significantly altered global climate throughout the planet's history. Efforts to reconstruct past climates must include this previously overlooked factor, a new University of Michigan-led study concludes. Oxygen currently comprises about 21 percent of Earth's atmosphere by volume but has varied between 10 percent and 35 percent over the pa
 

MIPT physicists develop ultrasensitive nanomechanical biosensor

 
‎23 ‎June ‎2015, ‏‎04:58:31 AMGo to full article
Moscow, Russia (SPX) Jun 16, 2015
Two young researchers working at the MIPT Laboratory of Nanooptics and Plasmonics, Dmitry Fedyanin and Yury Stebunov, have developed an ultracompact highly sensitive nanomechanical sensor for analyzing the chemical composition of substances and detecting biological objects, such as viral disease markers, which appear when the immune system responds to incurable or hard-to-cure diseases, includin
 

Ultrafast heat conduction can manipulate nanoscale magnets

 
‎23 ‎June ‎2015, ‏‎04:58:31 AMGo to full article
Urbana IL (SPX) Jun 16, 2015
Researchers at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign have uncovered physical mechanisms allowing the manipulation of magnetic information with heat. These new phenomena rely on the transport of thermal energy, in contrast to the conventional application of magnetic fields, providing a new, and highly desirable way to manipulate magnetization at the nanoscale. "In our study, we mak
 

Oculus out to let people touch virtual worlds

 
‎23 ‎June ‎2015, ‏‎04:58:31 AMGo to full article
Los Angeles (AFP) June 18, 2015
Behind closed doors on the show floor of the world's premier video game show, Facebook-owned Oculus was letting people touch virtual worlds. Oculus provided a select few with an early peek at how it is trying to tackle the challenge of letting people intuitively interact with faux objects in fantasy realms. Prototype Oculus Touch Half Moon controllers that can be gripped as easily as cla
 

NASA Begins Testing Next Mars Lander Insight

 
‎30 ‎May ‎2015, ‏‎10:58:52 AMGo to full article
Denver CO (JPL) May 29, 2015
Testing is underway on NASA's next mission on the journey to Mars, a stationary lander scheduled to launch in March 2016. The lander is called InSight, an abbreviation for Interior Exploration using Seismic Investigations, Geodesy and Heat Transport. It is about the size of a car and will be the first mission devoted to understanding the interior structure of the Red Planet. Examining the
 

Boeing Awarded First Commercial Human Spaceflight Mission

 
‎30 ‎May ‎2015, ‏‎10:58:52 AMGo to full article
Houston TX (SPX) May 29, 2015
NASA issued a task order as part of Boeing's $4.2 billion Commercial Crew Transportation Capability (CCtCap) contract recently to include the company's first-ever service flight to the International Space Station. The award marks the first time in human spaceflight history NASA has contracted with a commercial company for a human spaceflight mission. "This occasion will go in the books of
 

New Horizons team completes first search for Pluto system hazards

 
‎30 ‎May ‎2015, ‏‎10:58:52 AMGo to full article
Laurel MD (SPX) May 29, 2015
NASA's New Horizons team has analyzed the first set of hazard-search images of the Pluto system taken by the approaching spacecraft itself - and so far, all looks clear for the spacecraft's safe passage. The observations were made May 11-12 from a range of 47 million miles (76 million kilometers) using the telescopic Long Range Reconnaissance Imager (LORRI) on New Horizons. For these obser
 

Inverted Velocity Sensors Caused Proton-M Failure in 2013

 
‎30 ‎May ‎2015, ‏‎10:58:52 AMGo to full article
Moscow (Sputnik) May 29, 2015
A Proton-M rocket carrier failure in 2013 was caused by an incorrect velocity sensor installation, Russian Investigative Committee spokesman Vladimir Markin said Wednesday. According to Markin, the investigation found that three employees of Russia's Khrunichev State Research and Production Space Center had installed velocity sensors on the rocket carrier "upside down." "That altered
 

Air Force Certifies SpaceX for National Security Space Missions

 
‎30 ‎May ‎2015, ‏‎10:58:52 AMGo to full article
Los Angeles AFB CA (AFNS) May 29, 2015
Lieutenant General Samuel Greaves, Commander of the Air Force Space and Missile Systems Center (SMC) and Air Force Program Executive Officer for Space, has announced the certification of Space Exploration Technologies Corporation's (SpaceX) Falcon 9 Launch System for national security space missions. SpaceX is now eligible for award of qualified national security space launch missions as o
 

The Supreme Council of Parachute Experts

 
‎30 ‎May ‎2015, ‏‎10:58:52 AMGo to full article
Pasadena CA (JPL) May 29, 2015
It was not your typical NASA meeting. But then again, it would have been difficult to have a typical NASA meeting surrounded by all the hooks, nets, processing tables and other fishy paraphernalia found in a corrugated shack on a pier on the south coast of Kauai, Hawaii. But those assembled there on June 29, 2014, didn't really care about their surroundings, nor the musty, aquatic smell of
 

NASA Begins Major Reconfiguration of International Space Station

 
‎30 ‎May ‎2015, ‏‎10:58:52 AMGo to full article
Moscow (Sputnik) May 29, 2015
NASA plans to relocate a storage module from one node to another in what would be the largest change to the configuration of the International Space Station (ISS) as the agency prepares the ISS for the arrival of commercial spacecraft. The Permanent Multipurpose Module (PMM), named after Leonardo da Vinci, will be remotely transported from the Unity node to the Tranquility module on Wednes
 

Cassini Prepares for Last Up-close Look at Hyperion

 
‎30 ‎May ‎2015, ‏‎10:58:52 AMGo to full article
Pasadena CA (JPL) May 29, 2015
NASA's Cassini spacecraft will make its final close approach to Saturn's large, irregularly shaped moon Hyperion on Sunday, May 31. The Saturn-orbiting spacecraft will pass Hyperion at a distance of about 21,000 miles (34,000 kilometers) at approximately 6:36 a.m. PDT (9:36 a.m. EDT). Mission controllers expect images from the encounter to arrive on Earth within 24 to 48 hours. Mission sci
 

Discovery shows what the solar system looked like as a 'toddler'

 
‎30 ‎May ‎2015, ‏‎10:58:52 AMGo to full article
Cambridge, UK (SPX) May 29, 2015
An international team of astronomers, including researchers from the University of Cambridge, has identified a young planetary system which may aid in understanding how our own solar system formed and developed billions of years ago. Using the Gemini Planet Imager (GPI) at the Gemini South telescope in Chile, the researchers identified a disc-shaped bright ring of dust around a star only s
 

How spacetime is built by quantum entanglement

 
‎30 ‎May ‎2015, ‏‎10:58:52 AMGo to full article
Tokyo, Japan (SPX) May 29, 2015
A collaboration of physicists and a mathematician has made a significant step toward unifying general relativity and quantum mechanics by explaining how spacetime emerges from quantum entanglement in a more fundamental theory. The paper announcing the discovery by Hirosi Ooguri, a Principal Investigator at the University of Tokyo's Kavli IPMU, with Caltech mathematician Matilde Marcolli an
 

Dawn Spirals Closer to Ceres, Returns a New View

 
‎30 ‎May ‎2015, ‏‎10:58:52 AMGo to full article
Pasadena CA (JPL) May 29, 2015
A new view of Ceres, taken by NASA's Dawn spacecraft on May 23, shows finer detail is becoming visible on the dwarf planet. The spacecraft snapped the image at a distance of 3,200 miles (5,100 kilometers) with a resolution of 1,600 feet (480 meters) per pixel. The image is part of a sequence taken for navigational purposes. After transmitting these images to Earth on May 23, Da
 

Livermore scientists one step closer to mimicking gamma-ray bursts

 
‎30 ‎May ‎2015, ‏‎10:58:52 AMGo to full article
Livermore CA (SPX) May 29, 2015
Using ever more energetic lasers, Lawrence Livermore researchers have produced a record high number of electron-positron pairs, opening exciting opportunities to study extreme astrophysical processes, such as black holes and gamma-ray bursts. By performing experiments using three laser systems - Titan at Lawrence Livermore, Omega-EP at the Laboratory for Laser Energetics, and Orion at Atom
 

Deep Web Search May Help Scientists

 
‎30 ‎May ‎2015, ‏‎10:58:52 AMGo to full article
Pasadena CA (JPL) May 27, 2015
When you do a simple Web search on a topic, the results that pop up aren't the whole story. The Internet contains a vast trove of information - sometimes called the "Deep Web" - that isn't indexed by search engines: information that would be useful for tracking criminals, terrorist activities, sex trafficking and the spread of diseases. Scientists could also use it to search for images and data
 

Seoul Divided on Proposed THAAD Introduction

 
‎30 ‎May ‎2015, ‏‎10:58:52 AMGo to full article
Moscow (Sputnik) May 25, 2015
Washington's desire to deploy its advanced missile defense system in South Korea remains a serious cause of concern in Seoul and also in China and Russia, media reported on Thursday. The Pentagon has expressed its willingness to deploy a Terminal High-Altitude Area Defense (THAAD) battery on the Korean Peninsula, home to about 28,500 American troops, to better cope with the perceived threa
 

Russia, Iran talks on S-300 missiles end in 'success'

 
‎30 ‎May ‎2015, ‏‎10:58:52 AMGo to full article
Moscow (AFP) May 26, 2015
Moscow and Tehran have concluded talks on the delivery of Russian S-300 missiles to Iran which should take place "quite" soon, Deputy Foreign Minister Hossein Amir-Abdollahian said Monday. "The negotiations on the subject have ended in success. I estimate that the S-300 delivery will take place in quite a short time," Amir-Abdollahian said in Moscow. "It will be done at the soonest oppor
 

Newly dedicated observatory to search for gravitational waves

 
‎24 ‎May ‎2015, ‏‎06:50:56 PMGo to full article
Washington DC (SPX) May 22, 2015
Seeking to expand how we observe and understand the universe where we live, the National Science Foundation has helped dedicate the Advanced Laser Gravitational Wave Observatories (Advanced LIGO) at the LIGO Hanford facility in Richland, Wash. The California Institute of Technology and Massachusetts Institute of Technology designed the NSF-funded facilities and operate them with the goal o
 

Patent for Navy small space debris tracker

 
‎24 ‎May ‎2015, ‏‎06:50:56 PMGo to full article
Washington (UPI) May 22, 2015
A U.S. Navy device that detects small debris in space and provides data on their trajectory has been granted a U.S. patent. The Optical Orbital Debris Spotter from the Naval Research Laboratory is compact in size, uses low power and can be integrated into larger satellite designs or flown independently onboard nano-satellite platforms, the Navy said. The device concept is the cre
 

Physicist Finds Mysterious Anti-electron Clouds Inside Thunderstorm

 
‎24 ‎May ‎2015, ‏‎06:50:56 PMGo to full article
Durham NH (SPX) May 22, 2015
A terrifying few moments flying into the top of an active thunderstorm in a research aircraft has led to an unexpected discovery that could help explain the longstanding mystery of how lightning gets initiated inside a thunderstorm. University of New Hampshire physicist Joseph Dwyer and lightning science colleagues from the University of California at Santa Cruz and Florida Tech describe t
 

Ceres bright spots: Clearer pictures, but still no answers

 
‎24 ‎May ‎2015, ‏‎06:50:56 PMGo to full article
Pasadena, Calif. (UPI) May 22, 2015
Scientists had hoped sharper images of Ceres and its mysterious bright spots would provide some clarity as to their nature and origin, but they remain befuddled. Researchers are fairly certain something in the bottom of a large crater is reflecting the sun's rays, but they still can't verify exactly what the reflective material is. NASA's Dawn probe has spent the last several wee
 

Initial Ariane 5 assembly completed for July launch of dual payloads

 
‎24 ‎May ‎2015, ‏‎06:50:56 PMGo to full article
Kourou, French Guiana (ESA) May 22, 2015
Another Ariane 5 has completed its initial build-up at the Spaceport in French Guiana, marking a major milestone in preparations for Arianespace's third heavy-lift mission of 2015 - which will orbit the European MSG-4 meteorological satellite and Brazilian Star One C4 telecommunications relay platform during July. As part of regular pre-flight preparations inside the Spaceport's Launcher I
 

ASC Signal wins large multi-antenna order in Asia

 
‎24 ‎May ‎2015, ‏‎06:50:56 PMGo to full article
Plano TX (SPX) May 22, 2015
ASC Signal Corporation was awarded a contract from one of Asia's largest information and communications technology providers for the installation of seven 9.3-meter C-band and one 7.6-meter Ku-band antennas. Included with the antenna purchase are seven of ASC's Next Generation Controller (NGC) and custom feed systems. The new antennas are being installed at a major teleport in Singapore an
 

Superhydrophobic glass coating offers clear benefits

 
‎24 ‎May ‎2015, ‏‎06:50:56 PMGo to full article
Oak Ridge TN (SPX) May 15, 2015
A moth's eye and lotus leaf were the inspirations for an antireflective water-repelling, or superhydrophobic, glass coating that holds significant potential for solar panels, lenses, detectors, windows, weapons systems and many other products. The discovery by researchers at the Department of Energy's Oak Ridge National Laboratory, detailed in a paper published in the Journal of Materials
 

Random nanowire configurations boost conductivity

 
‎24 ‎May ‎2015, ‏‎06:50:56 PMGo to full article
Bethlehem PA (SPX) May 21, 2015
Researchers at Lehigh University have identified for the first time that a performance gain in the electrical conductivity of random metal nanowire networks can be achieved by slightly restricting nanowire orientation. The most surprising result of the study is that heavily ordered configurations do not outperform configurations with some degree of randomness; randomness in the case of metal nan
 

Using a sounding rocket to help calibrate NASA's SDO

 
‎24 ‎May ‎2015, ‏‎06:50:56 PMGo to full article
Greenbelt MD (SPX) May 22, 2015
Watching the sun is dangerous work for a telescope. Solar instruments in space naturally degrade over time, bombarded by a constant stream of solar particles that can cause a film of material to adhere to the optics. Decades of research and engineering skill have improved protecting such optics, but one crucial solution is to regularly recalibrate the instruments to accommodate such changes.
 

Gas arms form giant spiraling molecular cradles of dense molecular cores

 
‎24 ‎May ‎2015, ‏‎06:50:56 PMGo to full article
Taipei, Taiwan (SPX) May 22, 2015
A research team led by Dr. Hauyu Liu at the Institute of Astronomy and Astrophysics, Academia Sinica (ASIAA) observed the luminous OB cluster-forming massive molecular clump G33.92+0.11 with the Atacama Large Millimeter/submillimeter Array (ALMA), and unveiled the fine molecular gas structures deeply embedded at the center of the parent molecular cloud. This finding provides a greatly simp
 

Caltech astronomers observe a supernova colliding with its companion star

 
‎24 ‎May ‎2015, ‏‎06:50:56 PMGo to full article
Pasadena CA (SPX) May 22, 2015
Type Ia supernovae, one of the most dazzling phenomena in the universe, are produced when small dense stars called white dwarfs explode with ferocious intensity. At their peak, these supernovae can outshine an entire galaxy. Although thousands of supernovae of this kind were found in the last decades, the process by which a white dwarf becomes one has been unclear. That began to change on
 

Scientists tackle mystery of thunderstorms that strike at night

 
‎24 ‎May ‎2015, ‏‎06:50:56 PMGo to full article
Boulder CO (SPX) May 22, 2015
Thunderstorms that form at night, without a prod from the Sun's heat, are a mysterious phenomenon. This summer scientists will be staying up late in search of some answers. From June 1 through July 15, researchers from across North America will fan out each evening across the Great Plains, where storms are more common at night than during the day. The research effort, co-organized by the N
 

New options for spintronic devices

 
‎24 ‎May ‎2015, ‏‎06:50:56 PMGo to full article
Berlin, Germany (SPX) May 20, 2015
Scientists from Paris and Helmholtz-Zentrum Berlin have been able to switch ferromagnetic domains on and off with low voltage in a structure made of two different ferroic materials. The switching works slightly above room temperature. Their results, which are published online in Scientific Reports, might inspire future applications in low-power spintronics, for instance for fast and efficient da
 

Exploring a new frontier of cyber-physical systems: The human body

 
‎24 ‎May ‎2015, ‏‎06:50:56 PMGo to full article
Washington DC (SPX) May 21, 2015
The National Science Foundation has announced two, five-year, center-scale awards totaling $8.75 million to advance the state-of-the-art in medical and cyber-physical systems (CPS). One project will develop "Cyberheart"--a platform for virtual, patient-specific human heart models and associated device therapies that can be used to improve and accelerate medical-device development and testi
 

Cheap radio frequency antenna printed with graphene ink

 
‎24 ‎May ‎2015, ‏‎06:50:56 PMGo to full article
Washington DC (SPX) May 21, 2015
Scientists have moved graphene - the incredibly strong and conductive single-atom-thick sheet of carbon - a significant step along the path from lab bench novelty to commercially viable material for new electronic applications. Researchers from the University of Manchester, together with BGT Materials Limited, a graphene manufacturer in the United Kingdom, have printed a radio frequency an
 

NASA: Hang on a Minute, We're NOT Working on Warp-Drive Technology

 
‎13 ‎May ‎2015, ‏‎04:29:45 AMGo to full article
Moscow (Sputnik) May 13, 2015
After overly excitable media outlets reported the creation of "warp-drive" technology, NASA has had to come out and set the record straight about what recent reports about an electromagnetic drive that runs without fuel do and do not mean. An April 29 article on NASASpaceflight.com described the results of a test performed on a prototype engine within a vacuum which appeared to create a sm
 

Fifth Vega takes shape for its flight with Sentinel-2A

 
‎13 ‎May ‎2015, ‏‎04:29:45 AMGo to full article
Kourou, French Guiana (ESA) May 13, 2015
The fifth Vega launcher continues its integration process in French Guiana for a mission this summer to orbit Europe's Sentinel-2A Earth observation satellite. During activity at the Spaceport's ZLV launch site, Vega's Zefiro 23 solid propellant second stage has now been integrated atop the vehicle's P80 first stage, which also uses solid propellant. This vertical assembly process is
 

Europa's Mystery Dark Material Could Be Sea Salt

 
‎13 ‎May ‎2015, ‏‎04:29:45 AMGo to full article
Pasadena CA (JPL) May 13, 2015
NASA laboratory experiments suggest the dark material coating some geological features of Jupiter's moon Europa is likely sea salt from a subsurface ocean, discolored by exposure to radiation. The presence of sea salt on Europa's surface suggests the ocean is interacting with its rocky seafloor - an important consideration in determining whether the icy moon could support life. The study i
 

Proba-V maps world air traffic from space

 
‎13 ‎May ‎2015, ‏‎04:29:45 AMGo to full article
Paris (ESA) May 13, 2015
As ESA's Proba-V works quietly on its main task of monitoring vegetation growth across Earth, the minisatellite is also picking up something from a little higher: signals from thousands of aircraft. Launched two years ago, Proba-V has picked up upwards of 25 million positions from more than 15 000 separate aircraft. This is a technical world-first, demonstrating the feasibility of follow-o
 

NASA's New Horizons Spots Pluto's Faintest Known Moons

 
‎13 ‎May ‎2015, ‏‎04:29:45 AMGo to full article
Boulder CO (SPX) May 13, 2015
It's a complete Pluto family photo - or at least a photo of the family members we've already met. For the first time, NASA's New Horizons spacecraft has photographed Kerberos and Styx - the smallest and faintest of Pluto's five known moons. Following the spacecraft's detection of Pluto's giant moon Charon in July 2013, and Pluto's smaller moons Hydra and Nix in July 2014 and January 2015,
 

NASA funds SwRI instrument to date Moon and Mars rocks

 
‎13 ‎May ‎2015, ‏‎04:29:45 AMGo to full article
San Antonio TX (SPX) May 13, 2015
NASA has approved $2.6 million to advance development of Southwest Research Institute's (SwRI) Chemistry, Organics, and Dating Experiment (CODEX) instrument. The device will allow unmanned rovers to analyze the decay of radioactive elements to determine the age of rocks on the Moon and Mars. "CODEX will provide unprecedented in-situ age information about surface samples, which is not only
 

MESSENGER reveals Mercury's magnetic field secrets

 
‎13 ‎May ‎2015, ‏‎04:29:45 AMGo to full article
Vancouver, Canada (SPX) May 13, 2015
New data from MESSENGER, the spacecraft that orbited Mercury for four years before crashing into the planet a week ago, reveals Mercury's magnetic field is almost four billion years old. The discovery helps scientists piece together the history of Mercury, the closest planet to the sun and one about which we knew very little before MESSENGER. NASA's MESSENGER probe left Earth in 2004, reac
 

Space Launch System Program Moving Forward with Critical Design Review

 
‎13 ‎May ‎2015, ‏‎04:29:45 AMGo to full article
Huntsville AL (SPX) May 13, 2015
NASA's Space Launch System (SLS) Program is kicking off its critical design review May 11 at NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center in Huntsville, Alabama. This new rocket will be the most powerful launch vehicle ever built. It is designed to be sustainable and evolve to carry crew and cargo on deep space missions, including an asteroid and ultimately to Mars. Milestone reviews like the criti
 

Weather forecasts for planets beyond our solar system

 
‎13 ‎May ‎2015, ‏‎04:29:45 AMGo to full article
Toronto, Canada (SPX) May 13, 2015
"Cloudy for the morning, turning to clear with scorching heat in the afternoon." While this might describe a typical late-summer day in many places on Earth, it may also apply to planets outside our solar system, according to a new study by an international team of astrophysicists from the University of Toronto, York University and Queen's University Belfast. Using sensitive observations f
 

SMC awards 7.8 million dollar contract to Georgia Tech Research Institute

 
‎13 ‎May ‎2015, ‏‎04:29:45 AMGo to full article
Los Angeles AFB CA (SPX) May 13, 2015
Georgia Tech Research Institute, Atlanta, Georgia, has been awarded a $7,857,568.00 contract, for combustion stability modeling and design tool development. This contract provides for the development of a suite of software-based design tools for predicting and analyzing stability characteristics of combustion devices based on hydrocarbon-fueled,oxidizer-rich staged combustion rocket engine
 

New program to acquire geospatial applications

 
‎13 ‎May ‎2015, ‏‎04:29:45 AMGo to full article
Chantilly, Va. (UPI) May 11, 2015
A government program to solicit and acquire geospatial applications from commercial developers has been launched by the National Geospatial-Intelligence Agency. The GEOINT App Provider Program, IGAPP, is being managed and operated by TASC, an Engility Holdings company. The program facilitates the delivery of the application creations to the NGA GEOINT App Store, an NGA online store fron
 

Breaking waves perturb Earth's magnetic field

 
‎13 ‎May ‎2015, ‏‎04:29:45 AMGo to full article
Durham NH (SPX) May 12, 2015
The underlying physical process that creates striking "breaking wave" cloud patterns in our atmosphere also frequently opens the gates to high-energy solar wind plasma that perturbs Earth's magnetic field, or magnetosphere, which protects us from cosmic radiation. The discovery was made by two University of New Hampshire space physicists, who published their findings in the online journal Nature
 

ESA and ADS sign deal for new Copernicus Earth observation mission

 
‎13 ‎May ‎2015, ‏‎04:29:45 AMGo to full article
Berlin (SPX) May 12, 2015
At the 36th International Symposium on Remote Sensing of Environment in Berlin, the European Space Agency (ESA) and Airbus Defence and Space, the world's second largest space company, signed the development and production contract for the Jason-CS/Sentinel-6A satellite. Jason-CS/Sentinel-6 is a mission to carry out high-precision measurements of ocean surface topography. The contract is wo
 

Fresh evidence for how water reached Earth found in asteroid debris

 
‎13 ‎May ‎2015, ‏‎04:29:45 AMGo to full article
Warwick, UK (SPX) May 12, 2015
Water delivery via asteroids or comets is likely taking place in many other planetary systems, just as it happened on Earth, new research strongly suggests. Published by the Royal Astronomical Society and led by the University of Warwick, the research finds evidence for numerous planetary bodies, including asteroids and comets, containing large amounts of water. The research findings add f
 

FINDER Search and Rescue Technology Helped Save Lives in Nepal

 
‎13 ‎May ‎2015, ‏‎04:29:45 AMGo to full article
Pasadena CA (JPL) May 12, 2015
In the wreckage of a collapsed textile factory and another building in the Nepalese village of Chautara, four men were rescued, thanks to a NASA technology that was able to find their heartbeats. A small, suitcase-sized device called FINDER helped uncover these survivors - two from each destroyed building - in one of the hardest-hit areas of the 7.8-magnitude earthquake that rattled Nepal
 

NASA pushes back against proposal to slash climate budget

 
‎01 ‎May ‎2015, ‏‎02:42:32 AMGo to full article
Washington (AFP) May 1, 2015
NASA pushed back Thursday against a congressional proposal to slash more than $300 million in funding from its branch focused on climate issues. The proposal would cut funding to NASA's Earth Sciences division, which researches the planet's natural systems and processes - including climate change, severe weather and glaciers. Republican Lamar Smith, who chairs the House of Representativ
 

Telenor satellite begins post-launch maneuvers according to plan

 
‎01 ‎May ‎2015, ‏‎02:42:32 AMGo to full article
Palo Alto CA (SPX) May 01, 2015
Space Systems/Loral reports that a satellite designed and built for Telenor Satellite Broadcasting (TSBc), was successfully launched and is performing post-launch maneuvers according to plan. The satellite, THOR 7, deployed its solar arrays on schedule following its launch aboard an Ariane 5 launch vehicle from the European Spaceport in Kourou, French Guiana. It began firing its main thruster ea
 

Strong Evidence for Coronal Heating by Nanoflares

 
‎01 ‎May ‎2015, ‏‎02:42:32 AMGo to full article
Indianapolis IN (SPX) May 01, 2015
The Sun's surface is blisteringly hot at 6,000 kelvins or 10,340 degrees Fahrenheit - but its atmosphere is another 300 times hotter. This has led to an enduring mystery for those who study the Sun: What heats the atmosphere to such extreme temperatures? Normally when you move away from a hot source the environment gets cooler, but some mechanism is clearly at work in the solar atmosphere, the c
 

Arianespace at the EU-Japan Business Round Table

 
‎01 ‎May ‎2015, ‏‎02:42:32 AMGo to full article
Tokyo, Japan (SPX) May 01, 2015
Arianespace Chairman and CEO Stephane Israel took an active role in this week's meetings of the EU-Japan Business Round Table, which seeks to further strengthen relations between the European Union and Japan - including a focus on launch services. As part of a high-level delegation - which comprises some 50 senior executives from leading Japanese and European companies - Israel discussed w
 

Russia to Create World's First Rocket Engine Manufacturing Holding

 
‎01 ‎May ‎2015, ‏‎02:42:32 AMGo to full article
Moscow (Sputnik) May 01, 2015
Russia's United Rocket and Space Corporation (URSC) is drafting a proposal on creation a unique holding, which is set to unite several manufacturers of engines for rockets and missiles, Russia's daily newspaper Izvestia reports on Tuesday. The exact structure of the holding and its head-enterprise are yet to be defined. "Yes, we are working on the creation of a rocket engine manufact
 

Technologies enable ambitious MMS mission

 
‎01 ‎May ‎2015, ‏‎02:42:32 AMGo to full article
Greenbelt MD (SPX) May 01, 2015
It was unprecedented developing a mission that could fly four identically equipped spacecraft in a tight formation and take measurements 100 times faster than any previous space mission - an achievement enabled in part by four NASA-developed technologies that in some cases took nearly 10 years to mature. "To get to this point in time, we had to overcome a number of engineering challenges,"
 

Seeing Stars Through The Cloud

 
‎01 ‎May ‎2015, ‏‎02:42:32 AMGo to full article
London, UK (SPX) May 01, 2015
SKA Organisation and AWS are launching the AstroCompute in the Cloud grant programme to accelerate the development of innovative tools and techniques for processing, storing and analysing the global astronomy community's vast amounts of astronomic data in the cloud. Grant recipients will have access to credits for AWS cloud services over a two-year period and up to one petabyte (PB) of sto
 

Arianespace to launch HellaSat-4/SGS-1 for Arabsat and KACST

 
‎01 ‎May ‎2015, ‏‎02:42:32 AMGo to full article
Paris (SPX) May 01, 2015
Arianespace, Arabsat and King Abdul-Aziz City for Science and Technology (KACST) have announced the signature of a launch service contract for the Hellasat-4/Saudi Geo Satellite-1 satellite. The satellite will be built by Lockheed Martin as part of a turnkey contract with the operator Arabsat, and for Saudi Arabia-based KASCT. HellaSat-4/Saudi Geo Satellite-1 will be launched in 2018 by an
 

First proton collisions should start in early June

 
‎01 ‎May ‎2015, ‏‎02:42:32 AMGo to full article
Dallas TX (SPX) May 01, 2015
First collisions of protons at the world's largest science experiment are expected to start the first or second week of June, according to a senior research scientist with CERN's Large Hadron Collider in Geneva. "It will be about another six weeks to commission the machine, and many things can still happen on the way," said physicist Albert De Roeck, a staff member at CERN and a professor
 

Turkish firm joins NATO BMD support effort

 
‎01 ‎May ‎2015, ‏‎02:42:32 AMGo to full article
Ankara, Turkey (UPI) Apr 29, 2015
Turkish defense electronics company Aselsan has joined a multinational industry team for engineering support of NATO's Ballistic Missile Defense program. The team, led by Leidos of the United States, will provide engineering and integration support for the NATO BMD capability, including BMD enhancements to NATO command, control and communications systems, and refinement and maintenance
 

Tidal tugs on Teflon faults drive slow-slipping earthquakes

 
‎01 ‎May ‎2015, ‏‎02:42:32 AMGo to full article
Seattle WA (SPX) Apr 30, 2015
Unknown to most people, the Pacific Northwest experiences a magnitude-6.6 earthquake about once a year. The reason nobody notices is that the movement happens slowly and deep underground, in a part of the fault whose behavior, known as slow-slip, was only recently discovered. A University of Washington seismologist who studies slow-slip quakes has looked at how they respond to tidal forces
 

Ascent or no ascent

 
‎01 ‎May ‎2015, ‏‎02:42:32 AMGo to full article
Potsdam, Germany (SPX) Apr 30, 2015
Gigantic volumes of hot material rising from the deep earth's mantle to the base of the lithosphere have shaped the face of our planet. Provided they have a sufficient volume, they can lead to break-up of continents or cause mass extinction events in certain periods of the Earth's history. So far it was assumed that because of their high temperatures those bodies - called mantle plumes - ascend
 

Aerospace Defense Force detects recon sats spying on Russia

 
‎01 ‎May ‎2015, ‏‎02:42:32 AMGo to full article
Moscow (Sputnik) Apr 30, 2015
Russia's Aerospace Defense Force (VKO) has recently detected on the orbit a group of reconnaissance satellites spying on Russia, commander of the Space Command Maj. Gen. Oleg Maidanovich said Sunday. "Recently the staff of the Main Space Intelligence Center detected a group of newly launched satellites. The group was set to collect intelligence on the devices located on the territory of th
 

Rapid Innovation Fund Award to the Remote Sensing Systems Directorate

 
‎01 ‎May ‎2015, ‏‎02:42:32 AMGo to full article
Los Angeles AFB CA (SPX) Apr 30, 2015
The Space and Missile Systems Center Remote Sensing Systems Directorate was recently selected for a Rapid Innovation Fund award of $3 million to support Space Based Infrared System data exploitation innovations. This award will be used to fund the Architecture for Real-time Overhead Persistent Infrared Wideband (ARROW) project, an initiative which enables the detection and tracking of dimm
 

MIPT researchers grow cardiac tissue on 'spider silk' substrate

 
‎01 ‎May ‎2015, ‏‎02:42:32 AMGo to full article
Moscow, Russia (SPX) Apr 12, 2015
Genetically engineered fibers of the protein spidroin, which is the construction material for spider webs, has proven to be a perfect substrate for cultivating heart tissue cells, MIPT researchers found. They discuss their findings in an article that has recently come out in the journal PLOS ONE. The cultivation of organs and tissues from a patient's cells is the bleeding edge of medical r
 

 

 

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Media Type: DVD
Published 20-Sep-2010
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Why do scientists now believe we live in a 10-dimensional universe?

Has physics finally reached the very boundaries of reality?

There seems to be evidence to suggest that our world and everything in it are only ghostly images; projections from a level of reality so beyond our own that the real reality is literally beyond both space and time. The main architect of this astonishing idea is one of the world's most eminent thinkers- physicist David Bohm, a protege of Einstein's. Earlier, he noticed that, in plasmas, particles stopped behaving like individuals and started behaving as if they were part of a larger and inter connected whole. He continued his work in the behavior of oceans of these particles, noting their behaving as if they know what each on the untold trillions of individual particles were doing.

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Run Time: 2 hour(s)
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Genetics Research Confirms Biblical Timeline

Exciting research from the summer of 2012 described DNA variation in the protein coding regions of the human genome linked to population growth. One of the investigation's conclusions was that the human genome began to rapidly diversify not more than 5,000 years ago.1,2 This observation closely agrees with a biblical timeline of post-flood human diversification. Yet another study, this one published in the journal Nature, accessed even more extensive data and unintentionally confirmed the recent human history described in Genesis.3

Differences in human DNA can be characterized across populations and ethnic groups using a variety of techniques. One of the most informative genetic technologies in this regard is the analysis of rare DNA variation in the protein coding regions of the genome. Variability in these regions is less frequent than the more numerous genetic differences that occur in the non-coding regulatory regions. Researchers can statistically combine this information with demographic data derived from population growth across the world to generate time scales related to human genetic diversification.4

What makes this type of research unique is that evolutionary scientists typically incorporate hypothetical deep time scales taken from the authority of paleontologists or other similar deep-time scenarios to calibrate models of genetic change over time. Demographics-based studies using observed world population dynamics do not rely on this bias and are therefore more accurate and realistic.

In a 2012 Science report, geneticists analyzed DNA sequences of 15,585 protein-coding gene regions in the human genome for 1,351 European Americans and 1,088 African Americans for rare DNA variation.1,2 This new study accessed rare coding variation in 15,336 genes from over 6,500 humans—almost three times the amount of data compared to the first study.3 A separate group of researchers performed the new study.

The Nature results convey a second spectacular confirmation of the amazingly biblical conclusions from the first study. These scientists confirmed that the human genome began to rapidly diversify not more than 5,000 years ago. In addition, they found significant levels of  variation to be associated with degradation of the human genome, not forward evolutionary progress. This fits closely with research performed by Cornell University geneticist John Sanford who demonstrated through biologically realistic population genetic modeling that genomes actually devolve over time in a process called genetic entropy.5

According to the Bible, the pre-flood world population was reduced to Noah's three sons and their wives, creating a genetic bottleneck from which all humans descended. Immediately following the global flood event, we would expect to see a rapid diversification continuing up to the present. According to Scripture, this began not more than 5,000 years ago. We would also expect the human genome to devolve or degrade as it accumulates irreversible genetic errors over time. Now, two secular research papers confirm these biblical predictions.

References

  1. Tomkins, J. 2012. Human DNA Variation Linked to Biblical Event Timeline. Creation Science Update. Posted on icr.org July 23, 2012, accessed December 31, 2012.
  2. Tennessen, J. et al. 2012. Evolution and Functional Impact of Rare Coding Variation from Deep Sequencing of Human Exomes. Science. 337 (6090): 64-69.
  3. Fu, W, et al. Analysis of 6,515 exomes reveals the recent origin of most human protein-coding variants. Nature. Published online before print, July 13, 2012.
  4. Keinan, A and A. Clark. 2012. Recent Explosive Human Population Growth Has Resulted in an Excess of Rare Genetic Variants. Science. 336 (6082): 740-743.
  5. Sanford, J. C. 2008. Genetic Entropy and the Mystery of the Genome, 3rd ed. Waterloo, NY: FMS Publications.

* Dr. Tomkins is a Research Associate and received his Ph.D. in Genetics from Clemson University.

 

 
 

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‎26 ‎May ‎2015, ‏‎10:00:00 AMGo to full article


 


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‎16 ‎April ‎2015, ‏‎10:00:00 AMGo to full article

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‎06 ‎April ‎2015, ‏‎10:00:00 AMGo to full article

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‎30 ‎March ‎2015, ‏‎10:00:00 AMGo to full article

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‎23 ‎March ‎2015, ‏‎10:00:00 AMGo to full article

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‎19 ‎March ‎2015, ‏‎10:00:00 AMGo to full article

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Live Webcasts March 18 and 22!

 
‎16 ‎March ‎2015, ‏‎10:00:00 AMGo to full article


 


Get a front-row seat to “Science Confirms Biblical Creation” and “Your Origins Matter” in the comfort of your own home as ICR astrophysicist Dr. Jason Lisle shares biblical and scientific truths. Go to ICR.org/webcast at 7:00 p.m. PDT on Wednesday, March 18, and 9:00 or 10:30 a.m. PDT on Sunday, March 22, to view these engaging presentations.

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‎12 ‎February ‎2015, ‏‎10:00:00 AMGo to full article

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‎26 ‎January ‎2015, ‏‎10:00:00 AMGo to full article

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‎19 ‎January ‎2015, ‏‎10:00:00 AMGo to full article

In 1995 the Hubble Telescope photographed spectacular columns of gas, illuminated by nearby stars, in a section of the Eagle Nebula. The enormous columns of gas in this famous photo have been nicknamed "pillars of creation" since secular scientists insist that new stars are being "born" within them.

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‎15 ‎January ‎2015, ‏‎10:00:00 AMGo to full article

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‎08 ‎January ‎2015, ‏‎10:00:00 AMGo to full article

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‎05 ‎January ‎2015, ‏‎10:00:00 AMGo to full article

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‎29 ‎December ‎2014, ‏‎10:00:00 AMGo to full article

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‎22 ‎December ‎2014, ‏‎10:00:00 AMGo to full article

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‎18 ‎December ‎2014, ‏‎10:00:00 AMGo to full article

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‎15 ‎December ‎2014, ‏‎10:00:00 AMGo to full article

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‎11 ‎December ‎2014, ‏‎10:00:00 AMGo to full article

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Dino Tracks

 
‎11 ‎November ‎2014, ‏‎10:00:00 AMGo to full article

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‎07 ‎November ‎2014, ‏‎10:00:00 AMGo to full article

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‎05 ‎November ‎2014, ‏‎10:00:00 AMGo to full article

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‎31 ‎October ‎2014, ‏‎10:00:00 AMGo to full article

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‎29 ‎October ‎2014, ‏‎10:00:00 AMGo to full article

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‎27 ‎October ‎2014, ‏‎10:00:00 AMGo to full article

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‎24 ‎October ‎2014, ‏‎10:00:00 AMGo to full article

John Coleman, co-founder of the Weather Channel, claims that politics is influencing the supposedly unbiased realm of science—particularly in the debate over climate change.

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Brain Bath: A Clever Design Solution

 
‎17 ‎October ‎2014, ‏‎10:00:00 AMGo to full article

What makes sleep so mentally refreshing? University of Rochester neuroscientist Jeff Iliff addressed the crowd gathered at a September 2014 TEDMED event and explained his amazing new discoveries. The words he used perfectly match what one would expect while describing the works of an ingenious designer.

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Giant Clams Are Brilliant Algae Farmers

 
‎15 ‎October ‎2014, ‏‎10:00:00 AMGo to full article

Giant clams living in the Pacific Ocean's shallow-water tropics display brilliant, iridescent colors. Why do they display such radiance? Researchers uncovered five high-tech specifications that show how these giant clams use specialized iridescent cells to farm colonies of algae.

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A Fuss Over Dust: Planck Satellite Fails to Confirm Big Bang 'Proof'

 
‎13 ‎October ‎2014, ‏‎10:00:00 AMGo to full article

Planck satellite data confirm that the "smoking gun" Big Bang evidence is likely the result of something much more mundane: dust within our own galaxy.

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Throwing Darwin a Curve

 
‎10 ‎October ‎2014, ‏‎10:00:00 AMGo to full article

Great pitchers make it look so easy, and “practice makes perfect,” but it helps that the brain power necessary for control, neurological connections, and muscular arrangements for the human arm are exceedingly better than any system that exists on the planet. Is throwing a ball really that complex?

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Were Intestines Designed for Bacteria?

 
‎08 ‎October ‎2014, ‏‎10:00:00 AMGo to full article

Scientists purposefully made mice sick to test how the creatures’ intestines—and the microbes they harbor—would react. They discovered details behind a remarkable relationship that, when working well, keeps both parties healthy.

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Vital Function Found for Whale 'Leg' Bones

 
‎06 ‎October ‎2014, ‏‎10:00:00 AMGo to full article

Few animal traits are trotted out as illustrations of evolution as often as the whale’s supposed vestigial hip bones. Recent research has uncovered new details about the critical function of these whale hips—details that undermine this key evolutionary argument and confirm divine design.

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Jurassic Squirrels?

 
‎03 ‎October ‎2014, ‏‎10:00:00 AMGo to full article

Jurassic mammals made headlines recently, as Chinese paleontologists described six tiny skeletons comprising three new species. The squirrel-like fossils break the long-held idea that most so-called "dinosaur-era" mammals resembled shrews. These newfound mammals look like they lived in trees—not underground like shrews. Do the new fossils help evolutionists clarify their story for the origin of mammals, or do they crank more twists into evolution's troubled saga?

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Australopith Child Gets an Academic Spanking

 
‎29 ‎September ‎2014, ‏‎10:00:00 AMGo to full article

A fossil group of alleged evolutionary human ancestors called australopithecines—all quite ape-like in their features—have traditionally been uncooperative as transitional forms. Now the famous Taung child, a supposed example of early transitional skull features, has been debunked.

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Cambrian Fossil Intensifies Evolutionary Conundrum

 
‎26 ‎September ‎2014, ‏‎10:00:00 AMGo to full article

New fossil finds further verify one of evolution's biggest problems: the Cambrian explosion. According to evolutionary reckoning, a massive explosion of new life supposedly spawned dozens of brand-new fully formed body plans about 530 million years ago. Details from a newly described Canadian fossil fish intensify this Cambrian conundrum.

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Genome Scrambling and Encryption Befuddles Evolution

 
‎24 ‎September ‎2014, ‏‎10:00:00 AMGo to full article

One-cell creatures called ciliates are expanding the concept of genome complexity at an exponential rate. Now a newly sequenced ciliate genome reveals unimaginable levels of programmed rearrangement combined with an ingenious system of encryption.

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Big Bang Fizzles under Lithium Test

 
‎22 ‎September ‎2014, ‏‎10:00:00 AMGo to full article

Secular astrophysicists often talk about “primordial nucleosynthesis” as though it were a proven historical event. In theory, it describes how certain conditions during an early Big Bang universe somehow cobbled together the first elements. But no historical evidence corroborates this primordial nucleosynthesis, an idea beset by a theoretical barrier called the “lithium problem.” Secular scientists recently put this problem to a practical test.

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Are We Evolving Stupidity?

 
‎19 ‎September ‎2014, ‏‎10:00:00 AMGo to full article

Social psychologists are tracking IQ scores and noticed a decline in the last decade after a steady rise since the 1950s. Some wonder if the recent downturn reflects genes that have been eroding all along. Are we evolving stupidity?

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Ten Evidences for Creation

 
‎17 ‎September ‎2014, ‏‎10:00:00 AMGo to full article

Get some fast facts on the evidences for creation science!

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Bible May Solve Colossal Ancient Iceberg Riddle

 
‎15 ‎September ‎2014, ‏‎10:00:00 AMGo to full article

Five seafloor scour troughs show tell-tale signs of having been gouged out by colossal icebergs. But none of today’s icebergs are nearly big enough to scour the seafloor at such a great depth.

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Dual-Gene Codes Defy Evolution...Again

 
‎12 ‎September ‎2014, ‏‎10:00:00 AMGo to full article

Discoveries of DNA sequences that contain different languages, each one with multiple purposes, are utterly defying evolutionary predictions. What was once hailed as redundant code is proving to be key in protein production.

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Ciliate Genome Reveals Mind-Bending Complexity

 
‎10 ‎September ‎2014, ‏‎10:00:00 AMGo to full article

Certain types of fungi can be parasitic to both plants and animals. Two new studies show that this has developed, in part, by a loss of genetic information—not a gain as predicted by evolution.

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New Giant Dinosaur from Argentina

 
‎08 ‎September ‎2014, ‏‎10:00:00 AMGo to full article

Scientists described a new and remarkable fossil skeleton of a giant titanosaur, a group that includes the largest creatures ever to have lived on land. Because this specimen is nearly 45 percent complete, it gives more details than any other fossil of its kind, as well as some details that confirm the biblical creation model.

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Fungal Parasitism Marked by Gene Loss, Not Gain

 
‎05 ‎September ‎2014, ‏‎10:00:00 AMGo to full article

Certain types of fungi can be parasitic to both plants and animals. Two new studies show that this has developed, in part, by a loss of genetic information—not a gain as predicted by evolution.

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Decoding Snake-Venom Origins

 
‎03 ‎September ‎2014, ‏‎10:00:00 AMGo to full article

The origin of snake venom has long been a mystery to both creationists and evolutionists. However, by stepping outside the standard research paradigm, scientists recently showed that snake venom proteins may have arisen from existing salivary proteins, supporting the idea that they arose post-Fall through modification of existing features.

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Darwin's Finches: Answers From Epigenetics

 
‎29 ‎August ‎2014, ‏‎10:00:00 AMGo to full article

Authentic speciation is a process whereby organisms diversify within the boundaries of their gene pools, and this can result in variants with specific ecological adaptability. While it was once thought that this process was strictly facilitated by DNA sequence variability, Darwin's classic example of speciation in finches now includes a surprisingly strong epigenetic component as well.

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Octopus Skin Inspires High-Tech Camouflage Fabric

 
‎27 ‎August ‎2014, ‏‎10:00:00 AMGo to full article

An octopus can change the color of its skin at will to mimic any kind of surrounding. It actively camouflages itself with astoundingly complicated biological machinery. Wouldn't it be great if, say, a soldier's uniform or an armored vehicle used similar technology?

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New Finds Reveal Fully-Human Neandertal

 
‎25 ‎August ‎2014, ‏‎10:00:00 AMGo to full article

The case for Neandertals as more primitive members of an evolutionary continuum that spans from apes to modern man continues to weaken. Genetic and archaeological finds are completely reshaping modern concepts of Neandertal men and women.

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There's More to the Story

 
‎22 ‎August ‎2014, ‏‎10:00:00 AMGo to full article

The Dallas Morning News recently reported that a group of Ph.D. scientists is swimming upstream against the scientific community. Instead of believing in millions of years of evolution, the team at the Institute for Creation Research dares to suggest that science confirms biblical creation's view of a world only thousands of years old. And there's more to the story.

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What Is 'Real Scientific Research'?

 
‎20 ‎August ‎2014, ‏‎10:00:00 AMGo to full article

A recent article in The Dallas Morning News and a follow-up NBC interview presented some history and touched on the tenets of the Institute for Creation Research. Both news reports sparked inquiries from readers and viewers. For example, some are now asking, "What defines credible scientific research?"

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DNA Was Created as a Reservoir for the Information of Life

 
‎18 ‎August ‎2014, ‏‎10:00:00 AMGo to full article

Secular scientists claimed in the 1970s that chimp genomes are 98% similar to humans, and it was apparently verified by more modern techniques. But that estimate actually used isolated segments of DNA that we already share with chimps—not the whole genomes. The latest comparison that included all of the two species’ DNA revealed a huge difference from the percentage scientists have been claiming for years.

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Transhumanism is an international intellectual and cultural movement supporting the use of science and technology to improve human mental and physical characteristics and capacities.

by Dr. Martin Erdmann


The human species can, if it wishes, transcend itself. We need a name for this new belief. Perhaps transhumanism will serve: man remaining man, but transcending himself, by realizing new possibilities of and for his human nature.
Julian Huxley
1st director of the United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization (UNESCO) (wrote nearly fifty years ago)
Transhumanism is a word that is beginning to bubble to the top of our prophetic studies and horizon. Simply described, transhumanism is an international intellectual and cultural movement supporting the use of science and technology to improve human mental and physical characteristics and capacities - in essence, to create a "posthuman" society.
This is not a passing fad. Transhumanist programs are sponsored in institutions such as Oxford, Standford, and Caltech. Sponsorships come from organizations such as Ford, Apple, Intel, Xerox, Sun Microsystems, and others. DARPA, Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency, a technical department within the U.S. Department of Defense is also involved in transhumanist projects.
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The Origins of Information: Exploring and Explaining Biological Information


 

In the 21st century, the information age has finally come to biology. We now know that biology at its root is comprised of information rich systems, such as the complex digital code encoded in DNA. Groundbreaking discoveries of the past decade are revealing the information bearing properties of biological systems.

Dr. Stephen C. Meyer, a Cambridge trained philosopher of science is examining and explaining the amazing depth of digital technology found in each and every living cell such as nested coding, digital processing, distributive retrieval and storage systems, and genomic operating systems.

Meyer is developing a more fundamental argument for intelligent design that is based not on a single feature like the bacterial flagellum, but rather on a pervasive feature of all living systems. Alongside matter and energy, Dr. Meyer shows that there is a third fundamental entity in the universe needed for life: information.

 

http://www.stephencmeyer.org/

Got Science? Genesis 1 and Evidence

 

 

 
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Many scientists say complex life just randomly happened.
Primordial soup + lightning strike = Bingo! Is there any shred of scientific evidence that life was CREATED as Genesis 1 claims? Dr. Stephen Meyer, author of SIGNATURE IN THE CELL, says not a shred. Rather, a ton. Learn good reasoning techniques here.
 
08 June 2012, 08:09:11 PM
 

Intelligent Design is not Creationism

 
08 June 2012, 08:09:11 PM | Robert CrowtherGo to full article

This article was originally published in the Daily Telegraph (UK) on January 29. Original Article In 2004, the distinguished philosopher Antony Flew of the University of Reading made worldwide news when he repudiated a lifelong commitment to atheism and affirmed the reality of some kind of a creator. Flew cited evidence of intelligent design in DNA and the arguments of "American [intelligent] design theorists" as important reasons for this shift. Since then, British readers have learnt about the theory of intelligent design (ID) mainly from media reports about United States court battles over the legality of teaching students about it. According to most reports, ID is a "faith-based" alternative to evolution based solely on religion. But is this accurate? As one of the architects of the theory, I know it isn't. Contrary to media reports, ID is not a religious-based idea, but an evidence-based scientific theory about life's origins. According to Darwinian biologists such as Oxford University's Richard Dawkins, living systems "give the appearance of having been designed for a purpose". But, for modern Darwinists, that appearance of design is illusory, because the purely undirected process of natural selection acting on random mutations is entirely sufficient to produce the intricate designed-like structures found in living organisms. By contrast, ID holds that there are tell-tale features of living systems and the universe that are best explained by a designing intelligence. The theory does not challenge the idea of evolution defined as change over time, or even common ancestry, but it disputes Darwin's idea that the cause of biological change is wholly blind and undirected. What signs of intelligence do design advocates see? In recent years, biologists have discovered an exquisite world of nanotechnology within living cells - complex circuits, sliding clamps, energy-generating turbines and miniature machines. For example, bacterial cells are propelled by rotary engines called flagellar motors that rotate at 100,000rpm. These engines look like they were designed by engineers, with many distinct mechanical parts (made of proteins), including rotors, stators, O-rings, bushings, U-joints and drive shafts. The biochemist Michael Behe points out that the flagellar motor depends on the co-ordinated function of 30 protein parts. Remove one of these proteins and the rotary motor doesn't work. The motor is, in Behe's words, "irreducibly complex". This creates a problem for the Darwinian mechanism. Natural selection preserves or "selects" functional advantages as they arise by random mutation. Yet the flagellar motor does not function unless all its 30 parts are present. Thus, natural selection can "select" the motor once it has arisen as a functioning whole, but it cannot produce the motor in a step-by-step Darwinian fashion. Natural selection purportedly builds complex systems from simpler structures by preserving a series of intermediates, each of which must perform some function. With the flagellar motor, most of the critical intermediate structures perform no function for selection to preserve. This leaves the origin of the flagellar motor unexplained by the mechanism - natural selection - that Darwin specifically proposed to replace the design hypothesis. Is there a better explanation? Based on our uniform experience, we know of only one type of cause that produces irreducibly complex systems: intelligence. Whenever we encounter complex systems - whether integrated circuits or internal combustion engines - and we know how they arose, invariably a designing intelligence played a role. Consider an even more fundamental argument for design. In 1953, when Watson and Crick elucidated the structure of the DNA molecule, they made a startling discovery. Strings of precisely sequenced chemicals called nucleotides in DNA store and transmit the assembly instructions - the information - in a four-character digital code for building the protein molecules the cell needs to survive. Crick then developed his "sequence hypothesis", in which the chemical bases in DNA function like letters in a written language or symbols in a computer code. As Dawkins has noted, "the machine code of the genes is uncannily computer-like". The informational features of the cell at least appear designed. Yet, to date, no theory of undirected chemical evolution has explained the origin of the digital information needed to build the first living cell. Why? There is simply too much information in the cell to be explained by chance alone. The information in DNA (and RNA) has also been shown to defy explanation by forces of chemical necessity. Saying otherwise would be like saying a headline arose as the result of chemical attraction between ink and paper. Clearly, something else is at work. DNA functions like a software program. We know from experience that software comes from programmers. We know that information - whether, say, in hieroglyphics or radio signals - always arises from an intelligent source. As the pioneering information theorist Henry Quastler observed: "Information habitually arises from conscious activity." So the discovery of digital information in DNA provides strong grounds for inferring that intelligence played a causal role in its origin. Thus, ID is not based on religion, but on scientific discoveries and our experience of cause and effect, the basis of all scientific reasoning about the past. Unlike creationism, ID is an inference from biological data. Even so, ID may provide support for theistic belief. But that is not grounds for dismissing it. Those who do confuse the evidence for the theory with its possible implications. Many astrophysicists initially rejected the Big Bang theory because it seemed to point to the need for a transcendent cause of matter, space and time. But science eventually accepted it because the evidence strongly supported it. Today, a similar prejudice confronts ID. Nevertheless, this new theory must also be evaluated on the basis of the evidence, not philosophical preferences. As Professor Flew advises: "We must follow the evidence, wherever it leads." Stephen C Meyer edited 'Darwinism, Design and Public Education' (Michigan State University Press). He has a PhD in philosophy of science from Cambridge University and is a senior fellow at the Discovery Institute in Seattle.

 

09 December 2011, 11:13:24 PM

New Research Supports Meyer's Discussion of Pre-Biotic Chemistry in Signature in the Cell

 
09 December 2011, 11:13:24 PM | Andrew McDiarmidGo to full article
A recent Nature publication reports a new technique for measuring the oxygen levels in Earth's atmosphere some 4.4 billion years ago. The authors found that by studying cerium oxidation states in zircon, a compound formed from volcanic magma, they could ascertain the oxidation levels in the early earth. Their findings suggest that the early Earth's oxygen levels were very close to current levels. This research supports Dr. Meyer's discussion in Signature in the Cell. On pgs. 224-226 of Ch. 10: Beyond the Reach of Chance, Meyer states that when Stanley Miller conducted his famous 1953 experiment simulating early Earth's atmosphere, he "assumed that the earth's atmosphere contained virtually no free oxygen." Meyer reveals that new geochemical evidence showed that the assumptions Miller had made about the early atmosphere were incorrect. This new research is additional confirmation that oxygen was present in significant quantities. Because oxygen quenches organic reactions necessary to produce essential building blocks of life, the ability of inorganic materials to produce organic life, as chemical evolutionary theory assumes, is not possible. Read the complete article at ENV.

 

Dr. Meyer Debates Signature in the Cell Arguments with Keith Fox on Premier Radio UK

24 November 2011, 12:37:19 AM | Andrew McDiarmidGo to full article
During a recent visit to London, Dr. Stephen Meyer debated Keith Fox on Premier Radio UK's "Unbelievable" program. Fox is a professor of biochemistry at Southampton University and Chair of the UK's Christians in Science network. Two years after its publication, Meyer's Signature in the Cell continues to make an impact with its powerful argument for design in DNA. In this lively conversation, Meyer and Fox discuss origins of life and the design inference in science.

 

« Overflowtoday.com asks Stephen Meyer if he's got science | Main

Dr. Meyer Debates Signature in the Cell Arguments with Keith Fox on Premier Radio UK


During a recent visit to London, Dr. Stephen Meyer debated Keith Fox on Premier Radio UK's "Unbelievable" program. Fox is a professor of biochemistry at Southampton University and Chair of the UK's Christians in Science network. Two years after its publication, Meyer's Signature in the Cell continues to make an impact with its powerful argument for design in DNA. In this lively conversation, Meyer and Fox discuss origins of life and the design inference in science.


 

 

Searching For The Truth On Origins
By Roger Oakland

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