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Biotech & Global Pestilence Introduction:

 

The threat of germ warfare has brought to the forefront long-forgotten diseases like plague, anthrax, and smallpox. Recent television news programs have highlighted secret projects in the former Soviet Union to develop antibiotic-resistant strains of genetically engineered viruses and bacteria.


[READ THE FULL INTRODUCTION]

 

 


 

Human Nature

Speakers:

Ron Matsen

R179.00

 

 

 

About available formats

Description: 

What does it mean to be human? Philosophers, theologians, sociologists and psychologists have attempted to understand the nature of mankind for ages. Their conclusions often contradict each other which lead to confusion rather than clarification. Clearly Man is a very complicated social being. The Bible tells us that man is “fearfully and wonderfully made.”
  • How do we understand our makeup and does it make a difference?
  • What is the meaning of being “created in the image of God?”
  • What causes our natural responses and can we change this behaviour?

Join Ron Matsen from the Executive Briefing Room of the River Lodge, New Zealand as he explores the subject of our “Human Nature” and gives insight into the architecture and accountability of all mankind.

This briefing pack contains approx. 2 hours of teaching.

  • DVD discs
  • M4A files
  • PDF Notes file
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Dedicated Page

 

 

 

Price R 179

 

 

 

 

Beginning of Wisdom

 

by

 Dr. Chuck Missler

“The fear of God is the beginning of wisdom.” Proverbs 9:10

But how do we balance the awesome majesty due to the Creator and Ruler of the universe with the gracious family intimacy that is now available to us through the completed work of Christ?

What does His Holiness demand of us, personally?

What are the hazards of failing to render the Almighty His due, while availing ourselves the riches committed to us of the precious promises in His Word?

How do we deal with these paramount issues facing us daily in practical challenges?

Chuck Missler grapples with these wildly misunderstood tensions with down-to-earth frankness and Biblically-based candor.

 


 

 

Price R 179.00

 

 

The Gospel: The Message of Reconciliation

DVD

by Ron Matsen 

 

 

 

Price R 179.00

 

 

 

Description

One of the last instructions given by Jesus to the Church was, “Go into all the world and preach the gospel.” (Mark 16:15)

The fact is most Christians don’t know how to share their faith effectively. Sadly, many of the people they know in the world today are wandering around, lost and without hope, having never heard the wonderful Message of Reconciliation.

How would you answer the question, “What must I do to be saved?”

What are the essential facts, demands and promises of the Gospel?

Why are we told to evangelize?

Join Ron Matsen in the Executive Briefing Room of the River Lodge, New Zealand as he explores the subject of “The Gospel – The Message of Reconciliation” and gives practical insight into how to share the essential doctrines of salvation.

This briefing pack contains 2 hours of teaching

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Koinonia Institute presents its 2014 Strategic Perspectives IX Conference in Coeur d' Alene, Idaho on DVD, intel and insight to understand the times.


DVD Set - 10 discs
Run time approximately 21 Hours
Dr. Chuck Missler: The Spiritual Entrepreneur
L.A. Marzulli: On the Trail of the Nephilim
Bill Salus: Nuclear Showdown in Iran: Revealing the Ancient Prophecy of Elam
Mark Biltz: The Blood Moons
Joseph Farah: ISIS SHMISIS: God's Mideast Peace Plan
Bob Cornuke: Amazing New Discoveries that Change Everything about the Location of Solomon's Temple
Louis Powell: China - The Sleeping Dragon
Ron Matsen: The Re-emergence of Assyria


Also featuring: Trevor MacDuff, Chris Corlett, Jeff Altus, Gordon McDonald, William Welty, Avi Lipkin, Dan Stolebarger, Kings Highway/Debbie Holland, Steve Elwart, John Loeffler, and Jay Seegert

 

Price R799.00

 

 

 
Diseases/Conditions News Headlines - Yahoo! News

 

Samsung Electronics to create fund for cancer-stricken workers, safety

 
‎03 ‎August ‎2015, ‏‎12:35:04 PMGo to full article
A man walks at the Samsung Electronics' headquarters in SeoulTech giant Samsung Electronics Co Ltd said on Monday it will create a 100 billion won ($85.8 million) fund to compensate cancer-stricken workers and their families, and for efforts to prevention such diseases at its chip and display factories. Samsung said in a statement the fund will make payments to workers or families of those who became sick while working at its plants, including contractors. South Korean activist group Sharps, which represents many of the cancer-stricken workers, said on Monday it was aware of around 200 workers who had fallen ill after working at a Samsung plant.
 
 

New cocktails to test limits of cancer drug pricing

 
‎03 ‎August ‎2015, ‏‎06:03:07 AMGo to full article
By Ben Hirschler LONDON (Reuters) - New cancer drug cocktails set to reach the market in the next few years will test the limits of premium pricing for life-saving medicines, forcing company executives to consider fresh market strategies. The growing reluctance of governments and private insurers to fund very expensive drugs - even remarkably effective ones - points to a showdown as manufacturers mix and match therapies that harness the immune system to fight tumors. Dozens of new cancer combinations will be launched over the next few years, with ones for lung cancer, melanoma and other solid tumors taking off strongly after 2018, drug company pipelines suggest.
 

Four dead, 65 sick in New York City Legionnaires' disease outbreak

 
‎01 ‎August ‎2015, ‏‎10:49:36 PMGo to full article
By Katie Reilly NEW YORK (Reuters) - A deadly outbreak of Legionnaires' disease, a severe type of pneumonia, has now killed four people and sickened 65 in the Bronx section of New York City since July 10, New York City health officials said on Saturday. This wave of Legionnaires', which officials have called unusual, is now more than five times the number of cases recorded in the last outbreak, in which 12 people in the Bronx fell ill in December 2014. The disease is caused by Legionella, a bacteria found in certain plumbing systems, including hot tubs, humidifiers, cooling towers and hot water tanks.
 

More research links sedentary time to diabetes

 
‎31 ‎July ‎2015, ‏‎11:06:04 PMGo to full article
By Lisa Rapaport (Reuters Health) - People who are inactive for hours on end each day may be more likely to develop diabetes than people who spend more time moving around, a study confirms. “We are beginning to believe that being highly sedentary is something different than not getting exercise,” said lead author Bethany Barone Gibbs, a researcher in health and physical activity at the University of Pittsburgh. “Someone who runs 30 minutes every day can sit for the other 15 hours of the day at work, commuting, and at home and this person would be considered physically active but also quite sedentary,” Gibbs said by email.
 

A smarter way to track your asthma symptoms

 
‎31 ‎July ‎2015, ‏‎05:42:48 PMGo to full article
A smarter way to track your asthma symptomsA new, free-to-download app from non-profit Allergy & Asthma Network could help people better monitor and understand how asthma affects them or their children and provide potentially valuable insights for healthcare professionals. Called the Asthma Storylines app and available for the iPhone, Android and the desktop, it can be used for tracking everything from frequency of specific symptoms and emotional impact, to setting up reminders for taking medication or for medical appointments. The idea of the app is to create a comprehensive picture of how asthma manifests itself in an individual over time and potentially identify triggers as much as patterns.

 

Mental health suffers most in major nuclear accidents, studies find

 
‎31 ‎July ‎2015, ‏‎01:03:05 AMGo to full article
By Kate Kelland LONDON (Reuters) - People caught up in a nuclear disaster are more likely to suffer severe psychological disorders such as depression and post-traumatic stress disorder rather than any harm from radiation, scientists said on Friday. The studies counter the misconception that nuclear disasters have caused widespread death and physical illness, with the researchers finding that the mental health effects were far more profound. "In most nuclear accidents very few people are exposed to a life-threatening dose of radiation," wrote Akira Ohtsuru of the Fukushima Medical University (FMU).
 

Outbreak of Legionnaire's Disease Sickens 46 in NYC

 
‎30 ‎July ‎2015, ‏‎10:54:55 PMGo to full article
Outbreak of Legionnaire's Disease Sickens 46 in NYCAn outbreak of Legionnaire’s disease has infected at least 46 in New York City and health officials said the bacteria has already been found in cooling units on top of at least two buildings. Two patients with Legionnaire's disease died during the outbreak, but officials stressed that the two patients, a man and woman in their 50s, had other conditions including lung and heart issues. Caused by a bacteria called Legionella, the infection causes a type of pneumonia that can be damaging or even fatal for those with compromised immune systems or underlying health conditions.
 
 

Only small increase in US girls getting cervical cancer shot

 
‎30 ‎July ‎2015, ‏‎10:16:42 PMGo to full article
NEW YORK (AP) — More U.S. girls are getting a controversial vaccine, but the increase last year was only slight.
 

Research suggests gestational diabetes preventable

 
‎30 ‎July ‎2015, ‏‎06:32:21 PMGo to full article
A simple lifestyle change could reduce your risk for gestational diabetes, according to a new study.A simple lifestyle intervention could be all it takes to prevent gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) even in high-risk women, according to a new study. Working with 293 women considered at risk for GDM due to obesity -- having a body mass index (BMI) of 30 or higher -- or a history of the condition, researchers divided them into a control group and an intervention group. All participants' pregnancies were less than 20 weeks underway at the start of the study and the 155 women in the test group received a diet and exercise intervention supervised by experienced nurses whereas the remaining women in the control group received standard care.
 
 

National Minority Mental Health Awareness Month - A NAMI-NYC Metro Wrap Up

 
‎29 ‎July ‎2015, ‏‎09:58:29 PMGo to full article
National Minority Mental Health Awareness Month - A NAMI-NYC Metro Wrap UpNo matter who you are, living with a mental health condition can be challenging, but for some, culture, race, and ethnic background can exacerbate mental health challenges, and create disparities in access to quality mental health care. The National Institute of Mental Health's National Healthcare Disparities Report 2012 found that "health care...
 
 

Telemedicine can widen access to depression therapy for seniors

 
‎29 ‎July ‎2015, ‏‎08:37:46 PMGo to full article
By Madeline Kennedy (Reuters Health) - Talk therapy delivered by two-way video call helped older veterans with depression as much as in-person therapy sessions, a U.S. study found. Many seniors face obstacles to getting help for depression, including mobility issues and fear of social stigma, researchers say, so telemedicine might expand their access to treatment. “Psychotherapy works for depression whether you deliver it by face-to-face or the telemedicine approach,” and telemedicine is a good option for “older adults who have barriers to mobility, stigma, or geographic isolation,” said lead author Dr. Leonard Egede “At our facility, we have almost 40 percent of people who live in rural areas, so this is a good opportunity to be able to provide care for them without them having to drive long distances,” noted Egede, the Allen H. Johnson Endowed Chair and professor of medicine at the Medical University of South Carolina in Charleston, by email.
 

GlaxoSmithKline sees staged roll-out of malaria vaccine

 
‎29 ‎July ‎2015, ‏‎08:35:06 PMGo to full article
A British Airways airplane flies past a signage for pharmaceutical giant GlaxoSmithKlein in LondonThe world's first malaria vaccine, which won a green light last week from European drugs regulators, will be rolled out gradually in Africa, its maker said on Wednesday. "We believe that there should be a thoughtful, staged roll-out of this vaccine, particularly because it is important that we acquire more knowledge about where it really works the best," GlaxoSmithKline (GSK) Chief Executive Andrew Witty told reporters. Experts also need to build up a bigger database on safety, he added, since it is the first time a vaccine will have been launched in Africa without any history of use in developed countries.
 
 

Legionnaires' disease kills two, sickens 31 in New York City

 
‎29 ‎July ‎2015, ‏‎07:20:05 PMGo to full article
A deadly outbreak of Legionnaires' disease that killed two people and sickened 31 is under investigation in the South Bronx section of New York City, health officials said on Wednesday. The new wave of Legionnaires', a type of pneumonia caused by bacteria, has been recorded since July 10, the city's health department said in a statement. The cause was traced to contamination in cooling towers at Co-op City, the world's largest cooperative housing development, according to the health department.
 

Sanofi's combination diabetes drug hits goal in late-stage trial

 
‎29 ‎July ‎2015, ‏‎07:16:46 AMGo to full article
French drugs firm Sanofi's logo is pictured inside the company's headquarters during the company's 2014 annual results presentation in ParisSanofi said on Wednesday a first late-stage Phase III study of its LixiLan diabetes drug had met its main target, while another would be completed at the end of the third quarter. LixiLan consists of a single-injection combination of Lyxumia, a drug developed with Danish drugmaker Zealand Pharma, and Sanofi's Lantus. It targets patients suffering from type 2 diabetes.
 
 

Iowa extends bird flu disaster proclamation through August

 
‎29 ‎July ‎2015, ‏‎12:19:20 AMGo to full article
(Reuters) - Iowa Governor Terry Branstad on Tuesday extended the state's bird flu disaster proclamation by a month until Aug. 30, keeping in place a raft of state resources for poultry farms recovering from an outbreak of the disease, country's worst-ever. Without the extension, the disaster proclamation would have expired on July 31 even though a cleanup had not yet been completed, the governor's office said in a release. More than 48 million birds, mostly chickens and turkeys, have died from highly pathogenic avian influenza or been culled to control its spread since late last year.
 

Insulin resistance might increase Alzheimer’s risk

 
‎29 ‎July ‎2015, ‏‎12:02:42 AMGo to full article
By Lisa Rapaport (Reuters Health) - Insulin resistance may increase the risk for Alzheimer’s disease by depriving the brain of sugar needed for normal cognition, a small study suggests. “By altering insulin resistance in midlife, it may be possible to reduce future risk of Alzheimer’s,” said study co-author Barbara Bendlin, an Alzheimer’s researcher at the University of Wisconsin School of Medicine and Public Health, in an email to Reuters Health. Insulin resistance, the body’s failure to respond to the hormone, is a hallmark of diabetes.
 

While Working to Eradicate Malaria, Let's Eliminate Malaria Deaths

 
‎28 ‎July ‎2015, ‏‎11:59:48 PMGo to full article
While Working to Eradicate Malaria, Let's Eliminate Malaria DeathsLast week, there was a glimmer of hope for everyone that suffers from malaria: the world's first-ever malaria vaccine received a green light from European authorities. While we aren't out of the woods yet, this is a positive step toward eliminating this deadly foe. While RTS,S, does provide hope for a tomorrow without malaria, we cannot be...
 
 

You Are Not Your Cancer: Keeping Struggles in Perspective

 
‎28 ‎July ‎2015, ‏‎11:00:15 PMGo to full article
You Are Not Your Cancer: Keeping Struggles in PerspectiveAs a writer and survivor, I'm often asked to contribute freelance articles about cancer and all it's effects. It doesn't hurt that I also started a blog, HerAfter.com, on what it's like to live 'normally' after such a life-altering fight for survival. For the most part, I'm flattered when my perspective as a woman and writer is respected for...
 
 

US expects to pay farmers $191 million for birds lost to flu

 
‎28 ‎July ‎2015, ‏‎10:09:08 PMGo to full article
DES MOINES, Iowa (AP) — The U.S. government expects to spend $191 million to pay chicken and turkey farmers for birds lost to avian flu, Agriculture Secretary Tom Vilsack said Tuesday as he called for Congress to consider a disaster program for poultry producers similar to that for other livestock farmers.
 

Depression Can Lead to Individuals Questioning Their Value(s)

 
‎28 ‎July ‎2015, ‏‎06:27:32 PMGo to full article
Value -- whether it's personal, family, financial, moral, or spiritual -- is pursued by everyone. It can be a driving force, an artificial projection, or sometimes used as a weapon to diminish, demoralize, or devalue someone's contributions. Notwithstanding, the issue with assessing value is that it's an artificial evaluation of worth based...
 

Shift work doesn't increase the risk of prostate cancer compared to day work

 
‎28 ‎July ‎2015, ‏‎05:45:52 PMGo to full article
To reach their conclusion, the scientists studied a total of 27,828 male industrial production workers (15,219 daytime and 12,609 shift) residing in the German federal state of Rhineland-Palatinate who worked for at least one year in a chemical company.Contrary to what scientists previously believed, a study by German researchers has suggested that rotating shift work has no effect on the occurrence of prostate cancer. The results of their study were published in the Deutsches Ärzteblatt International journal. Recent studies have shown that employees who work in rotating shifts may be more susceptible to cancer than salaried employees working traditional daytime hours.
 
 

Merck raises forecast on strong sales of diabetes, cancer drugs

 
‎28 ‎July ‎2015, ‏‎02:01:40 PMGo to full article
(Reuters) - Merck & Co Inc reported a better-than-expected quarterly profit and boosted its full-year earnings forecast as demand for its diabetes and cancer drugs increased. The company also said it expects to reap benefits from its $8.4 billion purchase of Cubist Pharmaceuticals, the maker of blockbuster antibiotic Cubicin. Sales of Merck's diabetes drug, Januvia, rose 1.3 percent to $1.6 billion in the quarter ended June 30.
 

Sanofi links with Regeneron in $2.2 billion cancer drug push

 
‎28 ‎July ‎2015, ‏‎08:44:47 AMGo to full article
A logo is seen in front of the entrance at the headquarters of French drugmaker Sanofi in Paris(Reuters) - French drugmaker Sanofi said on Tuesday it was committing up to $2.17 billion to a collaboration with its long-time partner Regeneron Pharmaceuticals in the hot area of cancer immunotherapy. Sanofi will make an upfront payment of $640 million to Regeneron and the U.S. biotech company will get up to $375 million more if certain sales targets are hit. Sanofi will also invest more than $1 billion in research for the program, which aims to tap the body's immune system to help fight cancer. ...
 
 

U.S. Navy investigates report of cancer cluster at Guantanamo

 
‎28 ‎July ‎2015, ‏‎12:41:19 AMGo to full article
To match feature USA-GUANTANAMO/GUARDSThe U.S. Navy is investigating a complaint that seeks the evacuation of civilian and military lawyers from parts of the U.S. base in Guantanamo Bay, Cuba, following reports of cancer cases among personnel working on the trials of detainees there. At least seven civilians and military members who worked on detainee trials at Guantanamo Bay have been diagnosed with cancer, according to the complaint, which was filed with the U.S. Defense Department’s Office of the Inspector General. The complaint claims that an unusually large number of relatively healthy and young people who worked at the base have been diagnosed with cancer.
 
 

Primary care doctors should screen for depression: panel

 
‎27 ‎July ‎2015, ‏‎11:16:36 PMGo to full article
By Andrew M. Seaman (Reuters Health) - U.S. adults should be screened for depression, according to a proposal from a government-backed panel of medical experts. With this proposal, the U.S. Preventive Services Task Force broadens its 2009 recommendation that adults be screened in doctors' offices if staff-assisted depression care is available. "We believe all clinical practices should be able to put those systems in place," said Dr. Kirsten Bibbins-Domingo, the USPSTF's co-vice chair.
 

Young cancer patients may be unaware of fertility options

 
‎27 ‎July ‎2015, ‏‎10:32:31 PMGo to full article
By Lisa Rapaport (Reuters Health) - Young cancer patients, often left infertile after treatment, may be unaware of ways to preserve their options for having children, a study suggests. Out of 459 adolescents and young adults diagnosed with cancer in 2007 or 2008, more than 70 percent said doctors had explained their risk of infertility. Patients who already had children were also less likely to explore fertility preservation than those who didn’t have children, the study found.
 

Physical exercise could help curb symptoms of Alzheimer's

 
‎27 ‎July ‎2015, ‏‎06:18:49 PMGo to full article
Studies indicate that physical exercise may help people live better with Alzheimer's and vascular dementia.Three studies (American, Danish and Canadian), presented simultaneously at the Alzheimer's Association International Conference (AAIC), indicate that physical exercise may help people live better with Alzheimer's and vascular dementia. The Alzheimer's Association International Conference, held on July 23 in Washington DC, is the biggest global conference for specialists dealing with Alzheimer's and other dementia related illnesses. Not only can the risk of getting Alzheimer's or other forms of dementia be reduced, but physical activity could in fact be an efficient form of treatment.
 
 

Molecule imitating exercise could help treat type 2 diabetes and obesity

 
‎27 ‎July ‎2015, ‏‎05:51:14 PMGo to full article
All of the benefits, none of the effort? Scientists are investigating a molecule that appears to mimic exercise.A molecule has reportedly been developed that mimics the effects of exercise, potentially reducing type 2 diabetes and obesity.
 
 

Germany culls 10,000 hens after confirmed bird flu case

 
‎27 ‎July ‎2015, ‏‎03:18:00 PMGo to full article
German authorities have slaughtered around 10,000 hens after a case of bird flu was confirmed at a poultry farm in the northwestern state of Lower Saxony, the state's agriculture ministry said on Monday. Germany's animal health body, the Friedrich Loeffler Institute, confirmed the case as high pathogenic H7N7 bird flu. Lower Saxony, a leading poultry production region, reported outbreaks of the H5N8 strain of bird flu in December, as well as cases of the milder, "low pathogenic" form of the H7N7 strain in March and June this year.
 

Case of low-risk H7N7 bird flu found at German poultry farm

 
‎27 ‎July ‎2015, ‏‎02:41:44 PMGo to full article
A case of the low-risk bird flu strain H7N7 has been found on a poultry farm in Emsland in north Germany, the state of Lower Saxony said on Monday. The 10,000 egg-laying hens on the farm have been culled, the state's agriculture ministry said in a statement. The H7N7 bird flu strain was also confirmed at a farm in England on July 13.

 

 

FDA OK's Odomzo from Novartis for common skin cancer type

 
‎24 ‎July ‎2015, ‏‎11:17:11 PMGo to full article
EAST RUTHERFORD, N.J. (AP) — A new drug for advanced basal cell carcinoma, an increasingly common cancer in the skin's top layer, has won Food and Drug Administration approval.
 

Vulnerable populations often miss cancer warning signs

 
‎24 ‎July ‎2015, ‏‎07:33:38 PMGo to full article
By Janice Neumann (Reuters Health) - Some of society’s most vulnerable citizens are also most likely to overlook cancer warning signs, a new U.K. study suggests. While Britain provides health care for everyone and has campaigns to boost cancer awareness, the researchers found that many groups need more education and encouragement to seek help for symptoms. “Many campaigns are still not targeted to specific population subgroups, and a ‘one-size-fits-all’ approach is not likely to be the most effective,” said lead author Maja Niksic, a doctoral student in cancer epidemiology and population health at King’s College London.
 

FDA approves Novartis's advanced skin cancer drug

 
‎24 ‎July ‎2015, ‏‎07:09:12 PMGo to full article
Logo of Swiss drugmaker Novartis is seen at its headquarters in Basel(Reuters) - The U.S. Food and Drug Administration approved Novartis AG's oral pill to treat the most common form of advanced skin cancer. Basal cell carcinoma is generally a slow growing and painless form of skin cancer that starts in the top layer of the skin. Although locally advanced basal skin cancer does not spread to other parts of the body, it cannot be cured with surgery or radiation therapy.
 
 

EU regulator recommends 1st license for malaria vaccine

 
‎24 ‎July ‎2015, ‏‎04:23:25 PMGo to full article
FILE - In this Oct. 30, 2009 file photo, a mother holds her baby as she receives a new malaria vaccine as part of a trial at the Walter Reed Project Research Center in Kombewa in Western Kenya. The European Medicines Agency is recommending that the world’s leading malaria vaccine be licensed even though it is only about 30 percent effective and that protection fades over time. In a statement published on Friday, July 24, 2015, the agency said it had “adopted a positive scientific opinion” for the vaccine’s use outside the European Union, a regulatory process that helps speed new medicines to the market. The vaccine, known as Mosquirix and made by GlaxoSmithKline, protects only about one-third of children though it might help protect some kids from getting the parasitic disease. (AP Photo/Karel Prinsloo, File)LONDON (AP) — The European Medicines Agency has recommended approving what would be the world's first licensed malaria vaccine, even though it's only about 30 percent effective and its protection fades over time.
 
 

Malaria vaccine gets regulatory nod

 
‎24 ‎July ‎2015, ‏‎03:11:06 PMGo to full article
Malaria, the mosquito-borne disease kills some 584,000 people per year -- more than 75 percent of them children under five, according to the WHOThe world's most advanced malaria vaccine got the nod Friday from European regulators, despite mixed trial results, for eventual use in children in African countries plagued by the killer disease. Dubbed Mosquirix or RTS,S, the drug received a "positive scientific opinion" from the European Medicines Agency (EMA) following decades of research and millions of dollars of investment. Mosquirix is the most clinically-advanced vaccine against the mosquito-borne disease that infects some 200 million people and kills about 600,000 every year, more than 75 percent of them children under five.
 
 

European regulators give go-ahead for malaria vaccine

 
‎24 ‎July ‎2015, ‏‎01:17:17 PMGo to full article
The headquarters of pharmaceutical company GlaxoSmithKlineEuropean regulators on Friday gave the go-ahead for the world's most advanced malaria candidate vaccine, despite mixed results from a years-long trial on nearly 15,500 children in seven African countries. The London-based European Medicines Agency (EMA) said in a statement it had adopted "a positive scientific opinion for Mosquirix... for use outside the European Union". The vaccine is aimed at young children -- the main victims of malaria -- and is being developed by the British pharmaceutical giant GlaxoSmithKline (GSK).
 
 

World's first malaria vaccine gets regulatory go-ahead, faces WHO review

 
‎24 ‎July ‎2015, ‏‎01:06:30 PMGo to full article
The signage for the GlaxoSmithKline building is pictured in LondonBy Kate Kelland LONDON, July 24 (Reuters) - The world's first malaria vaccine got a green light on Friday from European drugs regulators who recommended it as safe and effective to use in babies in Africa at risk of the mosquito-borne disease. The shot, called Mosquirix and developed by British drugmaker GlaxoSmithKline and the PATH Malaria Vaccine Initiative, would be the first licensed human vaccine against a parasitic disease and could help to prevent millions of cases of the killer disease in countries that use it. It still faces hurdles before being rolled out in Africa, including winning agreement from governments and other funders that it is worth using, since it offers only partial protection.
 
 

Two generic drugs reduce breast cancer deaths: studies

 
‎24 ‎July ‎2015, ‏‎11:29:39 AMGo to full article
Two generic drugs reduce breast cancer deaths: studiesTwo inexpensive classes of drugs available in generic form each reduce the recurrence of breast cancer in post-menopausal women as well as death rates from the disease, a pair of studies reported Friday. Taking the medications together may further boost anti-cancer benefits and help cancel out undesirable side-effects of one of the drugs, according to the research published in medical journal The Lancet. The first "meta-study" pulling together data from nine trials covering 30,000 post-menopausal women found endocrine treatments based on a class of drugs called aromatase inhibitors yield higher survival rates after five years compared to standard endocrine therapy with tamoxifen.
 
 

FDA seeks more clinical evidence on Sunesis Pharma cancer drug

 
‎24 ‎July ‎2015, ‏‎12:48:17 AMGo to full article
Sunesis Pharmaceuticals Inc said the U.S. Food and Drug Administration called for more clinical evidence before considering approval for its cancer drug, sending the company's shares down 60 percent in after-market trading. The FDA wanted the additional evidence before Sunesis files its marketing application for the drug, the company said in a statement on Thursday. The European Medicines Agency (EMA) however, gave the company the nod to submit a marketing application for vosaroxin, Sunesis said.
 

Exercise good for brain, even for those with Alzheimer's

 
‎24 ‎July ‎2015, ‏‎12:02:48 AMGo to full article
This photo provided by the Wake Forest Baptist Medical Center shows Michael Gendy of King, N.C. Gendy continues to exercise after participating in a Wake Forest School of Medicine study that found aerobic activity may lower a risk factor for developing Alzheimer’s. (Cagney Gentry/Wake Forest Baptist Medical Center via AP)WASHINGTON (AP) — Exercise may do more than keep a healthy brain fit: New research suggests working up a good sweat may also offer some help once memory starts to slide— and even improve life for people with Alzheimer's.
 
 

Toxic coworkers linked to worse mental health for college students

 
‎23 ‎July ‎2015, ‏‎09:19:35 PMGo to full article
By Lisa Rapaport (Reuters Health) - Working college students were more likely to have mental health problems if they had toxic relationships with co-workers than if they were on friendly terms with colleagues in a small new U.S. study. “If you think about a typical 24-hour day for a college student, aside from sleeping, students are going to school and studying and also working part-time, four hours a day on average,” lead study author Allison Vaughn, a psychology researcher at San Diego State University, said by email. “It makes sense that the people a college student works with would also have the potential to be health-relevant,” she added.

 

 

NBA Hall Of Famer Dominique Wilkins Opens Up About His Personal Struggle With Diabetes

 
‎23 ‎July ‎2015, ‏‎06:20:11 PMGo to full article
NBA Hall Of Famer Dominique Wilkins Opens Up About His Personal Struggle With DiabetesJust one year after nine-time NBA all-star Dominique Wilkins retired from a successful basketball career, the Hall-of-Famer received devastating news. Despite his undeniable physical fitness and commitment to staying in shape, Wilkins was diagnosed with Type 2 diabetes. This week, the 55-year-old former Atlanta Hawks player launched...
 
 

Experts support call for lower cancer drug prices

 
‎23 ‎July ‎2015, ‏‎06:06:39 AMGo to full article
A group of 118 leading cancer experts have developed a list of proposals designed to reduce the cost of cancer drugs, and support a grassroots patient protest movement to pressure drug companies to charge what they deem a fair value for treatments. The experts include former presidents of the American Society of Clinical Oncology and the American Society of Hematology. "It's time for patients and their physicians to call for change," said Mayo Clinic hematologist Dr. Ayalew Tefferi, lead author of the paper published on Thursday in the journal Mayo Clinic Proceedings.
 

Biogen Alzheimer's data disappoints, Lilly gets slight bump

 
‎23 ‎July ‎2015, ‏‎03:19:10 AMGo to full article
Disappointing data for Biogen Inc's experimental Alzheimer's drug dragged shares of the company lower on Wednesday, while investors took a slightly more positive view of new findings for a treatment from Eli Lilly and Co. Shares of Biogen traded 3.9 percent lower in midafternoon after falling as much as 4.9 percent, while Lilly was up slightly, recovering from a decline of 4.7 percent after the two companies released study data at the Alzheimer's Association International Conference in Washington. Wall Street analysts said the initial Lilly drop may have been influenced by the negative take on Biogen, since both of their drugs work by blocking formation of the protein beta amyloid, which is believed to cause brain plaques that are the hallmark of Alzheimer's. Alzheimer's experts said there were signs for hope for both treatments, but they will wait for results of much larger confirmatory trials before getting excited.
 

Eisai shares tank after partner Biogen's Alzheimer's data disappoints

 
‎23 ‎July ‎2015, ‏‎03:18:53 AMGo to full article
TOKYO (Reuters) - Shares in Japanese drug maker Eisai Co fell nearly 10 percent early on Thursday after news of disappointing data for partner Biogen Inc's experimental Alzheimer's drug. Eisai was down 7 percent at 8,228 yen at 0109 GMT, after falling to as low as 7975.0 yen. Its shares had jumped to a record high in March driven by promising results of Biogen's experimental drug. (Reporting by Ayai Tomisawa; Editing by Chang-Ran Kim)
 

Eli Lilly: Experimental Alzheimer's drug shows some benefit

 
‎22 ‎July ‎2015, ‏‎11:16:08 PMGo to full article
FILE - This July 17, 2012, file photo, shows the Eli Lilly & Co. corporate headquarters in Indianapolis. Eli Lilly & Co. reported July 22, 2015, that an experimental medication might slow mild Alzheimer's if people take it early enough, one of a handful of drugs in late-stage testing in the frustrating hunt for a better treatment.(AP Photo/Michael Conroy, File)WASHINGTON (AP) — Eli Lilly & Co. reported Wednesday that an experimental medication might slow mild Alzheimer's if people take it early enough, one of a handful of drugs in late-stage testing in the frustrating hunt for a better treatment.
 
 

Roche steps up work on two experimental Alzheimer's drugs

 
‎22 ‎July ‎2015, ‏‎10:45:37 PMGo to full article
By Ben Hirschler LONDON (Reuters) - Roche is to step up its research efforts on two Alzheimer's drugs, both of which suffered setbacks in tests last year, reflecting its belief in drugs targeting protein plaques found in brains of patients with the disease. The move follows new evidence presented on Wednesday that rival antibody drugs from Eli Lilly and Biogen, working in a similar way, may produce improvements in people with the memory-robbing condition. A Roche spokesman said crenezumab would now move into late-stage Phase III development and it also aimed to run fresh clinical trials using higher doses of gantenerumab, after that drug failed in an initial Phase III study.
 

Promise seen for drug in patients with early Alzheimer's

 
‎22 ‎July ‎2015, ‏‎06:26:01 PMGo to full article
A patient suffering from Alzheimer's disease is pictured on January 19, 2005 at a hospital in FranceA new kind of drug to fight Alzheimer's has shown promise when given to people in the early stages of the disease, drug-maker Eli Lilly said Wednesday. Known as solanezumab, the drug is a monoclonal antibody that helps the brain clear amyloid-beta before it clumps together to form plaques that are implicated in Alzheimer's, which affects 44 million people living with dementia worldwide, and has no effective treatment. In 2012, solanezumab was shown to be no better than a sugar pill in clinical trials.
 
 

Women with Alzheimer's may face faster decline than men

 
‎22 ‎July ‎2015, ‏‎04:52:28 PMGo to full article
Women with Alzheimer's may face faster decline than menWomen with Alzheimer's may face a swifter mental decline than men with the same condition, but researchers are not sure why, according to a study released this week at US a medical conference. Some two-thirds of US seniors living with Alzheimer's disease are women, and women are almost twice as likely as men to develop the incurable cognitive disease, according to the Alzheimer's Association, which is hosting is annual conference in the US capital. On Tuesday, researchers from Duke University presented findings on a study of 141 women and 257 men, aged in their mid 70s, who suffer from Alzheimer's disease.
 
 

Lilly says drug slows Alzheimer's in patients with mild disease

 
‎22 ‎July ‎2015, ‏‎01:05:13 PMGo to full article
Patients with mild Alzheimer's disease who took Eli Lilly and Co's experimental drug solanezumab early in the course of their disease preserved more of their cognitive and functional ability, according to new Lilly data released on Wednesday. Lilly presented new followup data from two large trials of the infused medicine on Wednesday at the Alzheimer's Association International Conference (AAIC) in Washington. In 2012, the original 18-month studies of solanezumab, called Expedition and Expedition 2, each included about 1,000 patients with mild to moderate disease.
 

Mixed result on Biogen Alzheimer's drug as 6mg dose falls short

 
‎22 ‎July ‎2015, ‏‎12:57:26 PMGo to full article
A 6 mg dose of Biogen's experimental Alzheimer's disease drug significantly reduced beta amyloid plaque in the brain but failed to significantly slow mental decline, potentially tempering great enthusiasm that greeted data on two other doses of the treatment earlier this year. The 6 mg data, which showed some slowing of mental decline, were presented on Wednesday at the Alzheimer's Association International Conference (AAIC) in Washington, D.C. The biotech drug, aducanumab, was hailed as a potential breakthrough in March when it became the first Alzheimer's treatment to significantly slow cognitive decline and reduce what is believed to be the brain-destroying plaque in patients with early and mild forms of the disease, according to 54-week data from a small, early stage trial.
 

AstraZeneca suffers setback as drug fails in eye cancer

 
‎22 ‎July ‎2015, ‏‎09:26:56 AMGo to full article
A sign is seen at an AstraZeneca site in MacclesfieldBy Ben Hirschler LONDON (Reuters) - AstraZeneca's much anticipated cancer drug pipeline suffered a modest blow on Wednesday when the experimental drug selumetinib failed to meet its goal in a late-stage trial for a rare cancer of the eye. Selumetinib is being investigated primarily as a treatment for advanced non-small cell lung cancer. Selumetinib belongs to a class of cancer drugs known as MEK inhibitors, which includes Novartis's approved product Mekinist and the experimental compound cobimetinib from Roche and Exelixis.
 
 

More evidence smoking raises risk of death from breast cancer

 
‎21 ‎July ‎2015, ‏‎11:09:23 PMGo to full article
By Lisa Rapaport (Reuters Health) - Long-time smokers may face an increased risk of death if they develop breast cancer, according to a Japanese study that adds to a growing body of evidence highlighting the lethal effects of cigarettes. Among more than 800 women with breast cancer, those who had smoked for more than two decades had at least triple the odds of dying of any cause, or from breast cancer in particular, compared with women who never used cigarettes. Fewer years of smoking were also linked to an increased risk of death from breast cancer, but the extra risk was so small that it might have been due to chance.
 

A 7-Step 'Seamlys' Approach to Healing My Auto-Immune Disease

 
‎21 ‎July ‎2015, ‏‎09:27:21 PMGo to full article
A 7-Step 'Seamlys' Approach to Healing My Auto-Immune DiseaseAt 37, after suffering two unexplained ectopic pregnancies, weight gain and extreme exhaustion I discovered I have Hashimoto's disease, an inflammatory auto-immune disease (AID). My family history is ripe with all kinds of AID from Parkinson's to Type I diabetes. Although I take a daily dose of medicine in order to regulate my thyroid gland,...
 
 

Coffee May Decrease Diabetes Risk, Because Coffee Is Awesome

 
‎21 ‎July ‎2015, ‏‎08:53:49 PMGo to full article
Coffee May Decrease Diabetes Risk, Because Coffee Is Awesome Your major coffee habit may help reduce your risk of developing Type 2 diabetes, according to a new study. Researchers found that habitual coffee drinkers -- meaning those who had more than 1.5 cups per day -- were half as likely to develop Type 2 diabetes over a 10-year period as casual coffee drinkers, who had fewer than 1.5 cups per...
 
 

Researchers get a step closer to universal flu vaccine

 
‎21 ‎July ‎2015, ‏‎06:04:35 PMGo to full article
A future flu vaccine could protect against nuerous strains, even those that could lead to future pandemics.A new study leads the way toward a potential vaccine that could provide protection against numerous strains of influenza, including ones that could cause future pandemics. Researchers at the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases (NIAID) used a virus-like particle vaccine cocktail that expressed several different subtypes of a surface protein key to the flu virus. Through a series of experiments, they found that 95 percent of mice vaccinated with the cocktail were protected against eight different flu strains expressing seven different subtypes -- including ones that were not in the vaccine at all.
 
 

Sanofi cholesterol drug, GSK malaria shot may get EU okay Friday

 
‎21 ‎July ‎2015, ‏‎03:17:08 PMGo to full article
Sanofi and Regeneron's new cholesterol drug Praluent could be recommended for approval in Europe as early as this week, along with the world's first malaria vaccine from GlaxoSmithKline. A European green light for Praluent would put the closely watched so-called PCSK9 drug two months behind Amgen's rival product Repatha, which was formally approved by the European Commission on Tuesday after a positive opinion in May. According to an agenda posted on the European Medicines Agency's (EMA) website, a committee of experts will consider whether to recommend Praluent and GSK's malaria vaccine at a four-day meeting concluding on July 23. Recommendations for marketing approval by its Committee for Medicinal Products for Human Use (CHMP) are normally endorsed by the European Commission within a couple of months.
 

300 minutes of exercise per week could lower the risk of postmenopausal breast cancer

 
‎21 ‎July ‎2015, ‏‎11:27:17 AMGo to full article
Doubling weekly physical activity from 150 to 300 minutes can significantly lower the risk of postmenopausal breast cancerA team of Canadian researchers has demonstrated that doubling the amount of weekly physical activity from 150 to 300 minutes could lower the the risk of breast cancer in postmenopausal women. The study establishes a link between total body fat and an increased risk of postmenopausal breast cancer. The study was conducted by a Canadian research team led by University of Calgary researcher Christine Friedenreich, PhD., who also serves as cancer epidemiologist with the Alberta Health Services.
 
 

Studies: Better sleep may be important for Alzheimer's risk

 
‎20 ‎July ‎2015, ‏‎09:32:24 PMGo to full article
Graphic shows projection for number of people in U.S. with Alzheimer’s disease; 1c x 3 inches; 46.5 mm x 76 mm;WASHINGTON (AP) — To sleep, perchance to... ward off Alzheimer's? New research suggests poor sleep may increase people's risk of Alzheimer's disease, by spurring a brain-clogging gunk that in turn further interrupts shut-eye.
 
 

Bristol-Myers cancer immunotherapy advances on two fronts

 
‎20 ‎July ‎2015, ‏‎08:01:08 PMGo to full article
(Reuters) - Bristol-Myers Squibb Co's Opdivo, a new oncology drug that makes cancer cells more susceptible to the immune system, on Monday won European approval to treat a form of lung cancer and was also found to be beneficial in patients with advanced kidney cancer. Bristol-Myers shares rose 1.2 percent after the favorable separate announcements involving the drug, which is already approved in the United States to treat advanced squamous lung cancer and melanoma that has spread. The drug works by blocking receptors to PD-1, or programmed death-1, a protein cancer cells use to evade detection by the immune system.
 

Coffee drinking may lower inflammation, reduce diabetes risk

 
‎20 ‎July ‎2015, ‏‎05:20:19 PMGo to full article
A man sits in a The Coffee Bean & Tea Leaf cafe in the rain in the Manhattan borough New YorkBy Kathryn Doyle (Reuters Health) - Coffee drinkers in a long-term study were about half as likely to develop type 2 diabetes as those who didn't drink coffee, and researchers think an inflammation-lowering effect of the beverage might be the key. “Extensive research has revealed that coffee drinking exhibits both beneficial and aggravating health effects,” said Demosthenes B. Panagiotakos of the department of Nutrition and Dietetics at Harokopio University in Athens, Greece. “An inverse relation between coffee intake and diabetes has been reported in many prospective studies whereas some have yielded insignificant results,” Panagiotakos, a co-author of the new study, told Reuters Health by email.
 
 

Bristol-Myers' Opdivo found effective in kidney cancer

 
‎20 ‎July ‎2015, ‏‎03:54:29 PMGo to full article
(Reuters) - Bristol-Myers Squibb Co said a late-stage trial of its drug, Opdivo, was stopped early after the immunotherapy was found to be effective in patients with the most common form of kidney cancer. The U.S. drugmaker said on Monday the study, Checkmate-025, was stopped early after an independent data monitoring committee concluded that Opdivo provided a survival advantage over the cancer drug, everolimus, among patients with advanced or metastatic renal cell carcinoma. Expectations that the trial would be stopped early were high, Evercore ISI Mark Schoenebaum said, given the effectiveness of Opdivo in mid-stage studies, the limited benefit of everolimus, and that renal cell cancer has historically responded well to immunologic therapies.
 

UN needs $20 million to battle bird flu in West Africa

 
‎20 ‎July ‎2015, ‏‎01:53:17 PMGo to full article
Bird flu has been spreading in poultry farms, markets and family holdings in Burkina Faso, the Ivory Coast, Niger, Nigeria and GhanaThe UN appealed on Monday for $20 million to stem outbreaks of bird flu in West Africa, a region still weakened by the Ebola crisis. The Rome-based Food and Agriculture Organisation(FAO) said it needed the funds (18.45 million euros) to respond swiftly to outbreaks of H5N1 avian flu, without which the poultry virus would spread beyond the region. Because the highly virulent disease can be transmitted to humans, the FAO said it was working closely with the World Health Organization (WHO) on contingency plans and probing suspected flu cases.
 
 

Bird flu spreading across West Africa, human spillover feared: U.N.

 
‎20 ‎July ‎2015, ‏‎01:19:52 PMGo to full article
By Chris Arsenault ROME (Thomson Reuters Foundation) - A highly contagious strain of avian flu is spreading across West Africa, decimating poultry farms and stoking fears the virus will jump from birds to humans, the U.N.'s food agency warned on Monday. Markets and farms in Nigeria, Burkina Faso, Niger, Ivory Coast and Ghana have been hit with the deadly H5N1 virus over the past six months, the U.N.'s Food and Agriculture Organization (FAO) said.
 

Families affected by early Alzheimer's seek better treatment

 
‎20 ‎July ‎2015, ‏‎09:45:50 AMGo to full article
Giedre Cohen, 37, of Calabasas, Calif., and Carrie Richardson, 34, of Montgomery, Ala., pose for a picture during a break at the Alzheimer's Association International Conference in Washington, Saturday, July 18, 2015. Saturday for the first time, researchers brought together dozens of these families with the very rarest form of Alzheimer's, young and inherited--patients, patients-to-be and their healthy loved ones _ from as far as Australia and Britain to meet face-to-face. (AP Photo/Manuel Balce Ceneta)WASHINGTON (AP) — Alzheimer's has ravaged generations of Dean DeMoe's family — his grandmother, father, siblings — all in their 40s and 50s.
 
 

Iowa chicks sent as far away as Brazil to evade deadly bird flu

 
‎20 ‎July ‎2015, ‏‎06:18:27 AMGo to full article
File photo of chicks free of the bird flu virus that await being purchased at a feed and farm supply store in HoustonWith the delicate birds just hours old, the president of Murray McMurray Hatchery hit the road around 1 a.m. on a Saturday to drive through the night to a friend's farm in Texas "just to have them in a safe place," he said. Breeding chickens that are the valuable genetic source for egg-laying hens have gone into hiding as the outbreak of bird flu in poultry has developed into the worst animal-health emergency in U.S. history. Wood's breeding stock includes chickens with genetic lines that date back to the early 1900s.

 

 

UN needs $20 million to battle bird flu in West Africa

 
‎20 ‎July ‎2015, ‏‎01:53:17 PMGo to full article
Bird flu has been spreading in poultry farms, markets and family holdings in Burkina Faso, the Ivory Coast, Niger, Nigeria and GhanaThe UN appealed on Monday for $20 million to stem outbreaks of bird flu in West Africa, a region still weakened by the Ebola crisis. The Rome-based Food and Agriculture Organisation(FAO) said it needed the funds (18.45 million euros) to respond swiftly to outbreaks of H5N1 avian flu, without which the poultry virus would spread beyond the region. Because the highly virulent disease can be transmitted to humans, the FAO said it was working closely with the World Health Organization (WHO) on contingency plans and probing suspected flu cases.
 
 

Bird flu spreading across West Africa, human spillover feared: U.N.

 
‎20 ‎July ‎2015, ‏‎01:19:52 PMGo to full article
By Chris Arsenault ROME (Thomson Reuters Foundation) - A highly contagious strain of avian flu is spreading across West Africa, decimating poultry farms and stoking fears the virus will jump from birds to humans, the U.N.'s food agency warned on Monday. Markets and farms in Nigeria, Burkina Faso, Niger, Ivory Coast and Ghana have been hit with the deadly H5N1 virus over the past six months, the U.N.'s Food and Agriculture Organization (FAO) said.
 

Families affected by early Alzheimer's seek better treatment

 
‎20 ‎July ‎2015, ‏‎09:45:50 AMGo to full article
Giedre Cohen, 37, of Calabasas, Calif., and Carrie Richardson, 34, of Montgomery, Ala., pose for a picture during a break at the Alzheimer's Association International Conference in Washington, Saturday, July 18, 2015. Saturday for the first time, researchers brought together dozens of these families with the very rarest form of Alzheimer's, young and inherited--patients, patients-to-be and their healthy loved ones _ from as far as Australia and Britain to meet face-to-face. (AP Photo/Manuel Balce Ceneta)WASHINGTON (AP) — Alzheimer's has ravaged generations of Dean DeMoe's family — his grandmother, father, siblings — all in their 40s and 50s.
 
 

Iowa chicks sent as far away as Brazil to evade deadly bird flu

 
‎20 ‎July ‎2015, ‏‎06:18:27 AMGo to full article
File photo of chicks free of the bird flu virus that await being purchased at a feed and farm supply store in HoustonWith the delicate birds just hours old, the president of Murray McMurray Hatchery hit the road around 1 a.m. on a Saturday to drive through the night to a friend's farm in Texas "just to have them in a safe place," he said. Breeding chickens that are the valuable genetic source for egg-laying hens have gone into hiding as the outbreak of bird flu in poultry has developed into the worst animal-health emergency in U.S. history. Wood's breeding stock includes chickens with genetic lines that date back to the early 1900s.
 
 

California universities battle over Alzheimer's research

 
‎19 ‎July ‎2015, ‏‎11:00:43 PMGo to full article
LOS ANGELES (AP) — One university's effort to poach a star faculty member at another Southern California university has devolved into a legal battle that some fear may impede Alzheimer's disease research.
 

Families hit by rare early Alzheimer's push for research

 
‎19 ‎July ‎2015, ‏‎06:30:25 PMGo to full article
Dean DeMoe, center, with his wife, Deb DeMoe, left, and their daughter McKenna DeMoe, 19, right, attend the Alzheimer's Association International Conference in Washington, Saturday, July 18, 2015. Alzheimer's has ravaged generations of Dean DeMoe's family _ his grandmother, father, siblings _ all in their 40s and 50s. DeMoe, too, inherited the culprit gene mutation and at 53, the North Dakota man volunteers for a drug study he hopes one day will end the family's burden. (AP Photo/Manuel Balce Ceneta)WASHINGTON (AP) — Alzheimer's has ravaged generations of Dean DeMoe's family — his grandmother, father, siblings — all in their 40s and 50s.

 

 

 

 

Ahead of Alzheimer’s meeting, researchers seize on signs of progress

 
‎18 ‎July ‎2015, ‏‎02:07:18 PMGo to full article
By Bill Berkrot and Ransdell Pierson NEW YORK (Reuters) - After decades of Alzheimer’s research that led to dead ends, including 123 drugs that failed, top researchers in the field say they are far more confident now of producing an effective treatment. New experimental drugs from Eli Lilly and Co and Biogen have shown promise in slowing down the progression of the mind-wasting disease, attracting the attention of investors and patients. "The recurring platitude, which has been going on forever is 'gee we're about five years away from a really effective treatment,'" said Steven Ferris, who directs the Alzheimer's clinical trials program at NYU Langone Medical Center in New York.
 

Rolling walkers ease outdoor walks for lung disease patients

 
‎17 ‎July ‎2015, ‏‎11:07:13 PMGo to full article
By Roxanne Nelson (Reuters Health) - A rolling walker, known as a rollator, can help people with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) walk outdoors more easily and for a longer time, according to a small trial in The Netherlands. Compared to when they walked unaided, or used a bicycle-like device called a draisine, COPD patients in the study walked much further and reported feeling much better using the rollator. “We have shown that the use of a rollator can be beneficial for patients with moderate and advanced COPD, in terms of outdoor walking distance and time,” said lead author Dr. Anouk W Vaes, from Center of Expertise for Chronic Organ Failure, Horn.
 

California Man Allegedly 'Treated' Cancer Patient With Mysterious Substances

 
‎17 ‎July ‎2015, ‏‎10:50:03 PMGo to full article
California Man Allegedly 'Treated' Cancer Patient With Mysterious SubstancesA California man is out on bail after being accused of illegally practicing medicine after he allegedly gave a desperate cancer patient expired medication and a "baggie of dirt,” authorities say. Officers from the Ventura County Sheriff’s Interagency Pharmaceutical Crimes Unit are investigating whether Vincent Gammill, 69, preyed on cancer victims by promising alternative treatments. Gammill was arrested earlier this month on multiple charges, including dependent adult abuse, furnishing dangerous drugs without a license and practicing medicine without a license.
 
 

Aerobic exercise helpful for asthma

 
‎17 ‎July ‎2015, ‏‎07:22:05 PMGo to full article
Women take part in an aerobics class at the gymnasium of a sports center in CartagoBy Lisa Rapaport (Reuters Health) - People with moderate to severe asthma who add aerobic exercise to their treatment regimen may have an easier time controlling common symptoms than people who rely on drugs alone, a small study suggests. Patients randomly assigned to a three-month treadmill exercise regimen showed decreases in two aspects of the illness that make it difficult to breathe: inflammation and heightened sensitivity in the airway. While it’s not surprising that asthma patients may benefit from aerobic exercise, the findings offer new evidence that physical activity can help even in patients who are already controlling symptoms with medication, said lead author Dr. Celso Carvalho, a researcher at the University of Sao Paulo School of Medicine in Brazil.
 
 

Blacks may be less likely to get chemo for advanced colon cancer

 
‎16 ‎July ‎2015, ‏‎04:22:18 PMGo to full article
By Lisa Rapaport (Reuters Health) - Black patients with advanced colon cancer are less likely to receive chemotherapy after surgery to excise tumors than white patients, a U.S. study suggests. The treatment disparity seen in recent years may be tied to the economic downturn following the 2008 financial crisis, said lead study author Caitlin Murphy, an epidemiology researcher at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. “Black Americans were disproportionately affected by the recession, and, combined with the escalating cost of chemotherapy drugs, this may have contributed to a lower receipt of chemotherapy,” she said by email.

 

Study claims stem cell advance for mitochondrial disease

 
‎16 ‎July ‎2015, ‏‎08:49:19 AMGo to full article
Study claims stem cell advance for mitochondrial diseaseScientists said Wednesday they had taken a key step towards stem cell therapy for rare mitochondrial disorders, passed on from mother to child. "This breakthrough... sets the stage for replacing diseased tissue in patients and opens the door to a world of regenerative medicine where doctors are able to treat human diseases that are currently incurable," said a statement from the Oregon Health & Science University, whose scientists took part in the study. Mitochondria are the tiny powerhouses found in most cells in the body, turning sugar and oxygen into energy.
 
 

Large UK trial to ask if mindfulness boosts teenage mental health

 
‎15 ‎July ‎2015, ‏‎11:02:25 PMGo to full article
By Kate Kelland LONDON (Reuters) - Nearly 6,000 British school children are to take part in a major trial designed to assess whether mindfulness training for teenagers can improve their mental health. Mindfulness is based on the idea of being more aware of the present by intentionally focusing on emotions, thoughts and sensations and viewing them with acceptance. The three-part study will include the first large randomized control trial of mindfulness training compared with teaching as usual in 76 schools.
 

Study show high-risk areas for Lyme disease growing

 
‎15 ‎July ‎2015, ‏‎10:26:24 PMGo to full article
FILE - This March 2002 file photo shows a deer tick under a microscope in the entomology lab at the University of Rhode Island in South Kingstown, R.I. According to a new government study published Wednesday, July 15, 2015, the geographic areas where Lyme disease is a bigger danger have grown dramatically. U.S. cases remain concentrated in the Northeast and upper Midwest. But now more areas in those regions are considered high risk. (AP Photo/Victoria Arocho, File)NEW YORK (AP) — The geographic areas where Lyme disease is a bigger danger have grown dramatically, according to a new government study published Wednesday
 
 

Study links breast cancer and hormone pro-enkephalin levels

 
‎15 ‎July ‎2015, ‏‎06:21:40 PMGo to full article
Women could one day benefit from a new breast cancer screening test that allows for an earlier diagnosis of the disease or its risks.A study from Lund University in Sweden has demonstrated that women with low levels of the painkilling hormone pro-enkephalin have a much higher risk of contracting breast cancer. The discovery should allow doctors to put into place a new breast cancer detection test for earlier diagnosis. Directed by Professor Olle Melander, the study aims to establish the link between enkephalin, a hormone that also possesses anxiolytic properties, and breast cancer risk.
 
 

Republicans postpone House vote on breast cancer bill

 
‎15 ‎July ‎2015, ‏‎12:13:06 AMGo to full article
WASHINGTON (AP) — Republican leaders delayed a House vote Tuesday on a bill raising money for breast cancer research over anger that some of the funds would go to a group that has worked with the Planned Parenthood Federation of America, which supports abortion rights.
 

Monsanto says panel to review WHO finding on cancer link to herbicide

 
‎14 ‎July ‎2015, ‏‎10:34:09 PMGo to full article
Monsanto's Roundup weedkiller atomizers are displayed for sale at a garden shop at Bonneuil-Sur-Marne near ParisMonsanto Co, whose Roundup product is one of the world's most widely used herbicides, said on Tuesday it has arranged for an outside scientific review of a World Health Organization finding that the weed killer's key ingredient probably causes cancer. The WHO's International Agency for Research on Cancer (IARC) said in March that it had concluded that the ingredient, called glyphosate, was probably carcinogenic after reviewing a range of scientific literature.
 
 

Countries must invest more in mental health in hard times: WHO

 
‎14 ‎July ‎2015, ‏‎06:27:44 PMGo to full article
By Stephanie Nebehay GENEVA (Reuters) - Rich and poor countries alike must invest more in mental health care, especially during economic crises when rates of depression and suicide tend to rise, the World Health Organization (WHO)said on Tuesday. One in 10 people worldwide has a mental health disorder but only one percent of the global health workforce is treating such illnesses, which are still widely stigmatized, the United Nations agency said. "The resources devoted to mental health, financial as well as human resources, remain extremely small all over the world," Dr. Shekhar Saxena, Director of WHO's Department of Mental Health and Substance Abuse, told a news briefing.
 

Zogenix delays epilepsy drug trials by three months

 
‎14 ‎July ‎2015, ‏‎05:18:29 PMGo to full article
(Reuters) - Drug developer Zogenix Inc said on Tuesday that it would push back late-stage trials of its treatment for a rare form of epilepsy by about three months to enroll more patients. The company said it now planned to begin late-stage trials of the drug, ZX008, in the fourth quarter, and would seek to enroll 105 patients in the studies, up from 40 to 60 earlier, acting on guidance from the U.S. Food and Drug Administration. The drug is aimed at treating children with Dravet syndrome, a rare form of epilepsy that begins in infancy.
 

Caveats, costs and complexities shadow first malaria vaccine

 
‎14 ‎July ‎2015, ‏‎01:16:35 PMGo to full article
A child sick with malaria and from malnutrition lies on a bed in a hospital in BorBacked by billionaire philanthropist Bill Gates and developed by GlaxoSmithKline, the vaccine -- called RTS,S or Mosquirix -- is being assessed by regulators and global health authorities. Granting it a license and recommending it for rollout in sub-Saharan Africa, where malaria kills one child almost every minute, ought to be a no-brainer. Malaria is caused by a parasite carried in the saliva of mosquitoes.
 
 

Study: Silent cancer in moms a rare result in prenatal tests

 
‎14 ‎July ‎2015, ‏‎12:53:47 AMGo to full article
CHICAGO (AP) — For pregnant women, abnormal results from certain prenatal tests may signal that something is wrong — with the moms-to-be, not the fetus, a preliminary study suggests.
 

Organized programs help prevent or delay diabetes

 
‎14 ‎July ‎2015, ‏‎12:24:13 AMGo to full article
Patient takes a blood glucose test during event aimed to help people with diabetes to cope with their illness at Saint Luka diagnostics medical center in SofiaBy Kathryn Doyle (Reuters Health) - Organized diet and exercise programs can stave off diabetes for those at risk, according to a new recommendation. The Community Preventive Services Task Force, an independent, unpaid group of public health and prevention experts who develop recommendations for community health, commissioned a review of 53 studies describing 66 combined diet and physical activity promotion programs. The Task Force found strong evidence that these programs are effective at reducing the number of new cases of diabetes, according to a report in Annals of Internal Medicine.
 
 

Cancer survivors may face barriers to adoption

 
‎13 ‎July ‎2015, ‏‎09:33:45 PMGo to full article
A patient receives chemotherapy treatment for breast cancer at the Antoine-Lacassagne Cancer Center in NiceBy Lisa Rapaport (Reuters Health) - Cancer survivors, who are often left infertile by the disease or treatment, may face unexpected hurdles if they later turn to adoption to start a family, a study suggests. Researchers who contacted adoption agencies found that while all prospective parents were asked to provide a medical history, cancer survivors might also be required to submit letters from physicians or show they were disease free for at least five years. “Some survivors have no trouble at all getting this medical clearance and it just becomes one of many documents they need to gather, but others have had difficulty with the letter,” said study leader Gwendolyn Quinn of the Moffitt Cancer Center in Tampa, in email to Reuters Health.
 
 

 

 

FDA approves AstraZeneca's lung cancer drug as first-line treatment

 
‎13 ‎July ‎2015, ‏‎07:56:31 PMGo to full article
A sign is seen at an AstraZeneca site in Macclesfield(Reuters) - The U.S. Food and Drug Administration has approved AstraZeneca Plc's drug, Iressa, as a first-line treatment for a common form of lung cancer. The drug was previously approved for use in non-small cell lung cancer patients only after they did not respond to chemotherapy. The FDA said on Tuesday the approval was based on results from a trial of 106 patients with previously untreated non-small cell lung cancer.
 
 

The Road To My Depression

 
‎13 ‎July ‎2015, ‏‎04:07:56 PMGo to full article
The Road To My DepressionSix or seven years ago, a very dear friend of mine went through a particularly dark depression. I didn't know what to do or how to help. So I wrote her a book with pictures about my experiences with depression and gave it to her as a gift. The thing was, that when I looked at my own self and my own depression, it was funny. It was very sad, but...

 

Michigan Doctor Who Mistreated Cancer Patients Sentenced to 45 Years

 
‎11 ‎July ‎2015, ‏‎01:53:00 AMGo to full article
Michigan Doctor Who Mistreated Cancer Patients Sentenced to 45 YearsA Michigan doctor who admitted to mistreating cancer patients so he could defraud insurance companies was sentenced to 45 years in prison. Dr. Farid Fata, 50, pleaded guilty last year to fraud, money laundering and conspiracy charges. "I misused my talents, yes, and permitted this sin to enter me because of power and greed," Fata said, according to the Associate Press.
 
 

Understanding the Real Source of Back Pain

 
‎11 ‎July ‎2015, ‏‎12:01:17 AMGo to full article
Understanding the Real Source of Back PainBy Pete EgoscueIn the United States, back pain is one of the top complaints people bring to their doctors. What is the cause of this back pain that is so prevalent in our culture?First, some basic anatomy. The human spine is called "the segmented bone," meaning it's a bone that the body recognizes as one bone, in the same way it recognizes,...
 
 

Survivors of teenage cancer struggle with jobs, emotions later in life

 
‎10 ‎July ‎2015, ‏‎10:34:01 PMGo to full article
By Madeline Kennedy (Reuters Health) - Even decades later, people diagnosed with cancer in their teenage years are less likely to have college degrees, to work full time, to be married or to live independently, a recent U.S. study found. Survivors of teenage cancer also faced higher rates of depression and anxiety, as well as issues with memory and task efficiency, compared to their siblings who did not have cancer. While the effects of childhood cancer are more widely studied, there has been less research into the effects of cancer treatment on adolescents, said Prasad, a pediatric cancer specialist at the Louisiana State University School Health Sciences Center in New Orleans.
 

Novo Nordisk's new GLP-1 diabetes drug hits goal in trial

 
‎10 ‎July ‎2015, ‏‎07:00:36 PMGo to full article
(Reuters) - Denmark's Novo Nordisk said on Friday its new once-weekly diabetes drug semaglutide worked successfully in a late-stage clinical trial, boosting hopes for a medicine seen as critical to maintaining the firm's lead in the field. In addition, from a mean baseline of 92 kg, people on the two doses of the drug lost 3.8 kg and 4.6 kg in weight, respectively, compared with a weight loss of 1.0 kg for those treated with placebo. "We are excited about these results, which confirm that semaglutide has the potential to help people with type 2 diabetes achieve both good glycaemic control and a significant weight loss with one weekly injection," said Novo's chief science officer Mads Krogsgaard Thomsen.
 

Britain finds suspected bird flu on farm, says 'low risk' to public

 
‎10 ‎July ‎2015, ‏‎04:59:19 PMGo to full article
Britain said on Friday a suspected case of avian flu had been reported at a poultry farm in northern England, but the risk to public health was very low and it posed no food safety concerns. "We have taken swift precautionary action to limit the risk of disease spreading," said Britain's chief vet, Nigel Gibbens. "These measures to control the movement of poultry and humanely cull birds at the farm are part of our tried and tested approach to deal with such incidents." The Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs (Defra) said an investigation into the suspected bird flu case was ongoing.
 

Florida Senator Bill Nelson to undergo prostate cancer surgery

 
‎10 ‎July ‎2015, ‏‎01:56:57 AMGo to full article
U.S. Senator Bill Nelson speaks to the 2013 NAACP convention in OrlandoU.S. Senator Bill Nelson, a Florida Democrat, has been diagnosed with prostate cancer and will undergo surgery next week to treat it, his office said on Thursday. Nelson's cancer was discovered in its early stages during a routine medical exam and the 72-year-old will have surgery on Monday, his office said in a statement. "Extensive scans showed no signs of the cancer spreading outside the prostate," it said. The statement said the diagnosis does not affect Nelson's plans to run for re-election in 2018.
 
 

FDA panel: Lilly cancer drug has positive risk/benefit profile

 
‎09 ‎July ‎2015, ‏‎08:35:22 PMGo to full article
An advisory panel to the U.S. Food and Drug Administration effectively supported approval of Eli Lilly & Co's experimental lung cancer drug necitumumab on Thursday but recommended measures be taken to mitigate the drug's risks. The panel did not officially vote but an informal poll taken by the FDA indicated most members believe the benefits of the drug outweigh the risks. The FDA is not obliged to follow the advice of its advisers but generally does so.

 

Oral cholera vaccine could speed control efforts, trial finds

 
‎09 ‎July ‎2015, ‏‎01:23:38 AMGo to full article
By Kate Kelland LONDON (Reuters) - An oral vaccine has reduced cases of severe cholera by nearly 40 percent in a key trial in Bangladeshi slums, suggesting the shot could be used routinely to help endemic countries control the life-threatening disease. In the first real-life trial of the vaccine, called Shanchol and recommended by the World Health Organisation (WHO), researchers said it proved safe, easy to administer and relatively inexpensive at $1.85 per dose. More than one billion people are thought to be at risk of cholera in more than 50 countries where it is endemic.
 

White House says open to working with Congress on disease research bill

 
‎09 ‎July ‎2015, ‏‎01:21:53 AMGo to full article
The White House said on Wednesday it was open to working with Congress on a bill that would invest in disease research and would be paid for with sales of oil from U.S. emergency reserves. The House of Representatives is considering a bipartisan bill that would increase funding for the U.S. National Institutes of Health and the Food and Drug Administration to boost research and approvals of new treatments for rare diseases. Funding for the measure would come from selling 80 million barrels of oil a year over eight years from the Strategic Petroleum Reserve, emergency stockpiles that currently hold more than 690 million barrels of oil.
 

Cholera vaccine works in real-life trial: study

 
‎09 ‎July ‎2015, ‏‎01:21:36 AMGo to full article
A boy receives a dose of a vaccine against cholera in Saut d'Eau, in the Central Plateau of Haiti, on September 17, 2014A cheap, oral vaccine provided "significant" protection against cholera in a real-life trial in Bangladesh, where the disease kills thousands every year, scientists reported on Thursday. "Our findings show that a routine oral cholera vaccination programme in cholera-endemic countries could substantially reduce the burden of disease and greatly contribute to cholera control efforts," study co-author Firdausi Qadri of the International Centre for Diarrhoeal Disease Research Bangladesh said in a statement. "Ultimately, the key to controlling cholera is clean water and adequate sanitation, which half the developing world (around 2.5 billion people) lack," said Qadri.
 
 

Expert testifies against cancer doctor at sentencing hearing

 
‎09 ‎July ‎2015, ‏‎12:02:30 AMGo to full article
Liz Lupo, of Lake Orion, Mich., holds a sign memorializing her mother, who died while under Dr. Fata's care, outside the federal courthouse in downtown Detroit, Monday July 6, 2015. Fata is headed to prison for fraud and other crimes. But U.S. District Judge Paul Borman first is hearing from experts and former patients about the extent of his scheme to reap millions of dollars from Medicare and other health programs. (David Guralnick/Detroit News via AP) DETROIT FREE PRESS OUT; HUFFINGTON POST OUT; MANDATORY CREDITDETROIT (AP) — An expert who looked at the files of 100 patients of a Detroit-area cancer doctor facing prison for unnecessary treatments testified Wednesday that the records were disturbing.
 
 

Breast cancer: screening mammograms don't necessarily reduce fatality rates

 
‎08 ‎July ‎2015, ‏‎05:06:59 PMGo to full article
Specialists are not all on the same page regarding screening mammograms.Two studies published simultaneously in the US and Great Britain call into question the efficiency of screening mammograms for breast cancer. The first study, led by Professor Philippe Autier from the Institute of Global Public Health, a joint health research initiative of Strathclyde University and the Lyon-based International Prevention Research Institute (iPRI), and Professor Peter Boyle, Director of the University of Strathclyde Institute of Global Public Health at iPRI, was published in the Journal of the Royal Society of Medicine. The study had concluded that early screening could prevent 20-25% of fatalities due to breast cancer.
 
 

U.S. plans changes to bird-flu response after criticism

 
‎08 ‎July ‎2015, ‏‎01:05:57 AMGo to full article
Health workers pack dead chickens into trash bins at a wholesale poultry market in Hong KongThe U.S. Agriculture Department wants to improve its handling of the nation's worst-ever outbreak of bird flu in poultry after coming under criticism for a slow and confusing response. The USDA is aiming to assign one person to communicate with each infected farm during the entire time the facility is affected by the deadly virus, John Clifford, the chief U.S. veterinary officer, said at a U.S. Senate Agriculture Committee hearing on Tuesday. Currently, a USDA representative deals with an infected farm for a period of about three to four weeks as part of a rotation, Clifford told lawmakers.
 
 

More men with prostate cancer are opting for surveillance

 
‎07 ‎July ‎2015, ‏‎11:14:05 PMGo to full article
By Andrew M. Seaman (Reuters Health) - Men with early-stage prostate cancer are increasingly opting for regular monitoring and holding off on treatment unless the disease progresses, a new study suggests. Use of so-called active surveillance, or watchful waiting, among men with localized prostate cancer was low from 1990 through 2009 but rose sharply between 2010 and 2013, according to data published in JAMA. "This is progress in the right direction," said lead author Dr. Matthew Cooperberg of the University of California, San Francisco.
 

Bariatric surgery is the most efficient treatment for treating type 2 diabetes

 
‎07 ‎July ‎2015, ‏‎05:03:25 PMGo to full article
Gastric bypass, one of the methods used in bariatric surgeries, may also help treat type 2 diabetes.Researchers from the University of Pittsburgh Medical Center in Pennsylvania have concluded that bariatric surgeries, used to combat obesity, are also useful for treating type 2 diabetes. In fact, it appears to be much more efficient than simply enacting lifestyle changes. Nearly 90% of obese people suffer from type 2 diabetes.
 
 

Lilly cancer drug improves survival, raises blood clot risk: FDA

 
‎07 ‎July ‎2015, ‏‎03:48:13 PMGo to full article
By Toni Clarke WASHINGTON (Reuters) - Eli Lilly & Co.'s experimental lung cancer drug necitumumab improved overall survival by an average of 1.6 months but also increased the risk of sometimes fatal blood clots, according to a preliminary review by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration. The FDA's review was posted on its website on Tuesday ahead of July 9 meeting of outside experts who will discuss the drug and recommend whether it should be approved. The FDA usually follows the advice of its advisory panels.
 

Cholera kills 32 in South Sudan, education key to stemming outbreak: U.N.

 
‎07 ‎July ‎2015, ‏‎03:06:45 PMGo to full article
By Kieran Guilbert LONDON (Thomson Reuters Foundation) - A cholera outbreak in war-torn South Sudan has killed at least 32 people, a fifth of them children under five, and schools have a major role to play in stemming the spread of the disease, the United Nations said on Tuesday. More than 700 cholera cases have been reported in the capital Juba and Bor, the capital of Jonglei state, in the last five weeks, according to the U.N. children's agency UNICEF. "Cholera is a deadly disease that inordinately affects young children," Jonathan Veitch, UNICEF representative in South Sudan, said in a statement.
 

Mammograms may not reduce breast cancer deaths

 
‎07 ‎July ‎2015, ‏‎12:02:30 AMGo to full article
A woman undergoes a free mammogram inside Peru's first mobile unit for breast cancer detection, in LimaBy Reuters Staff (Reuters Health) - Breast cancer screenings may not lead to fewer deaths but may lead to overdiagnosis, U.S. researchers suggest. In areas of the U.S. with high levels of screening, more tumors were diagnosed - but breast cancer death rates were no lower than in areas with fewer screenings, researchers report. "The mortality results that we observed are far from definitive," cautioned Charles Harding, the study's lead author from Seattle, Washington.
 
 

Cancer Mortality News, Between the Lines

 
‎06 ‎July ‎2015, ‏‎10:13:15 PMGo to full article
Cancer Mortality News, Between the LinesA CDC report just released indicates that the age-adjusted risk of cancer death is declining for Americans overall, and the trajectory is largely in line with the aspirational objectives of Healthy People 2020. There are several, salient messages in this report- and at least one more between its lines.First, as noted, the principal finding is...
 
 

Care for depression, anxiety helps war-exposed children long-term

 
‎06 ‎July ‎2015, ‏‎08:57:58 PMGo to full article
-PHOTO TAKEN 21JUL05- Sierra Leonian kids pose in Kailahun, about 19kms (12 miles) away from the Lib..By Anne Harding (Reuters Health) - Treating depression and anxiety in youngsters affected by war may have lasting benefits for their mental health and ability to function in society, new findings suggest. The study, of former child soldiers and other young people affected by Sierra Leone's civil war, found that those with higher levels of anxiety and depression two years after the end of the conflict had the highest levels of these “internalizing symptoms” four years later. The findings suggest that treating anxiety and depression in war-affected youth could have multi-faceted effects on their future mental health, attitudes, and behavior, the researchers write in Pediatrics.
 
 

After 44 years, halting progress on workplace disease

 
‎06 ‎July ‎2015, ‏‎11:00:00 AMGo to full article
Hindered by court decisions, the White House and Congress, OSHA's war on health hazards has faltered.
 

Malnutrition brings a terrible disease to children in Niger

 
‎04 ‎July ‎2015, ‏‎07:21:20 AMGo to full article
A young girl operated after suffering noma disease, poses for a photo at the health centre of the NGO Sentinelles, in Zinder, southern NigerMourdja's nose has been eaten away, like one lip and part of her upper gum, leaving the 13-year-old girl atrociously disfigured by noma, a disease that thrives on malnutrition. "It was better before," the teenager says shyly and simply in the arid heartland of Niger, one of the world's poorest nations, clearly ill at ease and fiddling with her bracelets. "The problem is that this is a very fast-acting disease," says nurse Fati Badamasi, who works for the Swiss NGO Sentinelles, active in Niger since 1992.
 
 

Weight-loss surgery edges out lifestyle changes for type 2 diabetes

 
‎03 ‎July ‎2015, ‏‎10:33:09 PMGo to full article
Patient takes a blood glucose test during event aimed to help people with diabetes to cope with their illness at Saint Luka diagnostics medical center in SofiaBy Andrew M. Seaman (Reuters Health) - People with type 2 diabetes who have weight loss surgery are more likely to have significant improvements in their diabetes three years compared to diabetics who try lifestyle changes, a small new study suggests. "One of the most important things to take away is that there is durability of remission over time," said Dr. Anita Courcoulas of the University of Pittsburgh Medical Center, who led the research. Past studies have found that weight loss surgeries sometimes result in improvement for people with type 2 diabetes, but it remains to be seen if the surgeries are better at treating the condition than lifestyle interventions, the researchers write in JAMA Surgery.
 
 

Could insulin pills prevent diabetes? Big study seeks answer

 
‎03 ‎July ‎2015, ‏‎08:33:09 AMGo to full article
In this photo taken Wednesday, May 13, 2015, Hayden Murphy, 13, sits for a photo with his medicine at his home in Plainfield, Ill. Hayden is among more than 400 children and adults participating in U.S. government-funded international research investigating whether experimental insulin capsules can prevent or at least delay Type 1 diabetes. To enroll, participants must first get bad news: results of a blood test showing their chances for developing the disease are high. (AP Photo/Nam Y. Huh)CHICAGO (AP) — For nearly a century, insulin has been a life-saving diabetes treatment. Now scientists are testing a tantalizing question: What if pills containing the same medicine patients inject every day could also prevent the disease?
 
 

Zhejiang Hisun Pharma teams up Sanofi on developing diabetes-related treatment

 
‎03 ‎July ‎2015, ‏‎05:59:30 AMGo to full article
July 3 (Reuters) - Zhejiang Hisun Pharmaceutical Co Ltd * Says signed non-binding MOU with Sanofi SA toset up a joint venture in China focusing on developing insulinand diabetes-related treatment Source text in Chinese: http://bit.ly/1LLDynM Further company coverage: (Reporting by Hong Kong newsroom)
 

California cancer patient with amnesia identified by family

 
‎03 ‎July ‎2015, ‏‎03:56:59 AMGo to full article
A Southern California cancer patient unable to recall her identity or family since she was found dazed on a street four months ago has finally reconnected with relatives after a nephew spotted her on the evening news, media reported on Thursday. The woman, whose Facebook image has circulated widely on the Internet and was previously known only as Sam, was identified on Wednesday night as Pennsylvania native Ashley Manetta, 53, according to San Diego's NBC television affiliate. The TV station, which originally broke the story about a California cancer patient with amnesia, said the two siblings then spoke by telephone.
 

Immunotherapy tablets for seasonal allergies offer small benefit

 
‎02 ‎July ‎2015, ‏‎08:44:17 PMGo to full article
By Kathryn Doyle (Reuters Health) - Oral tablets for grass pollen allergies, which are available in Europe and the U.S., offer only a small benefit for people with seasonal allergies, and more than half will have side effects from the medication, according to a new review of existing research. “The reported benefit is very small on average,” said lead author Dr. Danilo Di Bona of the Azienda Ospedaliera Universitaria Policlinico di Palermo in Italy. The researchers considered 13 randomized controlled trials comparing under-the-tongue “meltaway” immunotherapy tablets with placebo pills, and measuring changes in reported allergy symptoms and the use of other allergy medications.
 

You Don't Look Like You Have Epilepsy

 
‎02 ‎July ‎2015, ‏‎08:13:48 PMGo to full article
You Don't Look Like You Have EpilepsyNot every condition is always visible.I live with epilepsy. I have lived with this condition for going on seven years this December. I was diagnosed with this condition in 2008, four short months after marrying my husband -- days before both of our birthdays and two weeks before Christmas. I had one previous seizure at the age of 16 and no...
 
 

Insulin pump may cut risk of heart disease deaths with diabetes

 
‎02 ‎July ‎2015, ‏‎06:01:39 PMGo to full article
By Roxanne Nelson (Reuters Health) - People with type 1 diabetes must control their blood sugar with insulin, but getting it automatically from an implanted pump may also help to stave off death from heart disease, according to a large Scandinavian study. Among more than 18,000 type 1 diabetics in Sweden followed over time, those with an insulin pump were about half as likely to die of heart-related causes, and 25 percent less likely to die of any cause, compared to those who injected themselves with insulin many times a day. “Our study shows that treatment with an insulin pump almost halves the risk of cardiovascular mortality,” said lead study author Dr. Isabelle Steineck from Aarhus University Hospital in Denmark.
 

California cancer patient with amnesia identified by sister: NBC

 
‎02 ‎July ‎2015, ‏‎04:53:45 PMGo to full article
(Reuters) - A woman with amnesia who has been undergoing cancer treatments since she was found semiconscious in Southern California has been identified by her sister after turning to social media in a bid to rekindle her memory and find her family, an NBC affiliate in San Diego reported on Thursday.
 

Brown fat transplant reverses type 1 diabetes in mice

 
‎02 ‎July ‎2015, ‏‎03:08:51 PMGo to full article
Transplanting brown fat in mice cured them of their type 1 diabetes in a recent study.Transplanting "good" brown fat from embryos into adult mice cured their type 1 diabetes in a recent study by a team from Vanderbilt University in the US state of Tennessee. Brown adipose tissue is well known to burn energy, upping the body's resting metabolism whereas its white counterpart stores energy, and thus an abundance of white adipose tissue makes it easy to gain weight. Type 1 diabetes is an autoimmune disease in which the pancreas ceases to produce insulin, an important hormone that processes glucose when you eat sugary foods.
 
 

Diabetes drug helps people lose weight: study

 
‎02 ‎July ‎2015, ‏‎09:12:07 AMGo to full article
Diabetes drug helps people lose weight: studyLiraglutide, an injectable diabetes drug that US regulators approved last year for weight loss, helped obese people lose an average of 18 pounds (eight kilograms), a yearlong study said Wednesday. Most patients were able to keep the weight off for the duration of the 56-week study on the drug marketed as Saxenda by Novo Nordisk, according to the findings published in the New England Journal of Medicine.

 

 

 

Weathering the Coming Storm


 

 

 

Price R399.00

 

 


 

Description

Dr. Chuck Missler, an internationally known business executive, outlines our current economic predicament and defensive steps you can take to lessen the impact of the impending economic crisis. As a Bible teacher for over 30 years with a ministry reaching over 40 countries, Chuck shares some key strategies to prepare yourself spiritually and practically.

Is the World facing another major economic upheaval?

What is the best strategy to protect your family in times of economic uncertainty?

The Church has enjoyed a relatively peaceful existence in the West for a few centuries but the with the coming persecution, how do we go about organizing home study and home-church?

Soul Survival – Keeping your “lamp full” during the hard times ahead.

Join Dr. Chuck Missler and Ron Matsen in the Executive Brie fing Room of
The River Lodge, New Zealand, in an intensive summary outlining what lies
ahead and how we can prepare for the coming storm.

Runtime: Approx. 5 hours

© 2012 Koinonia House Inc.

Available in the following formats:

 

DVD:

•3 Disks
•5 M4A Files
•1 PDF Notes File
•Color, 16:9, Dolby Digital 2.0 stereo, Region encoding (This DVD will be viewable in other countries WITH the proper DVD player and television set.)


 
 

Expectations

 of the

 Antichrist

 

 

Dr. Chuck Missler and Ron Matsen

 

Price R 499.00

 

There are many diverse anticipations concerning the Coming World Leader, commonly referred to as “The Antichrist.” This study will explore the Biblical descriptions with the specific expectations of the globalists, Islam, the Vatican, Freemasonry, and others.
• Will he be a Nephilim?
• Why is the Vatican openly preparing to receive an “alien” visitor?
• Will he be a resurrection of Nimrod? Is his DNA a factor?
• What are the expectations of transhumanist technologists in this regard?
Clearly, the Bible has much more to illuminate this issue far beyond the popular conceptions; and yet the composite perspective will astonish most. Furthermore, is there a climactic cosmic deception being prepared that, if it were possible, “it would deceive the very elect”? Jesus commanded us, “Be not deceived.” But, how?
How close are these events to our current horizon?
Join Dr. Chuck Missler and Ron Matsen in an intensive summary of some of the Strategic Trends that will impact all of us.
Available in the following formats:

DVD:
•3 Discs
•6 M4A Files
•1 PDF Notes File
•Color, Fullscreen 16:9, Dolby Digital 2.0 stereo, Region  encoding ( This DVD will be viewable in other countries WITH the proper DVD player and television set.)


 

 

 

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End the Shame. End the Isolation. End Fistula.

 

 

 

 

 
 

 

Genetically Modified Food & People.

 

 

 

 

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*** New Release ***

 Angels, Volume III:

The Denizens of the Metacosm

 

DVD

 

 

Price R 179.00

 

Angels, Volume III: The Denizens of the Metacosm

 

DVD

by Dr. Chuck Missler

 

Description

Volumes 1 & 2 of this series explored the finite limits and boundaries of our physical reality. After probing the limits of both the Macrocosm and the Microcosm, we discovered that our reality is but a shadow of larger reality, the Metacosm, a domain of extra-dimensional transfers and other paradoxical phenomena.

 

Volume 3 explores the contradictory behavior of UFOs and other demonic deceptions characteristic of the End Times. Explore these topics in more detail in either this two-hour briefing, Angels Vol 3: The Denizens of the Metacosm or our six-hour extensive study, Expectations of the Antichrist.

 

 

• Are they real?

• Why do UFOs enjoy a military classification higher than our most sensitive weapons systems?

• Why are the events which occurred in Roswell New Mexico still classified after 66 years?

• Why is the Vatican openly preparing to receive an Alien Visitor?

• How should a Christian deal with the occurrences of Alien abductions?

• Jesus admonished us to “Be not deceived.” How?

• How do we prepare for the deception which, “if it were possible, would deceive the very elect”?

 

Join Dr. Chuck Missler in the Executive Briefing Room of the River Lodge, New Zealand, exploring the misinformation, (and deliberate disinformation) about the various “denizens of the Metacosm” and other insights of the invisible war unfolding on our near horizon.

 

This briefing pack contains 2 hours of teaching

 

Available in the following formats

 

DVD:

•1 Disc

•2 M4A Files

•Color, Fullscreen 16:9, Dolby Digital 2.0 stereo, Region. This DVD will be viewable in other countries WITH the proper DVD player and television set.)

 

DVD

PRICE  R 159.00

DVD

PRICE R 159.00

 

DVD

Price  R 159.00

 

DVD

Price R 159.00

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


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"In seasons of severe trial, the Christian has nothing on earth that he can trust to, and is therefore compelled to cast himself on God alone. When no human deliverance can avail, he must simply and entirely trust himself to the providence and care of God. Happy storm that wrecks a man on such a rock as this! O blessed hurricane that drives the soul to God--and God alone!"
- Spurgeon

 

 

 

 

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