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Biotech & Global Pestilence Introduction:

 

The threat of germ warfare has brought to the forefront long-forgotten diseases like plague, anthrax, and smallpox. Recent television news programs have highlighted secret projects in the former Soviet Union to develop antibiotic-resistant strains of genetically engineered viruses and bacteria.


[READ THE FULL INTRODUCTION]

 

 


 

Human Nature

Speakers:

Ron Matsen

R179.00

 

 

 

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Description: 

What does it mean to be human? Philosophers, theologians, sociologists and psychologists have attempted to understand the nature of mankind for ages. Their conclusions often contradict each other which lead to confusion rather than clarification. Clearly Man is a very complicated social being. The Bible tells us that man is “fearfully and wonderfully made.”
  • How do we understand our makeup and does it make a difference?
  • What is the meaning of being “created in the image of God?”
  • What causes our natural responses and can we change this behaviour?

Join Ron Matsen from the Executive Briefing Room of the River Lodge, New Zealand as he explores the subject of our “Human Nature” and gives insight into the architecture and accountability of all mankind.

This briefing pack contains approx. 2 hours of teaching.

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Beginning of Wisdom

 

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 Dr. Chuck Missler

“The fear of God is the beginning of wisdom.” Proverbs 9:10

But how do we balance the awesome majesty due to the Creator and Ruler of the universe with the gracious family intimacy that is now available to us through the completed work of Christ?

What does His Holiness demand of us, personally?

What are the hazards of failing to render the Almighty His due, while availing ourselves the riches committed to us of the precious promises in His Word?

How do we deal with these paramount issues facing us daily in practical challenges?

Chuck Missler grapples with these wildly misunderstood tensions with down-to-earth frankness and Biblically-based candor.

 


 

 

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The Gospel: The Message of Reconciliation

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by Ron Matsen 

 

 

 

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One of the last instructions given by Jesus to the Church was, “Go into all the world and preach the gospel.” (Mark 16:15)

The fact is most Christians don’t know how to share their faith effectively. Sadly, many of the people they know in the world today are wandering around, lost and without hope, having never heard the wonderful Message of Reconciliation.

How would you answer the question, “What must I do to be saved?”

What are the essential facts, demands and promises of the Gospel?

Why are we told to evangelize?

Join Ron Matsen in the Executive Briefing Room of the River Lodge, New Zealand as he explores the subject of “The Gospel – The Message of Reconciliation” and gives practical insight into how to share the essential doctrines of salvation.

This briefing pack contains 2 hours of teaching

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Koinonia Institute presents its 2014 Strategic Perspectives IX Conference in Coeur d' Alene, Idaho on DVD, intel and insight to understand the times.


DVD Set - 10 discs
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Dr. Chuck Missler: The Spiritual Entrepreneur
L.A. Marzulli: On the Trail of the Nephilim
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Mark Biltz: The Blood Moons
Joseph Farah: ISIS SHMISIS: God's Mideast Peace Plan
Bob Cornuke: Amazing New Discoveries that Change Everything about the Location of Solomon's Temple
Louis Powell: China - The Sleeping Dragon
Ron Matsen: The Re-emergence of Assyria


Also featuring: Trevor MacDuff, Chris Corlett, Jeff Altus, Gordon McDonald, William Welty, Avi Lipkin, Dan Stolebarger, Kings Highway/Debbie Holland, Steve Elwart, John Loeffler, and Jay Seegert

 

Price R799.00

 

 

 

Shower Proof

 

Scientists find aggressive strain of HIV in Cuba <http://www.wnd.com/2015/02/scientists-find-aggressive-strain-of-hiv-in-cuba/>

 

 

‎16 ‎February ‎2015, ‏‎07:21:41 PM | -NO AUTHOR-Go to full article <http://www.wnd.com/2015/02/scientists-find-aggressive-strain-of-hiv-in-cuba/>

 

(Fox News) Scientists have found an aggressive strain of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) in Cuba that they say can progress to AIDS so rapidly that patients may not even know they are infected before symptoms appear, Medical News Today reported.

 

The Cuban variant of HIV is categorized as a recombinant version of the virus, which can occur if a person engages in unprotected sex with multiple infected partners and contracts multiple strains of the HIV virus, which later recombine within a person to create a new variant.

 

In a normal HIV infection, the virus attaches to proteins on the membranes of cells known as CCR5 before it is able to penetrate the cell. The HIV-infected patient may experience a number of healthy years before the virus becomes CXCR4, which quickly progresses to AIDS, according to the report.

 

In the new Cuban strain, researchers found that HIV makes the transition to CXCR4 more quickly than in the other strains, resulting in a shorter number of “healthy” years. The new strain can cause AIDS to appear within just three years of infection.

 

Go to commentsComments (0) <http://www.wnd.com/2015/02/scientists-find-aggressive-strain-of-hiv-in-cuba/#comments>

 

Diseases/Conditions News Headlines - Yahoo! News

 

Younger men more bothered after prostate cancer treatment

 
‎28 ‎February ‎2015, ‏‎12:04:35 AMGo to full article
By Shereen Lehman After treatment for localized prostate cancer, changes in quality of life will vary by age, as will men’s reactions to those changes, according to a new study. “While older and younger men start with different baseline quality of life function, older men may be less bothered by certain declines that may affect younger patients more,” Dr. Lindsay Hampson told Reuters Health in an email. Prostate cancer is the most common malignancy in men of all ages in the U.S. Almost 60 percent of new cases are diagnosed in men over the age of 65, and the average age is 66. Older men are often diagnosed with more aggressive disease and are less likely to get treatment, in part because they worry about the impact on their sexual and urinary function, Hampson and her colleagues write in European Urology.
 

Watch out for nasty global flu surprises, WHO warns

 
‎27 ‎February ‎2015, ‏‎08:37:42 PMGo to full article
By Kate and Kelland LONDON, Feb 27 - The world remains highly vulnerable to a possible severe flu pandemic and governments should increase surveillance, vigilance and preparedness, the World Health Organization (WHO) said on Friday. It said the world was fortunate that the last flu pandemic, caused by H1N1 swine flu in 2009/2010, was relatively mild, but added: "Such good fortune is no precedent". In a seven-page report on flu, WHO said that on many levels, the world is better prepared now than ever before for a flu pandemic. The level of alert is high, it said, and there is better surveillance of flu viruses in both animals and humans.
 

Roche says EU agency recommends Avastin for cervical cancer

 
‎27 ‎February ‎2015, ‏‎06:49:16 PMGo to full article
ZURICH (Reuters) - Roche said on Friday that European regulators had recommended approval of its drug Avastin in combination with chemotherapy as a treatment for women with an advanced form of cancer of the cervix. Avastin, which is already approved in Europe to treat advanced stages of breast cancer, colorectal cancer, non-small cell lung cancer, kidney cancer and ovarian cancer, was the Basel-based drugmaker's biggest seller last year with sales of 6.42 billion Swiss francs ($6.76 billion). (Reporting By Zurich Slot; Editing by David Goodman)
 

You Know Everything About Nutrition. So Why Are You Still Overeating?

 
‎27 ‎February ‎2015, ‏‎05:39:32 PMGo to full article
You Know Everything About Nutrition. So Why Are You Still Overeating?You know the nutritional value of almost everything at the supermarket. You could recite the calories in a slice of pizza, list the things you "should" buy at the grocery store, recount the types of grains for easy digestion, and write out all of the most nutrient dense super-foods. But despite the fact that you know everything about nutrition...
 
 

Sanofi diabetes drug Toujeo wins EU green light, pricing in focus

 
‎27 ‎February ‎2015, ‏‎03:10:23 PMGo to full article
French drugs firm Sanofi's logo is pictured inside the company's headquarters during the company's 2014 annual results presentation in ParisBy Ben Hirschler LONDON (Reuters) - French drugmaker Sanofi's new Toujeo diabetes drug has been recommended for approval in Europe, two days after being cleared for sale in the United States, regulators said on Friday. The positive decision from experts at the European Medicines Agency (EMA) had been expected and paves the way for the long-lasting insulin product to be marketed soon in Sanofi's chosen first European markets, Germany and Britain. Recommendations for marketing approval by the agency's Committee for Medicinal Products for Human Use (CHMP) are normally endorsed by the European Commission within a couple of months. Significantly, the EMA highlighted the benefits of Toujeo in reducing the risk of hypoglycemia, or dangerously low blood sugar levels, compared to Lantus.
 
 

Novartis lung cancer drug gets EU recommendation

 
‎27 ‎February ‎2015, ‏‎02:31:59 PMGo to full article
Swiss drugmaker Novartis' logo is seen at the company's plant in the northern Swiss town of SteinEuropean health regulators said on Friday they had recommended approval of a drug for advanced lung cancer developed by Swiss drugmaker Novartis that is intended to treat patients with a specific genetic mutation. It is designed for use in non-small cell lung cancer patients who have previously been treated with Pfizer's Xalkori, another ALK inhibitor. Between 2 and 7 percent of non-small cell lung cancer patients have the specific mutation of the ALK (anaplastic lymphoma kinase) protein for which such treatment is targeted.
 
 

Heat blamed for spray vaccine's failure against swine flu

 
‎27 ‎February ‎2015, ‏‎01:43:21 AMGo to full article
FILE- In this Oct. 4, 2005, file photo, Danielle Holland reacts as she is given a FluMist influenza vaccination in St. Leonard, Md. The makers of AstraZeneca FluMist spray version of the flu vaccine say now they know why it has failed to protect young U.S. children against swine flu — fragile doses got too warm. The vaccine works well for most flu strains, but small studies found it didn't work very well against the swine flu bug that first emerged in 2009. Swine flu has returned each year since but wasn't a big player this flu season. At a medical meeting Thursday, Feb. 26, 2015, company officials said they investigated and concluded that the swine flu part of the vaccine is unusually sensitive to heat. (AP Photo/Chris Gardner, File)ATLANTA (AP) — The makers of the nasal spray version of the flu vaccine say now they know why it has failed to protect young U.S. children against swine flu — fragile doses got too warm.
 
 

Sanofi's diabetes drug Toujeo gets U.S. approval, label disappoints

 
‎27 ‎February ‎2015, ‏‎01:37:30 AMGo to full article
French drugmaker Sanofi SA's new Toujeo diabetes drug won U.S. regulatory approval, but with wording on its prescribing label that analysts say could make marketing difficult. Toujeo is a more potent follow-up to the drugmaker's top-selling Lantus insulin product, which accounts for a fifth of Sanofi sales. Sanofi is hoping to convert patients to Toujeo as Lantus is due to lose its U.S. patent protection this month. The U.S. Food and Drug Administration late Wednesday approved the once daily, long-acting basal insulin to treat type 1 and the far more prevalent type 2 diabetes.
 

Drinking coffee may lower risk of multiple sclerosis

 
‎26 ‎February ‎2015, ‏‎11:12:04 PMGo to full article
People who drink four to six cups of coffee daily may be less likely to get multiple sclerosis, according to international research out ThursdayPeople who drink four to six cups of coffee daily may be less likely to get multiple sclerosis, according to international research out Thursday. "Caffeine intake has been associated with a reduced risk of Parkinson's and Alzheimer's diseases," said lead author Ellen Mowry of the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine in Baltimore, Maryland. "Our study shows that coffee intake may also protect against MS, supporting the idea that the drug may have protective effects for the brain," she added. The findings of a US and Swedish study -- released ahead of the American Academy of Neurology annual meeting in Washington -- each compared more than 1,000 MS patients to a similar number of healthy people.
 
 

Nasal flu vaccines may be safe for kids with egg allergies

 
‎26 ‎February ‎2015, ‏‎09:07:53 PMGo to full article
By Shereen Lehman (Reuters Health) - Nasal-spray flu vaccines appear to be safe for children over age two who have egg allergies or asthma, say UK researchers. No systemic or severe allergic reactions were seen among 282 egg-allergic children who received the vaccine. Nasal-spray vaccines containing live but disabled influenza virus, known as live attenuated influenza vaccine (LAIV), are cultured in chicken eggs and contain traces of egg proteins. “On the basis of this data, we do think the intranasal flu vaccine (LAIV) is safe in children with egg allergy,” said Paul Turner, who led the new study, in an email.
 

Terminal cancer care should do more to treat depression

 
‎26 ‎February ‎2015, ‏‎06:20:53 PMGo to full article
By Janice Neumann Reuters Health - Depression could be clouding the last 24 hours of life for a significant number of people with advanced cancer, pointing to a need for better – and earlier - psychological help, according to a large study from Norway. Although it’s challenging to tease apart depression symptoms from the pain, fatigue and cognitive problems associated with end-stage cancer, more can be done to alleviate depression and anxiety, researchers said. “Health care providers may think this is a normal part of the dying process,” said lead author Dr. Elene Janberidze from the European Palliative Care Research Center at the Norwegian University of Science and Technology in Trondheim. “However, some patients experiencing depressive symptoms and/or depression can be treated and thus both the patients and their families may have a better quality of life,” Janberidze told Reuters Health in an email.
 

Sanofi diabetes drug awaits imminent EU green light

 
‎26 ‎February ‎2015, ‏‎05:50:33 PMGo to full article
By Ben Hirschler LONDON (Reuters) - Sanofi's new Toujeo diabetes drug is on track to receive a potential green light from European regulators this week, building on a U.S. regulatory approval awarded on Wednesday. Toujeo is a more potent follow-up to the French drugmaker's top-selling Lantus insulin product, which accounts for a fifth of group sales, and the new drug is pivotal to Sanofi's diabetes business as Lantus faces loss of patent protection. A committee of experts at the European Medicines Agency is considering whether to recommend Toujeo at a regular monthly meeting in London, according to the agency's website. Assuming Toujeo gets a positive opinion, it is likely to be formally approved by the European Commission a couple of months later, allowing Sanofi to launch in its chosen first European markets of Germany and Britain.
 

Former Utah Senator Bob Bennett diagnosed with pancreatic cancer

 
‎26 ‎February ‎2015, ‏‎05:01:57 AMGo to full article
(Reuters) - Former U.S. Senator Bob Bennett, the Utah Republican who was one of the first, high-profile political casualties of a 2010 Tea Party insurgency, has been diagnosed with pancreatic cancer and will begin treatment later this week, Utah media reported on Wednesday. Bennett, 81, said in a statement quoted by the Salt Lake Tribune that doctors were hopeful that a "combination of chemotherapy and radiation can shrink the tumor to a point where it will become operable." The Utah Deseret News further quoted the former senator as saying there was "no firm prognosis" for him at this point. Both newspapers said he planned to begin treatment on Friday at Johns Hopkins University in Baltimore. Bennett's bid for a fourth Senate term in 2010 foundered on a conservative backlash over the healthcare overhaul pushed through Congress by President Barack Obama, leading to a revolt against the Republican Party establishment by state Tea Party activists.
 

FDA approves Sanofi's diabetes drug Toujeo

 
‎26 ‎February ‎2015, ‏‎03:54:44 AMGo to full article
U.S. health regulators on Wednesday approved Sanofi's diabetes drug Toujeo, a more potent follow-up to the French drugmaker's top-selling insulin product Lantus. The Food and Drug Administration approved the once daily, long-acting basal insulin to treat adults with both type 1 and the far more prevalent type 2 diabetes. The medicine is considered among the most important in Sanofi's pipeline. Sanofi bought some time with a patent infringement lawsuit filed last year against Eli Lilly and Co that would keep a cheaper Lantus generic off the market for 30 months.
 

Study links common food additives to Crohn's disease, colitis

 
‎25 ‎February ‎2015, ‏‎09:18:11 PMGo to full article
An ice cream cone is held against a blue sky in BlackpoolBy Will Dunham WASHINGTON (Reuters) - Common additives in ice cream, margarine, packaged bread and many processed foods may promote the inflammatory bowel diseases ulcerative colitis and Crohn's disease as well as a group of obesity-related conditions, scientists said on Wednesday. The researchers focused on emulsifiers, chemicals added to many food products to improve texture and extend shelf life. In mouse experiments, they found emulsifiers can change the species composition of gut bacteria and induce intestinal inflammation.
 
 

Enough Distractions: Let's Address the Real Causes of Diet-Related Diseases

 
‎25 ‎February ‎2015, ‏‎06:15:06 PMGo to full article
By Adriana Selwyn and Derek YachThe low-carbohydrate diet phenomenon is the latest in a long line of diets claiming to be the solution to rapidly rising rates of lifestyle-related chronic diseases. It comes as no surprise then that on Feb. 19-22, the world's first International Low Carb High Fat Health Summit will take place in Cape Town, South...
 

Skin test could help diagnose Alzheimer's

 
‎25 ‎February ‎2015, ‏‎01:58:07 PMGo to full article
A skin test could help identify Alzheimer's and Parkinson's diseases.Skin biopsies could help reveal information about Alzheimer's and Parkinson's diseases, according to a new study. The biopsies can detect elevated levels of abnormal proteins associated with the diseases. For the study, researchers took biopsies from 20 people with Alzheimer's disease, 16 with Parkinson's and 17 with dementia caused by other conditions and compared them to 12 healthy people of about the same age.
 
 

AstraZeneca taps biotech firm Orca for autoimmune disease drugs

 
‎25 ‎February ‎2015, ‏‎09:23:58 AMGo to full article
A sign is seen at an AstraZeneca site in MacclesfieldLONDON (Reuters) - AstraZeneca has boosted its early-stage research in autoimmune disease by signing a three-year research deal with start-up firm Orca Pharmaceuticals, a small British biotech company formed in 2013, on a new class of drugs. Orca will receive an upfront payment and further fees from AstraZeneca with a potential total value of $122.5 million, the companies said on Wednesday. Final payments will depend on the success of Orca's so-called retinoic acid–related orphan nuclear receptor gamma inhibitors. (Reporting by Ben Hirschler; editing by David Clarke)
 
 

Phone support can help ease postpartum depression

 
‎25 ‎February ‎2015, ‏‎12:11:35 AMGo to full article
In the study, women with postpartum depression received telephone counseling from other women who had previously suffered from the disorder and recovered. “Postpartum depression is a problem for one in seven women, and many of them don’t get help because there’s a stigma and they don’t have time and it’s expensive,” said study leader Dr. Nicole Letourneau, a professor and research chair in parent-infant mental health at the University of Calgary. “Training peer counselors to do phone counseling is an effective, low-cost and non-stigmatizing way for new moms to get the help they need.” Particularly for first-time mothers, postpartum depression can be hard to distinguish from the stress and fatigue that come with caring for a new infant around the clock, Letourneau said.
 

Bavarian Nordic vaccine helps prolong life in prostate cancer trial

 
‎24 ‎February ‎2015, ‏‎09:42:56 PMGo to full article
An experimental therapeutic vaccine from Danish drugmaker Bavarian Nordic helped significantly extend survival in patients with advanced prostate cancer, according to results of a small early-stage trial conducted by the U.S. National Cancer Institute. Shares of Bavarian Nordic closed up almost 12 percent in Copenhagen after the company released the data on Tuesday. The study involved 30 patients with prostate cancer that had failed to benefit from standard treatments that reduce levels of testosterone, the male hormone that fuels the cancer. Patients were treated with the company's Prostvac vaccine, in addition to escalating doses of Bristol-Myers Squibb Co's Yervoy, an approved injectable treatment for advanced melanoma that works by taking the brakes off the body's immune system.
 

Cholera feared in Syria due to dirty water, WHO warns

 
‎24 ‎February ‎2015, ‏‎07:31:26 PMGo to full article
Children remove trash blocking the drains in the Al Inzarat district in AleppoBy Stephanie Nebehay GENEVA (Reuters) - A cholera outbreak is feared in coming months in Syria, where other water-borne diseases such as hepatitis A and typhoid are on the rise due to poor sanitation, the World Health Organization (WHO) warned on Tuesday. Safe drinking water is available at about one-third of the level it was before the conflict erupted nearly five years ago, and supplies are cut-off to punish civilians at times, it said. Some 31,460 cases of hepatitis A were reported in Syria last year and more than 1,000 cases have been recorded per week since January, said Dr. Elizabeth Hoff, WHO representative in Syria. "Water has been used for political dividends and has been turned off to certain areas and that leads people to drink water from unsafe areas," Cholera, an intestinal infection often linked to contaminated drinking water, causes severe diarrhea and vomiting, leaving small children especially vulnerable to death from dehydration, according to the U.N. health agency.
 
 

Indian city bans gatherings over swine flu outbreak

 
‎24 ‎February ‎2015, ‏‎04:48:58 PMGo to full article
India has detected more than 3,000 cases of swine flu as this medic prepares to treat a patient in AhmedabadAn Indian city has banned public gatherings to contain the spread of deadly swine flu after thousands were infected with the virus, officials said Tuesday. Authorities in Ahmedabad, the largest city in western Gujarat state, said 219 people had died of swine flu since the start of the year, with more than 3,300 cases detected so far. "We have issued a notification prohibiting any kind of public gathering in the district," said senior city administrator Rajkumar Beniwal, adding only weddings and funerals would be exempt. The decision came after Gujarat's junior health minister tested positive for swine flu Monday, just a day after the state assembly speaker was diagnosed with the virus.
 
 

Smokers at higher risk of depression, says British study

 
‎24 ‎February ‎2015, ‏‎12:14:58 PMGo to full article
Smokers have a 70 percent greater risk of anxiety and depression than non-smokers, a British Heart Foundation study showsSmokers are 70 percent more likely to suffer from anxiety and depression than non-smokers, despite the widespread view that lighting up is a stress reliever, says a study published on Tuesday. The British Heart Foundation (BHF) report -- issued ahead of No Smoking Day on March 11 -- says quitting smoking could improve mental health. The study of nearly 6,500 people over the age of 40 found that 18.3 percent of smokers reported suffering depression and anxiety compared with 10 percent of non-smokers and 11.3 percent of ex-smokers. This goes against the perception of more than a third (36 percent) of UK smokers who told researchers they believe the habit helps relieve stress, BHF said.
 
 

Novartis blood cancer drug wins U.S. OK after setback

 
‎23 ‎February ‎2015, ‏‎11:59:26 PMGo to full article
Swiss drugmaker Novartis' logo is seen at the company's plant in the northern Swiss town of Stein(Reuters) - The U.S. Food and Drug Administration on Monday approved Novartis AG's drug to treat patients who have relapsed after earlier therapies for multiple myeloma, an aggressive blood cancer, even though an advisory panel in November recommended against approval. The drug, Farydak, in clinical trials almost doubled to 10.6 months the amount of time it took for the disease to progress, compared with standard treatment. Farydak was approved for use in combination with Takeda Pharmaceutical Co Ltd's Velcade and the anti-inflammatory drug dexamethasone once a patient has received at least two prior treatment regimens. Prior treatments would include Velcade and an immunomodulatory drug, such as Celgene Corp's Revlimid.
 
 

Early exposure to peanuts helps prevent allergies in kids

 
‎23 ‎February ‎2015, ‏‎11:56:19 PMGo to full article
This Feb. 20, 2015, photo shows an arrangement of peanuts in New York. For years, parents of babies who seem likely to develop a peanut allergy have gone to extremes to keep them away from peanut-based foods. Now, a major study suggests that is exactly the wrong thing to do. (AP Photo/Patrick Sison)For years, parents of babies who seem likely to develop a peanut allergy have gone to extremes to keep them away from peanut-based foods. Now a major study suggests that is exactly the wrong thing to do.
 
 

What to know about new research on babies, peanut allergies

 
‎23 ‎February ‎2015, ‏‎11:43:56 PMGo to full article
This Feb. 20, 2015, photo shows an arrangement of peanuts in New York. For years, parents of babies who seem likely to develop a peanut allergy have gone to extremes to keep them away from peanut-based foods. Now, a major study suggests that is exactly the wrong thing to do. (AP Photo/Patrick Sison)Children at high risk of developing peanut allergies are far less likely to do so if they are given peanut-containing foods before they turn 1, finds a major study that is expected to quickly change dietary advice to many parents.
 
 

Washing dishes by hand linked to fewer allergies in kids

 
‎23 ‎February ‎2015, ‏‎11:38:19 PMGo to full article
By Andrew M. Seaman (Reuters Health) - Parents who wash dishes by hand, instead of in a dishwasher, are less likely to have kids with allergies, according to a new study from Sweden. While the researchers can’t say avoiding dishwashing machines prevents childhood allergies, they suggest that bacteria left on hand-washed plates may teach the body to tolerate its environment. Other studies have suggested that growing up on farms and living in developing countries reduce a child’s risk of allergies, the researchers wrote February 23 in the journal Pediatrics. The study’s lead author told Reuters Health by email that while those earlier findings are interesting, they can’t realistically be used to reduce allergies among children.
 

WHO calls for 'smart' syringes to stem deadly diseases

 
‎23 ‎February ‎2015, ‏‎08:13:23 PMGo to full article
The World Health Organization has called on healthcare providers around the globe to switch to syringes that can only be used onceThe World Health Organization has called on healthcare providers around the globe to switch to syringes that can only be used once in order to better battle deadly diseases spread by needle sharing. The new "smart" syringes recommended by the WHO include features that prevent them from being used a second time. Others have metal clips that prevent the plunger from being pulled back after it is used and another type has a needle that retracts into the syringe after a shot. "Adoption of safety-engineered syringes is absolutely critical to protecting people worldwide from becoming infected with HIV, hepatitis and other diseases," said Gottfried Hirnschall, head of WHO's HIV/AIDS Department.
 
 

Novartis AG wins approval to buy GSK cancer drugs, with conditions

 
‎23 ‎February ‎2015, ‏‎07:36:21 PMGo to full article
Swiss drugmaker Novartis' logo is seen at the company's plant in the northern Swiss town of SteinNovartis AG has won U.S. antitrust approval to buy GlaxoSmithKline’s oncology drugs, with conditions, the U.S. Federal Trade Commission said on Monday. To win U.S. approval for the $16 billion deal, Novartis agreed to divest assets related to its BRAF and MEK inhibitor drugs, now in development to fight melanoma, the FTC said. The deal is one of three related transactions announced in April 2014 in which GlaxoSmithKline would buy Novartis' global vaccine business, except for flu vaccines, Novartis would buy Glaxo's cancer drugs and the two companies would combine to create a consumer healthcare business.
 
 

Final frontier for school nutrition: Bake sales

 
‎23 ‎February ‎2015, ‏‎06:43:50 PMGo to full article
By Kathryn Doyle (Reuters Health) - In a new policy statement, the American Academy of Pediatrics says school nutrition has made incredible strides over the last two decades, but high-calorie, low quality foods are still available from informal sources like bake sales, birthday parties, and other events for which students, parents and staff bring treats from home. “Great things have happened in terms of sweetened beverages, school meals, snacks and vended foods in schools,” said Dr. Robert Murray, professor of nutrition at The Ohio State University in Columbus and one of the two lead authors of the policy statement.
 

Washing dishes by hand could keep allergies at bay

 
‎23 ‎February ‎2015, ‏‎04:21:29 PMGo to full article
The way you wash your dishes could have an effect on your children's health.A study released in the journal Pediatrics reveals that kids living in households in which dishes are washed by hand may experience fewer allergy-related illnesses. The Swedish questionnaire-based study looked at 1,029 kids aged 7 and 8 in two areas of Sweden and included questions on asthma, eczema and rhinoconjunctivitis taken from the International Study of Asthma and Allergies in Childhood questionnaire.
 
 

Lilly delays submission to market once-daily diabetes drug

 
‎23 ‎February ‎2015, ‏‎04:10:24 PMGo to full article
(Reuters) - Eli Lilly and Co said it would delay its application to market its once-daily diabetes treatment, basal insulin peglispro, beyond the current quarter. The delay stems from a need to generate additional data to evaluate any potential effects on liver fat related to the treatment in late-stage trials, Lilly said. The company said it could not determine the length of the delay until trial plans were developed, but it would likely submit marketing applications for the drug with U.S. and European regulators after 2016. (Reporting by Natalie Grover in Bengaluru; Editing by Joyjeet Das)
 

Novo Nordisk has positive trial results for oral diabetes drug, shares jump

 
‎20 ‎February ‎2015, ‏‎04:56:02 PMGo to full article
Danish drugmaker Novo Nordisk, the world's biggest insulin maker, said on Friday it had received positive results from a Phase II trial of an oral version of a long-acting GLP-1 drug for treatment of people with type 2 diabetes. The process could take a year or more to complete, but promises to bring forward the treatment of diabetes by pills rather than injections, long considered an important step for the Danish company as well as for diabetes sufferers. Sydbank analyst Soren Lontoft noted the trial success moved Novo a step closer to tapping into what could be a 100 billion Danish crown ($15 billion) market for oral type 2 diabetes treatments. Tim Race, analysts with Deutsche Bank, said should Novo proceed with developing the drug, he expected a launch no earlier than in 2020.
 

Indian health authorizes say 700 have died in flu outbreak

 
‎20 ‎February ‎2015, ‏‎02:35:26 PMGo to full article
NEW DELHI (AP) — Health authorities were working to ensure remote hospitals in northern and western India had adequate medical supplies for a flu outbreak that has claimed more than 700 lives in 10 weeks.
 

Bayer diabetes business sale not imminent: sources

 
‎20 ‎February ‎2015, ‏‎01:40:13 PMGo to full article
Logo of German drugmaker Bayer is seen in LeverkusenBy Ludwig Burger and Arno Schuetze FRANKFURT (Reuters) - German drugmaker Bayer is in talks to sell its diabetes devices division but a sale is not imminent, two sources with knowledge of the matter told Reuters. Bayer is making a second attempt to sell the Contour blood glucose-meter business, which had annual sales of 722 million euros ($819 million) in 2013, as it overhauls its business to focus on margin-rich healthcare sectors. KKR-backed Panasonic Healthcare Holdings has been in talks with Bayer over the diabetes devices division for some time, but final bids are some weeks off, one source with direct knowledge of the matter said. The U.S. private equity firm owns 80 percent of Panasonic Healthcare and Panasonic Corp owns 20 percent.
 
 

Renowned Neurologist Oliver Sacks Announces He Has Terminal Cancer

 
‎20 ‎February ‎2015, ‏‎07:11:00 AMGo to full article
Renowned Neurologist Oliver Sacks Announces He Has Terminal CancerRenowned neurologist and author of "Awakenings" Oliver Sacks announced today that he has terminal cancer. Sacks, a professor of neurology at New York University School of Medicine, said in a New York Times article that cancer had been found in his liver nine years after he was first diagnosed with a rare ocular tumor. Sacks, 81, is best known for his writing on neurological case histories including "The Man Who Mistook His Wife for a Hat" and an "An Anthropologist on Mars." His book "Awakenings," based on his work in the 1960s with patients who were unable to initiate movement, was turned into an Oscar-nominated movie of the same name starring Robin Williams and Robert De Niro.
 
 

FDA eases access to DNA screening for inherited diseases

 
‎20 ‎February ‎2015, ‏‎03:44:51 AMGo to full article
WASHINGTON (AP) — Federal health officials are easing access to DNA tests used to screen parents for devastating genetic disorders that can be passed on to their children. The surprise announcement offers a path forward for Google-backed genetic testing firm 23andMe, which previously clashed with regulators over its direct-to-consumer technology.
 

Drug-resistant malaria parasite spreading

 
‎20 ‎February ‎2015, ‏‎02:12:36 AMGo to full article
A Thai Health official holds blood test slides at a Malaria clinic in Kanchanaburi province near the Thai-Myanmar border on October 26, 2012Parasites resistant to the frontline malaria drug have spread westward from southeast Asia to just short of the Indian border -- a gateway to Africa, researchers warned Friday. A spread into India "would pose a serious threat to the global control and eradication of malaria," said a statement that accompanied the study published in The Lancet Infectious Diseases. "If drug resistance spreads from Asia to the African sub-continent, or emerges in Africa independently as we've seen several times before, millions of lives will be at risk." Since the Plasmodium parasite developed resistance to other drug types, artemisinin is the best and safest medicine to treat the estimated 198 million malaria infections that occurred worldwide in 2013. There were about 584,000 deaths, according to the UN's World Health Organization (WHO) -- 90 percent of them in Africa.
 
 

Drug-resistant malaria found close to Myanmar border with India

 
‎20 ‎February ‎2015, ‏‎02:04:44 AMGo to full article
A government health worker takes a blood sample to be tested for malaria in Ta Gay Laung village hall in Hpa-An district in Kayin state, south-eastern MyanmarBy Kate Kelland LONDON (Reuters) - Malaria with total resistance to the antimalarial drug artemisinin has taken hold in Myanmar and spread close to the border with India, threatening to repeat history and render crucial medicines useless, scientists said on Friday. If the spread of artemisinin-resistant malaria parasites were to reach into India, they said, that would pose a serious threat to the chances of global control and eradication of the killer mosquito-borne disease. "Myanmar is considered the front line in the battle against artemisinin resistance as it forms a gateway for resistance to spread to the rest of the world," said Charles Woodrow of the Mahidol-Oxford tropical medicine research unit, who led the study at Oxford University.
 
 

Why Getting Arthritis at 28 Wasn't the Worst Thing

 
‎19 ‎February ‎2015, ‏‎10:05:33 PMGo to full article
Why Getting Arthritis at 28 Wasn't the Worst ThingIt started with a bump on the inside of my palm underneath my ring finger. A week or so later, that same bump appeared underneath my other ring finger. I kept thinking that the bumps were actually calluses, since I had been lifting weights more often. That was almost 17 years ago. At the time, I had a 2-year-old and a sometimes-colicky...
 
 

Black women less likely to take breast cancer hormone therapy

 
‎19 ‎February ‎2015, ‏‎09:49:18 PMGo to full article
By Kathryn Doyle (Reuters Health) – Among early-stage breast cancer patients in the U.S., black women are less likely than white women to take their prescribed hormone medications, according to a new study that partly - but not entirely - blames economic disparities between races. Black women are less likely to be diagnosed with breast cancer than white women, but more likely to die from it, a disparity that emerged in the 1980s and has widened ever since, the authors note in the introduction. When it comes to hormone prescriptions, women with fewer financial resources and higher prescription drug co-pays, which are more common for black women, are less likely to stick to the therapy, according to the new study that was led by Dr. Dawn L. Hershman of Herbert Irving Comprehensive Cancer Center at Columbia University in New York. For the study, Hershman's team used an insurance claims database including more than 10,000 women over age 50 who were diagnosed with early-stage breast cancer between 2007 and 2011 and given a prescription for aromatase inhibitors or tamoxifen, both hormonal therapies.
 

U.S. cancer survival rates improving

 
‎19 ‎February ‎2015, ‏‎09:07:46 PMGo to full article
By Andrew M. Seaman (Reuters Health) – The proportion of people surviving years after a cancer diagnosis is improving, according to a new analysis. Men and women ages 50 to 64, who were diagnosed in 2005 to 2009 with a variety of cancer types, were 39 to 68 percent more likely to be alive five years later, compared to people of the same age diagnosed in 1990 to 1994, researchers found. “Pretty much all populations improved their cancer survival over time,” said Dr. Wei Zheng, the study’s senior author from Vanderbilt University in Nashville. As reported in JAMA Oncology, he and his colleagues analyzed data from a national sample of more than 1 million people who were diagnosed with cancer of the colon or rectum, breast, prostate, lung, liver, pancreas or ovary between 1990 and 2010.

 

 

Diseases affecting the poorest can be eliminated, scientists say

 
‎19 ‎February ‎2015, ‏‎05:29:12 PMGo to full article
By Alex Whiting LONDON (Thomson Reuters Foundation) - It is a little known disease but it could make medical history if scientists' predictions are correct: yaws could completely disappear by 2020, given the right resources. Guinea worm is nearly there, and polio too could be added to the list. The World Health Organization (WHO) on Thursday urged developing countries to invest more in tackling so-called neglected tropical diseases such as yaws, saying more investment would alleviate human misery and free people trapped in poverty. When the WHO launched mass treatment campaigns with penicillin vaccines, the number of cases plummeted by 95 percent by the end of the 1960s, according to David Mabey, an expert in yaws and professor at the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine.
 

Michigan-based martial arts program helps kids kick cancer

 
‎19 ‎February ‎2015, ‏‎03:30:01 PMGo to full article
In a photo from Jan. 28, 2015 in Southfield, Mich. Jayson Harris punches a pad held by Michael Hunt during the Kids Kicking Cancer class. The class, run by Rabbi Elimelech Goldberg, teaches martial arts relaxation and meditation techniques to children facing cancer and other serious illnesses. The program is designed to help the kids manage the stress, anxiety and pain of their illnesses and medical treatments. (AP Photo/Carlos Osorio)SOUTHFIELD, Mich. (AP) — The young people who learn martial arts at a studio north of Detroit are not considered students.
 
 

WHO urges billions to fight neglected tropical diseases

 
‎19 ‎February ‎2015, ‏‎11:54:40 AMGo to full article
A boy affected by dengue fever rests at a hospital in Tegucigalpa, Honduras, on March 3, 2014The World Health Organization on Thursday urged countries to invest billions of dollars to tackle 17 neglected tropical diseases -- including dengue fever, leprosy and sleeping sickness -- which kill 500,000 people globally each year. "Increased investments by national governments can alleviate human misery, distribute economic gains more evenly and free masses of people long trapped in poverty," WHO Director General Margaret Chan said. Dirk Engels, who heads the WHO department of control of neglected tropical diseases, told reporters in Geneva that Africa is the "continent where the most absolute number of these diseases occur," with many people suffering from more than one of them. He said some 450 million people in sub-Saharan Africa are at risk of contracting these diseases.
 
 

WHO urges developing countries to fund tropical diseases fight

 
‎19 ‎February ‎2015, ‏‎07:04:12 AMGo to full article
WHO Director-General Margaret Chan addresses the media during a special meeting on Ebola at the WHO headquarters in GenevaBy Kate Kelland LONDON (Reuters) - The World Health Organization called on developing countries on Thursday to invest $1 per person per year until 2030 to tackle 17 neglected tropical diseases (NTDs) and improve the health and well-being of more than 1.5 billion people. "Increased investments by national governments can alleviate human misery, distribute economic gains more evenly and free masses of people long trapped in poverty," WHO director-general Margaret Chan said in a report.
 
 

'Epigenome map' opens new paths for combatting disease

 
‎19 ‎February ‎2015, ‏‎01:11:07 AMGo to full article
A slide with DNA is seen in a genetics lab at the University of Miami in Miami, Florida on February 2, 2011The work, assembled by scientific publishing house Nature, is the most ambitious look yet at epigenetics, considered one of medicine's most promising frontiers. Epigenomes are chemical tags attached to DNA, the inherited genetic code for making and sustaining life. There is more and more evidence that epigenomes play a role in conditions such as cancer, Alzheimer's, autism and heart disease. The new papers described the epigenomes of 111 different types of cell, including brain, muscle, liver, skin and foetal cells.
 
 

Kids with type 1 diabetes at risk for mental health problems

 
‎18 ‎February ‎2015, ‏‎08:48:22 PMGo to full article
A person receives a test for diabetes during Care Harbor LA free medical clinic in Los AngelesBy Kathryn Doyle (Reuters Health) – In a new Swedish study, kids diagnosed with type 1 diabetes were more likely than their healthy siblings to develop a psychiatric disorder or to attempt suicide. “We suspected that we would find higher risk of common psychiatric disorders such as depression or anxiety, as observed among adults with diabetes,” said lead author Agnieszka Butwicka of the Department of Medical Epidemiology and Biostatistics at the Karolinska Institute in Stockholm. “What was surprising was that risk was high for many different psychiatric disorders,” which may mean that applying the results of adult studies to kids is too simplistic, she told Reuters Health by email. More than 200,000 kids in the U.S. had diabetes in 2012, according to the National Diabetes Education Program, and most of them had type 1, which results from the body not producing enough insulin.
 
 

FDA approves new use for Celgene's cancer drug Revlimid

 
‎18 ‎February ‎2015, ‏‎06:04:07 PMGo to full article
By Toni Clarke WASHINGTON (Reuters) - The U.S. Food and Drug Administration has expanded the authorized use of Celgene Corp's cancer drug Revlimid to include newly diagnosed patients with multiple myeloma, the company said on Wednesday. Physicians in the United States have long been prescribing Revlimid for new patients on an "off-label" basis, but the company had not been allowed to promote its use in this population. The FDA's action means Celgene can market Revlimid, in combination with a different drug, dexamethasone, as a treatment for all multiple myeloma patients and helps validate the company's premise that treating patients earlier and for a longer period of time increases progression-free survival. The approval is expected to only modestly increase sales in the United States since doctors are already prescribing the drug for newly diagnosed patients.
 

Flu shot protects against new strain H7N9: study

 
‎18 ‎February ‎2015, ‏‎01:53:15 PMGo to full article
Flu shot protects against new strain H7N9: studyThe flu vaccine may not have protected most people against influenza circulating widely this season, but a study Tuesday showed it was effective against the new H7N9 strain that emerged in China in 2013. Antibodies that protect against H7N9 avian flu make up a small portion of people's immune response to the annual flu shot, "but appear to broadly neutralize H7 viruses and represent promising new targets for therapeutic development against a wide range of influenza strains," according to the research by the University of Chicago and Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai. "We have clear evidence that a normal immune response to flu vaccination offers protection against dangerous and highly unique strains of influenza such as H7N9," said co-senior author Patrick Wilson, associate professor of medicine at the University of Chicago. The study, published in the Journal of Clinical Investigation, was based on 28 people who were vaccinated against influenza.
 
 

Flu shot protects against new H7N9 strain: study

 
‎18 ‎February ‎2015, ‏‎02:09:57 AMGo to full article
The flu vaccine may not have protected most people against influenza circulating widely this season, but a study Tuesday showed it was effective against the new H7N9 strain that emerged in China in 2013The flu vaccine may not have protected most people against influenza circulating widely this season, but a study Tuesday showed it was effective against the new H7N9 strain that emerged in China in 2013. Antibodies that protect against H7N9 avian flu make up a small portion of people's immune response to the annual flu shot, "but appear to broadly neutralize H7 viruses and represent promising new targets for therapeutic development against a wide range of influenza strains," according to the research by the University of Chicago and Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai. "We have clear evidence that a normal immune response to flu vaccination offers protection against dangerous and highly unique strains of influenza such as H7N9," said co-senior author Patrick Wilson, associate professor of medicine at the University of Chicago. Three of the antibodies "appeared to completely neutralize H7N9 avian flu," said the study.
 
 

Racial gaps in diabetes not tied to social, economic status

 
‎16 ‎February ‎2015, ‏‎10:55:49 PMGo to full article
By Kathryn Doyle Reuters Health - Social and economic status does not explain the racial gaps in the care and outcomes of kids with type 1 diabetes, according to a new study. The finding suggests researchers look to other factors that may explain the racial gap in type 1 diabetes care, such as the perceptions of doctors and families, write the researchers in the journal Pediatrics February 16. Previous studies done in much smaller populations have had somewhat similar findings, wrote lead author Dr. Steven Willi of the Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia in an email to Reuters Health. More than 29 million Americans have diabetes, 5% of who have type 1, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.
 

Death toll rises to 28 in Mozambique cholera epidemic

 
‎16 ‎February ‎2015, ‏‎09:54:47 PMGo to full article
Local women wade through floodwater on the outskirts of Chokwe, near the Limpopo river, Mozambique, on January 26, 2011The death toll from a cholera epidemic in Mozambique that broke out after widespread flooding has climbed to 28, the government said Monday. "We are particularly concerned by the (situation in the) city of Tete where we are seeing an upsurge in new cases with an average of 70 admissions per day," Benigna Matsinhe, a deputy director in the health ministry, told reporters. Mozambique regularly suffers outbreaks of cholera and diarrhoea during its summer rainy season which runs between October and March.
 
 

Lab progress towards drug for auto-immune disease

 
‎16 ‎February ‎2015, ‏‎08:20:34 PMGo to full article
Researchers pinpoint two compounds that show promise for combatting arthritis, multiple sclerosis, gout and other auto-immune diseasesResearchers said Monday they had pinpointed two compounds -- one naturally derived from fasting and intensive exercise -- that show promise for combatting arthritis, multiple sclerosis, gout and other auto-immune diseases. The compounds throw a wrench into a molecular mechanism that causes inflammation, a driver of these diseases, the teams reported in Nature Medicine. Called beta-hydroxybutyrate (BHB) and MCC950, the compounds may open up an intriguing avenue in drug research, they said. "Drugs like aspirin or steroids can work in several diseases, but can have side effects or be ineffective," said Luke O'Neill, a biochemistry professor at Trinity College Dublin, whose team worked with Australian scientists on MCC950.
 
 

AstraZeneca's patent on asthma drug invalidated by U.S. court

 
‎16 ‎February ‎2015, ‏‎02:46:12 AMGo to full article
A sign is seen at an AstraZeneca site in MacclesfieldA U.S. federal judge ruled late on Friday that AstraZeneca PLC's patent on its Pulmicort Repsules treatment for asthma was invalid, opening up the market to a second, cheaper generic version. Actavis Plc said that the U.S. District Court for the District of New Jersey ruling prompted it to release a generic version of the lung drug. Another generic version of Pulmicort Respules from Teva Pharmaceutical Industries, under a previous agreement with AstraZeneca, has been on the market for some time.
 
 

Singapore PM Lee has prostate cancer, to take medical leave

 
‎15 ‎February ‎2015, ‏‎01:45:44 PMGo to full article
Singapore's PM Lee listens to speech during plenary session of 25th ASEAN summit at Myanmar International Convention Centre in NaypyitawBy Saeed Azhar SINGAPORE (Reuters) - Singapore Prime Minister Lee Hsien Loong has been diagnosed with prostate cancer and will undergo surgery to remove his prostate gland on Monday, his office said on Sunday. Lee, 63, will be on medical leave for one week and during this period Deputy Prime Minister Teo Chee Hean will head the government, the statement appearing on Lee's Facebook page said. Lee was previously diagnosed with lymphoma in 1992 but the cancer went into remission after successful chemotherapy. Lee Hsien Loong is the eldest son of Lee Kuan Yew, the architect of modern Singapore.
 
 

Canada confirms new case of mad cow disease, cattle prices rise

 
‎14 ‎February ‎2015, ‏‎12:16:47 AMGo to full article
Irish Beef Gets US OK After EU Mad Cow BanBy David Ljunggren and Scott Haggett OTTAWA/CALGARY (Reuters) - Canada confirmed its first case of mad cow disease since 2011 on Friday, but said the discovery should not hit a beef export sector worth C$2 billion ($1.6 billion) a year. The news, however, helped boost U.S. cattle prices. The Canadian Food Inspection Agency (CFIA) said no part of the animal, a beef cow from Alberta, had reached the human food or animal feed systems. Mad cow disease, formally known as bovine spongiform encephalopathy (BSE), is a progressive, fatal neurological disease.
 
 

Prostate cancer surgery may impair sex for both partners

 
‎13 ‎February ‎2015, ‏‎10:33:18 PMGo to full article
By Lisa Rapaport Both members of a couple can experience diminished sexual function after a man has prostate cancer surgery, Swiss researchers find, suggesting that treatment should include sex counseling for men and their partners. The researchers studied sexual function and satisfaction after men had a type of cancer surgery designed to remove the entire prostate, including semen glands, but protect nearby nerves that are involved in erections. “Typically, even with nerve sparing, a man may have difficulties for months before he gets back to a more normal erectile function, and then he will have an orgasm that doesn’t include ejaculation,” said Dr. Vincent Laudone, a urologic surgeon at Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center in New York who wasn’t involved in the study. Dr. Christophe Iselin, with the division of urologic surgery at Geneva University Hospital in Switzerland, and colleagues write in the International Journal of Impotence Research that screening is leading to more men, and younger men being treated for prostate cancer.
 

FDA approves Eisai's thyroid cancer drug

 
‎13 ‎February ‎2015, ‏‎09:44:35 PMGo to full article
A view shows the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) headquarters in Silver Spring(Reuters) - The U.S. Food and Drug Administration said it approved Japan's Eisai Co Ltd's drug to treat the most common form of thyroid cancer more than two months ahead of the review date. The drug, Lenvima, was cleared for use in patients with progressive, differentiated thyroid cancer (DTC) who have not adequately responded to radioactive iodine therapy, the agency said on Friday. Lenvima, known chemically as lenvatinib, is a kinase inhibitor that blocks certain proteins from helping cancer cells grow and divide. The drug, which was granted "orphan drug status" by the U.S. regulator, was evaluated by the agency under its priority review program.
 
 

CDC: Nasty flu season has peaked, is retreating

 
‎13 ‎February ‎2015, ‏‎09:32:33 PMGo to full article
FILE - In this Jan. 10, 2013, nurse Debbie Smerk, left, administers a flu shot to Pamela Black at MetroHealth, in Cleveland. A new report shows this winter’s nasty flu season has peaked and is clearly retreating. The flu reached its highest levels around the beginning of January, and stayed there for weeks. The government report out Friday, Feb. 13, 2015, shows flu has become less widespread and less intense in the last couple of weeks. (AP Photo/Tony Dejak, File)NEW YORK (AP) — This winter's nasty flu season has peaked and is clearly retreating, a new government report shows.
 
 

Over-the-counter drug may work well for arthritis

 
‎13 ‎February ‎2015, ‏‎07:03:31 PMGo to full article
By Kathryn Doyle (Reuters Health) – Three daily doses of glucosamine and chondroitin may provide the same relief as a smaller dose of prescription celecoxib for people with severe pain from osteoarthritis, according to a randomized trial in four European countries. In the U.S., glucosamine and chondroitin are available as over-the-counter supplements so their formulations are not regulated like the prescription European version. “The Europeans have an advantage on us in this regard as glucosamine, chondroitin and the combination are all available as medications,” said Dr. Allen Sawitzke of the Rheumatology Division at the University of Utah in Salt Lake City, a coauthor of the new study.
 

India sees rapid rise in swine flu deaths and cases

 
‎13 ‎February ‎2015, ‏‎03:25:28 PMGo to full article
A street dweller cooks in front of graffiti against the H1N1 influenza, at a streetside wall in MumbaiBy Aditya Kalra NEW DELHI (Reuters) - India has seen a sharp rise in the number of swine flu deaths and reported cases this year, prompting officials to investigate the cause and step up efforts to combat the virus. The H1N1 virus caused 485 deaths in India between Jan. 1 and Feb. 12, additional health secretary Arun Kumar Panda told reporters on Friday. "There is no explanation or reason," Panda said. "We will ask states to investigate why the number of cases is rising." In 2009-10, the H1N1 swine flu pandemic spread from central Mexico to 74 other countries including India, killing an estimated 284,000 people, according to the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.
 
 

Stem cells offer promising key to new malaria drugs: U.S. research

 
‎13 ‎February ‎2015, ‏‎03:17:30 PMGo to full article
By Lisa Anderson NEW YORK (Thomson Reuters Foundation) - Human stem cells engineered to produce renewable sources of mature, liver-like cells can be grown and infected with malaria to test potentially life-saving new drugs, according to researchers at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. The advance comes at a time when the parasitic mosquito-borne disease, which kills nearly 600,000 people every year, is showing increased resistance to current treatment, especially in Southeast Asia, according to the World Health Organization. The liver-like cells, or hepatocytes, in the MIT study were manufactured from stem cells derived from donated skin and blood samples. The resulting cells provide a potentially replenishable platform for testing drugs that target the early stage of malaria, when parasites may linger and multiply in the liver for weeks before spreading into the bloodstream.
 

Hormone drugs boost ovarian cancer risk by 40%: study

 
‎13 ‎February ‎2015, ‏‎12:29:29 PMGo to full article
A new probe marks the widest-ever analysis of the risk of ovarian cancer from HRT.Menopausal women who take hormone replacement therapy (HRT) boost the risk of ovarian cancer by 40 percent, even if they take the treatment only for a few years, a study said Friday. The probe marks the widest-ever analysis of the risk of ovarian cancer from HRT, a treatment whose use declined when its safety was questioned a dozen years ago. Researchers publishing in The Lancet carried out an overview of 52 published studies, covering nearly 21,500 women in North America, Europe and Australia who had been diagnosed with ovarian cancer. "For women who take HRT for five years from around age 50, there will be about one extra ovarian cancer for every 1,000 users, and one extra ovarian cancer death for every 1,700 users," said Richard Peto, a University of Oxford professor who co-authored the study.
 
 

Hormone drugs boost ovarian cancer risk by 40%

 
‎13 ‎February ‎2015, ‏‎02:19:55 AMGo to full article
Menopausal women who take hormone replacement therapy (HRT) boost the risk of ovarian cancer by 40 percent, even if they take the treatment only for a few years, a study said FridayMenopausal women who take hormone replacement therapy (HRT) boost the risk of ovarian cancer by 40 percent, even if they take the treatment only for a few years, a study said Friday. The probe marks the widest-ever analysis of the risk of ovarian cancer from HRT, a treatment whose use declined when its safety was questioned a dozen years ago. Researchers publishing in The Lancet carried out an overview of 52 published studies, covering nearly 21,500 women in North America, Europe and Australia who had been diagnosed with ovarian cancer. "For women who take HRT for five years from around age 50, there will be about one extra ovarian cancer for every 1,000 users, and one extra ovarian cancer death for every 1,700 users," said Richard Peto, a University of Oxford professor who co-authored the study.
 
 

Clinical trials may under report side effects of cancer drugs

 
‎12 ‎February ‎2015, ‏‎10:25:12 PMGo to full article
By Shereen Lehman Researchers may not realize how badly new cancer drugs make patients feel because physicians don’t always accurately report side effects, suggests a new study. The comparison of side effects reported by patients and their physicians in three separate cancer drug trials found that doctors under-reported by up to 75 percent how many patients had six of the most common chemotherapy side effects. Lacking accurate estimates of side effects makes it difficult for doctors to discuss the benefits versus risks of new cancer drugs with their patients, the study authors say. “Our findings are consistent with previous research data and confirm that patient reported outcomes have to be integrated into cancer clinical trials because they are very important in defining tolerability of new treatments from the patients’ perspective,” senior study author Dr. Francesco Perrone told Reuters Health in an email.
 

U.S. initiative aims to improve cancer care, cut costs

 
‎12 ‎February ‎2015, ‏‎09:45:04 PMGo to full article
(Reuters) - The U.S. government on Thursday announced a cancer care initiative for Medicare beneficiaries that will link payments to oncology practices to quality of care and patient outcomes as a means of improving treatments and cutting costs. The initiative by the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services (CMS) as part of the Affordable Care Act, often referred to as Obamacare, comes as expensive new cancer treatments put an increasing strain on state and federal healthcare budgets. "We aim to provide Medicare beneficiaries struggling with cancer with high-quality care around the clock and to reward doctors for the value, not volume, of care they provide," Dr. Patrick Conway, the chief medical officer for CMS, said in a statement. The majority of those diagnosed are over 65 and Medicare beneficiaries, CMS said.
 

California cancer patient sues for right to doctor-assisted death

 
‎12 ‎February ‎2015, ‏‎01:22:51 AMGo to full article
By Dan Whitcomb LOS ANGELES (Reuters) - A 53-year-old California woman suffering from leukemia sued the state's attorney general and San Francisco's top prosecutor on Wednesday seeking the right for physicians to aid the terminally ill in taking their own lives. The lawsuit asks San Francisco Superior Court to "clarify" that a California law making it illegal to aid, advise or encourage someone to commit suicide does not apply to doctors assisting a dying, mentally competent patient. "I am suing the State of California to remove the legal barrier between my doctor and myself to help me achieve a peaceful and dignified death, at the time and place of my choosing," lead plaintiff Christine White said in a written statement released with the lawsuit. The lawsuit was filed on her behalf by attorneys for the Disability Rights Legal Center.
 

Study ties more deaths, types of disease, to smoking

 
‎12 ‎February ‎2015, ‏‎12:16:25 AMGo to full article
This Tuesday, July 15, 2014 photo shows the tobacco in cigarettes in Philadelphia. A study ties a host of new diseases to smoking, and says an additional 60,000 to 120,000 deaths each year in the United States are probably due to tobacco use. The study by the American Cancer Society and several universities is published in the Thursday, Feb 12, 2015 edition of the New England Journal of Medicine. It looks beyond lung cancer, heart disease and other conditions already tied to smoking and adds breast cancer, prostate cancer and even routine infections to the list. (AP Photo/Matt Rourke)Breast cancer, prostate cancer, and even routine infections. A new report ties these and other maladies to smoking and says an additional 60,000 to 120,000 deaths each year in the United States are probably due to tobacco use.
 
 

Students sought who partied with Oregon man stricken by meningococcal disease

 
‎11 ‎February ‎2015, ‏‎10:30:48 PMGo to full article
By Courtney Sherwood PORTLAND, Ore. (Reuters) - Public health officials are working to identify and offer antibiotics to about 20 University of Oregon students who attended a fraternity party at the home of a man diagnosed this week with a potentially deadly meningococcemia infection, authorities said on Wednesday. The student at whose home the party was held was the third person in less than a month from the University of Oregon to contract meningococcemia, a bacterial precursor to meningitis that can also lead to damaging blood infections. “He was physically there at the gathering, but he would have had to be within three meters of someone to transmit an infection,” said Jason Davis, spokesman for Lane County Public Health. He urged students who may have been exposed to meningococcemia to reach out to public health officials and also said the recent outbreak is a reminder that vaccines are available to prevent infection.
 

World must tackle neglected diseases to end hunger

 
‎11 ‎February ‎2015, ‏‎08:53:08 PMGo to full article
By Alex Whiting LONDON (Thomson Reuters Foundation) - Attempts to end global hunger and improve education are being hampered by a little known group of diseases that affect the world's poorest and must be tackled too, the head of a body pushing for the elimination of such diseases said. They include sleeping sickness, yaws, dengue fever, river blindness, Chagas disease and intestinal worms. "You can spend a lot of resources distributing protein supplements or vitamins, but in the end if you're administering them to people infested with worms then that supplement is just being eaten by the worms," Marianne Comparet, director of the London-based International Society for Neglected Tropical Diseases, said in an interview. Intestinal worms are spread through human faeces in areas with poor sanitation, and affect more than 880 million children, according to the World Health Organization.
 

Teacher depression may affect child learning

 
‎11 ‎February ‎2015, ‏‎08:20:00 PMGo to full article
By Kathryn Doyle The more depressive symptoms third grade teachers had in a new study, the less progress in math their struggling students made during the school year. Teacher depression may be one of many factors that determine how well kids can learn, Carol McDonald Connor, a psychology professor at Arizona State University in Tempe, told Reuters Health. In the winter, the teachers used a 20-item questionnaire to rate their frequency of depressive symptoms like loneliness, trouble sleeping and “the blues.” Also in the winter, researchers used classroom video observations to rate the quality of the learning environment using individualized instruction, organization and teacher warmth as metrics. As teacher depression symptoms increased, the learning environment tended to become poorer quality, according to the results published in Child Development.
 

Cholera outbreak kills 19 in flood-hit Mozambique

 
‎11 ‎February ‎2015, ‏‎12:49:08 PMGo to full article
A cholera outbreak in parts of Mozambique hit by floods has killed 19 people, the government said, raising the death toll from one of the worst disasters to hit southern Africa in years. Another 158 people have died in Mozambique in flooding triggered by heavy rains at the start of the year, which also affected Malawi, Madagascar and Zimbabwe. Mozambique's deputy health minister Mouzinho Saide said late on Tuesday that flooded rivers had started to subside in the country's northern and central provinces, easing the plight of some 177,000 people affected by the rain storms.
 

Doctors' assumptions on sex heighten lesbians' cervical cancer risk: study

 
‎11 ‎February ‎2015, ‏‎02:27:04 AMGo to full article
Lesbians may be at higher risk of cervical cancer because they get fewer screenings than heterosexual women, due partly to doctors' sometimes incorrect assumptions about their sexual history, University of Washington researchers said on Tuesday. Although nearly all cases of cervical cancer are attributable to a human papillomavirus, or HPV, infection, healthcare providers often do not encourage lesbian patients to get regular HPV screenings, the researchers found. A lack of testing can also occur at times because lesbians lack insurance or do not always have a need for pregnancy prevention checkups, or may not want to share their sexual orientation with doctors, the researchers said. "If we are serious about reducing the rates of cervical cancer in lesbians, an unbiased health assessment by a provider must ask the question: 'Do you have sex with men, women or both?'" University of Washington School of Nursing professor Joachim Voss said in a statement.
 

Time and activity linked to back pain risk

 
‎11 ‎February ‎2015, ‏‎12:21:11 AMGo to full article
“Back pain is a major public health concern,” said Manuela Ferreira of The George Institute for Global Health at The University of Sydney, Australia, one of the study’s authors. “It’s among the leading causes of disability around the world.” Ferreira and her colleagues interviewed nearly 1,000 people who developed sudden lower back pain in 2011 and 2012, asking whether they'd been exposed to any of 12 possible triggers in the two hours before their pain started. Overall, people were most likely to have sudden lower back pain in the morning. Manual tasks involving objects away from the body, animals or people, and unstable objects increased the risk of back pain between five and six times.
 

Scientists unravel mystery of snake venom

 
‎10 ‎February ‎2015, ‏‎03:24:43 PMGo to full article
Scientists unravel mystery of snake venomScientists have unraveled the mystery of how the Costa Rican coral snake's venom causes seizures in its victims, a finding that could boost research into schizophrenia, epilepsy and chronic pain, researchers said Monday. The recipe involves a pair of proteins called micrurotoxins (MmTX) that bind to pores on nerve cells in the brain and spinal cord known as GABA(A) receptors, resulting in potentially deadly seizures, according to the study in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, a peer-reviewed US journal. "What we found are the first known animal toxins, and by far the most potent compounds, to target GABA(A) receptors," said Frank Bosmans, assistant professor of physiology and neuroscience at the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine. MmTX was found to bind to GABA(A) receptors more tightly than any other compound known, and also attached to a unique site on the GABA(A) receptor protein.
 
 

Canada reports H5N1 bird flu virus in British Columbia: OIE

 
‎09 ‎February ‎2015, ‏‎11:42:42 PMGo to full article
A view of a poultry farm under quarantine due to bird flu, or avian influenza, in ChilliwackBy Sybille de La Hamaide PARIS (Reuters) - Canada reported an outbreak of the highly pathogenic H5N1 bird flu virus in the province of British Columbia, the World Organisation for Animal Health (OIE) said on Monday. The outbreak was detected on Feb. 2 in a backyard poultry flock in the province, where bird flu cases of the separate H5N2 strain had been reported in December, OIE said, citing the Canadian Food Inspection Agency (CFIA). The agency stressed that H5N1 avian influenza had not been reported in a commercial poultry flock in Canada and that the virus found in British Columbia was different from a strain circulating in Asia.
 
 

Clubs need long-term mental health plan: FIFPro

 
‎06 ‎February ‎2015, ‏‎03:56:41 PMGo to full article
By Philip O'Connor (Reuters) - Soccer clubs need to take a longer-term approach to the mental health of their players, and not just for the duration of their contracts, the chief medical officer of world players' union FIFPro told Reuters. The issue was brought to the fore after former Premier League player and ex-chairman of the English Professional Footballers' Association Clarke Carlisle said this week that he had been trying to commit suicide when he was struck by a truck in December. "(Carlisle is) quite extreme example of course, so when it comes to this it's a little bit surprising, (but) it doesn't matter if it's a pro footballer or a normal human being," Dr. Vincent Gouttebarge said in an interview. Once a taboo subject, the issue has been pushed to the forefront following a number of high-profile cases of players and ex-players battling mental health issues, with some tragically taking their own lives.
 

U.S. approves Medicare coverage for lung cancer screening

 
‎05 ‎February ‎2015, ‏‎11:55:04 PMGo to full article
U.S. health regulators on Thursday approved Medicare coverage for lung cancer screening by low-dose CT, the first time the government health insurance program for the elderly and disabled will pay for such a program of early detection in an effort to save lives. The decision applies to Medicare beneficiaries aged 55-77 who are current smokers or who quit within the last 15 years, and who racked up at least 30 "pack years." The latter is possible if they smoked one pack a day for 30 years, for instance, two packs a day for 15 or three packs a day for a decade. The coverage is effective immediately, the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services announced, and applies nationwide.
 

Puerto Rico declares flu epidemic; 1 dead, 140 hospitalized

 
‎05 ‎February ‎2015, ‏‎09:07:33 PMGo to full article
SAN JUAN, Puerto Rico (AP) — Puerto Rico's health secretary has declared a flu epidemic in the U.S. territory that has temporarily shut down at least one school.
 

Patient ratings not linked to cancer surgery outcomes

 
‎05 ‎February ‎2015, ‏‎06:12:43 PMGo to full article
By Kathryn Doyle (Reuters Health) – - For hospitals, patient satisfaction ratings don’t necessarily line up with cancer surgery stats, according to a new study. “I don't think the results are necessarily surprising, they just highlight that there is very little publicly reported hospital data to help guide cancer patients in decision making,” said lead author Dr. Jason D. Wright of the Columbia University College of Physicians and Surgeons in New York. It’s difficult to say if the results would be similar with a different group of patients who were not undergoing surgery for cancer, he said. The researchers used a database of more than 63,000 patients who had solid cancer tumors removed surgically at 448 hospitals in the U.S. The Hospital Compare database collects patient satisfaction ratings, quality of care measures – such as whether patients received guideline-recommended medications - and 30-day surgical outcomes.
 

Drugmaker Valeant raises bid for Dendreon cancer vaccine

 
‎05 ‎February ‎2015, ‏‎06:06:16 PMGo to full article
(Reuters) - Valeant Pharmaceuticals International Inc said on Thursday it has raised its bid for worldwide rights to a prostate cancer vaccine owned by bankrupt drugmaker Dendreon Corp. Laval, Quebec-based Valeant said that in response to competing bids, it has hiked its bid to $400 million in cash from $296 million for the drug, called Provenge, and certain other assets. Seattle-based Dendreon filed for bankruptcy protection in November after sales of Provenge fell short of expectations and left the company deep in debt.
 

Californians called on to help study disease afflicting native pigeons

 
‎05 ‎February ‎2015, ‏‎12:15:13 AMGo to full article
(Reuters) - California wildlife authorities are asking residents to take down bird baths and feeders if they spot sick or dead birds in their yards as experts closely monitor a disease afflicting the state's only native pigeon species. Increased mortality rates have been reported since mid-December among California's band-tailed pigeons, which are seen in flocks up to 200-strong during the winter in coastal areas from the San Francisco Bay Area south into Santa Barbara County and in the San Bernardino Mountains. The California Department of Fish and Wildlife (CDFW) blames the deaths on Avian Trichomonosis, a disease caused by a single-celled microscopic protozoan parasite transmitted to the band-tailed pigeons by non-native rock pigeons, also known as city pigeons, which were introduced to North America from Europe. CDFW environmental scientist Krysta Rogers said on Wednesday that the department's Wildlife Investigations Laboratory wants members of the public to be on the lookout for band-tailed pigeons this winter and go online to report any sick or dead bird species they see.
 

Lung cancer now deadlier than breast cancer in rich nations

 
‎04 ‎February ‎2015, ‏‎11:51:55 PMGo to full article
Lung cancer is now the leading cause of cancer death among women in developed nations, beating out breast cancer which had long been the top killer, researchers saidLung cancer is now the leading cause of cancer death among women in developed nations, beating out breast cancer which had long been the top killer, researchers said Wednesday. The new analysis was led by researchers at the American Cancer Society in collaboration with the International Agency for Research on Cancer (IARC) in France. Lung cancer has been the top cancer killer among men for several decades in both developed and developing nations. In less developed nations, breast cancer remains the leading cancer killer among women.
 
 

Lung cancer now top cancer killer for women in rich nations

 
‎04 ‎February ‎2015, ‏‎10:30:45 PMGo to full article
FILE - In this Thursday, Dec. 27, 2007 file photo, a cigarette burns out in an ashtray after lunch at a restaurant in Paris. According to a report released on Wednesday, Feb. 4, 2015, for the first time, lung cancer has passed breast cancer as the leading cause of cancer deaths for women in rich countries, according to the American Cancer Society based on new numbers from the International Agency for Research on Cancer. (AP Photo/Francois Mori)For the first time, lung cancer has passed breast cancer as the leading cause of cancer deaths for women in rich countries.
 
 

Blood from Ebola survivors could help spur new disease treatments

 
‎04 ‎February ‎2015, ‏‎08:38:26 PMGo to full article
An Ebola trials notebook is seen in a laboratoryBy Julie Steenhuysen CHICAGO (Reuters) - After successfully treating four Ebola patients last year, Emory University in Atlanta is now leading a government-funded project that will use blood from survivors of the deadly virus to test a novel way of treating infectious disease. The new project will inject people with genetic material, such as DNA or RNA, in hopes of spurring a person’s own cells to make specific antibodies capable of fighting Ebola or other pathogens. "The person's body is the factory," said Dr. James Crowe of Vanderbilt University, one of the collaborators on the project. The Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency (DARPA), the Pentagon's elite research arm, has awarded Emory up to $10.8 million over three years to direct the project.
 
 

Genmab data points to early bone cancer drug launch: analysts

 
‎04 ‎February ‎2015, ‏‎01:43:49 PMGo to full article
By Teis Jensen COPENHAGEN (Reuters) - Positive results from a trial by Danish biotech company Genmab of its bone marrow cancer drug could lead to a launch as early as this year and it may become a blockbuster treatment earning $3.5 billion in annual revenues, analysts said. Genmab said the study of daratumumab, which evaluated multiple myeloma patients who had already had at least three different lines of therapy unsuccessfully, showed an overall response rate of 29.2 percent. The response rate indicated Genmab's drug worked better than two recently approved drugs, Onyx Pharmaceuticals' Kyprolis and Celgene's Pomalyst, although these have been tested in different ways, Sydbank analyst Soren Lontoft Hansen said. Shares in Genmab rose by as much as 10 percent early on Wednesday to a record high of 467.80 Danish crowns per share before trimming gains to 461 crowns at 1129 GMT.
 

U.S. FDA approves Pfizer's high profile breast cancer drug

 
‎04 ‎February ‎2015, ‏‎12:42:45 AMGo to full article
The Pfizer logo is seen at their world headquarters in New YorkThe U.S. Food and Drug Administration on Tuesday approved Pfizer Inc's Ibrance, a potential new standard of care for advanced breast cancer, in a regulatory decision that came more than two months earlier than expected. Wall Street has considered the drug, whose chemical name is palbociclib, to be one of the most promising medicines in Pfizer's development pipeline. It was approved for previously untreated postnopausal women whose cancer cells have receptors to the female hormone estrogen and who do not have mutations in the HER2 gene that can contribute to uncontrolled growth of breast cells. Such patients represent the largest proportion of breast cancer cases and are typically treated with the chemotherapy tamoxifen or letrozole, a drug used to prevent production of estrogen.
 
 

Federal health officials face tough questions on flu vaccine

 
‎03 ‎February ‎2015, ‏‎11:17:33 PMGo to full article
Dr. Anthony Fauci, Director, National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, National Institutes of Health, testifies before the House Energy and Commerce subcommittee hearing on Capitol Hill in Washington, Tuesday, February 3, 2015. Fauci said the decision to vaccinate against measles "is really a slam dunk." (AP Photo/Molly Riley)WASHINGTON (AP) — It was a tale of two vaccines — one making politically charged headlines about kids not vaccinated against measles and the other reflecting the bleak reality of a harsh flu season.
 
 

The 6 Injustices of Thyroid Cancer

 
‎03 ‎February ‎2015, ‏‎10:53:52 PMGo to full article
The 6 Injustices of Thyroid CancerImagine if your best friend -- the one who deserves one hell of a co-pay for the psych-worthy advice she doles out on a daily basis (with love and/or or a swift kick in the butt, as needed) suddenly couldn't speak.My lifeline, Jill Gurfinkel, had a paralyzed vocal cord for what seemed like forever. Not from cheering for her then 7-year-old son...
 
 

Washington State sets up third poultry quarantine amid avian flu worries

 
‎03 ‎February ‎2015, ‏‎09:52:37 PMGo to full article
The state of Washington said Tuesday it has established a third poultry quarantine zone after state officials discovered that a flock of about 100 birds in Okanogan County was infected with the avian influenza virus. The Washington State Department of Agriculture adopted an emergency rule on Sunday to establish the new quarantine area, which encompasses a six-mile area in Oroville, Wash., state officials said. State officials are conducting additional tests to identify the specific flue strain that infected the flock.
 

Celiac disease might explain fertility problems

 
‎03 ‎February ‎2015, ‏‎09:26:33 PMGo to full article
By Lisa Rapaport Celiac disease may be at the root of some women’s problems with infertility, Indian researchers say. While there are many more common causes of infertility, the study suggests that women who don't have a ready explanation for their failure to conceive should be screened for celiac disease, said Dr. Govind Makharia, a professor at All India institute of Medical Sciences in New Delhi. "There isn't strong evidence to say that celiac disease causes infertility, but there are many anecdotal experiences where women with infertility have conceived after being diagnosed with celiac disease and put on a gluten free diet," Makharia told Reuters Health in an e-mail About one in 100 people have celiac disease.
 

Scientists developing disease-sniffing smartphone

 
‎03 ‎February ‎2015, ‏‎06:43:39 PMGo to full article
Disease detection via your smartphone is in the works.A device that pairs with your smartphone and screens your breath for early detection of potentially life-threatening diseases is in the works at a research consortium at the Technion-Israel Institute of Technology. A combination of micro and nano-sensors will analyze the exhaled breath and send the information through the smartphone to be processed for interpretation -- perhaps in a corresponding app -- which establishes the diagnosis. The technology is not only capable of early disease detection, it knows if you are likely to contract a specific disease and help you avoid doing so, according to a press release from the American Technion Society.
 
 

Isis Pharma's diabetes drug takes longer than expected to work

 
‎03 ‎February ‎2015, ‏‎06:31:46 PMGo to full article
Isis Pharmaceuticals Inc's experimental diabetes drug took a longer-than-expected 36 weeks to show a statistically significant reduction in blood sugar levels in patients with type 2 diabetes. Isis did not disclose the effect of the drug, ISIS-PTP1B, at 26 weeks. Deutsche Bank's Alethia Young said the data looked less robust than some commonly prescribed treatments and Isis's own experimental glucagon receptor, ISIS-GCGR. Isis noticed that blood sugar levels kept falling even after dosing was stopped after 26 weeks, and expects the drug to lower sugar levels further over a longer duration, analysts said.
 

Cost of having diabetes has doubled in two decades

 
‎02 ‎February ‎2015, ‏‎09:23:53 PMGo to full article
A person receives a test for diabetes during Care Harbor LA free medical clinic in Los AngelesBy Madeline Kennedy The cost of managing diabetes has more than doubled in the past 20 years, a new analysis says. The average diabetes patient now spends $2,790 more per year than they did in 1987 - and more than half the additional spending is for medications. “People need to be mindful about the substantial increase in the cost of diabetes, which has been partially fueled by the rising prices of newer drugs,” said Xiaohui Zhou, a health economist at the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) who led the study. The 1987 survey, involving 22,538 people, showed that diabetics spent $2,588 per person more on healthcare than people without diabetes.
 
 

A Problem With How We Treat Cancer -- and How to Fix It

 
‎02 ‎February ‎2015, ‏‎06:20:08 PMGo to full article
A Problem With How We Treat Cancer -- and How to Fix ItI was diagnosed with cancer after giving birth to my third child. The tumor had grown especially large thanks to my body's hormones that had been growing my baby. The medical community helped my disease but could not help my despair.Then, five years after cancer -- and just after I finished my first triathlon -- I developed heart, liver and...
 
 

FDA approves Boehringer-Lilly drug for type-2 diabetes patients

 
‎02 ‎February ‎2015, ‏‎03:58:50 PMGo to full article
(Reuters) - The U.S. Food and Drug Administration approved a drug developed by Eli Lilly and Co and privately held Boehringer Ingelheim Pharmaceuticals Inc to improve blood sugar control in type-2 diabetes patients, the companies said. The drug, Glyxambi, combines empagliflozin and linagliptin, commonly prescribed diabetes medications which are manufactured by Lilly and Boehringer. (Reporting by Amrutha Penumudi in Bengaluru; Editing by Don Sebastian)
 

Heavy kids can have celiac disease, too

 
‎31 ‎January ‎2015, ‏‎12:16:02 AMGo to full article
By Andrew M. Seaman (Reuters Health) – Overweight children are just as likely as thin children to have celiac disease, a new study confirms. It's a common misconception - even among many doctors - that celiac disease is limited to people who are underweight. “Being overweight certainly does not exclude the diagnosis, as this paper shows,” said Dr. Peter Green, director of the Celiac Disease Center at Columbia University Medical Center in New York City, who was not involved in the new study. Between 0.5 percent and 1 percent of people living in the developed world are thought to have celiac disease, in which gluten in food triggers a damaging immune response in the small intestines.
 

Canada says husband of woman diagnosed with avian flu also infected

 
‎30 ‎January ‎2015, ‏‎08:56:45 PMGo to full article
The husband of a woman who tested positive for the H7N9 avian flu virus earlier this week was also infected, likely from a common source during their visit to China, Canadian federal and provincial governments confirmed on Friday. The couple, residents of British Columbia, exhibited symptoms one day apart and likely did not infect each other, Canada's chief public health officer and British Columbia's deputy provincial health officer said in a joint statement. The H7N9 virus has not been detected in birds in Canada. The virus first infected three people in China in March 2013.
 

Flu hospitalizations of elderly hit record high, CDC says

 
‎30 ‎January ‎2015, ‏‎08:04:05 PMGo to full article
NEW YORK (AP) — Some new evidence this is a particularly bad flu season: Flu-related hospitalizations of the elderly are the highest since the government started tracking that statistic nine years ago.
 

Cancer organization partners with NFL on prostate treatment

 
‎30 ‎January ‎2015, ‏‎06:35:48 PMGo to full article
NFL: Super Bowl XLIX-Head Coach Press ConferenceA U.S. cancer organization has partnered with the NFL alumni association ahead of Sunday's Super Bowl XLIX to raise awareness about screening, diagnosis and treatment for prostate cancer, a disease that kills tens of thousands of U.S. men a year.  The Cancer Treatment Centers of America (CTCA), a private, for-profit operator of cancer treatment hospitals and outpatient clinics, will treat NFL Alumni who are fighting prostate cancer, which afflicts almost one in seven U.S. men, at its five hospitals in Atlanta, Chicago, Philadelphia, Phoenix and Tulsa. "CTCA is proud to partner with NFLA and we look forward to making a difference in the lives of those alums who are or will be diagnosed with prostate cancer," Gerard van Grinsven, chief executive and president of CTCA, said in a statement Thursday. Prostate cancer is one of the most common cancers among men in the United States, second only to non-melanoma skin cancer.
 
 

Science takes a step towards diabetes pill

 
‎30 ‎January ‎2015, ‏‎06:29:35 PMGo to full article
A species of healthy gut bacteria -- tweaked in the science lab -- could be a key player in curing diabetes, according to a new study.A probiotic pill developed at Cornell University sent glucose levels plummeting by as much as 30 percent in diabetic rats, according to the researchers who took part in the study. The science-born probiotic was administered orally to the rats for 90 days, resulting in favorable dips in high blood glucose levels. Epithelial cells -- capable of secretion and selective absorption -- in the upper intestine converted themselves into cells that acted like glucose-monitoring, insulin-secreting pancreatic beta cells. It was tested on healthy rats, and no change in blood glucose levels resulted.
 
 

Valeant to buy Dendreon's prostate cancer vaccine Provenge

 
‎30 ‎January ‎2015, ‏‎06:05:25 AMGo to full article
(Reuters) - Bankrupt drugmaker Dendreon Corp has reached a stalking-horse deal with Canada's Valeant Pharmaceuticals International Inc to sell the worldwide rights to its cancer vaccine, Provenge, and certain assets for $296 million. The deal is subject to higher and better bids and extended the bid deadline to Feb. 10 for interested parties to participate in an auction, Dendreon said on Thursday. A stalking-horse bidder often helps draw others to an auction by setting a floor price, but they also require the bankrupt company to commit to paying break-up and other fees if the stalking horse is outbid. Seattle-based Dendreon filed for bankruptcy protection in November, after sales of Provenge fell short of expectations and left the company deep in debt.
 

Study supports Roche's disputed blockbuster flu drug Tamiflu

 
‎30 ‎January ‎2015, ‏‎02:12:38 AMGo to full article
The logo of Swiss pharmaceutical company Roche is seen outside their headquarters in BaselBy Kate Kelland LONDON, Jan 30 (Reuters) - A major analysis of one of the world's most fiercely disputed medicines, Roche's Tamiflu, has found it cuts flu symptoms by a day and can help some patients avoid hospital treatment and complications. Published in The Lancet on Friday, the pooled analysis included data from all previously published and unpublished trials of Tamiflu, which has been the subject of intense scientific debate for years. The drug, known generically as oseltamivir, is an anti-viral which was stockpiled and widely used by governments during the 2009/2010 H1N1 "swine flu" pandemic. It is approved by regulators worldwide and is on the World Health Organization's "essential medicines" list.
 
 

FDA expands use of Imbruvica to treat rare form of blood cancer

 
‎30 ‎January ‎2015, ‏‎12:39:18 AMGo to full article
The U.S. Food and Drug Administration approved the expanded use of Imbruvica, sold by Johnson & Johnson and Pharmacyclics Inc, to treat Waldenström's macroglobulinemia (WM), a rare form of blood cancer for which no specific pharmaceutical therapy exists. WM, a type of non-Hodgkin lymphoma, was discovered more than 70 years ago. It usually worsens slowly over time and causes abnormal blood cells, known as B lymphocytes (B-cells), to grow within the bone marrow, lymph nodes, liver and spleen. The FDA granted Imbruvica breakthrough therapy designation for WM, a status given to drugs seen as important advances in the treatment of serious diseases, but it added a warning that it could cause tumor lysis syndrome (TLS).
 

6 Ways We Can Use Taste and Smell to Optimize Our Nutrition

 
‎29 ‎January ‎2015, ‏‎07:02:51 PMGo to full article
6 Ways We Can Use Taste and Smell to Optimize Our NutritionLet's be honest. Rarely a day passes when we are not bombarded with information on how we can improve our health. This usually takes shape in the form of new "fat free" foods, diet fads, and the latest fitness trends. Perhaps that eight-muscled meat snake housed in our pie hole and our discerning schnoz are far less exciting, but these...
 
 

Nigeria H5N1 bird flu spreads to four more states, total 11

 
‎29 ‎January ‎2015, ‏‎01:39:40 PMGo to full article
A man selling live chickens waits for customers in a local food market in Nigeria's commercial capital LagosAn outbreak of H5N1 bird flu in Nigerian poultry farms has spread to four more states, raising the total of affected areas to 11, the agricultural and rural development minister said on Thursday. Africa's most populous country and biggest economy was the first country on the continent to detect bird flu, in 2006 when chicken farms were found to have the H5N1 strain. In 2007, Nigeria recorded its first human death from the disease. "At the time of my briefing the nation on January 21, 2015, seven states had reported cases of the bird flu.
 
 

Norway finds first case of mad cow disease, says food safe

 
‎29 ‎January ‎2015, ‏‎01:14:05 PMGo to full article
Norway reported its first ever case of mad cow disease on Thursday, saying the instance was an isolated one and telling consumers it was still safe to eat beef and drink milk. Tests at a British laboratory confirmed the disease, also known as bovine spongiform encephalopathy (BSE), in a 15-year-old cow, which had been slaughtered, the Norwegian Food Safety Authority said. A new variant of Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease, nvCJD, killed dozens of people in Europe beginning in the mid-1990s.
 

5-Year-Old Girl Dies After Catching the Flu, Even After Getting Vaccine

 
‎29 ‎January ‎2015, ‏‎02:40:00 AMGo to full article
5-Year-Old Girl Dies After Catching the Flu, Even After Getting VaccineKiera Driscoll, 5, had a slight fever on Sunday morning, but she seemed to be feeling better after taking some children's ibuprofen, said her father, Patrick Driscoll. "In fact, she was playing outside that afternoon with my wife and even made a comment that it was 'the most fun time ever,'" Driscoll said. But then Kiera's slight fever returned and her cough worsened and included phlegm, Driscoll said. She didn't have asthma but occasionally had a barking cough as a baby, Driscoll said.
 
 

Norway confirms 'atypical' case of mad cow disease

 
‎29 ‎January ‎2015, ‏‎02:29:01 AMGo to full article
Norwegian authorities confirmed an "atypical" case of mad cow disease, but say it poses no risk to public healthNorwegian authorities confirmed an "atypical" case of mad cow disease Thursday but said that it posed no risk to public health. Unlike the classic form of bovine spongiform encephalopathy (BSE) -- transmitted through the now banned practice of feeding cows with meat-based feed -- which caused an epidemic in Britain in the 1990s, isolated cases of "atypical" BSE can appear in old livestock. "The discovery of an atypical case of BSE has no implications for food security in Norway and there is no question of withdrawing products or putting other measures in place," Kristina Landsverk, a spokeswoman at the Norwegian Food Safety Authority, said in a statement. The case -- discovered on a farm in central Norway -- was the first to be detected in the Nordic country but similar isolated cases have been reported in other countries including Switzerland and Brazil in recent years.
 
 

Household Cleaning Tips for Cold and Flu Season

 
‎29 ‎January ‎2015, ‏‎01:11:49 AMGo to full article
Household Cleaning Tips for Cold and Flu SeasonIn the midst of cold and flu season, you're often greeted with sniffles and achoos everywhere you go. Washing your hands and stocking up on orange juice are great starting points, but there's more you can do at home to decrease your chances of falling ill. Take these steps to keep yourself and your family in good health.Disinfect hot spotsThink...
 
 

'Expensive' placebo beats 'cheap' one in Parkinson's disease: study

 
‎28 ‎January ‎2015, ‏‎11:13:36 PMGo to full article
By Sharon Begley NEW YORK (Reuters) - When patients with Parkinson's disease received an injection described as an effective drug costing $1,500 per dose, their motor function improved significantly more than when they got one supposedly costing $100, scientists reported on Wednesday. The research, said an editorial in the journal Neurology, which published it, "takes the study of placebo effect to a new dimension." More and more studies have documented the power of placebos, in which patients experience an improvement in symptoms despite receiving sugar pills, sham surgery, or other intervention with no intrinsic therapeutic value. Earlier studies have shown that patients' expectations can lead to improvements in Parkinson's, a progressive motor disease in which the brain's production of dopamine plummets. As it happens, dopamine release is increased by belief, novelty, and the expectation of reward - mental states that underlie placebo effects, said neurologist Alberto Espay of the University of Cincinnati, who led the new study.
 

Million asthma sufferers may be misdiagnosed: UK watchdog

 
‎28 ‎January ‎2015, ‏‎08:12:13 PMGo to full article
Around 4.1 million people in Britain receive treatment for asthma but many have been misdiagnosed, health experts warnMore than one million people receiving treatment for asthma may have been wrongly diagnosed, a health watchdog warned Wednesday as it published new draft guidance for doctors on testing for the condition. Around 4.1 million people in Britain receive treatment for asthma but studies suggest that up to 30 percent do not show clear evidence of having the illness, the National Institute for Health and Care Excellence (NICE) said. Some may have had asthma in the past but many were likely to have been given an incorrect diagnosis, the watchdog said. Professor Mark Baker, director of clinical practice at NICE, said: "Accurate diagnosis of asthma has been a significant problem which means that people may be wrongly diagnosed or cases might be missed in others.
 
 

Novartis pharma boss expects pressure on cancer drug prices

 
‎27 ‎January ‎2015, ‏‎04:24:27 PMGo to full article
Payers are likely to put pressure on drugmakers to lower the cost of cancer medicines, particularly when alternative treatments are available, the head of Novartis' pharma division said on Tuesday. "I think there will be increased pressure on oncology prices," David Epstein, head of Novartis' pharmaceutical division told an analyst call after the company reported fourth-quarter results. Earlier this month it said cost savings on expensive cancer treatments could be achieved if the company were involved earlier in the decision-making process.
 

Canada resident tests positive for H7N9 avian flu virus

 
‎27 ‎January ‎2015, ‏‎12:51:53 AMGo to full article
By Julie Gordon VANCOUVER (Reuters) - A Vancouver area resident has tested positive for the H7N9 avian flu virus in the first documented case of the infection in a human in North America, the Canadian government said on Monday. The woman, who is in her 50s, had returned to Canada from China and is recovering from the illness in self-isolation, the Public Health Agency of Canada said in a statement. "I want to emphasize that the risk to Canadians is very low because there is no evidence of sustained human-to-human transmission of H7N9," Gregory Taylor, Canada's Chief Public Health Officer, said at a news conference in Ottawa. Taylor said the woman returned to Canada on Jan. 12 after visiting numerous locations in China and began to feel ill two days later on Jan. 14.
 

California turkey farm quarantined after bird flu detected

 
‎26 ‎January ‎2015, ‏‎06:43:23 PMGo to full article
Bird Flu Detected on California Poultry FarmBy Theopolis Waters CHICAGO (Reuters) - A California turkey farm has been quarantined after confirmation of the first case of an outbreak of the highly pathogenic H5N8 avian influenza strain in the Pacific Northwest and in a commercial flock, the U.S. government said. The news on Saturday came just weeks after China banned U.S. poultry after an outbreak of another strain of bird flu in the Pacific Northwest. In the latest outbreak, Foster Farms said in a statement that it had informed the U.S. Department of Agriculture after detecting the H5N8 strain on a single turkey ranch in Stanislaus County following routine testing. State and government labs confirmed the findings from samples submitted by Foster Farms, which had experienced a spike in bird deaths, according to the USDA.
 
 

Samsung developing wearable headset that detects strokes

 
‎26 ‎January ‎2015, ‏‎02:48:31 PMGo to full article
C-Lab engineers are developing a wearable health sensor for stroke detectionSamsung says its product is not only much faster than hospital equipment but that its sensors are able to pick up more detail thanks to an ultra-conductive material the team discovered that resembles rubber. The new material also makes it possible to wear the sensors in barrettes, eyeglasses or any piece of headgear instead of the rather medical headset that serves as the creators' prototype.

 

http://www.enca.com/coverage/deadly-spread-ebola-virus

 

The deadly spread of the Ebola virus

Ebola nurse treated in London as Sierra Leone rate rises

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Nigeria awaits Ebola update

 

 

 

Weathering the Coming Storm


 

 

 

Price R399.00

 

 


 

Description

Dr. Chuck Missler, an internationally known business executive, outlines our current economic predicament and defensive steps you can take to lessen the impact of the impending economic crisis. As a Bible teacher for over 30 years with a ministry reaching over 40 countries, Chuck shares some key strategies to prepare yourself spiritually and practically.

Is the World facing another major economic upheaval?

What is the best strategy to protect your family in times of economic uncertainty?

The Church has enjoyed a relatively peaceful existence in the West for a few centuries but the with the coming persecution, how do we go about organizing home study and home-church?

Soul Survival – Keeping your “lamp full” during the hard times ahead.

Join Dr. Chuck Missler and Ron Matsen in the Executive Brie fing Room of
The River Lodge, New Zealand, in an intensive summary outlining what lies
ahead and how we can prepare for the coming storm.

Runtime: Approx. 5 hours

© 2012 Koinonia House Inc.

Available in the following formats:

 

DVD:

•3 Disks
•5 M4A Files
•1 PDF Notes File
•Color, 16:9, Dolby Digital 2.0 stereo, Region encoding (This DVD will be viewable in other countries WITH the proper DVD player and television set.)


 


On this Day

 

December Wrap Up!

 

Expectations

 of the

 Antichrist

 

 

Dr. Chuck Missler and Ron Matsen

 

Price R 499.00

 

There are many diverse anticipations concerning the Coming World Leader, commonly referred to as “The Antichrist.” This study will explore the Biblical descriptions with the specific expectations of the globalists, Islam, the Vatican, Freemasonry, and others.
• Will he be a Nephilim?
• Why is the Vatican openly preparing to receive an “alien” visitor?
• Will he be a resurrection of Nimrod? Is his DNA a factor?
• What are the expectations of transhumanist technologists in this regard?
Clearly, the Bible has much more to illuminate this issue far beyond the popular conceptions; and yet the composite perspective will astonish most. Furthermore, is there a climactic cosmic deception being prepared that, if it were possible, “it would deceive the very elect”? Jesus commanded us, “Be not deceived.” But, how?
How close are these events to our current horizon?
Join Dr. Chuck Missler and Ron Matsen in an intensive summary of some of the Strategic Trends that will impact all of us.
Available in the following formats:

DVD:
•3 Discs
•6 M4A Files
•1 PDF Notes File
•Color, Fullscreen 16:9, Dolby Digital 2.0 stereo, Region  encoding ( This DVD will be viewable in other countries WITH the proper DVD player and television set.)


 

 

 

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Featured Video

End the Shame. End the Isolation. End Fistula.

 

 

 

 

***Brand New Release***

 

Beginning of Wisdom

by

 Dr. Chuck Missler


“The fear of God is the beginning of wisdom.” Proverbs 9:10

But how do we balance the awesome majesty due to the Creator and Ruler of the universe with the gracious family intimacy that is now available to us through the completed work of Christ?

What does His Holiness demand of us, personally?

What are the hazards of failing to render the Almighty His due, while availing ourselves the riches committed to us of the precious promises in His Word?

How do we deal with these paramount issues facing us daily in practical challenges?

Chuck Missler grapples with these wildly misunderstood tensions with down-to-earth frankness and Biblically-based candor.
 

Price R 179

 
 

 

Hal Lindsey Report:

 

THE REAL ISSUE

SAME SEX MARRIAGE

 

Genetically Modified Food & People.

 

 

 

Go Live           Link

 

*** New Release ***

 Angels, Volume III:

The Denizens of the Metacosm

 

DVD

 

 

Price R 179.00

 

Angels, Volume III: The Denizens of the Metacosm

 

DVD

by Dr. Chuck Missler

 

Description

Volumes 1 & 2 of this series explored the finite limits and boundaries of our physical reality. After probing the limits of both the Macrocosm and the Microcosm, we discovered that our reality is but a shadow of larger reality, the Metacosm, a domain of extra-dimensional transfers and other paradoxical phenomena.

 

Volume 3 explores the contradictory behavior of UFOs and other demonic deceptions characteristic of the End Times. Explore these topics in more detail in either this two-hour briefing, Angels Vol 3: The Denizens of the Metacosm or our six-hour extensive study, Expectations of the Antichrist.

 

 

• Are they real?

• Why do UFOs enjoy a military classification higher than our most sensitive weapons systems?

• Why are the events which occurred in Roswell New Mexico still classified after 66 years?

• Why is the Vatican openly preparing to receive an Alien Visitor?

• How should a Christian deal with the occurrences of Alien abductions?

• Jesus admonished us to “Be not deceived.” How?

• How do we prepare for the deception which, “if it were possible, would deceive the very elect”?

 

Join Dr. Chuck Missler in the Executive Briefing Room of the River Lodge, New Zealand, exploring the misinformation, (and deliberate disinformation) about the various “denizens of the Metacosm” and other insights of the invisible war unfolding on our near horizon.

 

This briefing pack contains 2 hours of teaching

 

Available in the following formats

 

DVD:

•1 Disc

•2 M4A Files

•Color, Fullscreen 16:9, Dolby Digital 2.0 stereo, Region. This DVD will be viewable in other countries WITH the proper DVD player and television set.)

 

DVD

PRICE  R 159.00

DVD

PRICE R 159.00

 

DVD

Price  R 159.00

 

DVD

Price R 159.00

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


Global Events Disaster Site


Extreme Weather, Epidemic, Terror Attack, Biological Hazard,

Volcano Eruption, Earthquake, Incidents at Sea

 

 

"In seasons of severe trial, the Christian has nothing on earth that he can trust to, and is therefore compelled to cast himself on God alone. When no human deliverance can avail, he must simply and entirely trust himself to the providence and care of God. Happy storm that wrecks a man on such a rock as this! O blessed hurricane that drives the soul to God--and God alone!"
- Spurgeon

 

 

 

***SPECIAL OFFER ***

The Hybrid Age  

BUY THE DVD

&

GET THE BOOK

 

ONLY

PRICE R199.00

THIS LINK ONLY

 

 

The Hybrid Age  


by Tom Horn and Chuck Missler

 
 
 
Price R 159.00
 
 

***In Stock ***

Forbidden Gates: How Genetics, Robotics, Artificial Intelligence, Synthetic Biology, Nanotechnology, and Human Enhancement Herald The Dawn Of TechnoDimensional Spiritual Warfare.
THE BOOK

 

Price R179.00

 

 

Book

While Forbidden Gates includes fresh insights for traditional, tried and true methods of overcoming darkness, it also unveils for the first time how breakthrough advances in science, technology, and philosophy—including cybernetics, bio-engineering, nanotechnology, machine intelligence, synthetic biology, and transhumanism—will combine to create mind-boggling game-changes to everything you have ever known about spiritual warfare.

In recent years, astonishing technological developments have pushed the frontiers of humanity toward far-reaching morphological transformation that promises in the very near future to redefine what it means to be human. An international, intellectual and fast-growing cultural movement known as transhumanism intends the use of genetics, robotics, artificial intelligence and nanotechnology (GRIN technologies) as tools that will radically redesign our minds, our memories, our physiology, our offspring, and even perhaps, as Joel Garreau in his bestselling book Radical Evolution claims, our very souls. The technological, cultural, and metaphysical shift now under way unapologetically forecasts a future dominated by this new species of unrecognizably superior humans, and applications under study now to make this dream reality are being funded by thousands of government and private research facilities around the world. As the reader will learn, this includes among other things rewriting human DNA and combining men with beasts, a fact that some university studies and transhumanists believe will not only alter our bodies and souls but could ultimately open a door to contact with unseen intelligence.

As a result, new modes of perception between things visible and invisible are expected to challenge the Church in ways that are historically and theologically unprecedented. Without comprehending what is quickly approaching in related disciplines of research and development, vast numbers of believers could be paralyzed by the most fantastic—and most far reaching—supernatural implications. The destiny of each individual—as well as the future of their family—will depend on their knowledge of the new paradigm and their preparedness to face it head on.

303 Pages


 

 

 

 

 

+27 11 969 0086


frosty@khouseafrica.com   

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


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