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Monitor The Strategic Trends

Biotech & Global Pestilence Introduction:

 

The threat of germ warfare has brought to the forefront long-forgotten diseases like plague, anthrax, and smallpox. Recent television news programs have highlighted secret projects in the former Soviet Union to develop antibiotic-resistant strains of genetically engineered viruses and bacteria.


[READ THE FULL INTRODUCTION]

 

 


 
 

Human Nature

Speakers:

Ron Matsen

R179.00

 

 

 

About available formats

Description: 

What does it mean to be human? Philosophers, theologians, sociologists and psychologists have attempted to understand the nature of mankind for ages. Their conclusions often contradict each other which lead to confusion rather than clarification. Clearly Man is a very complicated social being. The Bible tells us that man is “fearfully and wonderfully made.”
  • How do we understand our makeup and does it make a difference?
  • What is the meaning of being “created in the image of God?”
  • What causes our natural responses and can we change this behaviour?

Join Ron Matsen from the Executive Briefing Room of the River Lodge, New Zealand as he explores the subject of our “Human Nature” and gives insight into the architecture and accountability of all mankind.

This briefing pack contains approx. 2 hours of teaching.

  • DVD discs
  • M4A files
  • PDF Notes file
  •  

 

 

 

 

 
 

 

CANCER  Awareness

 

 

 

http://news.yahoo.com/rss/cancer

 

Our Precious Daughter Penny

Penny has been the bravest and shining example the Lord could have chosen and will be a witness to the Glory of God and the faithfulness of His promises forever.

We give thanks to all who supported her with their prayers, may God pour out His everlasting Love over you forever.
BARBARA & RICHARD FROST & FAMILY
 

 

 

 

 

 

We are humbled beyond words by the Glory of God's Grace.

We will be forever grateful for the the wonderful friends praying continuously for Penny and her family.

 

 

Biotech & Global Pestilence

 

Cancer News Headlines

 

Hallmarks of Cancer 1: Self-Sufficiency in Growth Signals

 

 

 

Linda Ronstadt & James Ingram - "Somewhere Out There"

 

 

Linda Ronstadt - Tracks Of My Tears

 

 

 

Linda Ronstadt - Long Long Time Linda Ronstadt

 

 

 

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PENNY

 

 

 

 

 

Price R 179

 

 

 

 

Beginning of Wisdom

 

by

 Dr. Chuck Missler

“The fear of God is the beginning of wisdom.” Proverbs 9:10

But how do we balance the awesome majesty due to the Creator and Ruler of the universe with the gracious family intimacy that is now available to us through the completed work of Christ?

What does His Holiness demand of us, personally?

What are the hazards of failing to render the Almighty His due, while availing ourselves the riches committed to us of the precious promises in His Word?

How do we deal with these paramount issues facing us daily in practical challenges?

Chuck Missler grapples with these wildly misunderstood tensions with down-to-earth frankness and Biblically-based candor.

 


 

 

Price R 179.00

 

 

The Gospel: The Message of Reconciliation

DVD

by Ron Matsen 

 

 

 

Price R 179.00

 

 

 

Description

One of the last instructions given by Jesus to the Church was, “Go into all the world and preach the gospel.” (Mark 16:15)

The fact is most Christians don’t know how to share their faith effectively. Sadly, many of the people they know in the world today are wandering around, lost and without hope, having never heard the wonderful Message of Reconciliation.

How would you answer the question, “What must I do to be saved?”

What are the essential facts, demands and promises of the Gospel?

Why are we told to evangelize?

Join Ron Matsen in the Executive Briefing Room of the River Lodge, New Zealand as he explores the subject of “The Gospel – The Message of Reconciliation” and gives practical insight into how to share the essential doctrines of salvation.

This briefing pack contains 2 hours of teaching

© Copyright 2013

 

 

 

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Behold a Livid Horse: Emergent Diseases and Biochemical Warfare

 

 

PRICE R 249.00

 

 

 

Behold a Livid Horse:

 Emergent Diseases

 and

Biochemical Warfare

 

DVD

 

by Dr. Chuck Missler

 

 

Dr. Chuck Missler explores these and other questions below concerning this climactic Fourth Horsemen and the unique role it plays in the End-Time Scenario:

•Why are previously conquered diseases now making a comeback?

•How real is the threat of biological terrorism?

•Why is it more dangerous than chemical terrorism?

•Was the AIDS virus deliberately designed? By whom? And why?

•Is there any truth behind an agenda to control (and reduce) the world’s population? By whom? And why?

•Who are the two riders associated with the Livid Horse? How do they differ?

 

This briefing pack contains 2 hours of teaching

 

Available in the following formats

 

DVD:

•2 MP3 files

•1 PDF Notes file

•Colour, Full screen 16:9, Dolby Digital 2.0 stereo,

 

 

Diseases/Conditions News Headlines - Yahoo! News

 

Alzheimer's stemmed but not stopped, say experts

 
‎Today, ‎September ‎19, ‎2016, ‏‎4 hours agoGo to full article
Alzheimer's stemmed but not stopped, say expertsSoaring rates of population growth and ageing have long been seen as portending a global explosion of Alzheimer's, the debilitating disease that robs older people of their memory and independence. In rich countries at least, recent data suggests the rate of new cases has slowed or even reversed -- a tantalising hint that quality-of-life improvements may protect against dementia. "These findings are promising, and suggest that identifying and reducing risk factors for Alzheimer's and other dementias may be effective," Keith Fargo, scientific director at the American Alzheimer's Association, told AFP.
 
 

Bill Gates: Disease fight is tough but progress is 'incredible'

 
‎Yesterday, ‎September ‎18, ‎2016, ‏‎6:24:11 PMGo to full article
Philanthropist Bill Gates speaks at the Fifth Replenishment Conference of the Global Fund to Fight AIDS, Tuberculosis and Malaria in Montreal, Quebec, on September 17, 2016Through his foundation, billionaire philanthropist Bill Gates is the top nongovernmental donor to the Global Fund against AIDS, tuberculosis and malaria, with plans to give $600 million between 2017-2019. In an interview with AFP, Gates said the Global Fund's successes have given him hope, even in the face of huge challenges. Q: Canada's International Development Minister Marie-Claude Bibeau has said that our generation is the one that has to fight these epidemics -- (and) global warming.
 
 

Global Fund collects almost $13 bn to fight AIDS, malaria and TB

 
‎Saturday, ‎September ‎17, ‎2016, ‏‎11:37:58 PMGo to full article
Canadian Prime Minister Justin Trudeau speaks during a press conference following the conclusion of the Fifth Replenishment Conference of the Global Fund to Fight AIDS, Tuberculosis and Malaria in Montreal, Quebec, September 17, 2016Donors pledged nearly $13 billion on Saturday in the fight to eradicate AIDS, tuberculosis and malaria by 2030, Canadian Prime Minister Justin Trudeau announced at an international conference. "It is my great honor to announce that for the fifth replenishment conference for the Global Fund to end AIDS, tuberculosis and malaria, we have reached our goal together," he said at the close of the donors' meeting. Trudeau hosted the conference, which was attended by several heads of states as well as UN Secretary-General Ban Ki-Moon, Microsoft founder and philanthropist Bill Gates, and pop singer Bono -- who co-founded the nonprofit group ONE, which works to reduce poverty and disease in Africa.
 
 

Global fund raises $12.9 billion to fight AIDS, TB and malaria

 
‎Saturday, ‎September ‎17, ‎2016, ‏‎10:50:33 PMGo to full article
Canada's Prime Minister Justin Trudeau makes closing remarks to the Fifth Replenishment Conference of the Global Fund to Fight AIDS, Tuberculosis, and Malaria in MontrealBy Allison Lampert MONTREAL (Reuters) - A global fund has raised over $12.9 billion from international donors as part of a campaign aimed at effectively eradicating AIDS, malaria and tuberculosis by 2030, conference organizers said on Saturday. The Global Fund asked government, faith-based and private-sector partners to raise a total of $13 billion at a donor conference in Montreal to support its activities over the next three years, starting in 2017. "We can declare success for we have saved the lives of 8 million people in the coming years," Canadian Prime Minister Justin Trudeau told reporters after attending the conference, which drew several heads of state, singer Bono and Microsoft Corp co-founder and philanthropist Bill Gates.
 
 

Bono, Bill Gates headline donor conference fighting diseases

 
‎Saturday, ‎September ‎17, ‎2016, ‏‎7:56:04 PMGo to full article
Canadian Prime Minister Justin Trudeau shakes hands with U2 singer Bono during a bi-lateral meeting at the Fifth Replenishment Conference of the Global Fund to Fight AIDS, Tuberculosis and Malaria in Montreal, Quebec, September 17, 2016An international donor conference closed in Saturday on a $13 billion fundraising target for the fight to eradicate AIDS, tuberculosis and malaria by 2030 -- cheered on by Bono, Bill Gates and political leaders. Canadian Prime Minister Justin Trudeau is hosting the fifth triennial Global Fund replenishment conference to fight against these diseases, with UN Secretary-General Ban Ki-moon and a half dozen heads of state also in attendance.
 
 

VP Biden gives new push on 'Cancer Moonshot' clinical trials

 
‎Friday, ‎September ‎16, ‎2016, ‏‎7:24:05 PMGo to full article
File photo of Vice President Biden addressing the session "Cancer Moonshot: A Call to Action" during the annual meeting 2016 of the WEF in DavosU.S. Vice President Joseph Biden on Friday announced new measures to help cancer patients navigate the clinical trials process as part of the administration's "Cancer Moonshot" initiative to speed new treatments to market. In a statement released ahead of a planned speech at Rice University in Houston, Biden said clinical trials are essential for developing new and more effective cancer diagnostics and treatments.
 
 

Cancer-risk genetic testing reports can vary from lab to lab

 
‎Friday, ‎September ‎16, ‎2016, ‏‎6:10:09 PMGo to full article
By Kathryn Doyle (Reuters Health) - Testing for gene mutations linked to cancer risk may guide how a patient is treated, but the determination of whether a mutation is dangerous or benign can vary from lab to lab, according to a recent study. There are guidelines for classifying gene variants, but interpreting the guidelines can vary by lab or provider, the authors write in the Journal of Clinical Oncology. “We are now facing a new era when genetic testing becomes more easy to perform technically but still there are challenges that remain in interpretation of the data,” said lead author Dr. Judith Balmana of the Hospital Vall d’Hebron and Universitat Autonoma de Barcelona in Spain.
 

Exercise may reduce alcohol-related cancer risk

 
‎Friday, ‎September ‎16, ‎2016, ‏‎5:15:46 PMGo to full article
By Carolyn Crist (Reuters Health) - Getting regular moderate or vigorous exercise may offset some of the potentially lethal health effects of regular alcohol consumption, a new study suggests. Researchers confirmed an increased risk of death from alcohol-related cancers as well as death from all causes among those who drank more than just occasionally, compared to people who never imbibed. “Alcohol is the most commonly consumed psychotropic drug that, in contrast to most other drugs, is socially and culturally acceptable,” said senior author Emmanuel Stamatakis, an associate professor of exercise, health and physical activity at the University of Sydney in Australia.
 

Brain cancer now deadliest for U.S. children: study

 
‎Friday, ‎September ‎16, ‎2016, ‏‎3:18:02 PMGo to full article
A general view of Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) headquarters in AtlantaBy David Beasley ATLANTA (Reuters) - Brain cancer is now the deadliest form of childhood cancer in the United States, surpassing leukemia as treatment advances have allowed doctors to cure many blood-related cancers, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention said on Friday. In 1999, nearly one in three children who died of cancer had leukemia, while brain cancer caused the deaths of one in four. By 2014, the numbers had reversed, researchers found comparing death rates from pediatric cancers in these years.
 
 

EMA panel recommends nod for Pfizer's breast cancer drug

 
‎Friday, ‎September ‎16, ‎2016, ‏‎3:15:27 PMGo to full article
The Pfizer logo is seen at their world headquarters in New York(Reuters) - U.S. drugmaker Pfizer Inc's breast cancer drug, Ibrance, should be given marketing approval, an advisory committee at the European Medicines Agency recommended. The CHMP's opinion will now be reviewed by the EMA, Pfizer said in a statement on Friday. Novartis is also testing an experimental breast cancer pill which belongs to same drug class as Pfizer's Ibrance.
 
 

Brain cancer now leading childhood cancer killer

 
‎Friday, ‎September ‎16, ‎2016, ‏‎2:45:29 PMGo to full article
NEW YORK (AP) — Brain cancer is now the deadliest childhood cancer in the U.S., now ahead of leukemia, a result of improved leukemia treatment and a frustrating lack of progress on brain cancer.
 

Novavax vaccine for respiratory disease fails in late stage trial

 
‎Thursday, ‎September ‎15, ‎2016, ‏‎11:48:38 PMGo to full article
(Reuters) - Novavax Inc said on Thursday that its experimental vaccine for a serious infectious respiratory disease failed at the final stage of human testing, sending its stock plunging more than 80 percent. The drug failed to meet the main or secondary efficacy goals of a Phase III trial of nearly 12,000 older adults, the company said in a news release. The trial was intended to show that the Novavax vaccine could prevent moderate to severe respiratory syncytial virus, commonly known as RSV.
 

Too soon to tell if 9/11 firefighters face increased cancer risk

 
‎Thursday, ‎September ‎15, ‎2016, ‏‎7:38:26 PMGo to full article
By Lisa Rapaport (Reuters Health) - Fifteen years after the 9/11 attacks, the jury is still out on whether firefighters who worked at the World Trade Center site have increased odds of developing cancer, a U.S. study suggests. Some previous research has linked working at the site with higher rates of certain cancers than are seen among people who weren’t at the World Trade Center during that time. The current study, however, found firefighters who responded to the attacks in New York don’t appear to have a greater cancer risk than firefighters from San Francisco, Chicago and Philadelphia who were not part of the 9/11 emergency response – with the exception of two cancer types.
 

Teva, Intel to develop wearable technology for Huntington's disease

 
‎Thursday, ‎September ‎15, ‎2016, ‏‎6:15:46 PMGo to full article
A sign bearing the logo of Teva is seen in Jerusalem(Reuters) - Teva Pharmaceutical Industries Ltd said on Thursday it was collaborating with Intel Corp to develop a wearable technology platform to track the progression of disease in patients with Huntington's, a fatal degenerative disorder. There are no approved drugs to alter the course of Huntington's, although there are medicines that help with symptoms. Teva , with Intel, will deploy the technology as part of an ongoing mid-stage Huntington's study, the Israeli company said on Thursday.
 
 

Prostate cancer options show little difference in survival

 
‎Thursday, ‎September ‎15, ‎2016, ‏‎4:03:34 PMGo to full article
Generic: Prostate cancerMen with localized prostate cancer were unlikely to die in the 10 years after diagnosis regardless of whether they chose surgery, radiation or no intervention at all, researchers said Wednesday. The findings in the New England Journal of Medicine included more than 1,600 men aged 50-69 who agreed to be randomly assigned to either surgery to remove the tumor, radiation to shrink it or active monitoring -- a wait and see approach. About one percent of men in the study died within 10 years of prostate cancer, "irrespective of the treatment assigned, a rate that was considerably lower than was anticipated when the trial commenced," said the study, led by Freddie Hamdy of Oxford University.
 
 

Invest more to defeat killer diseases, Kenyan president tells African nations

 
‎Thursday, ‎September ‎15, ‎2016, ‏‎3:00:47 PMGo to full article
By Astrid Zweynert LONDON (Thomson Reuters Foundation) - Kenyan President Uhuru Kenyatta said on Thursday that ending diseases like AIDS, tuberculosis and malaria in Africa was within reach if countries spent more on healthcare which would ensure their people stayed healthy, and boost their economies. In an exclusive blog for the Thomson Reuters Foundation, Kenyatta credited international donors for helping Africa to make "tremendous gains" in fighting these diseases, which in the 1990s killed millions of people on the continent every year.
 

Can long naps cause diabetes?

 
‎Thursday, ‎September ‎15, ‎2016, ‏‎11:30:46 AMGo to full article
A study looked at links between long naps and diabetes.A study presented at a scientific congress Thursday reported a link between long naps and a higher risk of diabetes, though it couldn't say if daytime sleeping was a symptom or a cause. People who slept more than an hour each day were 45 percent more likely to develop type 2 diabetes, a debilitating condition associated with overweight and a sedentary lifestyle, the study found. Without treatment, the disease can lead to blindness, nerve damage, kidney failure, heart disease and premature death.
 
 

Treat or monitor early prostate cancer? 10-yr survival same

 
‎Thursday, ‎September ‎15, ‎2016, ‏‎1:07:11 AMGo to full article
Douglas Collett, a retired construction worker from Cromhall, England, speaks about his prostate cancer diagnosis on Tuesday, Sept. 13, 2016. The 73-year-old says, "My initial reaction was to get rid of it." But after reading up on the risks and benefits of surgery and radiation, he feels more men should be fully informed about the various strategies. (AP Photo/APTN)LONDON (AP) — Men with early prostate cancer who choose to closely monitor their disease are just as likely to survive at least 10 years as those who have surgery or radiation, finds a major study that directly tested and compared these options.
 
 

Parents of children with cancer sometimes regret decisions

 
‎Wednesday, ‎September ‎14, ‎2016, ‏‎11:43:38 PMGo to full article
By Andrew M. Seaman (Reuters Health) - Parents of children with cancer face difficult decisions, and a new study suggests that about one in six of them look back on some of their choices with a great deal of regret. Parents may feel as if they have no control when their child is first diagnosed with cancer, and making decisions about treatment is the one thing they can do, said Dr. Jennifer Mack, a pediatric oncologist at the Dana-Farber Cancer Institute and Boston Children's Hospital. "We wanted to try to understand what parents experience and when they look back on their decisions, how they feel about them," she said.
 

Spectrum bladder cancer drug not effective: U.S. FDA panel

 
‎Wednesday, ‎September ‎14, ‎2016, ‏‎9:02:14 PMGo to full article
Spectrum Pharmaceuticals Inc's experimental bladder cancer treatment apaziquone is not effective in delaying the time to recurrence of the disease, an advisory committee to the U.S. Food and Drug Administration concluded on Wednesday. Spectrum's shares fell 6.2 percent to $5.15. The committee, which convened to advise the FDA on whether to approve the drug, voted unanimously that the treatment has no more effect on the disease than a placebo over a two-year period.
 

France to lift bird flu restriction zone on Thursday

 
‎Wednesday, ‎September ‎14, ‎2016, ‏‎5:53:48 PMGo to full article
France will lift a restriction zone on Thursday it imposed late last year in the country's southwest to stop the spread of a bird flu virus that prompted trade restrictions on French poultry products, it said on Wednesday. France, the European Union's largest agricultural producer, imposed stricter controls and then banned all duck and goose production in 17 administrative departments, to contain a highly pathogenic bird flu outbreak that spread throughout southwestern France. The region is the main producer of foie gras, made of duck and goose liver.
 

Key facts about strokes as Israel's Peres critical

 
‎Wednesday, ‎September ‎14, ‎2016, ‏‎3:37:58 PMGo to full article
Former Israeli president Shimon remained in intensive care and was breathing with the help of a respirator, but was still able to respond to promptsThe haemorrhagic stroke suffered by former Israeli president Shimon Peres is one of the most serious forms of stroke and can be fatal. Peres, 93, is the last of the state of Israel's founding fathers and has held nearly every major office in the country, including prime minister twice and president. There are two main types of stroke -- one caused by blockages of vessels (ischaemic) and the other by bleeding (haemorrhagic).
 
 

Sugar Industry Paid for Medical Review in 1960s That Downplayed Link Between Sugar and Heart Disease, Report Finds

 
‎Wednesday, ‎September ‎14, ‎2016, ‏‎3:01:48 AMGo to full article
Sugar Industry Paid for Medical Review in 1960s That Downplayed Link Between Sugar and Heart Disease, Report FindsA report in the Journal of the American Medical Association Internal Medicine reviewed a case from the 1960s when three Harvard researchers were paid by a sugar industry group to do research looking at heart disease and sugar consumption. The paper resulting from that research found "limited" evidence for the link between sugar consumption and heart disease, contradicting previously published studies, according to the JAMA report, published Monday. The sugar industry "protected their interest for half a century, which points to the importance of truly independent science," study co-author Stanton Glantz told ABC News.
 
 

Video exams may help expand kids’ access to asthma care

 
‎Tuesday, ‎September ‎13, ‎2016, ‏‎5:22:46 PMGo to full article
By Lisa Rapaport (Reuters Health) - Children with asthma who live miles from specialists might do just as well when doctors treat them via video chats as they do when they visit physicians in person, a small experiment suggests. Researchers offered kids who lived approximately 70 to 150 miles away from Children’s Mercy Hospital in Kansas City, Missouri, a choice between going there for asthma care or getting checked out with virtual exams at clinics close to home. After six months, all of the children had a slight improvement in asthma symptoms, though the improvements weren’t big enough to rule out the possibility that they were due to chance.
 

Cancer overtakes heart disease as Australia's biggest killer

 
‎Tuesday, ‎September ‎13, ‎2016, ‏‎7:36:34 AMGo to full article
By Tom Westbrook SYDNEY (Reuters) - Cancer has become Australia's biggest killer, overtaking heart disease for the first time to take more lives than any other ailment, a government health agency said in a report released on Tuesday. Indigenous Australians also fare much worse than non-indigenous on almost every health score, according to Australia's Health 2016 report, complied by the government's Australian Institute of Health and Welfare and published every two years.
 

Sanofi, Google parent form $500 million diabetes joint venture

 
‎Monday, ‎September ‎12, ‎2016, ‏‎10:10:12 PMGo to full article
A logo is seen in front of the entrance at the headquarters of French drugmaker Sanofi in ParisFrench drugmaker Sanofi and Verily, the life sciences unit of Google parent Alphabet Inc , on Monday said they would invest about $500 million in a joint venture combining devices with services to improve diabetes care, an example of growing ties between the pharma and tech sectors. Sanofi said last year it was working on a partnership with Google in diabetes. "The company will leverage Verily's experience in miniaturized electronics, analytics, and consumer software development, with Sanofi's clinical expertise and experience in bringing innovative treatments to people living with diabetes," the two companies said in a statement.
 
 

Sanofi, Google launch diabetes joint venture

 
‎Monday, ‎September ‎12, ‎2016, ‏‎10:07:09 AMGo to full article
Sanofi and Google are teaming up on products for diabetes sufferers.Google and French pharmaceutical giant Sanofi announced Monday a new joint venture focused on diabetes care. The tie up between the drug maker and Verily, the health subsidiary of Google's parent company Alphabet, will focus on treatments for people living with the chronic disease. "As it will initially consist of connecting already existing products, we can expect the first innovations to arrive more quickly than if it was a pharmaceutical research programme starting from scratch," the head of Sanofi's diabetes business Stefan Oelrich told AFP.
 
 

Cholera blamed on U.N. peacekeepers surges in Haiti as funding vanishes

 
‎Friday, ‎September ‎9, ‎2016, ‏‎11:15:32 PMGo to full article
A girl cools off with drinkable water at a source in Port-au-Prince, HaitiBy Makini Brice PORT-AU-PRINCE (Reuters) - U.N.-led foreign funding has dried up for Haiti's fight against cholera, thought to have been introduced by Nepali peacekeepers, triggering a surge of deaths this year even as the global body vowed to help overcome the epidemic. The lack of support is notable because Haiti was free of cholera until 2010, when U.N. peacekeepers dumped infected sewage into a river, according to investigators. The United Nations has not legally accepted responsibility for the outbreak.
 
 

Depression risk spikes right after a stroke

 
‎Friday, ‎September ‎9, ‎2016, ‏‎8:40:31 PMGo to full article
By Lisa Rapaport (Reuters Health) - During the first three months after a stroke, survivors are about eight times more likely to experience depression than their peers who didn’t experience a stroke, a large Danish study suggests. Researchers analyzed data on a large group of stroke patients and compared them to similar people who didn’t have a stroke. Within two years after a stroke, 25 percent of patients had a diagnosis of depression, with more than half the diagnoses coming within the first three months.
 

Childhood cancer survivors living longer, cancer-free

 
‎Friday, ‎September ‎9, ‎2016, ‏‎7:00:12 PMGo to full article
By Madeline Kennedy (Reuters Health) - Due to better treatments and better monitoring, childhood cancer survivors are living longer, healthier lives, according to a study in the U.K. Looking at 60 years of data on nearly 35,000 childhood cancer survivors, researchers found decreasing mortality rates overall, and fewer deaths from cancer itself or from after-effects of cancer treatment. By the time survivors are in their 60s, circulatory problems like cardiovascular disease are their biggest cause of death – just like the rest of the population. “Survival after almost all specific types of childhood cancer has improved substantially,” said lead author Miranda Fidler of the Center for Childhood Cancer Survivor Studies at the University of Birmingham.
 

Regular exercise tied to lower health costs with heart disease

 
‎Thursday, ‎September ‎8, ‎2016, ‏‎7:12:58 PMGo to full article
Mothers Against Senseless Killings founder Tamar Manasseh takes part in a yoga class on a street intersection in the Englewood neighborhood of ChicagoA new study suggests that routine workouts are associated with significantly lower health costs for heart disease patients. Patients with heart disease who did moderate to vigorous physical activity for 30 minutes at least five times a week saved an average of more than $2,500 (about 2222 euros) in annual healthcare costs, the study found. “The financial benefits with regular exercise were notable across the entire spectrum of risk including those with and without known cardiovascular disease,” study author Dr. Khurram Nasir, director of the Center for Healthcare Advancement and Outcomes at Baptist Health South Florida, said by email.
 
 

Report sets research priorities for Biden's cancer moonshot

 
‎Thursday, ‎September ‎8, ‎2016, ‏‎4:10:46 AMGo to full article
WASHINGTON (AP) — A new report outlines a scientific roadmap for the White House's cancer "moonshot" initiative — urging research to harness the power of immune-based therapy, and to better tailor treatment by helping more patients get their tumors genetically profiled.
 

Dallas prosecutor resigns after battling depression

 
‎Wednesday, ‎September ‎7, ‎2016, ‏‎12:14:34 AMGo to full article
The district attorney for Dallas County, one of the most populous in the United States, resigned on Tuesday after battling personal issues that included three lengthy visits to treatment centers for depression since taking office in 2015. Susan Hawk, a first-term Republican who had previously been a state judge, has publicly acknowledged seeking treatment for depression and prescription drug abuse. Since being sworn into office in January 2015, Hawk, 46, has come under public scrutiny for her decision-making and behavior.
 

Gluten-free diet becoming more common even if celiac disease isn't

 
‎Tuesday, ‎September ‎6, ‎2016, ‏‎11:42:42 PMGo to full article
An employee arranges gluten-free products in a supermarket in NiceBy Andrew M. Seaman (Reuters Health) - More people in the U.S. are on gluten-free diets even though the proportion of Americans with celiac disease held steady from 2009 to 2014, according to a new study. Despite the fact that gluten-free diets are not known to provide any health benefits for the general population, some people believe they benefit from going gluten-free, said lead author Dr. Hyunseok Kim, of Rutgers New Jersey Medical School in Newark. "People may believe a gluten-free diet is healthier, and the diet is trendy," Kim said.
 
 

Tiny 'fitbits' to keep tabs on the body from within

 
‎Tuesday, ‎September ‎6, ‎2016, ‏‎7:38:17 PMGo to full article
A dust-sized wireless sensor that makes it possible to wirelessly monitor neural activity in real time when implanted inside the body, is shown on a finger in this handout photoBy Ben Gruber BERKELEY, Calif. (Reuters) - Scientists are developing dust-sized wireless sensors implanted inside the body to track neural activity in real-time, offering a potential new way to monitor or treat a range of conditions including epilepsy and control next-generation prosthetics. "You can almost think of it as sort of an internal, deep-tissue Fitbit, where you would be collecting a lot of data that today we think of as hard to access," said Michel Maharbiz, an associate professor of electrical engineering and computer science at the University of California, Berkeley. Current medical technologies employ a range of wired electrodes attached to different parts of the body to monitor and treat conditions ranging from heart arrhythmia to epilepsy.
 
 

WHO declares Sri Lanka malaria-free in 'truly remarkable' achievement

 
‎Tuesday, ‎September ‎6, ‎2016, ‏‎7:24:34 PMGo to full article
By Nita Bhalla NEW DELHI (Thomson Reuters Foundation) - The World Health Organisation (WHO) has declared Sri Lanka free of malaria, hailing it as a "remarkable public health achievement" for the Indian Ocean island, once one of the most affected nations in the world. The WHO said Sri Lanka had become the second country in the region to eliminate the mosquito-borne disease after Maldives with no locally transmitted cases of malaria in Sri Lanka in the last three and a half years. "Sri Lanka's achievement is truly remarkable.
 

WHO declares Sri Lanka free of malaria

 
‎Tuesday, ‎September ‎6, ‎2016, ‏‎4:09:45 PMGo to full article
Malaria is transmitted by anopheles mosquitoes, which are most active at nightThe World Health Organization has certified Sri Lanka free of malaria, the second country in the region to earn the distinction after the Maldives, the health ministry said Tuesday. The UN agency had sent teams to Sri Lanka in the past three years to evaluate its efforts to ensure there was not a single indigenous malaria case since 2012, the ministry said in a statement. "Minister Rajitha Senaratne was presented today with a certificate confirming Sri Lanka's malaria-free status by the WHO," the statement said adding that the island had set up a unit to eradicate the mosquito-borne disease.
 
 

Study of exhaust particles hints at Alzheimer's risk

 
‎Tuesday, ‎September ‎6, ‎2016, ‏‎3:59:03 PMGo to full article
Air pollution has been linked to cardiovascular and pulmonary diseases.Microscopic particles, possibly from air pollution, have been found in human brain tissue, according to a new study which flagged an Alzheimer's risk. The study authors urged further research into any "possible hazard to human health", even as outside experts cautioned it was premature to draw a definitive link between the particles and neurodegenerative disease. A team of scientists from Britain, Mexico and the United States conducted magnetic tests on frozen brain tissue obtained from 37 people aged three to 92.
 
 

GSK's triple drug cuts flare-ups in chronic lung disease

 
‎Tuesday, ‎September ‎6, ‎2016, ‏‎3:47:41 PMGo to full article
File photo of a GlaxoSmithKline logo outside one of its buildings in west LondonBy Ben Hirschler LONDON (Reuters) - An experimental three-in-one inhaled drug from GlaxoSmithKline significantly cut flare-ups in patients with chronic lung disease in a clinical trial, researchers said on Tuesday. GSK is ahead of rivals AstraZeneca and Novartis in developing a "closed triple" inhaler and plans to file the new treatment for chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) for regulatory approval this year. The study found patients taking the new triple therapy for 24 weeks had 35 percent fewer moderate or severe exacerbations compared to those on AstraZeneca's two-in-one Symbicort.
 
 

Birth pill cutting ovary cancer deaths: study

 
‎Tuesday, ‎September ‎6, ‎2016, ‏‎2:42:47 PMGo to full article
A report has linked oral contraceptive use with fewer deaths from ovarian cancer.Deaths from ovarian cancer fell significantly in Western countries from 2002 to 2012 and should continue declining largely thanks to widespread contraceptive pill use, researchers said Tuesday. Deaths fell 16 percent in the United States, 10 percent in the 28 European Union nations excluding Cyprus, for which there was no data, and eight percent in Canada. In Japan, which has a lower ovarian cancer rate than many other countries, the death rate fell two percent, said a study published in the Annals of Oncology.
 

 

Cancer News Headlines - Yahoo! News

 

 

 

Woman shares face-shaving photos to raise awareness of her condition

 
‎Today, ‎September ‎19, ‎2016, ‏‎4 hours agoGo to full article
Woman shares face-shaving photos to raise awareness of her conditionYou'd be hard-pressed to find someone who'd happily send pictures of themselves shaving, but for Australian woman Tina-Marie Beznec, 26, it's all about raising awareness of polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS). "As well as depression, anxiety, infertility, weight gain, hormonal imbalances, bloating, abdominal pains, acne, cysts, increased risk of cancer and everything else, a lot of woman [sic] including myself have to deal with facial hair," she wrote on Facebook. SEE ALSO: Watch: Postman gets 'help' from neighbourhood kitty on the daily Fitness blogger Beznec shared an image of herself shaving with fellow blogger Constance Hall on Sep. 10 with the aim of getting it shared more widely. "Do you know how UNFEMININE this can make a woman feel?!? I've always been super self conscious about it, but really just have to put this out there because I want create more awareness around this syndrome," Beznec said. "When you see someone who is overweight, has bald patches, or a woman who has facial hair DO NOT JUDGE ... You never know what a person is going through and it's unfair to put someone into the 'lazy and unhealthy' category without knowing their story." PCOS is a condition whereby a woman's ovaries are bigger than average, which results in high levels of insulin or the male hormone, androgens, or both.   According to the Victorian Health Department, PCOS affects 12 to 18 percent of women of reproductive age. 70 percent of these cases remain undiagnosed, which is why Beznec wants women to seek medical advice. "It's a hard battle but the sooner you get diagnosed, the sooner you can manage your symptoms," she wrote.
 
 

The Emotional Story Of A High School Water Boy Who Rushed For A TD In Front Of His Cancer-Stricken Mother

 
‎Yesterday, ‎September ‎18, ‎2016, ‏‎11:04:30 PMGo to full article
The Emotional Story Of A High School Water Boy Who Rushed For A TD In Front Of His Cancer-Stricken MotherThe story of Robby Heil, a senior “hydration manager” for Novi High School in Detroit, is one such tale. Heil, who has down syndrome, put down the water bottles and put on the pads under Friday night lights as the Wildcats took on South Lyon East. With 10:33 left in the second quarter and the score tied at 7, play was suspended and Heil, wearing number 24, took the field at running back.
 
 

Frankfurt extends player's contract while he fights cancer

 
‎Yesterday, ‎September ‎18, ‎2016, ‏‎8:32:06 PMGo to full article
FRANKFURT, Germany (AP) — German footballer Marco Russ has thanked Eintracht Frankfurt for extending his contract by two years while he undergoes cancer treatment.
 

Boy with Down syndrome scores touchdown as terminally ill mother watches

 
‎Yesterday, ‎September ‎18, ‎2016, ‏‎7:42:18 PMGo to full article
Boy with Down syndrome scores touchdown as terminally ill mother watchesFriday night was special for Novi High School in Michigan. After four years of serving the athletics department, Robby Heil, a senior with Down syndrome, finally got his chance to score a touchdown in a game. "This is something that we thought we could do to bring some joy, hopefully some outstanding memories," Novi head coach Jeff Burnside told WXYZ. SEE ALSO: An appreciation of the McDonald's employee with Down Syndrome who just retired after 32 years Robby was put into play during the second quarter against South Lyon East and the plan was put into place. The handoff went right to Robby, and he booked it for the end zone to score a touchdown.  The moment was even more special for Robby's mother, Debbie Heil. After watching her son score, Debbie, who has been diagnosed with terminal bone cancer, dropped to her knees after becoming overcome with emotion.  "I dropped to the ground because I was so emotional when I saw him make that touchdown," Debbie told WXYZ. "I've always been proud of him being the water boy, or as people call him the hydration manager, but this was incredible, he's Rudy tonight, he's Rudy." Robby also made an appearance on WXYZ's Sports Cave to talk about what happened. There, he demonstrated his touchdown dance, which wasn't visible after the touchdown due to his teammates' overwhelming support. 
 
 

Cancer-stricken teen jetpacks in Newport to help fulfill bucket list

 
‎Yesterday, ‎September ‎18, ‎2016, ‏‎3:32:45 AMGo to full article
Cancer-stricken teen jetpacks in Newport to help fulfill bucket listA teen with cancer came to Newport Beach to ride a water jetpack for the first time as he travels around the country crossing off his bucket list.
 
 

Reuters U.S. Sports Schedule at 2:30 p.m. ET on Saturday, Sept 17

 
‎Saturday, ‎September ‎17, ‎2016, ‏‎8:41:23 PMGo to full article
- - - - For U.S. Sports questions, contact budget@sportsxchange.com. For all other Sports queries, plesase contact us.general-news@thomsonreuters.com. All times ET unless noted. NFL Ravens assistant coach Brooks dies -- Clarence Brooks, the longest-tenured assistant coach on the Baltimore Ravens' staff, died of esophageal cancer. ...
 

EPA says glyphosate, used in Monsanto herbicide, likely not carcinogenic

 
‎Friday, ‎September ‎16, ‎2016, ‏‎11:32:02 PMGo to full article
By P.J. Huffstutter CHICAGO (Reuters) - Glyphosate, the key ingredient in Monsanto Co's Roundup herbicide, is not likely carcinogenic to humans, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency said on Friday as it outlined its current position on the controversial chemical. The EPA has been involved in a decades-long process to assess human and animal health risks, as well as ecological risks, of glyphosate. Various agencies around the world have offered conflicting opinions on whether glyphosate causes cancer.
 

State Department mourns death of ex-diplomat

 
‎Friday, ‎September ‎16, ‎2016, ‏‎8:27:57 PMGo to full article
WASHINGTON (AP) — State Department spokesman John Kirby says the department is mourning the death of former diplomat John Buzbee, who died Thursday of complications from cancer.
 

Cancer-stricken teacher serenaded by 400 students dies

 
‎Friday, ‎September ‎16, ‎2016, ‏‎7:35:13 PMGo to full article
Cancer-stricken teacher serenaded by 400 students diesBen Ellis was fighting an aggressive form of cancer. The Christ Presbyterian Academy in Nashville, Tennessee, where he worked told ABC News that Ellis died early Friday morning.
 
 

VP Biden gives new push on 'Cancer Moonshot' clinical trials

 
‎Friday, ‎September ‎16, ‎2016, ‏‎7:24:05 PMGo to full article
File photo of Vice President Biden addressing the session "Cancer Moonshot: A Call to Action" during the annual meeting 2016 of the WEF in DavosU.S. Vice President Joseph Biden on Friday announced new measures to help cancer patients navigate the clinical trials process as part of the administration's "Cancer Moonshot" initiative to speed new treatments to market. In a statement released ahead of a planned speech at Rice University in Houston, Biden said clinical trials are essential for developing new and more effective cancer diagnostics and treatments.
 
 

Boy grew out his gorgeous mane to make wigs for cancer patients

 
‎Friday, ‎September ‎16, ‎2016, ‏‎6:27:55 PMGo to full article
Boy grew out his gorgeous mane to make wigs for cancer patientsGrowing out your hair can serve as a lot more than just good braid material. After two years of no haircuts, 8-year-old Thomas Moore from Maryland got his flowing locks chopped off to make wigs for children with cancer. SEE ALSO: Mum raises awareness for childhood cancer with heartbreaking school photo my nephew grew his hair out for two years to donate to kids with cancer  pic.twitter.com/YuamNNcMEI — amber lynne (@storkpatrol) September 11, 2016 Moore's aunt Amber shared before and after photos of his transformation on Twitter, and her tweet has been liked over 113,000 times and retweeted over 57,000 times as of this writing. According to an NBC profile, Moore's project started about two years ago when he noticed his mother watching a video about a 5-year-old losing her hair due to chemotherapy. Learning about chemotherapy and that it affected children inspired Moore to grow his hair out – all the way to his tailbone. Moore's mom Angilea Pulos (a.k.a. Socue Soflien) expressed her pride on Facebook . "Myyyy baby! I'm so proud of him!" she wrote. "He's breathing all hard and smiling so BIG right now!!!" Moore donated three ponytails, each over a foot long. The internet looks forward to seeing your generosity again in another two years, Thomas. [ H/T: Bored Panda ]
 
 

Cancer-risk genetic testing reports can vary from lab to lab

 
‎Friday, ‎September ‎16, ‎2016, ‏‎6:10:09 PMGo to full article
By Kathryn Doyle (Reuters Health) - Testing for gene mutations linked to cancer risk may guide how a patient is treated, but the determination of whether a mutation is dangerous or benign can vary from lab to lab, according to a recent study. There are guidelines for classifying gene variants, but interpreting the guidelines can vary by lab or provider, the authors write in the Journal of Clinical Oncology. “We are now facing a new era when genetic testing becomes more easy to perform technically but still there are challenges that remain in interpretation of the data,” said lead author Dr. Judith Balmana of the Hospital Vall d’Hebron and Universitat Autonoma de Barcelona in Spain.
 

Exercise may reduce alcohol-related cancer risk

 
‎Friday, ‎September ‎16, ‎2016, ‏‎5:15:46 PMGo to full article
By Carolyn Crist (Reuters Health) - Getting regular moderate or vigorous exercise may offset some of the potentially lethal health effects of regular alcohol consumption, a new study suggests. Researchers confirmed an increased risk of death from alcohol-related cancers as well as death from all causes among those who drank more than just occasionally, compared to people who never imbibed. “Alcohol is the most commonly consumed psychotropic drug that, in contrast to most other drugs, is socially and culturally acceptable,” said senior author Emmanuel Stamatakis, an associate professor of exercise, health and physical activity at the University of Sydney in Australia.
 

EMA panel recommends nod for Pfizer's breast cancer drug

 
‎Friday, ‎September ‎16, ‎2016, ‏‎3:15:27 PMGo to full article
The Pfizer logo is seen at their world headquarters in New York(Reuters) - U.S. drugmaker Pfizer Inc's breast cancer drug, Ibrance, should be given marketing approval, an advisory committee at the European Medicines Agency recommended. The CHMP's opinion will now be reviewed by the EMA, Pfizer said in a statement on Friday. Novartis is also testing an experimental breast cancer pill which belongs to same drug class as Pfizer's Ibrance.
 
 

What the Cancer Moonshot Might Mean for Kids

 
‎Friday, ‎September ‎16, ‎2016, ‏‎3:00:00 PMGo to full article
When Lara Weberling of Bakersfield, California, heard about the Cancer Moonshot effort, announced in January by President Barack Obama, the news resonated deeply. As a mother who lost her young son to cancer and as a motivated cancer advocate, she's strongly aware of the need to put cancer in the national spotlight. Moonshot's goal in a nutshell: achieve a decade's worth of progress in cancer prevention, diagnosis and treatment within five years.
 

NASA astronaut wears spacesuit painted by kids with cancer

 
‎Friday, ‎September ‎16, ‎2016, ‏‎1:34:37 PMGo to full article
This undated handout photo from NASA shows astronaut Kate Rubins aboard the International Space Station wearing a hand-painted spacesuit decorated by childhood cancer patients at the University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center in Houston. NASA said Rubins will chat from the space station with patients during a 20-minute call on Friday, Sept. 16, 2016. (NASA via AP)HOUSTON (AP) — Some childhood cancer patients will chat Friday with an astronaut aboard the International Space Station wearing a hand-painted spacesuit they helped decorate.
 
 

Famed Turkish actor Tarik Akan dies after cancer battle

 
‎Friday, ‎September ‎16, ‎2016, ‏‎12:53:31 PMGo to full article
ISTANBUL (AP) — Tarik Akan, an acclaimed Turkish actor who earned accolades for the controversial 1982 film "Yol," has died after a brief battle with cancer. He was 66.
 

John Buzbee, a US diplomat who served in Mideast, dies at 50

 
‎Friday, ‎September ‎16, ‎2016, ‏‎9:18:24 AMGo to full article
In his photo provided by the family, taken April 16, 2014, John Buzbee is seen at the Alhambra in Granada, Spain. Buzbee, a veteran Foreign Service officer who served across the Middle East, including two stints in Iraq in the aftermath of the U.S. invasion, died Thursday, Sept. 15, 2016, from complications from metastatic colon cancer. He was 50. (Family Photo via AP)WASHINGTON (AP) — John Buzbee, a veteran Foreign Service officer who served across the Middle East, including two stints in Iraq after the 2003 U.S. invasion, has died from complications from metastatic colon cancer. He was 50.
 
 

Veteran US diplomat John Buzbee dies at 50

 
‎Thursday, ‎September ‎15, ‎2016, ‏‎11:03:38 PMGo to full article
In his photo provided by the family, taken April 16, 2014, John Buzbee is seen at the Alhambra in Granada, Spain. Buzbee, a veteran Foreign Service officer who served across the Middle East, including two stints in Iraq in the aftermath of the U.S. invasion, died Thursday, Sept. 15, 2016, from complications from metastatic colon cancer. He was 50. (Family Photo via AP)WASHINGTON (AP) — John Buzbee, a veteran Foreign Service officer who served across the Middle East, including two stints in Iraq after the 2003 U.S. invasion, died Thursday from complications from metastatic colon cancer. He was 50.
 
 

Maryland governor says he remains cancer-free

 
‎Thursday, ‎September ‎15, ‎2016, ‏‎10:07:07 PMGo to full article
Gov. Larry Hogan pauses to greet Boulder, whose owner Lori Gross said has lymphoma, after signing an executive order that renews the state's Council on Cancer Control on Thursday, Sept. 15, 2016, in Annapolis, Md. Hogan also said he remains cancer-free in his own battle against B-cell non-Hodgkin lymphoma. The governor said he has one more maintenance treatment scheduled before he will be "hopefully done with it forever." (AP Photo/Brian Witte)ANNAPOLIS, Md. (AP) — Maryland Gov. Larry Hogan said Thursday he remains cancer-free, with one more treatment scheduled before he hopes to have the disease behind him.
 
 

Bowie tipped for posthumous Mercury Prize win

 
‎Thursday, ‎September ‎15, ‎2016, ‏‎9:14:35 PMGo to full article
Late rock legend David Bowie is in the running for the prestigious Mercury Prize with "Blackstar," an album infused with jazz and a dark lyricismLate rock legend David Bowie's final album is hotly-tipped to claim the prestigious Mercury Prize on Thursday, when it goes up against fellow critics' favourites including Radiohead and Anohni. Bowie is in the running for "Blackstar," an album infused with jazz and a dark lyricism that foreshadowed his death in January just two days after the album's release, following an undisclosed cancer battle. Bowie, who never won the prestigious British music prize in his lifetime, would be the first artist to win it posthumously.
 
 

Too soon to tell if 9/11 firefighters face increased cancer risk

 
‎Thursday, ‎September ‎15, ‎2016, ‏‎7:38:26 PMGo to full article
By Lisa Rapaport (Reuters Health) - Fifteen years after the 9/11 attacks, the jury is still out on whether firefighters who worked at the World Trade Center site have increased odds of developing cancer, a U.S. study suggests. Some previous research has linked working at the site with higher rates of certain cancers than are seen among people who weren’t at the World Trade Center during that time. The current study, however, found firefighters who responded to the attacks in New York don’t appear to have a greater cancer risk than firefighters from San Francisco, Chicago and Philadelphia who were not part of the 9/11 emergency response – with the exception of two cancer types.
 

Mum raises awareness for childhood cancer with heartbreaking school photo

 
‎Thursday, ‎September ‎15, ‎2016, ‏‎3:01:06 PMGo to full article
Mum raises awareness for childhood cancer with heartbreaking school photoLONDON — A British mum who lost her little girl to cancer has shared an emotional post on Facebook to help raise awareness of the disease. Julie Apicella of Norfolk in December lost her daughter Emily after her long battle with Wilms' tumour, a cancer of the kidney. SEE ALSO: Mum makes heartbreaking plea in video about her son's death Emily underwent surgery, received chemotherapy and took part in a drugs trial, according to the Huffington Post UK , but she kept relapsing. "In July to August 2015 we came off the trial as it wasn't working and came home to make memories of our time left," Apicella said. "There were no treatments left to try." Now, Apicella is attempting to raise awareness of childhood cancer by encouraging as many people as possible to add a gold ribbon to their profile picture. Apicella's Facebook post had over 9000 shares at the time of writing. Here's Apicella's post in full. Image: facebook/julie apicella The post contains links to the The Go Gold Project, which encourages people to update their social media profiles for Childhood Cancer Awareness Month, and Glow Gold September, which involves buildings across the world being illuminated gold to further raise awareness. "My daughter ran out of options and we as a family had to watch as her cancer took over her body with nothing to try and cure her and that is tragic," Apicella told the Huffington Post UK . "I would like the gold ribbon of childhood cancer to be as recognised as the pink ribbon for breast cancer, and for the symptoms [of] cancer to be as recognised as the meningitis rash glass test by parents and doctors." A list of the symptoms of Wilms' tumour can be found on Macmillan's website. More information about different types of childhood cancer can be found here.
 
 

Transgender patients face fear and stigma in the doctor's office

 
‎Thursday, ‎September ‎15, ‎2016, ‏‎7:05:35 AMGo to full article
Tanya Walker gives an interview at her apartment in New YorkTanya Walker had lung cancer and was coughing up blood, but she says her emergency room doctor kept asking about her genitals. "It seemed like they weren't going to treat me unless I told them what genitals I had," Walker, a 53-year-old transgender woman, activist and advocate, said about her 2013 experience in a U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs hospital in New York. The same rejection they confront at home and in society can often await them in the doctor's office, where many report being harassed, ridiculed or even assaulted.
 
 

Parents of children with cancer sometimes regret decisions

 
‎Wednesday, ‎September ‎14, ‎2016, ‏‎11:43:38 PMGo to full article
By Andrew M. Seaman (Reuters Health) - Parents of children with cancer face difficult decisions, and a new study suggests that about one in six of them look back on some of their choices with a great deal of regret. Parents may feel as if they have no control when their child is first diagnosed with cancer, and making decisions about treatment is the one thing they can do, said Dr. Jennifer Mack, a pediatric oncologist at the Dana-Farber Cancer Institute and Boston Children's Hospital. "We wanted to try to understand what parents experience and when they look back on their decisions, how they feel about them," she said.
 

Spectrum bladder cancer drug not effective: U.S. FDA panel

 
‎Wednesday, ‎September ‎14, ‎2016, ‏‎9:02:14 PMGo to full article
Spectrum Pharmaceuticals Inc's experimental bladder cancer treatment apaziquone is not effective in delaying the time to recurrence of the disease, an advisory committee to the U.S. Food and Drug Administration concluded on Wednesday. Spectrum's shares fell 6.2 percent to $5.15. The committee, which convened to advise the FDA on whether to approve the drug, voted unanimously that the treatment has no more effect on the disease than a placebo over a two-year period.
 

Emmys Host Jimmy Kimmel Lets Loose on His Bizarre Diet, Penis Pics and Why He Has All of Letterman's Neckties

 
‎Wednesday, ‎September ‎14, ‎2016, ‏‎6:00:00 AMGo to full article
Emmys Host Jimmy Kimmel Lets Loose on His Bizarre Diet, Penis Pics and Why He Has All of Letterman's NecktiesThe interview below clues you into the first time I met Jimmy Kimmel many years ago. What’s most important is what happened after that, which we didn’t really get into during the chat: He never changed. Fame didn’t change him. He wasn’t nice to critic schmucks one day when he was barely known and acting like we were cancer 10 years later when he had his ABC late-night show. He was the same to me back then as he is now. ...
 
 

Arizona sued over denying driver's licenses to some migrants

 
‎Wednesday, ‎September ‎14, ‎2016, ‏‎3:26:39 AMGo to full article
TUCSON, Ariz. (AP) — A single mother battling cancer and a victim of domestic abuse are among the immigrants who qualify for Arizona driver's licenses but have been illegally denied the chance to drive a car, a group of advocacy organizations said in a new federal lawsuit.
 

Choosing stronger sunscreen would reduce women's melanoma risk

 
‎Tuesday, ‎September ‎13, ‎2016, ‏‎11:25:36 PMGo to full article
By Andrew M. Seaman (Reuters Health) - The number of women affected by the deadliest form of skin cancer could fall by almost a fifth if they all used sunscreen with a sun protection factor (SPF) of 15 or higher, a new study suggests. While it may seem obvious that sunscreen with a higher SPF would protect against skin cancer, the study's lead author said past research produced conflicting results, in part because many sunscreen users don't apply sunscreens properly. In addition, said Reza Ghiasvand of the University of Oslo in Norway, people often don't reapply sunscreen as recommended.
 

Hundreds of students serenade teacher battling cancer

 
‎Tuesday, ‎September ‎13, ‎2016, ‏‎5:55:59 PMGo to full article
NASHVILLE, Tenn. (AP) — More than 400 students and faculty from a Tennessee school have left their classrooms to serenade a teacher suffering from an aggressive form of cancer.
 

Changing Face of Science: The Psychology of Face Transplants

 
‎Tuesday, ‎September ‎13, ‎2016, ‏‎4:38:00 PMGo to full article
It's a harrowing experience just a few dozen people have endured: losing their faces to horrific injuries and then, against all odds, receiving new ones, through face transplant surgeries. The first of these patients, Isabelle Dinoire, has died, her doctors confirmed this week. Dinoire lost her life in April to cancer, perhaps related to the anti-rejection drugs that transplant recipients must take to prevent their immune systems from attacking their new tissue, news outlets reported.
 

Soccer-Everton to donate 200,000 pounds to Sunderland fan

 
‎Tuesday, ‎September ‎13, ‎2016, ‏‎11:56:42 AMGo to full article
Everton have pledged to donate 200,000 pounds ($265,760) to five-year-old Sunderland fan Bradley Lowery in his battle against cancer, the Merseyside club said. Lowery was just two when he was first diagnosed with the life-threatening illness. "Everton Football Club has pledged a donation of 200,000 pounds to support Bradley Lowery in his brave battle," the club said in a statement on their website (www.evertonfc.com).
 

Cancer overtakes heart disease as Australia's biggest killer

 
‎Tuesday, ‎September ‎13, ‎2016, ‏‎7:36:34 AMGo to full article
By Tom Westbrook SYDNEY (Reuters) - Cancer has become Australia's biggest killer, overtaking heart disease for the first time to take more lives than any other ailment, a government health agency said in a report released on Tuesday. Indigenous Australians also fare much worse than non-indigenous on almost every health score, according to Australia's Health 2016 report, complied by the government's Australian Institute of Health and Welfare and published every two years.
 

Fans salute young Sunderland cancer sufferer

 
‎Monday, ‎September ‎12, ‎2016, ‏‎11:43:00 PMGo to full article
Sunderland's Stadium of Light honored five-year-old Bradley Lowery, who is battling cancerSunderland (United Kingdom) (AFP) - Five-year-old match mascot Bradley Lowery, who is battling cancer, had his name chanted and received a minute's applause in the fifth minute of the Premier League game between Sunderland and Everton on Monday.
 
 

Fantasy meets tragedy in surreal drama 'A Monster Calls'

 
‎Monday, ‎September ‎12, ‎2016, ‏‎7:20:16 PMGo to full article
Felicity Jones arrives at the European Premiere of Star Wars, The Force Awakens in Leicester Square, LondonA teenage boy's struggle with his mother's terminal illness takes a surreal turn when he finds comfort in a giant talking tree monster, in the emotional fantasy drama "A Monster Calls." The film, which had its world premiere at the Toronto International Film Festival on Saturday, follows the story of Connor, a quiet, artistic teenage boy who becomes a target for the school bully. As his mother, played by Felicity Jones, gets sicker from cancer, Conner goes to live with his cold, reserved grandmother, played by Sigourney Weaver. In the midst of his life crumbling around him, Connor is visited at night by a giant talking yew tree monster.
 
 

Chronic Sinus Problems Linked to Small Increase in Cancer Risk

 
‎Monday, ‎September ‎12, ‎2016, ‏‎4:51:51 PMGo to full article
The researchers found a link between people in the United States ages 65 and older who had chronic sinusitis and an increased risk of being diagnosed with one of three different types of head and neck cancer, compared with older adults without chronic sinus problems. Sinusitis is a common condition in which the sinuses become inflamed, causing  symptoms such as nasal congestion, facial pressure and thick nasal discharge. All three of the cancers linked with chronic sinusitis are rare, and they include nasopharyngeal cancer (cancer of an area in the upper part of the throat behind the nose), human papillomavirus-related oropharyngeal cancer (which occurs in an area in the middle of the throat, behind the mouth), and nasal cavity and paranasal sinus cavity cancers (the nasal cavity is the space behind the nose where air passes on its way to the throat, and paranasal refers to the spaces in the bones around the nose).
 

A USC Star's Mom Went To Her First Game Since Beating Breast Cancer, And He Scored A Touchdown

 
‎Sunday, ‎September ‎11, ‎2016, ‏‎4:15:00 PMGo to full article
A USC Star's Mom Went To Her First Game Since Beating Breast Cancer, And He Scored A Touchdown.@AdoreeKnows‘ mom was diagnosed with breast cancer last year and couldn’t go to any games. USC’s Adoree’ Jackson is a special athletic talent. While his exploits on the field may have earned him USC’s 2015 MVP and a nod as one of the team’s captains this year, what happened to him on Saturday surely trumps all of that.
 
 

US designer with Iraqi roots stuns NY fashion week

 
‎Saturday, ‎September ‎10, ‎2016, ‏‎9:34:44 PMGo to full article
Models display the fashion of Oday Shakar during New York Fashion Week on September 9, 2016Oday Shakar is still young but he has already lived through more than your average American fashion designer: childhood bullying, two years in Iraq after the Gulf War and cancer. "I realized I needed to find beauty in my own story so that's where I grabbed inspiration for this, so I mix contemporary Middle Eastern art with beautiful simple silhouettes for everyday (wear)," Shakar told AFP. "My aunt studied fashion design and wasn't able to pursue it, so in a way I'm doing all of this because she didn't get the chance and I have the opportunity, being an American," he said.
 
 

American Designer With Iraqi Roots Stuns New York Fashion Week

 
‎Saturday, ‎September ‎10, ‎2016, ‏‎9:13:39 PMGo to full article
Models display the fashion of Oday Shakar during New York Fashion Week on September 9, 2016Oday Shakar is still young but he has already lived through more than your average American fashion designer: childhood bullying, two years in Iraq after the Gulf War and cancer.
 
 

Vice President Joe Biden, Bradley Cooper, Katie Couric Attend Star-Studded 'Stand Up to Cancer' Telethon

 
‎Saturday, ‎September ‎10, ‎2016, ‏‎6:00:40 AMGo to full article
Tom Hanks, Emma Stone and a host of A-listers showed their support and raised money for cancer research at the live telecast on Friday.

 

 

Weathering the Coming Storm


 

 

 

Price R399.00

 

 


 

Description

Dr. Chuck Missler, an internationally known business executive, outlines our current economic predicament and defensive steps you can take to lessen the impact of the impending economic crisis. As a Bible teacher for over 30 years with a ministry reaching over 40 countries, Chuck shares some key strategies to prepare yourself spiritually and practically.

Is the World facing another major economic upheaval?

What is the best strategy to protect your family in times of economic uncertainty?

The Church has enjoyed a relatively peaceful existence in the West for a few centuries but the with the coming persecution, how do we go about organizing home study and home-church?

Soul Survival – Keeping your “lamp full” during the hard times ahead.

Join Dr. Chuck Missler and Ron Matsen in the Executive Brie fing Room of
The River Lodge, New Zealand, in an intensive summary outlining what lies
ahead and how we can prepare for the coming storm.

Runtime: Approx. 5 hours

© 2012 Koinonia House Inc.

Available in the following formats:

 

DVD:

•3 Disks
•5 M4A Files
•1 PDF Notes File
•Color, 16:9, Dolby Digital 2.0 stereo, Region encoding (This DVD will be viewable in other countries WITH the proper DVD player and television set.)


 
 

Expectations

 of the

 Antichrist

 

 

Dr. Chuck Missler and Ron Matsen

 

Price R 499.00

 

There are many diverse anticipations concerning the Coming World Leader, commonly referred to as “The Antichrist.” This study will explore the Biblical descriptions with the specific expectations of the globalists, Islam, the Vatican, Freemasonry, and others.
• Will he be a Nephilim?
• Why is the Vatican openly preparing to receive an “alien” visitor?
• Will he be a resurrection of Nimrod? Is his DNA a factor?
• What are the expectations of transhumanist technologists in this regard?
Clearly, the Bible has much more to illuminate this issue far beyond the popular conceptions; and yet the composite perspective will astonish most. Furthermore, is there a climactic cosmic deception being prepared that, if it were possible, “it would deceive the very elect”? Jesus commanded us, “Be not deceived.” But, how?
How close are these events to our current horizon?
Join Dr. Chuck Missler and Ron Matsen in an intensive summary of some of the Strategic Trends that will impact all of us.
Available in the following formats:

DVD:
•3 Discs
•6 M4A Files
•1 PDF Notes File
•Color, Fullscreen 16:9, Dolby Digital 2.0 stereo, Region  encoding ( This DVD will be viewable in other countries WITH the proper DVD player and television set.)


 

 

 

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Genetically Modified Food & People.

 

 

 

 Angels, Volume III:

The Denizens of the Metacosm

 

DVD

 

 

Price R 179.00

 

Angels, Volume III: The Denizens of the Metacosm

 

DVD

by Dr. Chuck Missler

 

Description

Volumes 1 & 2 of this series explored the finite limits and boundaries of our physical reality. After probing the limits of both the Macrocosm and the Microcosm, we discovered that our reality is but a shadow of larger reality, the Metacosm, a domain of extra-dimensional transfers and other paradoxical phenomena.

 

Volume 3 explores the contradictory behavior of UFOs and other demonic deceptions characteristic of the End Times. Explore these topics in more detail in either this two-hour briefing, Angels Vol 3: The Denizens of the Metacosm or our six-hour extensive study, Expectations of the Antichrist.

 

 

• Are they real?

• Why do UFOs enjoy a military classification higher than our most sensitive weapons systems?

• Why are the events which occurred in Roswell New Mexico still classified after 66 years?

• Why is the Vatican openly preparing to receive an Alien Visitor?

• How should a Christian deal with the occurrences of Alien abductions?

• Jesus admonished us to “Be not deceived.” How?

• How do we prepare for the deception which, “if it were possible, would deceive the very elect”?

 

Join Dr. Chuck Missler in the Executive Briefing Room of the River Lodge, New Zealand, exploring the misinformation, (and deliberate disinformation) about the various “denizens of the Metacosm” and other insights of the invisible war unfolding on our near horizon.

 

This briefing pack contains 2 hours of teaching

 

Available in the following formats

 

DVD:

•1 Disc

•2 M4A Files

•Color, Fullscreen 16:9, Dolby Digital 2.0 stereo, Region. This DVD will be viewable in other countries WITH the proper DVD player and television set.)

 

DVD

PRICE  R 159.00

DVD

PRICE R 159.00

 

DVD

Price  R 159.00

 

DVD

Price R 159.00

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


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"In seasons of severe trial, the Christian has nothing on earth that he can trust to, and is therefore compelled to cast himself on God alone. When no human deliverance can avail, he must simply and entirely trust himself to the providence and care of God. Happy storm that wrecks a man on such a rock as this! O blessed hurricane that drives the soul to God--and God alone!"
- Spurgeon

 

 

 

 

+27 11 969 0086


frosty@khouseafrica.com   

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


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