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Monitor The Strategic Trends

Biotech & Global Pestilence Introduction:

 

The threat of germ warfare has brought to the forefront long-forgotten diseases like plague, anthrax, and smallpox. Recent television news programs have highlighted secret projects in the former Soviet Union to develop antibiotic-resistant strains of genetically engineered viruses and bacteria.


[READ THE FULL INTRODUCTION]

 

 


 
 

Human Nature

Speakers:

Ron Matsen

R179.00

 

 

 

About available formats

Description: 

What does it mean to be human? Philosophers, theologians, sociologists and psychologists have attempted to understand the nature of mankind for ages. Their conclusions often contradict each other which lead to confusion rather than clarification. Clearly Man is a very complicated social being. The Bible tells us that man is “fearfully and wonderfully made.”
  • How do we understand our makeup and does it make a difference?
  • What is the meaning of being “created in the image of God?”
  • What causes our natural responses and can we change this behaviour?

Join Ron Matsen from the Executive Briefing Room of the River Lodge, New Zealand as he explores the subject of our “Human Nature” and gives insight into the architecture and accountability of all mankind.

This briefing pack contains approx. 2 hours of teaching.

  • DVD discs
  • M4A files
  • PDF Notes file
  •  

 

 

 

 

 

CANCER  Awareness

 

 

 

http://news.yahoo.com/rss/cancer

 

Our Precious Daughter Penny

Penny has been the bravest and shining example the Lord could have chosen and will be a witness to the Glory of God and the faithfulness of His promises forever.

We give thanks to all who supported her with their prayers, may God pour out His everlasting Love over you forever.
BARBARA & RICHARD FROST & FAMILY
 

 

 

28-11-2014

 

 

 

 

We are humbled beyond words by the Glory of God's Grace.

We will be forever grateful for the the wonderful friends praying continuously for Penny and her family.

 

 

Biotech & Global Pestilence

 

Cancer News Headlines

 

Hallmarks of Cancer 1: Self-Sufficiency in Growth Signals

 

 

 

Linda Ronstadt & James Ingram - "Somewhere Out There"

 

 

Linda Ronstadt - Tracks Of My Tears

 

 

 

Linda Ronstadt - Long Long Time Linda Ronstadt

 

 

 

Treasury Comments..

 

PENNY

 

 

 

 

 

Price R 179

 

 

 

 

Beginning of Wisdom

 

by

 Dr. Chuck Missler

“The fear of God is the beginning of wisdom.” Proverbs 9:10

But how do we balance the awesome majesty due to the Creator and Ruler of the universe with the gracious family intimacy that is now available to us through the completed work of Christ?

What does His Holiness demand of us, personally?

What are the hazards of failing to render the Almighty His due, while availing ourselves the riches committed to us of the precious promises in His Word?

How do we deal with these paramount issues facing us daily in practical challenges?

Chuck Missler grapples with these wildly misunderstood tensions with down-to-earth frankness and Biblically-based candor.

 


 

 

Price R 179.00

 

 

The Gospel: The Message of Reconciliation

DVD

by Ron Matsen 

 

 

 

Price R 179.00

 

 

 

Description

One of the last instructions given by Jesus to the Church was, “Go into all the world and preach the gospel.” (Mark 16:15)

The fact is most Christians don’t know how to share their faith effectively. Sadly, many of the people they know in the world today are wandering around, lost and without hope, having never heard the wonderful Message of Reconciliation.

How would you answer the question, “What must I do to be saved?”

What are the essential facts, demands and promises of the Gospel?

Why are we told to evangelize?

Join Ron Matsen in the Executive Briefing Room of the River Lodge, New Zealand as he explores the subject of “The Gospel – The Message of Reconciliation” and gives practical insight into how to share the essential doctrines of salvation.

This briefing pack contains 2 hours of teaching

© Copyright 2013

 

 

 

Disaster Management News from TerraDaily.com

 

Earth News, Earth Science, Energy Technology, Environment News

 

 

 

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 CURSE THEE'

 

 

Behold a Livid Horse: Emergent Diseases and Biochemical Warfare

 

 

PRICE R 249.00

 

 

 

Behold a Livid Horse:

 Emergent Diseases

 and

Biochemical Warfare

 

DVD

 

by Dr. Chuck Missler

 

 

Dr. Chuck Missler explores these and other questions below concerning this climactic Fourth Horsemen and the unique role it plays in the End-Time Scenario:

•Why are previously conquered diseases now making a comeback?

•How real is the threat of biological terrorism?

•Why is it more dangerous than chemical terrorism?

•Was the AIDS virus deliberately designed? By whom? And why?

•Is there any truth behind an agenda to control (and reduce) the world’s population? By whom? And why?

•Who are the two riders associated with the Livid Horse? How do they differ?

 

This briefing pack contains 2 hours of teaching

 

Available in the following formats

 

DVD:

•2 MP3 files

•1 PDF Notes file

•Colour, Full screen 16:9, Dolby Digital 2.0 stereo,

 

 

Diseases/Conditions News Headlines - Yahoo! News

 

 

Preventing cancer spread: mouse study points to fat

 
‎Today, ‎December ‎8, ‎2016, ‏‎10 hours agoGo to full article
Preventing cancer spread: mouse study points to fatSpanish scientists announced Wednesday they may have identified a way to stop cancer from spreading, at least in mice, and said it could be linked to eating fat. Writing in the journal Nature, the team said they had discovered a type of tumour cell which spreads cancer from organ to organ -- a process known as metastasis, which is what makes the disease so deadly. This worked for human mouth, skin and breast cancer.
 
 

Could flickering light treat Alzheimer's?

 
‎Today, ‎December ‎8, ‎2016, ‏‎10 hours agoGo to full article
Could flickering light treat Alzheimer's?Scientists have used flickering LED lights to shrink, in mouse brains, the beta amyloid plaques associated with Alzheimer's Disease in humans, they reported on Wednesday. "It's a big 'if'," said Li-Huei Tsai of the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, who co-authored the study. The therapy is believed to work by inducing electrical brain waves thought to have become dysfunctional in people with Alzheimer's.
 
 

Britain fines Pfizer record $107 million for huge drug price hike

 
‎Yesterday, ‎December ‎7, ‎2016, ‏‎4:22:15 PMGo to full article
The Pfizer logo is seen at their world headquarters in New YorkBritain's competition watchdog has fined Pfizer a record 84.2 million pounds ($107 million) for its role in ramping up the cost of an epilepsy drug by as much as 2,600 percent. The Competition and Markets Authority (CMA) also fined Flynn Pharma 5.2 million pounds for overcharging for phenytoin sodium capsules, following a dramatic price hike in 2012. The CMA's ruling comes amid a growing debate on both sides of the Atlantic about the ethics of price hikes for old off-patent medicines that are only made by a few firms and where there is little competition.
 
 

From smart toothbrushes to cancer, Philips bets big on software

 
‎Yesterday, ‎December ‎7, ‎2016, ‏‎12:22:12 PMGo to full article
Van Houten, CEO of Philips, speaks during the presentation of the 2013 full-year results in AmsterdamBy Ben Hirschler LONDON (Reuters) - These days the average researcher at Philips is more likely to be a software developer than an product engineer, reflecting a transformation at the former Dutch conglomerate that its chief executive says will gather pace. "It's a huge shift," Frans van Houten told Reuters, noting that around 60 percent of the healthcare technology company's R&D staff are now focused on software. It will not go to 100 percent, because we will still make products, but you could easily see that the value-add comes more out of software than hardware." Philips has repositioned itself as a health business after spinning off lighting, which has freed up capacity for acquisitions such as last year's $1.2 billion purchase of blood vessel imaging firm Volcano.
 
 

EU clears Bristol-Myers immunotherapy drug for blood cancer

 
‎Yesterday, ‎December ‎7, ‎2016, ‏‎2:02:09 AMGo to full article
LONDON (Reuters) - Bristol-Myers Squibb's immunotherapy drug Opdivo has been approved in Europe for the treatment of classical Hodgkin lymphoma, a rare blood cancer, the U.S. company said on Wednesday. Opdivo is already approved for melanoma, lung cancer and kidney cancer. (Reporting by Ben Hirschler. Editing by Jane Merriman)
 

IUDS, implants may be best birth control for women with diabetes

 
‎Tuesday, ‎December ‎6, ‎2016, ‏‎6:41:23 PMGo to full article
By Andrew M. Seaman (Reuters Health) - The two most effective hormonal birth control methods for women in general are also excellent options for women with diabetes, according to a new study. Intrauterine devices (IUDs) and contraceptive implants that are placed under the skin, both of which are highly effective, were linked with the lowest risk of blood clots in these higher-risk women. Hormonal contraceptives boost women's risk for clots, which can lead to heart attack and strokes.
 

Novartis' drug tops chemotherapy in untreated lung cancer patients

 
‎Tuesday, ‎December ‎6, ‎2016, ‏‎3:48:20 PMGo to full article
File photo of Swiss drugmaker Novartis' logo at the company's plant in the northern Swiss town of Stein(Reuters) - Novartis AG said its cancer drug, Zykadia, was twice as effective as chemotherapy in slowing the progression of a rare form of lung cancer in a late-stage study. Patients with anaplastic lymphoma kinase-positive (ALK+)advanced non-small cell lung cancer treated with Zykadia had a median progression-free survival of 16.6 months, compared to 8.1 months for those on chemotherapy. Novartis' drug also has conditional approval as a second-line treatment in Europe.
 
 

EU bans Ukraine poultry imports due to avian flu outbreak

 
‎Tuesday, ‎December ‎6, ‎2016, ‏‎3:28:29 PMGo to full article
The European Union (EU) has banned poultry imports from Ukraine due to concerns over avian flu, Ukraine's food safety watchdog said on Tuesday. The ban, which is for an indeterminate period, is linked to a recent case of avian flu in the southern Ukrainian region of Kherson, the watchdog said in a statement. The outbreak, the first in Ukraine since 2008, was not previously reported but the food agency said it had been discovered in early December at non-commercial farms.
 

Serbia confirms first case of H5N8 bird flu

 
‎Tuesday, ‎December ‎6, ‎2016, ‏‎2:39:10 PMGo to full article
Serbia reported its first case of bird flu on Tuesday, saying that six swans found dead in northern Serbia were infected with the H5N8 bird flu strain. Cases of bird flu have been found in a number of countries across Europe in recent weeks, including in neighboring Romania. Last month, neighboring Croatia said that 10 dead swans had been found infected with bird flu in the east of the country.
 

AstraZeneca pill slashes lung cancer progression in study

 
‎Tuesday, ‎December ‎6, ‎2016, ‏‎12:07:07 PMGo to full article
A sign is seen at an AstraZeneca site in MacclesfieldBy Ben Hirschler LONDON (Reuters) - AstraZeneca's pill Tagrisso cut the risk of lung cancer progressing by 70 percent compared to standard chemotherapy in a major clinical trial, lifting prospects for a drug that is key to the company's lofty long-term sales goals. The medicine is designed to help cancer patients with certain genetic mutations that are very common in China and other parts of east Asia. Tagrisso is already on the market, winning early approval based on mid-stage studies and selling $276 million in the first nine months of 2016, but AstraZeneca was required to produce a confirmatory Phase III randomized study detailing its benefits.
 
 

All of France placed on 'high risk' restrictions over bird flu

 
‎Tuesday, ‎December ‎6, ‎2016, ‏‎12:03:34 PMGo to full article
France widened "high risk" restrictions to the entire country after the detection of several cases of the highly pathogenic H5N8 avian flu strain in farms in southwest France and in wild ducks in northern France, the farm ministry said on Tuesday. The decision was also motivated by the "rapid change in the ... situation in France and in several European countries", the statement said. The ministry had already imposed tighter restrictions on several zones mostly located in humid areas last month in an effort to avoid contamination.
 

South Korea expands poultry cull to fight bird flu

 
‎Tuesday, ‎December ‎6, ‎2016, ‏‎9:25:55 AMGo to full article
Chickens are displayed for sale at chicken store in SeoulSouth Korea plans to cull more chickens and ducks as it tries to contain an outbreak of bird flu, with a total of around 8 percent of the nation's poultry population expected to be slaughtered. The government said on Tuesday that 28 cases of the H5N6 strain of bird flu had been confirmed since mid-November, with another 10 possible cases being investigated. The agriculture ministry said in a statement that 4.4 million farm birds had been slaughtered as of Tuesday, with another 2.6 million expected to be culled.
 
 

UN says dairy a potential ally in Asia nutrition challenges

 
‎Tuesday, ‎December ‎6, ‎2016, ‏‎5:56:20 AMGo to full article
BANGKOK (AP) — An apple a day kept the doctor away — but now in Asia, a cup of milk might do the trick.
 

Texas releases abortion booklet citing refuted cancer links

 
‎Tuesday, ‎December ‎6, ‎2016, ‏‎5:39:41 AMGo to full article
AUSTIN, Texas (AP) — A Texas state agency has released a new edition of a booklet for women considering an abortion that suggests there may be a link between terminating pregnancies and increased risks of breast cancer and depression.
 

DNA offers hard evidence of malaria in Roman Empire

 
‎Tuesday, ‎December ‎6, ‎2016, ‏‎1:23:15 AMGo to full article
Malaria currently kills nearly 450,000 people every year, the majority of them children under the age of fiveA DNA analysis of 2,000-year-old teeth unearthed from an Italian graveyard has offered hard evidence that malaria existed during the Roman Empire, researchers said Monday. The findings are based on mitochondrial DNA -- genetic material inherited from one's mother -- extracted from teeth belonging to 58 adults and 10 children at three imperial-period Italian cemeteries, their report in the journal Current Biology said. Two of the adults in the cemeteries, which date to the 1st and 3rd centuries, were found to have genomic evidence of malaria.
 
 

Cancer drugs may remain approved despite lack of benefit

 
‎Monday, ‎December ‎5, ‎2016, ‏‎5:27:35 PMGo to full article
(Story from December 1 refiled to correct Zuckerman's role in para 3 from "lead author" to "senior author.") By Andrew M. Seaman (Reuters Health) - In the United States, cancer drugs are sometimes approved through sped-up processes - and they often stay approved even if later studies show them to be inferior to other options or even worse than doing nothing, a new study found. Researchers evaluated studies done on 18 cancer drugs approved between 2008 and 2012 by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA). "We were shocked to find that these drugs don’t save lives and don’t improve quality of lives," said senior author Diana Zuckerman, who is president of the National Center for Health Research and the Cancer Prevention and Treatment Fund in Washington, D.C. To ensure a cancer treatment's safety and quickly get it to market, the FDA sometimes approves a drug if it meets "surrogate" research goals instead of the gold-standard endpoints the agency usually looks for.
 

Pfizer blood cancer drug tops standard therapy for untreated patients

 
‎Monday, ‎December ‎5, ‎2016, ‏‎5:19:53 PMGo to full article
The Pfizer logo is seen at their world headquarters in New York(Reuters) - Pfizer Inc said on Monday its cancer drug, Bosulif, was found superior to Novartis AG's Gleevec in a late-stage study on untreated patients with a form of blood and bone marrow cancer characterized by abnormal white blood cells production. Most people with chronic myeloid leukemia (CML) have a genetic mutation, called the Philadelphia chromosome, which causes the bone marrow to make an enzyme that triggers the development of abnormal and unhealthy white blood cells.
 
 

Novo Nordisk seeks EU and U.S. approval for new diabetes treatment

 
‎Monday, ‎December ‎5, ‎2016, ‏‎5:02:04 PMGo to full article
Sorensen CEO of Novo Nordisk gestures during an Interview at the company's headquarters in Bagsvaerd near CopenhagenDanish Novo Nordisk said on Monday it has filed for the European Union and the U.S. approval of semaglutide to treat adults with type 2 diabetes. The company said the results of the clinical trial, which included more than 8,000 adults with type 2 diabetes, demonstrated statistically significant and sustained blood glucose control, and a statistically significant reduction of cardiovascular risk compared to placebo.
 
 

Study raises questions over benefit of Roche's Gazyva cancer drug

 
‎Monday, ‎December ‎5, ‎2016, ‏‎3:55:20 PMGo to full article
The logo of Swiss pharmaceutical company Roche is seen outside their headquarters in BaselBy John Miller ZURICH (Reuters) - Roche's Gazyva cancer drug did not show a significant overall survival benefit and raised greater safety concerns than its predecessor Rituxan, a study showed, raising doubts over the Swiss pharmaceuticals group's bid to replace a key blockbuster. Gazyva is used with the chemotherapy drug bendamustine to treat follicular lymphoma (FL) and Roche is counting on it to help mitigate the impact of biosimilars on Rituxan, whose patents expired this year.. Roche failed to find a follow-up drug to its Avastin blockbuster this year and faces competition from rivals including Novartis whose Sandoz generics unit is hot on Rituxan's heels. An analysis released at the weekend meeting of the American Society of Hematology found that for patients with previously untreated FL, those getting Gazyva and bendamustine showed a 94 percent overall survival rate at three years.
 
 

New bird flu outbreak hits French foie gras exporters

 
‎Saturday, ‎December ‎3, ‎2016, ‏‎4:14:12 AMGo to full article
The H5N8 variant of bird flu, which also hit duck farmers in the Netherlands last month, is highly infectious for poultry but poses little danger to humansA new outbreak of bird flu hit France's foie gras producers just as a ban on exports outside Europe was about to be lifted in time for the crucial holiday period. The agriculture ministry said the outbreak of the "highly pathogenic" H5N8 strain of the virus was detected Thursday on a duck farm in the southwestern Tarn region, the heart of the lucrative, though controversial, foie gras industry. Exports outside the European Union had been suspended after an outbreak a year ago, and producers were waiting for the green light -- which had been set for Saturday -- to resume shipments just in time for the Christmas holidays, when the delicacy is especially popular.
 
 

New data on risk vs benefit for potent CAR-T cancer drugs

 
‎Saturday, ‎December ‎3, ‎2016, ‏‎2:14:18 AMGo to full article
A promising but risky new group of customized cancer drugs will be in focus this weekend at the annual meeting of the American Society of Hematology (ASH), where clinical trial results will help clarify their potential for doctors and investors. Experimental chimeric antigen receptor T-cells, or CAR-Ts, are made by genetically altering a patients' own T-cells in the lab to help the immune system find and kill cancer cells. Early excitement over the drugs has propelled investor interest in biotech Kite Pharma Inc, whose shares have tripled since a 2014 initial public offering, as well as rival Juno Therapeutics Inc, whose therapy JCAR015 has generated concerns after five leukemia patients died due to severe brain swelling.
 

Bird flu returns to France's southwest foie gras heartland

 
‎Friday, ‎December ‎2, ‎2016, ‏‎8:29:49 PMGo to full article
France confirmed on Friday an outbreak of severe bird flu on a duck farm in the southwest and said the virus was spreading in the region, in a setback for French poultry and foie gras producers recovering from a bird flu epidemic a year ago. The H5N8 avian influenza virus was confirmed at a farm in the Tarn administrative department, the agriculture ministry said, days after the virus was detected among wild birds in northern France and following outbreaks in Europe linked to migrating birds. A series of cases of H5N8 and other bird flu strains in Europe in recent weeks has led to slaughtering of poultry on some farms and preventative measures such as keeping commercial flocks indoors.
 

Germany detects H5N1 bird flu on poultry farm in Brandenburg

 
‎Friday, ‎December ‎2, ‎2016, ‏‎6:41:39 PMGo to full article
Germany reported a first case of the contagious bird flu strain H5N1 on Friday on a small poultry farm in the northeastern state of Brandenburg, the state's consumer protection ministry said. The farm in the Oberhavel district was sealed off and some 500 chicks, ducks and geese were culled, a spokeswoman for the consumer protection ministry of Brandenburg said. "It's the first time in the current season that this type of bird flu was detected on a poultry farm in Brandenburg," the spokeswoman said.
 

Medicare recipients with cancer face financial distress

 
‎Friday, ‎December ‎2, ‎2016, ‏‎6:10:22 PMGo to full article
By Carolyn Crist (Reuters Health) - Older cancer patients in the U.S. often face high out-of-pocket costs that are a significant financial burden, according to a new study. Medicare, the federal health insurance program for the elderly and disabled, establishes the fees doctors and hospitals are allowed to charge Medicare patients – but then generally only pays 80 percent of those fees. Many people enroll in Medicare HMOs, or they buy so-called Medicare supplemental policies, to help cover the gap.
 

Type 1 diabetes: researchers pinpoint molecule to regenerate insulin-producing cells

 
‎Friday, ‎December ‎2, ‎2016, ‏‎4:19:59 PMGo to full article
Type 1 diabetes: researchers pinpoint molecule to regenerate insulin-producing cellsA neurotransmitter by the name of GABA, known to reduce brain activity, could induce the regeneration of insulin-producing cells, researchers in France have found. The breakthrough, confirmed in mice and partially validated in humans, brings new hope to patients suffering from type 1 diabetes, explains the French National Institute of Health and Medical Research, INSERM (Institut national de la santé et de la recherce médicale). This latest research, published in the journal Cell, could hold particular significance for patients suffering from type 1 diabetes.
 
 

Magic-mushroom compound boosts cancer patients' mindset

 
‎Friday, ‎December ‎2, ‎2016, ‏‎11:58:50 AMGo to full article
Magic-mushroom compound boosts cancer patients' mindsetCancer patients often experience mental anguish and stress, but a single dose of a hallucinogen found in psychedelic mushrooms, along with psychological counseling, improved their mindset, two studies said Thursday. The approach "significantly lessens mental anguish in distressed cancer patients for months at a time," said the findings in the Journal of Psychopharmacology. The first study, led by researchers at New York University's Langone Medical Center, involved 29 people who were given psilocybin, a naturally occurring component of so-called "magic mushrooms" that is an illegal drug in the United States.
 
 

U.N. chief sorry for U.N. role in deadly Haiti cholera outbreak

 
‎Friday, ‎December ‎2, ‎2016, ‏‎3:02:14 AMGo to full article
A protester holds up a sign during a demonstration against the UN mission in downtown Port-au-PrinceBy Michelle Nichols UNITED NATIONS (Reuters) - - Outgoing United Nations Secretary-General Ban Ki-moon apologized to the people of Haiti on Thursday for the world body's role in a deadly cholera outbreak that has killed more than 9,300 people and was blamed on Nepali U.N. peacekeepers. Haiti was free of cholera until 2010, when the peacekeepers dumped infected sewage into a river. The United Nations does not accept legal responsibility for the outbreak of the disease that causes uncontrollable diarrhea and has sickened 800,000 people.
 
 

Merck wins UK okay for Keytruda in lung cancer after price cut

 
‎Friday, ‎December ‎2, ‎2016, ‏‎2:13:00 AMGo to full article
Britain's healthcare cost-effectiveness watchdog NICE has recommended use of Merck's immunotherapy drug Keytruda in certain lung cancer patients, after the U.S. drugmaker cut the price further for the state-run health service. Keytruda is already approved as a cost-effective treatment in melanoma but the National Institute for Health and Care Excellence (NICE) had initially blocked its use in lung cancer. "If companies work with us to price drugs reasonably and manage any uncertainties in the evidence base, we can continue to recommend patients have routine access to the treatments they need," Carole Longson, director of the NICE centre for health technology evaluation, said in a statement on Friday.
 

Cancer drugs may remain approved despite lack of benefit

 
‎Thursday, ‎December ‎1, ‎2016, ‏‎11:59:06 PMGo to full article
By Andrew M. Seaman (Reuters Health) - - In the United States, cancer drugs are sometimes approved through sped-up processes - and they often stay approved even if later studies show them to be inferior to other options or even worse than doing nothing, a new study found. Researchers evaluated studies done on 18 cancer drugs approved between 2008 and 2012 by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA). "We were shocked to find that these drugs don’t save lives and don’t improve quality of lives," said lead author Diana Zuckerman, who is president of the National Center for Health Research and the Cancer Prevention and Treatment Fund in Washington, D.C. To ensure a cancer treatment's safety and quickly get it to market, the FDA sometimes approves a drug if it meets "surrogate" research goals instead of the gold-standard endpoints the agency usually looks for.
 

Many doctors use wrong test to diagnose kids' food allergies

 
‎Thursday, ‎December ‎1, ‎2016, ‏‎10:07:17 PMGo to full article
By Anne Harding NEW YORK (Reuters Health) - Primary care doctors often use the wrong test to diagnose food allergies in children, new research shows. The practice can lead to overdiagnosis, with potentially harmful effects, including stunted growth due to unnecessary dietary restrictions, Dr. David Stukus, an author of the new study, told Reuters Health by phone. Known as food allergy panels, these blood tests check for sensitization to several different allergens at once, including many foods that don’t provoke allergic reactions, such as fruits, vegetables and different types of meat.
 

Tunisia reports H5 bird flu in wild birds: OIE

 
‎Thursday, ‎December ‎1, ‎2016, ‏‎8:37:13 PMGo to full article
Tunisia has reported an outbreak of the highly contagious H5 bird flu virus among wild birds in the north of the country, the World Organisation for Animal Health (OIE) said on Wednesday, citing information from the Tunisian agriculture ministry. The outbreak was confirmed after testing of 30 wild birds found dead last month in the Ichkeul Natural Park, it said. "Tunisia is located in the main migratory corridor for wild birds going to Africa from Europe during winter migration.
 

'Magic mushroom' psychedelic may ease anxiety, depression

 
‎Thursday, ‎December ‎1, ‎2016, ‏‎7:24:47 AMGo to full article
In this Monday, Nov. 28, 2016 photo, Dinah Bazer poses at her home in New York. Bazer found relief from cancer anxiety by being treating with a dose of psilocybin administered by a New York University study. Two studies, published Thursday, Dec. 1, 2016, say a single dose of the psychedelic ingredient in “magic mushrooms” can quickly and effectively treat anxiety and depression in cancer patients, an effect that may last for months. (AP Photo/Bebeto Matthews)NEW YORK (AP) — The psychedelic drug in "magic mushrooms" can quickly and effectively help treat anxiety and depression in cancer patients, an effect that may last for months, two small studies show.
 
 

Japan orders chicken cull on third bird flu outbreak in less than a week

 
‎Thursday, ‎December ‎1, ‎2016, ‏‎3:59:38 AMGo to full article
Japan has started culling another 230,000 chickens after the discovery of a highly contagious form of bird flu on a farm in the north of the country, the local government said. The latest bird flu outbreak in Joetsu City in Niigata prefecture marks the second instance in the prefecture and the third in Japan in less than a week. Authorities have been culling more than 300,000 chickens and ducks this week after the discovery of the first H5 bird flu in nearly two years.
 

GSK biotech asthma drug wins UK approval after extra price cut

 
‎Thursday, ‎December ‎1, ‎2016, ‏‎2:09:19 AMGo to full article
Signage for GlaxoSmithKline is seen on it's offices in London, BritainGlaxoSmithKline's new injectable asthma drug Nucala has been recommended for use in Britain's state-run health service in the most severe patients, after the drugmaker provided further analyses on its use and made an additional price cut.
 
 

Most patients with depression get poor care, or none at all: study

 
‎Thursday, ‎December ‎1, ‎2016, ‏‎2:07:24 AMGo to full article
By Kate Kelland LONDON (Reuters) - The vast majority of the estimated 350 million people worldwide suffering from depression are not receiving even minimally adequate treatment, according to an international study backed by the World Health Organization. The research, which covered almost 50,000 people in 21 countries, found that even in wealthy nations with relatively good health services, barely 20 percent of depression patients get adequate treatment. In poor countries the situation is far worse, the study found, with only one in 27 people with depression receiving adequate treatment.  "Much treatment currently offered to people with depression falls far short," said Graham Thornicroft, a professor at King's College London who led the study.
 

Telemedicine may work as well as in-person visits for depression

 
‎Thursday, ‎December ‎1, ‎2016, ‏‎12:16:32 AMGo to full article
By Lisa Rapaport (Reuters Health) - - Treating depression with video conference calls may offer symptom improvement similar to in-person visits, a recent U.S. study suggests. After one year, there was little or no meaningful difference in satisfaction or symptom relief between the two groups, the study found. “Based on results of this study and prior research, telemedicine is a highly relevant option to address the needs of rural patients or those living in remote locations, while providing patient satisfaction and quality of life similar to that provided by in-person treatment delivered at clinics,” said lead study author Dr. Leonard Egede, a researcher at the at the Medical University of South Carolina and the Ralph H. Johnson VA Medical Center in Charleston.
 

Obesity and diabetes by middle age tied to heart failure later on

 
‎Wednesday, ‎November ‎30, ‎2016, ‏‎11:10:12 PMGo to full article
By Lisa Rapaport (Reuters Health) - People who reach middle age without developing high blood pressure, diabetes or obesity may have a lower risk of heart failure later in life, a recent study suggests. Obesity, diabetes and hypertension can lead to structural changes in the heart that increase the stiffness of the muscle and reduce its ability to contract forcefully. Compared to people with all three risk factors – high blood pressure, diabetes and obesity – adults who had none of these health problems by age 45 were 73 percent less likely to develop heart failure over the rest of their lifetime, the study found.
 

Egypt reports outbreak of H5N8 bird flu in wild birds: OIE

 
‎Wednesday, ‎November ‎30, ‎2016, ‏‎7:13:38 PMGo to full article
PARIS (Reuters) - Egypt reported an outbreak of the highly contagious H5N8 bird flu virus in two wild birds in the northern part of the country, the World Organisation for Animal Health (OIE) said on Wednesday, citing a report from the Egyptian farm ministry. Two common coots were found dead in Damietta during routine epidemiological surveillance activity, the Egyptian authorities said in the report. (Reporting by Sybille de La Hamaide, editing by Gus Trompiz)
 

Alzheimer's patients in France seek calm on a virtual train ride

 
‎Wednesday, ‎November ‎30, ‎2016, ‏‎7:00:57 PMGo to full article
In January, three Alzheimer's patients will start trialing "travel therapy" onboard the virtual train.In northern France, at the Notre Dame de la Treille retirement home in Valenciennes, residents suffering from Alzheimer's disease will soon be invited to step aboard a virtual train. Since October, the Notre Dame de la Treille retirement home in Valenciennes has been gradually taking on the appearance of movie set. One of the rooms in this residential facility has been fitted out to resemble a train station, complete with signs, a ticket office, a bench, a clock and a train carriage.
 
 

Ukraine reports outbreak of H5 bird flu in backyard birds: OIE

 
‎Wednesday, ‎November ‎30, ‎2016, ‏‎7:00:11 PMGo to full article
Ukraine reported an outbreak of a highly contagious bird flu virus among backyard birds in the southern part of the country, the World Organisation for Animal Health (OIE) said on Wednesday, citing a report from the Ukrainian government. After veterinary services were informed of an increase in mortality among birds in the village of Novooleksandrivka near the Black Sea, samples were taken from the dead birds and showed a positive result for highly pathogenic H5 avian influenza, the Ukrainian authorities said. It was not clear whether it was the H5N8 virus which has been found among wild birds and farms across Europe, Asia and the Middle East.
 

Knowing personalized risk for diabetes may not change lifestyles

 
‎Wednesday, ‎November ‎30, ‎2016, ‏‎6:03:49 PMGo to full article
By Lisa Rapaport (Reuters Health) - Giving people detailed information about their personal genetic risk of developing diabetes may not inspire them to change their behavior any more than just giving them basic facts about the disease, a recent study suggests. "Overall, genetic risk information is becoming more and more common, and it's reasonable to assume that given the decreases in sequencing costs genetic risk information will proliferate," said lead study author Dr. Job Godino of the University of California, San Diego. "For common complex disorders like diabetes, it very well may not do so," Godino said.
 

Pfizer's Herceptin biosimilar succeeds in key breast cancer study

 
‎Wednesday, ‎November ‎30, ‎2016, ‏‎4:36:29 PMGo to full article
The Pfizer logo is seen at their world headquarters in New York(Reuters) - Pfizer Inc said on Wednesday its experimental biosimilar of Roche Holding AG's blockbuster breast cancer treatment Herceptin was found comparable with the branded version in a key study. Biotech drugs such as Herceptin are made in living cells, and then extracted and purified. Unlike generic drugs, which are interchangeable with their branded counterparts, biosimilars approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration to date are not considered interchangeable.
 
 

Bird flu found at small poultry farm in Germany

 
‎Wednesday, ‎November ‎30, ‎2016, ‏‎3:37:37 PMGo to full article
A case of high risk H5N8 bird flu has been found on a small farm in Mecklenburg-Vorpommern in east Germany, state authorities said on Wednesday. The farm has about 300 chickens, ducks and geese, said the Mecklenburg-Vorpommern state agriculture ministry. H5N8 bird flu has been found in over 370 wild birds in Germany since the present outbreak started in early November.
 

S. Korea confirms more cases of deadly bird flu

 
‎Wednesday, ‎November ‎30, ‎2016, ‏‎2:40:41 AMGo to full article
South Korean officials are forced to cull millions of chickens as part of the quarantine protocols every time there is an outbreak of the H5N6 virusSouth Korea on Wednesday revealed new cases of a deadly strain of bird flu as authorities said they had slaughtered two million chickens and ducks in a bid to control the outbreak. The H5N6 virus was first confirmed on November 18 at a farm in central South Korea and it has since spread to farms around the country, with the total number of cases now standing at 46. Health authorities stressed there had been no cases of human infections from H5N6 in South Korea.
 
 

Death toll from Australia's thunderstorm asthma reaches 6

 
‎Sunday, ‎November ‎27, ‎2016, ‏‎6:28:51 AMGo to full article
MELBOURNE, Australia (AP) — Six people have died and five remained on life support after a rare condition known as thunderstorm asthma struck Australia's second-largest city, officials said on Sunday.
 

Australian asthma storm claims sixth victim

 
‎Sunday, ‎November ‎27, ‎2016, ‏‎3:34:15 AMGo to full article
A sixth person has died in the Australian city of Melbourne after a storm triggered thousands of pollen allergy asthma attacks, the Victorian state government said on Sunday. Heavy rain and winds on Monday, just as spring peaks in the southern state of Victoria, allowed rye grass pollen to absorb moisture and burst into smaller particles that sent the pollen count soaring.
 

Dutch destroy 190,000 ducks in first bird flu cull

 
‎Saturday, ‎November ‎26, ‎2016, ‏‎8:37:37 PMGo to full article
Some 190,000 ducks were destroyed on Saturday at six farms in the Netherlands following an avian flu outbreak, the country's first cull of an epidemic sweeping northern Europe. Outbreaks of avian flu, primarily the highly pathogenic H5N8 strain, have been reported in Denmark, Finland, Germany and Sweden over the past week. Dutch authorities did not say what strain of the virus had been discovered at a poultry farm in the village Biddinghuizen, some 70 km (43 miles) east of Amsterdam.
 

French cancer specialist Innate Pharma can remain independent, for now: CEO

 
‎Friday, ‎November ‎25, ‎2016, ‏‎6:37:14 PMGo to full article
FILE PHOTO - Herve Brailly, CEO of Innate Pharma, attends the Reuters Biotech summit in ParisBy Matthias Blamont and Noëlle Mennella PARIS (Reuters) - France's Innate Pharma believes that its cash position and portfolio are sufficiently robust for the cancer drug company to remain independent for the time being and will seek co-development deals modeled on an agreement struck with AstraZeneca in April. Innate sees its independence as key to delivering optimum shareholder value in a sector characterized by big-money deals as large drugmakers look to acquire new, effective cancer treatments. In August Pfizer announced the $14 billion purchase of Medivation Inc, adding its blockbuster prostate cancer drug Xtandi to a growing oncology portfolio.
 
 

Chronic gum disease tied to risk of erectile dysfunction

 
‎Friday, ‎November ‎25, ‎2016, ‏‎6:20:01 PMGo to full article
By Kathryn Doyle (Reuters Health) – Erectile dysfunction is more common in men with gum disease, according to a new review of existing studies. Chronic bacterial infection of the gums, or periodontitis, is common and a major cause of tooth loss for adults, the authors write. The condition has been tied to a higher risk of cardiovascular disease and general inflammation, which in turn have been tied stroke and hardening of the arteries.
 

India confirms H5N8 bird flu outbreak in Karnataka: OIE

 
‎Friday, ‎November ‎25, ‎2016, ‏‎6:11:14 PMGo to full article
India has reported an outbreak of a highly contagious bird flu virus in the southwestern state of Karnataka, the World Organisation for Animal Health (OIE) said on Friday, citing a report from the Indian agriculture ministry. The H5N8 virus was confirmed among birds in the village of Itagi, and all 1,593 of the birds at risk from the disease died or were culled, according to the report posted by the Paris-based OIE.

 

Cancer News Headlines - Yahoo! News

 

 

U.S. Senate joins House to pass sweeping new health bill

 
‎Today, ‎December ‎8, ‎2016, ‏‎6 hours agoGo to full article
Manni Baez takes some of his daily antiviral medications for HIV at the National Institutes of Health in BethesdaThe U.S. Senate voted overwhelmingly on Wednesday to support sweeping legislation that will reshape the way the Food and Drug Administration approves new medicines. It will also provide funding for cancer and Alzheimer's research, help fight the opioid epidemic, expand access to mental health treatment and advance research into precision medicine. Two years in the making, the 21st Century Cures Act was passed last week by the House of Representatives and will now go to President Barack Obama to sign into law.
 
 

This artist creates stunning henna crowns for chemotherapy patients

 
‎Today, ‎December ‎8, ‎2016, ‏‎9 hours agoGo to full article
This artist creates stunning henna crowns for chemotherapy patientsGood deeds can be as beautiful in execution as they are in intention. Seattle-based henna company Sarahenna offers their stunning body art to customers for a myriad of occasions. From bridal looks to adorned pregnant bellies, the company is committed to making their clients feel beautiful.  Beyond the typical duties of a henna studio, Sarahenna is dedicated to helping others who may really be in need of a confidence boost — offering complimentary "henna crowns" to women who have experienced hair loss due to chemotherapy. SEE ALSO: Cancer survivor proposed to on live TV will make you cry a thousand tears "I have always known that I wanted a way to help others in a meaningful and tangible way," founder Sarah Walters told Mashable in an email. " [After] my mom asked me to do a crown for her friend who was fighting cancer in 2010 ... I knew I wanted to make them accessible to anyone who had lost their hair during chemo." Image: Sarahenna "My clients have told me they feel uplifted, beautiful, and attention from strangers is now about the art on their head rather than their illness," she continued. Based on traditional Indian henna, each gorgeous crown is meticulously created in an intricate pattern using a safe, plant-based paste on top of the head. Image: sarahenna "The experience of receiving a crown is peaceful and calming, like a spa treatment," Walters explained. "It feels nice to have someone take care of you and beautify you." Each detailed piece takes anywhere from 45 to 90 minutes to create, and lasts between one to three weeks — gradually fading as the skin naturally exfoliates away. On top of their feel-good properties, crowns are offered to each customer by donation. "The cost of the medical expenses associated with cancer are significant," Water said. "I want henna crowns to be accessible to everyone." A photo posted by Kim Holcomb (@kimholcomb) on Nov 7, 2016 at 11:46am PST "It's a positive experience during a difficult time," the artist explained. "I hope that my crowns make them feel loved." You can book an appointment with Sarah here, and follow more of her beautiful designs on Instagram and Facebook. BONUS: Gamer with cancer gets touching gift from his best friends
 
 

John Glenn, former U.S. astronaut, hospitalized

 
‎Today, ‎December ‎8, ‎2016, ‏‎9 hours agoGo to full article
Retired astronaut and former U.S. Senator Glenn looks on during the first day of the Clinton Global Initiative 2012 (CGI) meeting in New YorkJohn Glenn, the first American to orbit the Earth and a former U.S. senator and war hero, has been hospitalized for more than a week, an official said on Wednesday. Glenn, 95, is at the James Cancer Hospital at Ohio State University but does not necessarily have cancer, said Hank Wilson, spokesman at the university's John Glenn College of Public Affairs, which Glenn helped found. "When you're 95, it's always considered serious," said Wilson, who did not have further details about Glenn's condition or his prognosis.
 
 

Preventing cancer spread: mouse study points to fat

 
‎Today, ‎December ‎8, ‎2016, ‏‎10 hours agoGo to full article
Preventing cancer spread: mouse study points to fatSpanish scientists announced Wednesday they may have identified a way to stop cancer from spreading, at least in mice, and said it could be linked to eating fat. Writing in the journal Nature, the team said they had discovered a type of tumour cell which spreads cancer from organ to organ -- a process known as metastasis, which is what makes the disease so deadly. This worked for human mouth, skin and breast cancer.
 
 

American space legend John Glenn hospitalized in Ohio

 
‎Today, ‎December ‎8, ‎2016, ‏‎10 hours agoGo to full article
In 1962 John Glenn became the first US astronaut to orbit the Earth in a flight lasting just under five hours, and returned to space decades later at the age of 77 -- becoming the oldest astronaut in spaceJohn Glenn, who made history twice as the first American to orbit the Earth and the first senior citizen to venture into space, has been hospitalized, a spokesman at the Ohio State University college bearing his name said Wednesday. No details were offered on Glenn's illness or condition, but spokesman Hank Wilson of the John Glenn College of Public Affairs told AFP that the former astronaut had been admitted more than a week ago to the university's James Cancer Hospital. "I caution that even though Sen. Glenn is at The James that does not necessarily mean he has cancer," Wilson said.
 
 

Most people want to learn about their skin biopsy results online

 
‎Yesterday, ‎December ‎7, ‎2016, ‏‎10:46:20 PMGo to full article
By Andrew M. Seaman (Reuters Health) - Most people want to learn about their skin biopsy results over the internet - especially when they're benign, according to new research. People said their preferred method of finding out their skin biopsy results largely relies on the amount of information the clinician needs to relay and the amount of time it takes to receive the results, researchers report in JAMA Dermatology. "We want to make sure we’re addressing the needs of the patients as best we can," said senior author Dr. Charles Mitchell, of The George Washington University School of Medicine and Health Sciences in Washington, D.C. "Everyone is a bit different." Mitchell told Reuters Health that past research looked at how patients would like to receive skin biopsy results, but it largely included people who previously had the deadliest form of skin cancer known as melanoma.
 

Girl, 9, who inspired archers everywhere dies of rare cancer

 
‎Yesterday, ‎December ‎7, ‎2016, ‏‎5:41:23 PMGo to full article
WICHITA, Kan. (AP) — A 9-year-old Kansas girl whose battle with brain cancer sparked an outpouring of support from fellow archers has died.
 

Dead brother's vest, bracelet, coffee pot: what refugees take when they flee

 
‎Yesterday, ‎December ‎7, ‎2016, ‏‎4:35:10 PMGo to full article
By Emma Batha LONDON (Thomson Reuters Foundation) - When Syrian refugee Zakaria Alssayadi fled his village he grabbed his passport, money and the plain white vest his beloved brother was wearing the day he died of cancer. Fellow refugee Amal Tayyawi took a bracelet given by her sister, Anas Humidy picked up his poetry, Kawther Jahwani her coffee pot and five-year-old Nizar Rastnawi his Spiderman costume. The videos were filmed in Turkey which hosts more than 2.7 million of the 11 million Syrians uprooted from their homes since the war began in 2011.
 

Japan PM's advisers urge annual review of drug prices

 
‎Yesterday, ‎December ‎7, ‎2016, ‏‎1:18:57 PMGo to full article
Japanese PM Shinzo Abe gestures during a press conference in Buenos Aires, ArgentinaPrime Minister Shinzo Abe's economic advisers, hoping to curb Japan's ballooning healthcare costs, proposed on Wednesday reforms to the way drug prices are set, a step opposed by foreign and domestic drug makers who say the changes will stifle investment. The proposals follow a decision to halve the price of Bristol Myers Squibb Co's cancer drug Opdivo last month, and an earlier move to slash the price of Gilead Science Inc's highly effective but expensive hepatitis C drug Sovaldi. The four private-sector advisers at Abe's Council on Economic and Fiscal Policy (CEFP) proposed reviewing all prescription drug prices, which are set by the government, at least annually, rather than once every two years as currently.
 
 

From smart toothbrushes to cancer, Philips bets big on software

 
‎Yesterday, ‎December ‎7, ‎2016, ‏‎12:22:12 PMGo to full article
Van Houten, CEO of Philips, speaks during the presentation of the 2013 full-year results in AmsterdamBy Ben Hirschler LONDON (Reuters) - These days the average researcher at Philips is more likely to be a software developer than an product engineer, reflecting a transformation at the former Dutch conglomerate that its chief executive says will gather pace. "It's a huge shift," Frans van Houten told Reuters, noting that around 60 percent of the healthcare technology company's R&D staff are now focused on software. It will not go to 100 percent, because we will still make products, but you could easily see that the value-add comes more out of software than hardware." Philips has repositioned itself as a health business after spinning off lighting, which has freed up capacity for acquisitions such as last year's $1.2 billion purchase of blood vessel imaging firm Volcano.
 
 

Football star rushes to comfort young fan battling cancer after Facebook post

 
‎Yesterday, ‎December ‎7, ‎2016, ‏‎6:11:25 AMGo to full article
Football star rushes to comfort young fan battling cancer after Facebook postHere's something that will warm the coldest of hearts. Mahalia Murphy from Sydney, Australia, posted an urgent request on Facebook Tuesday for her terminally ill friend. And just like Batman, one of her friend's saw the signal and responded instantly. SEE ALSO: Sistagirls do Mardi Gras: Indigenous trans community crowdfunds for pride parade Kia Lettice, who has been fighting cancer, had "roughly four hours to live," according to Murphy's post. All Lettice wanted is for Australian rugby league player Greg Inglis or former player Beau Ryan to come and see her in order to "boost" her up.  Within half an hour of the post, Ryan answered the call despite being 120 kilometres (74 miles) away. "Leaving Shellharbour now! See you in two hours. Tell her to stay strong," he commented on the post.  Just after 10 p.m., Ryan was photographed next to Lettice and her best buddy Murphy posted it to her Facebook page. "Thanks to everyone for making this special moment happen. Beau Ryan you are a true legend man. Can't thank you enough for this moment," Murphy wrote. Ryan even shared a photo of him giving Lettice a kiss on the head on his own page, captioned by a single love heart.  He told Mashable he was visiting his parents and sister when he saw the message put out by Murphy. "She had not long to live and wanted to see me. Anyone would do the same thing if they were in my shoes," Ryan said.  "I would like people to be kind to other people." The impromptu visit clearly made a difference to Lettice. "The energy she gained from his presence was amazing! Beau Ryan is a legend! After four hours notice he made it," Murphy wrote on Facebook.  The response on Twitter from colleagues and the public was equally as heartwarming. What a champion  pic.twitter.com/jwR0MxycW3 — Joel Thompson (@joel_thompson12) December 6, 2016 Terrible circumstances but I take my hat off to you @therealbeauryan brilliant of you  pic.twitter.com/t1M7y5fjVI — Luke Campbell MBE (@luke11campbell) December 6, 2016 How good is this by Beau Ryan!! Not all heroes wear capes  @therealbeauryan pic.twitter.com/8raLx9ks7T — Rugby League News (@RugbyLeagueNews) December 6, 2016 Not all heroes wear capes, indeed. UPDATE: Dec. 7, 2016, 5:50 p.m. AEDT Added comments from Beau Ryan. BONUS: Meet the woman who found a way to keep the homeless warm and employed
 
 

EU clears Bristol-Myers immunotherapy drug for blood cancer

 
‎Yesterday, ‎December ‎7, ‎2016, ‏‎2:02:09 AMGo to full article
LONDON (Reuters) - Bristol-Myers Squibb's immunotherapy drug Opdivo has been approved in Europe for the treatment of classical Hodgkin lymphoma, a rare blood cancer, the U.S. company said on Wednesday. Opdivo is already approved for melanoma, lung cancer and kidney cancer. (Reporting by Ben Hirschler. Editing by Jane Merriman)
 

Novartis' drug tops chemotherapy in untreated lung cancer patients

 
‎Tuesday, ‎December ‎6, ‎2016, ‏‎3:48:20 PMGo to full article
File photo of Swiss drugmaker Novartis' logo at the company's plant in the northern Swiss town of Stein(Reuters) - Novartis AG said its cancer drug, Zykadia, was twice as effective as chemotherapy in slowing the progression of a rare form of lung cancer in a late-stage study. Patients with anaplastic lymphoma kinase-positive (ALK+)advanced non-small cell lung cancer treated with Zykadia had a median progression-free survival of 16.6 months, compared to 8.1 months for those on chemotherapy. Novartis' drug also has conditional approval as a second-line treatment in Europe.
 
 

AstraZeneca pill slashes lung cancer progression in study

 
‎Tuesday, ‎December ‎6, ‎2016, ‏‎12:07:07 PMGo to full article
A sign is seen at an AstraZeneca site in MacclesfieldBy Ben Hirschler LONDON (Reuters) - AstraZeneca's pill Tagrisso cut the risk of lung cancer progressing by 70 percent compared to standard chemotherapy in a major clinical trial, lifting prospects for a drug that is key to the company's lofty long-term sales goals. The medicine is designed to help cancer patients with certain genetic mutations that are very common in China and other parts of east Asia. Tagrisso is already on the market, winning early approval based on mid-stage studies and selling $276 million in the first nine months of 2016, but AstraZeneca was required to produce a confirmatory Phase III randomized study detailing its benefits.
 
 

Texas releases abortion booklet citing refuted cancer links

 
‎Tuesday, ‎December ‎6, ‎2016, ‏‎5:39:41 AMGo to full article
AUSTIN, Texas (AP) — A Texas state agency has released a new edition of a booklet for women considering an abortion that suggests there may be a link between terminating pregnancies and increased risks of breast cancer and depression.
 

Gwynn's death helped change MLB culture on smokeless tobacco

 
‎Tuesday, ‎December ‎6, ‎2016, ‏‎5:11:02 AMGo to full article
Former Baltimore Orioles player Cal Ripken Jr., speaks during an Under Armour announcement event at Major League Baseball's winter meetings, Monday, Dec. 5, 2016 in Oxon Hill, Md. Under Armour will take over as the supplier of Major League Baseball uniforms in 2020. (AP Photo/Alex Brandon)OXON HILL, Md. (AP) — Tony Gwynn's death from oral cancer was a turning point in baseball's culture that long tolerated smokeless tobacco.
 
 

Even with one cigarette a day, odds of early death are higher

 
‎Monday, ‎December ‎5, ‎2016, ‏‎10:12:46 PMGo to full article
A man smokes a cigarette along a road in MumbaiBy Lisa Rapaport Smokers who go through much less than a pack of cigarettes a day still have a higher risk of an early death than non-smokers, a new study suggests. “There is no safe level of cigarette smoking,” said lead study author Maki Inoue-Choi, a researcher at the National Cancer Institute in Rockville, Maryland. A growing number of smokers tend to be “light” smokers, going through less than half a pack of cigarettes a day, the authors write.
 
 

Social Smokers, Listen Up: Even 1 Daily Cigarette Could Kill You

 
‎Monday, ‎December ‎5, ‎2016, ‏‎9:45:23 PMGo to full article
Social smokers: If you thought it was OK to smoke just a few cigarettes or less a day, you thought wrong. A new study from the National Cancer Institute published Monday in JAMA Internal Medicine found that low-intensity smokers -- people who smoke no more than 10 cigarettes per day -- have an increased risk of dying prematurely. This increased to an 87 percent higher risk for people who smoked between one and 10 cigarettes each day.
 

Cancer drugs may remain approved despite lack of benefit

 
‎Monday, ‎December ‎5, ‎2016, ‏‎5:27:35 PMGo to full article
(Story from December 1 refiled to correct Zuckerman's role in para 3 from "lead author" to "senior author.") By Andrew M. Seaman (Reuters Health) - In the United States, cancer drugs are sometimes approved through sped-up processes - and they often stay approved even if later studies show them to be inferior to other options or even worse than doing nothing, a new study found. Researchers evaluated studies done on 18 cancer drugs approved between 2008 and 2012 by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA). "We were shocked to find that these drugs don’t save lives and don’t improve quality of lives," said senior author Diana Zuckerman, who is president of the National Center for Health Research and the Cancer Prevention and Treatment Fund in Washington, D.C. To ensure a cancer treatment's safety and quickly get it to market, the FDA sometimes approves a drug if it meets "surrogate" research goals instead of the gold-standard endpoints the agency usually looks for.
 

'Magic Mushrooms' Compound May Treat Depression in Cancer Patients

 
‎Monday, ‎December ‎5, ‎2016, ‏‎5:20:00 PMGo to full article
'Magic Mushrooms' Compound May Treat Depression in Cancer PatientsThe hallucinogen found in "magic mushrooms" can considerably reduce the depression and anxiety felt by patients who have terminal or advanced cancer, according to new research published in two studies. Both studies showed that just a single dose of psilocybin — a hallucinogenic compound found in certain mushroom species — could reduce psychological distress in cancer patients, and that this effect was immediate and long-lasting. Participants who took psilocybin reported reductions in their depression and anxiety just one day after taking the drug, and the effects of that one dose lasted for the next six months in up to 80 percent of participants in both studies.
 
 

Glowing Molecules Could Reveal Skin Cancer, Without a Biopsy

 
‎Monday, ‎December ‎5, ‎2016, ‏‎5:16:00 PMGo to full article
Glowing Molecules Could Reveal Skin Cancer, Without a BiopsyIf you want to get a mole checked to see if it's cancerous, it usually involves getting a bit of your skin sliced off and sent to a lab, in a process called a biopsy. The technique involves a high-resolution microscope that allows doctors to see the patient's mitochondria — the powerhouses of the cell, which "often form beautiful networks inside cells," said the study's lead investigator, Irene Georgakoudi, an associate professor of biomedical engineering at Tufts University in Medford, Massachusetts. Because cancer disrupts this "beautiful network," and leads the mitochondria to become unorganized, doctors peering into the mitochondria could potentially diagnose skin cancer and other disorders based on what they see, Georgakoudi said.
 
 

'I saw my fear': How psychedelic therapy is making a comeback

 
‎Monday, ‎December ‎5, ‎2016, ‏‎4:42:08 PMGo to full article
'I saw my fear': How psychedelic therapy is making a comebackAfter learning in 2010 that she had Stage 1 ovarian cancer, Dinah Bazer felt optimistic. Her doctors had just removed the grapefruit-sized tumor bulging from her belly and started her on a course of chemotherapy.    "I thought, when the chemo is over, we'll celebrate," Bazer, who is now 69, recalled. "But it was the exact opposite." Bazer's cancer was in remission, yet she felt terrified by the possibility of its return. Every check-up filled her with dread. She gained weight stress-eating bags of Halloween candy in her Brooklyn home. The upbeat spirit she'd shown her husband and two grown daughters was completely gone.    SEE ALSO: New artificial intelligence technique could erase fear from your brain Her downward spiral lasted until the fall of 2012, when she participated in a unique medical trial at New York University's Langone Medical Center. The trial involved taking a single dose of psilocybin—a key compound in hallucinogenic mushrooms—under a therapist's supervision. Researchers at NYU were exploring whether the drug could help ease existential depression in people with life-threatening cancer.  Bazer took the psilocybin in October. Over four years later, she remains transformed. "I saw my fear; it was a black mass under my rib cage. And I was just furious to see this thing there," she remembered of the experience. "I screamed at it, 'Get the fuck out! I won't be eaten alive!' As soon as I did that, it was gone," Bazer said.   "That lack of fear... has stayed with me." The NYU trial is among a growing number of studies exploring the therapeutic benefits of mind-altering compounds like psilocybin and MDMA (a.k.a. ecstasy or molly).  Psychiatrists around the world say there's early evidence that these psychoactive— and widely illegal—drugs can help treat people suffering from cancer-related anxiety, post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD), and addictions to alcohol, nicotine or cocaine. That isn't to say that rolling on molly or eating mud-crusted 'shrooms will deliver the same results, or are inherently a safe decision. But, researchers say, when taken in a controlled setting, and combined with therapy, these compounds could provide a potent and very real alternative to today's treatment options. When standard treatments don't work  Psychotherapy, for instance, doesn't work for many PTSD patients. Common anti-depressant medications carry a range of side effects, like insomnia, loss of sexual desire, weight gain and suicidal thoughts. "There's a real unmet need for people who can't tolerate the standard treatments," said George Greer, a psychiatrist in New Mexico and medical director of the Heffter Research Institute, the main funder of psilocybin research. This expanding research area saw two important advances last week alone. Magic mushrooms are seen in a grow room at a farm in Hazerswoude, central Netherlands. Image: AP PHOTO/PETER DEJONG On Nov. 29, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) said researchers could move forward with a large-scale, Phase 3 clinical trial for ecstasy-related therapy with PTSD patients.  Two days later, NYU and the Johns Hopkins School of Medicine published positive results from separate Phase 2 trials testing psilocybin treatment for cancer patients.  If all continues to go well, the FDA could potentially approve MDMA for medical use in as little as five years, and psilocybin in around a decade, researchers told Mashable.  Recreational drug use concerns While there's wide support for renewed research on these compounds, worries about their use persist.  Some experts argue that these kinds of studies send a dangerous message to the public that mind-altering drugs are safe for recreational use. A drug enforcement agent in the Philippines shows illegal ecstasy pills seized in Manila, Sept. 14, 2016. Image: Bullit Marquez/AP Ecstasy can cause high fevers and cardiac arrest. Studies show prolonged use may cause brain damage. Among mushroom users, about 10 percent of people put themselves or others at risk of physical harm while under psilocybin's spell, according to a new Johns Hopkins survey published with the cancer studies. "One has to be very cautious in moving forward, in terms of medicalizing this class of drugs," said Bertha Madras, a professor at Harvard Medical School's psychiatry department, and a psychobiologist at McLean Hospital. "If there is a perception among youth that it's a medicine," she told Mashable, "we're going to trigger a cascade of unintended consequences that will have far greater impact than the few people that have been helped in clinical trials thus far." From taboo to trials Plenty of research gains on psychoactive substances have been made in just the last decade—though testing of some of these drugs began long before. Scientists began studying the drugs' potential medical benefits in the 1950s. Even the U.S. military explored the use of MDMA and the hallucinogenic LSD for treating soldiers.  But by the 1970s and '80s, the mind-altering substances had wound up in too many people's hands, and concerns of bad trips and brain damage spread. Governments cracked down, and federal research dollars disappeared. Psilocybin, MDMA and LSD are all listed as Schedule 1 substances under the U.S. Controlled Substances Act. The federal government ruled these compounds as having no accepted medical use, and lack accepted safety measures for use under medical supervision. The latest research aims to prove those findings wrong. Roland Griffiths, a psychiatry professor who led the psilocybin trial at Johns Hopkins, said he started studying the compound because he was deeply curious about its conscience-expanding properties. In 2000, he spearheaded the first FDA-approved clinical study in decades that tested psilocybin in healthy volunteers, who were carefully screened and prepared. Early trials showed psilocybin could produce "deeply personal meaningful experiences, to which participants attribute enduring positive changes in attitudes, moods and behaviors," Griffiths said. The Johns Hopkins team next focused their research on cancer patients suffering from crushing existential anxiety. NYU researchers held similar clinical trials around the same time. One gram of psilocybin is seen on a scale at New York University, April 13, 2010. Image: AP photo/seth wenig According to the research published Dec. 1, about 80 percent of participants in both studies showed clinically significant reductions in depression and anxiety that lasted more than six months .  Some participants had disturbing hallucinations or experienced nausea or vomiting, but nobody was made worse off by the treatment. Bazer remembered feeling frightened at the start of her experience with psilocybin, which followed weeks of preparation with her therapist, Anthony Bossis. That day, she slipped on an eye mask and wore headphones playing soothing music.   "I was just tumbling in space, in the hold of a ship that's rocking in a stormy sea alone," she said. Bossis held her hand and encouraged her to "just go with it." That was when she expelled the black mass of fear. She floated in the music. She saw her family and friends, felt the sum of their love, and an intense wave of connectedness washed over her. "I'm an atheist, but I feel like the way to describe this is bathed in God's love," Bazer said. "This love was just — that's what the universe was, and I was part of it." Dinah Bazer poses at her home in Brooklyn, New York, Nov. 28, 2016. Image: AP photo/bebeto matthews Lisa Callaghan, who lives in Brooklyn, said her husband Patrick Mettes experienced a mystical journey during his psilocybin trial.  Mettes, a TV news director who passed away in 2012, was diagnosed with cancer of the bile ducts in 2007. His symptoms were "hellish," and chemotherapy was quickly wearing him down, his wife remembered. Callaghan said before taking psilocybin, her husband was a "Type A personality" who struggled with a short temper. Following the treatment, Mettes made peace with his inner turmoil. He was calm and content, and remained so throughout his final months of life.  "He physically felt that he was reborn in this process," Callaghan said. "The brain is an amazing thing, and the spirit—I think they're one and the same." Griffiths, the Johns Hopkins psychiatrist, said scientists have only a limited understanding of how psychedelics affect the brain's regions and receptors. Even less is known about how psychedelics might permanently affect people's personalities. "We're really, desperately ignorant," Griffiths said. The therapy 'sweet spot' MDMA, which isn't considered a psychedelic, seems to transform patients in a different way. The compound triggers the release of hormones that inspire feelings of affection and trust, while quieting feelings of fear or threat by slowing activity in the brain's amygdala.  By contrast, PTSD boosts activity in the amygdala and interferes with brain systems that moderate stress. When PTSD patients attempt to revisit their trauma in therapy, they might be flooded with horrible emotions, or become deeply numbed emotionally.  Pamphlets about PTSD are seen on a table at Fort Hamilton Army Garrison in Brooklyn, New York, 2009. Image: Chris hondros/Getty Images MDMA helps patients access a "sweet spot" between that overwhelming fear and numbness so they can explore their trauma and find ways to heal, said Michael Mithoefer, a psychiatrist in South Carolina who, with his wife Ann Mithoefer, is studying MDMA-based therapies. "It's not just that people get blissed out and everything is fine," he said. "They're processing PTSD and there's a lot of pain." "MDMA doesn't take that away," he added, "it just makes therapy possible." The Mithoefers began studying MDMA in the early 2000s, focusing on people who suffered PTSD as a result of violent crimes, childhood abuse, sexual assault or combat.  They found that 83 percent of participants who received both therapy and MDMA no longer met the clinical criteria for PTSD just two months after their second session with MDMA, according to the 2011 study. Follow-up exams with patients found the improvements lasted more than a year after therapy. An ecstasy pill. Image: AP photo/bullit marquez The Mithoefers' second trial, which included war veterans, firefighters and police officers, has shown similarly positive results. Separate Phase 2 trials have also been held in Switzerland, Israel, Canada and Colorado. The larger Phase 3 medical trial for MDMA-based therapy could begin sometime next year. If all goes well, the FDA could potentially approve MDMA for prescription use by 2021, said Brad Burge of the Multidisciplinary Association for Psychedelic Studies, a small nonprofit that funded the MDMA trials. Burge said the organization expects to spend at least $20 million to support the Phase 3 research. Most or all of that money will likely come from private foundations and philanthropists, since no U.S. government institution has backed research on banned substances. The Heffter Research Institute has raised around $6.7 million in private donations since 1993 to support psilocybin research, with most of the funding spent in the last five years. Magic mushrooms at a grow farm in the Netherlands. Image: AP photo/PETER DEJONG "There's a clear need worldwide for this treatment, and that's why [research] is accelerating at such a pace right now," Burge said. That research also includes gaining a better understanding of people's experiences on mind-altering drugs. Anthony Bossis, the NYU psilocybin researcher, said he is leading a new FDA-approved trial that asks religious leaders to describe the "landscape" of their mystical journeys while on psilocybin.  For Bazer, whose cancer has now been in remission for six years, the psilocybin treatment has instilled in her a lasting sense of tranquility. Bazer worked for over 30 years in IT before becoming an ice-skating coach, and she says she was constantly rushing and living under a cloud of stress. "I'm a typical New Yorker: I walk fast, drive more aggressively than I should, am trying to get ahead all the time," she said. "Psilocybin kind of slows you down, and I just wanted to hang onto that."  She hopes more people who are suffering psychologically can participate in clinical trials similar to her own. "I want to see this research continue," Bazer said. "I think this really could help people, if they could have this experience I have, and feel this love." BONUS: 'Pokémon Go' is helping some players cope with depression and anxiety
 
 

Study raises questions over benefit of Roche's Gazyva cancer drug

 
‎Monday, ‎December ‎5, ‎2016, ‏‎3:55:20 PMGo to full article
The logo of Swiss pharmaceutical company Roche is seen outside their headquarters in BaselBy John Miller ZURICH (Reuters) - Roche's Gazyva cancer drug did not show a significant overall survival benefit and raised greater safety concerns than its predecessor Rituxan, a study showed, raising doubts over the Swiss pharmaceuticals group's bid to replace a key blockbuster. Gazyva is used with the chemotherapy drug bendamustine to treat follicular lymphoma (FL) and Roche is counting on it to help mitigate the impact of biosimilars on Rituxan, whose patents expired this year.. Roche failed to find a follow-up drug to its Avastin blockbuster this year and faces competition from rivals including Novartis whose Sandoz generics unit is hot on Rituxan's heels. An analysis released at the weekend meeting of the American Society of Hematology found that for patients with previously untreated FL, those getting Gazyva and bendamustine showed a 94 percent overall survival rate at three years.
 
 

ICYMI in NFL: At site of cancer treatment, KC's Berry excels

 
‎Monday, ‎December ‎5, ‎2016, ‏‎9:53:52 AMGo to full article
Kansas City Chiefs strong safety Eric Berry (29) greets fans after an NFL football game against the Atlanta Falcons, Sunday, Dec. 4, 2016, in Atlanta. The Chiefs won 29-28. (AP Photo/Chuck Burton)As it is, this was going to be an emotional afternoon for Kansas City Chiefs safety Eric Berry, who grew up in suburban Atlanta and was playing at the Falcons for the first time as a pro — and, more meaningfully, the first time since he was treated for cancer in the city.
 
 

Video of guy punching a kangaroo in the face has quite a story behind it

 
‎Monday, ‎December ‎5, ‎2016, ‏‎6:53:27 AMGo to full article
Video of guy punching a kangaroo in the face has quite a story behind itSeen that viral video of man punching a kangaroo in Australia over the weekend? Turns out there's quite the saga behind it. It's all very intense. The video was first shared on the Facebook page of user Steven Stubenraugh, where it's since received 3.8 million views at the time of writing.  The video shows a man running toward a kangaroo, which has a dog in a headlock.  The man confronts the kangaroo, who then lets go of the dog after a struggle. Then out of nowhere, the dude gives the kangaroo a punch in the face.  SEE ALSO: Dude creates what is possibly the most Australian Christmas tree ever There's been discussion over whether the footage is fake or not, and of course, over whether it's okay to punch an animal in the face in self defence. It turns out the footage was from a "final" wild pig-hunting trip for a young man named Kailem, who died from cancer last week, according to news.com.au . "Basically Kailem wanted to catch a boar," trip-organiser Mathew Amor told the news outlet.  "And so a few of us got together to take him out, and another mate filmed more than an hour of video to put together as a DVD for Kailem and his family of the trip." The man who actually punched the kangaroo is only known as "Goo," and has kept quiet due to having a "good government job."  However Daily Mail say they have identified the man as a zookeeper, working in the elephant enclosure at Taronga Western Plains Zoo — which, if true, would add yet another layer of strangeness to the whole story.   By the way, the dog is fine thanks to its breastplate — used to protect it from boar tusks. "My mate only stunned it," Amor said. "His hand was OK, he didn't hit it very hard at all. It was funny because the guy who did it is the most placid bloke. We laughed at him for chucking such a sh*t punch." Yep, Australia is as wild as you think it is. BONUS: Baby orphaned possum snuggles her toy kangaroo, melts your heart
 
 

Scotland bans smoking in cars with children

 
‎Sunday, ‎December ‎4, ‎2016, ‏‎10:15:33 PMGo to full article
A new Scottish law aims to protect minors in cars from second-hand smoke.A new law comes into force in Scotland on Monday banning smoking in cars when children are present, as part of the government's plans for a "tobacco-free generation". Breathing second hand smoke is linked to asthma, respiratory infections, lung cancer and coronary heart disease, according to the World Health Organization. The law has been welcomed by health charities, with Ash Scotland saying it sends a clear message that children should grow up in a smoke-free environment.
 
 

New data on risk vs benefit for potent CAR-T cancer drugs

 
‎Saturday, ‎December ‎3, ‎2016, ‏‎12:46:51 AMGo to full article
By Deena Beasley (Reuters) - A promising but risky new group of customized cancer drugs will be in focus this weekend at the annual meeting of the American Society of Hematology (ASH), where clinical trial results will help clarify their potential for doctors and investors. Experimental chimeric antigen receptor T-cells, or CAR-Ts, are made by genetically altering a patients' own T-cells in the lab to help the immune system find and kill cancer cells. The altered cells are then infused back into the patient. ...
 

Johnny Depp Joins Film Project for Teen Living With Stage 4 Cancer

 
‎Friday, ‎December ‎2, ‎2016, ‏‎9:51:15 PMGo to full article
Johnny Depp Joins Film Project for Teen Living With Stage 4 CancerBy Chris Gardner, The Hollywood Reporter Some A-list Hollywood talent didn’t wait until Thanksgiving to give back. Filmmakers Sam Raimi, Catherine Hardwicke, and Ted Melfi joined Johnny Depp, David Lynch, J.K. Simmons, Laura Dern, Penelope Ann Miller, Richard Chamberlain, Jade Pettyjohn, Chad Coleman, Pritesh Shah, and Keith Allan to help make a dream film project come alive for Anthony Conti, a 16-year-old who is facing down stage IV adrenal cortical cancer. ...
 
 

Medicare recipients with cancer face financial distress

 
‎Friday, ‎December ‎2, ‎2016, ‏‎6:10:22 PMGo to full article
By Carolyn Crist (Reuters Health) - Older cancer patients in the U.S. often face high out-of-pocket costs that are a significant financial burden, according to a new study. Medicare, the federal health insurance program for the elderly and disabled, establishes the fees doctors and hospitals are allowed to charge Medicare patients – but then generally only pays 80 percent of those fees. Many people enroll in Medicare HMOs, or they buy so-called Medicare supplemental policies, to help cover the gap.
 

Amgen, Allergan apply for European nod for Avastin biosimilar

 
‎Friday, ‎December ‎2, ‎2016, ‏‎4:40:50 PMGo to full article
An Amgen sign is seen at the company's office in South San Francisco(Reuters) - Amgen Inc and Allergan Plc said they have submitted an application to the European health regulator seeking approval of their biosimilar version of Roche Holding AG's blockbuster cancer treatment, Avastin. The submission is based on the results of a late-stage study that showed Amgen and Allergan's ABP 215 was as safety and effective as Avastin in patients with the most common form of lung cancer. Avastin is also approved for use by patients with cancer of the colon, kidney, ovarian and breast.
 
 

Magic-mushroom compound boosts cancer patients' mindset

 
‎Friday, ‎December ‎2, ‎2016, ‏‎11:58:50 AMGo to full article
Magic-mushroom compound boosts cancer patients' mindsetCancer patients often experience mental anguish and stress, but a single dose of a hallucinogen found in psychedelic mushrooms, along with psychological counseling, improved their mindset, two studies said Thursday. The approach "significantly lessens mental anguish in distressed cancer patients for months at a time," said the findings in the Journal of Psychopharmacology. The first study, led by researchers at New York University's Langone Medical Center, involved 29 people who were given psilocybin, a naturally occurring component of so-called "magic mushrooms" that is an illegal drug in the United States.
 
 

The Atlantic Daily: Social Ills

 
‎Friday, ‎December ‎2, ‎2016, ‏‎3:17:35 AMGo to full article
The Atlantic Daily: Social IllsWhat We’re Following Fight for a Cure: The U.S. Congress is close to approving the 21st Century Cures Act, which would put more than $6 billion behind efforts to cure cancer, reform mental health treatment, test new drugs and medical tools, and more. The legislation, three years in the making, has gathered broad bipartisan support—but its backers were surprised this week when Senator Elizabeth Warren denounced the bill as “extortion” and “fraud” to benefit pharmaceutical companies. In some ways, the debate illustrates a strategic split in the aftermath of the presidential election: While some Democrats are eager for the bill to pass before Donald Trump takes office, Warren sees it as an opportunity for progressives within her party to “show some spine and start fighting back.”
 
 

Merck wins UK okay for Keytruda in lung cancer after price cut

 
‎Friday, ‎December ‎2, ‎2016, ‏‎2:13:00 AMGo to full article
Britain's healthcare cost-effectiveness watchdog NICE has recommended use of Merck's immunotherapy drug Keytruda in certain lung cancer patients, after the U.S. drugmaker cut the price further for the state-run health service. Keytruda is already approved as a cost-effective treatment in melanoma but the National Institute for Health and Care Excellence (NICE) had initially blocked its use in lung cancer. "If companies work with us to price drugs reasonably and manage any uncertainties in the evidence base, we can continue to recommend patients have routine access to the treatments they need," Carole Longson, director of the NICE centre for health technology evaluation, said in a statement on Friday.
 

Magic mushrooms ease anxiety in cancer patients, studies show

 
‎Friday, ‎December ‎2, ‎2016, ‏‎12:43:39 AMGo to full article
Magic mushrooms ease anxiety in cancer patients, studies showAfter Tammy Burgess was diagnosed with ovarian cancer at 55, she fell into the grips of crippling anxiety.  "I would just lay on the couch. I didn't go to work," she recently told researchers at New York University's Langone Medical Center. "When you're anxious about cancer, everything else becomes anxious." But Burgess said she eventually broke free of her existential fears, thanks to a surprising treatment: a capsule of psilocybin, a mind-altering compound found in magic mushrooms. "It was so peaceful and so beautiful," Burgess recalled. SEE ALSO: Ecstasy can reduce fears and stress in PTSD patients. Here's how. Burgess was among 29 participants in a small clinical trial to see whether psilocybin — a banned substance in the United States — could ease anxiety and depression in cancer patients. Participants, who all had cancer, received the doses in an eight-hour, supervised session together with psychological counseling. The trial's results were published Thursday in conjunction with a similar study by Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, which involved 51 cancer patients. In the trials, researchers had to secure federal waivers to use psilocybin. The naturally occurring compound is listed as a Schedule 1 substance under the U.S. Controlled Substances Act, meaning it is banned as the federal government has ruled it has no accepted medical use. Marijuana is also a Schedule 1 substance. The psilocybin studies found that just a single dose of the drug could significantly reduce depression and anxiety in people suffering from cancer with limited side effects, according to the research published in the Journal of Psychopharmacology. About 80 percent of participants in the two studies showed clinically significant reductions in both psychological conditions that lasted for more than six months. After participants ingested the psilocybin, researchers continued to track their clinical evaluation scores for anxiety and depression over several months. Participants received therapy sessions before and after consuming the drug. The studies add to a growing body of research exploring the potential therapeutic benefits of psychedelic substances. Earlier this week, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration gave the go-ahead to a large-scale trail of MDMA, a.k.a ecstasy, for patients with post-traumatic stress disorder. While researchers studied health impacts of psychedelic drugs in the 1950s and '60s, much of their work was halted after the substances became criminalized in the '70s and '80s. Researchers have only recently resumed these types of studies in the last decade or so. "Our results represent the strongest evidence to date of a clinical benefit from psilocybin therapy, with the potential to transform care for patients with cancer-related psychological distress," Stephen Ross, lead investigator for the NYU study and director of substance abuse services at NYU Langone, said in a statement. Roland Griffiths, a neuroscience professor at Johns Hopkins, noted that traditional psychotherapy offered to cancer patients, such as behavioral therapy and antidepressants, may not take effect for weeks or months, if ever. "The most interesting and remarkable finding is that a single dose of psilocybin, which lasts four to six hours, produced enduring decreases in depression and anxiety symptoms, and this may represent a fascinating new model for treating some psychiatric conditions," Griffiths said in a news release. Besides creating conscious-expanding experiences and unleashing a wave of compassion and connectedness, eating too many magic mushrooms can cause nausea, vomiting, lack of coordination — or even lead to death in extreme scenarios. Researchers leading the clinical trials stressed that they gave patients the psilocybin capsules under tightly controlled conditions and in the presence of clinically trained monitors. They cautioned against using the compound outside of such a research or patient care setting. Jeffrey Lieberman, a former president of the American Psychiatric Association, and Daniel Shalev of the New York State Psychiatric Institute were among the leaders in psychiatry, palliative care and drug regulation who provided commentary in support of the new research. The studies are "a model for revisiting criminalized compounds of interest in a safe, ethical way," they wrote. Lieberman and Shalev said easing research restrictions on psychedelics would open up "much potential for new scientific insights and clinical applications." Closeup image of dummy psilocybin drug. Image: NYU LANGONE MEDICAL CENTER Other experts, however, express skepticism about the results. William Breitbart, who chairs the psychiatry department at Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center in New York, said the diversity in the participants' cancer diagnoses undermined the studies' findings. Patients included people with early-stage cancer up to imminent terminal illness, making it harder to know which patients might have found relief from anxiety and depression without psilocybin, the New York Times reported Thursday. "Medical marijuana got its foot in the door by making the appeal that 'cancer patients are suffering, they're near death, so for compassionate purposes, let's make it available,'" Breitbart told the newspaper. "And then you’re able to extend this drug to other purposes." BONUS: Stunning images of the supermoon from around the globe  
 
 

Cancer drugs may remain approved despite lack of benefit

 
‎Thursday, ‎December ‎1, ‎2016, ‏‎11:59:06 PMGo to full article
By Andrew M. Seaman (Reuters Health) - - In the United States, cancer drugs are sometimes approved through sped-up processes - and they often stay approved even if later studies show them to be inferior to other options or even worse than doing nothing, a new study found. Researchers evaluated studies done on 18 cancer drugs approved between 2008 and 2012 by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA). "We were shocked to find that these drugs don’t save lives and don’t improve quality of lives," said lead author Diana Zuckerman, who is president of the National Center for Health Research and the Cancer Prevention and Treatment Fund in Washington, D.C. To ensure a cancer treatment's safety and quickly get it to market, the FDA sometimes approves a drug if it meets "surrogate" research goals instead of the gold-standard endpoints the agency usually looks for.
 

3 Ways to Take Your Plant-Based Diet to the Next Level

 
‎Thursday, ‎December ‎1, ‎2016, ‏‎5:55:22 PMGo to full article
Ready for some good news? While 2016 continues to be unpredictable, your diet doesn't have to be. By simply building meals around vegetables, fruits, whole grains, legumes, nuts and seeds, you can create a phytochemical shield against chronic diseases including obesity, diabetes, heart disease and even certain forms of cancer, according to a new position paper about vegetarian diets from the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics.
 

Congress Nears a Breakthrough on Medical Research Funding

 
‎Thursday, ‎December ‎1, ‎2016, ‏‎11:00:00 AMGo to full article
Lawmakers hail the 21st Century Cures Act as a rare bipartisan compromise to fund public health programs, combat the opioid epidemic, and advance cancer treatment. Elizabeth Warren calls it extortion.
 

'Magic mushroom' psychedelic may ease anxiety, depression

 
‎Thursday, ‎December ‎1, ‎2016, ‏‎7:24:47 AMGo to full article
In this Monday, Nov. 28, 2016 photo, Dinah Bazer poses at her home in New York. Bazer found relief from cancer anxiety by being treating with a dose of psilocybin administered by a New York University study. Two studies, published Thursday, Dec. 1, 2016, say a single dose of the psychedelic ingredient in “magic mushrooms” can quickly and effectively treat anxiety and depression in cancer patients, an effect that may last for months. (AP Photo/Bebeto Matthews)NEW YORK (AP) — The psychedelic drug in "magic mushrooms" can quickly and effectively help treat anxiety and depression in cancer patients, an effect that may last for months, two small studies show.
 
 

Bluebird, Celgene myeloma treatment impresses in tiny study

 
‎Thursday, ‎December ‎1, ‎2016, ‏‎1:39:11 AMGo to full article
Patients who previously were not helped by repeated treatments for multiple myeloma showed strong benefits from a new type of therapy in a small study, and with no worrisome side effects, drugmaker Bluebird Bio Inc said on Wednesday. The Phase 1 study enrolled patients who had basically run out of options for the blood cancer, after failing on average six previous rounds of treatment, including stem cell transplants. Among three patients given the lowest dose of the experimental treatment, one showed at least a 50 percent reduction in signs of the disease, including of a protein considered a hallmark of the cancer.
 

From Drug Research to a Cancer Moonshot, Lame Duck Congress Preps a Massive Health Care Bill

 
‎Wednesday, ‎November ‎30, ‎2016, ‏‎6:10:00 PMGo to full article
From Drug Research to a Cancer Moonshot, Lame Duck Congress Preps a Massive Health Care BillWith Republicans just weeks away from possibly repealing the Affordable Care Act, President Obama’s signature domestic policy program, it may seem like an odd time to look for bipartisan unity on legislation related to health care. The bill also outlines various measures to streamline the approval of new drugs and medical devices and to make it easier for desperately ill patients to get access to experimental medications that have not yet been approved for the general population.
 

 

 

Weathering the Coming Storm


 

 

 

Price R399.00

 

 


 

Description

Dr. Chuck Missler, an internationally known business executive, outlines our current economic predicament and defensive steps you can take to lessen the impact of the impending economic crisis. As a Bible teacher for over 30 years with a ministry reaching over 40 countries, Chuck shares some key strategies to prepare yourself spiritually and practically.

Is the World facing another major economic upheaval?

What is the best strategy to protect your family in times of economic uncertainty?

The Church has enjoyed a relatively peaceful existence in the West for a few centuries but the with the coming persecution, how do we go about organizing home study and home-church?

Soul Survival – Keeping your “lamp full” during the hard times ahead.

Join Dr. Chuck Missler and Ron Matsen in the Executive Brie fing Room of
The River Lodge, New Zealand, in an intensive summary outlining what lies
ahead and how we can prepare for the coming storm.

Runtime: Approx. 5 hours

© 2012 Koinonia House Inc.

Available in the following formats:

 

DVD:

•3 Disks
•5 M4A Files
•1 PDF Notes File
•Color, 16:9, Dolby Digital 2.0 stereo, Region encoding (This DVD will be viewable in other countries WITH the proper DVD player and television set.)


 
 

Expectations

 of the

 Antichrist

 

 

Dr. Chuck Missler and Ron Matsen

 

Price R 499.00

 

There are many diverse anticipations concerning the Coming World Leader, commonly referred to as “The Antichrist.” This study will explore the Biblical descriptions with the specific expectations of the globalists, Islam, the Vatican, Freemasonry, and others.
• Will he be a Nephilim?
• Why is the Vatican openly preparing to receive an “alien” visitor?
• Will he be a resurrection of Nimrod? Is his DNA a factor?
• What are the expectations of transhumanist technologists in this regard?
Clearly, the Bible has much more to illuminate this issue far beyond the popular conceptions; and yet the composite perspective will astonish most. Furthermore, is there a climactic cosmic deception being prepared that, if it were possible, “it would deceive the very elect”? Jesus commanded us, “Be not deceived.” But, how?
How close are these events to our current horizon?
Join Dr. Chuck Missler and Ron Matsen in an intensive summary of some of the Strategic Trends that will impact all of us.
Available in the following formats:

DVD:
•3 Discs
•6 M4A Files
•1 PDF Notes File
•Color, Fullscreen 16:9, Dolby Digital 2.0 stereo, Region  encoding ( This DVD will be viewable in other countries WITH the proper DVD player and television set.)


 

 

 

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Genetically Modified Food & People.

 

 

 

 Angels, Volume III:

The Denizens of the Metacosm

 

DVD

 

 

Price R 179.00

 

Angels, Volume III: The Denizens of the Metacosm

 

DVD

by Dr. Chuck Missler

 

Description

Volumes 1 & 2 of this series explored the finite limits and boundaries of our physical reality. After probing the limits of both the Macrocosm and the Microcosm, we discovered that our reality is but a shadow of larger reality, the Metacosm, a domain of extra-dimensional transfers and other paradoxical phenomena.

 

Volume 3 explores the contradictory behavior of UFOs and other demonic deceptions characteristic of the End Times. Explore these topics in more detail in either this two-hour briefing, Angels Vol 3: The Denizens of the Metacosm or our six-hour extensive study, Expectations of the Antichrist.

 

 

• Are they real?

• Why do UFOs enjoy a military classification higher than our most sensitive weapons systems?

• Why are the events which occurred in Roswell New Mexico still classified after 66 years?

• Why is the Vatican openly preparing to receive an Alien Visitor?

• How should a Christian deal with the occurrences of Alien abductions?

• Jesus admonished us to “Be not deceived.” How?

• How do we prepare for the deception which, “if it were possible, would deceive the very elect”?

 

Join Dr. Chuck Missler in the Executive Briefing Room of the River Lodge, New Zealand, exploring the misinformation, (and deliberate disinformation) about the various “denizens of the Metacosm” and other insights of the invisible war unfolding on our near horizon.

 

This briefing pack contains 2 hours of teaching

 

Available in the following formats

 

DVD:

•1 Disc

•2 M4A Files

•Color, Fullscreen 16:9, Dolby Digital 2.0 stereo, Region. This DVD will be viewable in other countries WITH the proper DVD player and television set.)

 

DVD

PRICE  R 159.00

DVD

PRICE R 159.00

 

DVD

Price  R 159.00

 

DVD

Price R 159.00

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


Global Events Disaster Site


Extreme Weather, Epidemic, Terror Attack, Biological Hazard,

Volcano Eruption, Earthquake, Incidents at Sea

 

 

"In seasons of severe trial, the Christian has nothing on earth that he can trust to, and is therefore compelled to cast himself on God alone. When no human deliverance can avail, he must simply and entirely trust himself to the providence and care of God. Happy storm that wrecks a man on such a rock as this! O blessed hurricane that drives the soul to God--and God alone!"
- Spurgeon

 

 

 

 

+27 11 969 0086


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