“Bringing the world into focus
through the lens of Scripture”

 

frosty@khouseafrica.com

 

 

 

K-House Africa

 

Banking Details

 

 

 Africa news

 

THE STRUGGLE FOR JERUSALEM

 

 

The Rise Of Islam

 

 

THE DECLINE OF THE USA

 

 

GLOBAL RELIGION

 

 

GLOBAL PESTILENCE

 

 

Global Government

 

 

THE RISE OF THE FAR EAST

 

 

THE RISE OF THE EUROPEAN SUPER STATE

 

 

WEAPONS PROLIFERATION

 

 

THE MAGOG INVASION

 

 

 

 Kings High Way Briefing Packs

 

 

 

 

INTERNATIONAL NEWS FEEDS


 In The News provided by Koinonia House


Best viewed with Internet Explorer.


 

Monitor The Strategic Trends

Biotech & Global Pestilence Introduction:

 

The threat of germ warfare has brought to the forefront long-forgotten diseases like plague, anthrax, and smallpox. Recent television news programs have highlighted secret projects in the former Soviet Union to develop antibiotic-resistant strains of genetically engineered viruses and bacteria.


[READ THE FULL INTRODUCTION]

 

 


 

Human Nature

Speakers:

Ron Matsen

R179.00

 

 

 

About available formats

Description: 

What does it mean to be human? Philosophers, theologians, sociologists and psychologists have attempted to understand the nature of mankind for ages. Their conclusions often contradict each other which lead to confusion rather than clarification. Clearly Man is a very complicated social being. The Bible tells us that man is “fearfully and wonderfully made.”
  • How do we understand our makeup and does it make a difference?
  • What is the meaning of being “created in the image of God?”
  • What causes our natural responses and can we change this behaviour?

Join Ron Matsen from the Executive Briefing Room of the River Lodge, New Zealand as he explores the subject of our “Human Nature” and gives insight into the architecture and accountability of all mankind.

This briefing pack contains approx. 2 hours of teaching.

  • DVD discs
  • M4A files
  • PDF Notes file
  •  

CANCER  Awareness

 

 

Dedicated Page

 

 

 

Price R 179

 

 

 

 

Beginning of Wisdom

 

by

 Dr. Chuck Missler

“The fear of God is the beginning of wisdom.” Proverbs 9:10

But how do we balance the awesome majesty due to the Creator and Ruler of the universe with the gracious family intimacy that is now available to us through the completed work of Christ?

What does His Holiness demand of us, personally?

What are the hazards of failing to render the Almighty His due, while availing ourselves the riches committed to us of the precious promises in His Word?

How do we deal with these paramount issues facing us daily in practical challenges?

Chuck Missler grapples with these wildly misunderstood tensions with down-to-earth frankness and Biblically-based candor.

 


 

 

Price R 179.00

 

 

The Gospel: The Message of Reconciliation

DVD

by Ron Matsen 

 

 

 

Price R 179.00

 

 

 

Description

One of the last instructions given by Jesus to the Church was, “Go into all the world and preach the gospel.” (Mark 16:15)

The fact is most Christians don’t know how to share their faith effectively. Sadly, many of the people they know in the world today are wandering around, lost and without hope, having never heard the wonderful Message of Reconciliation.

How would you answer the question, “What must I do to be saved?”

What are the essential facts, demands and promises of the Gospel?

Why are we told to evangelize?

Join Ron Matsen in the Executive Briefing Room of the River Lodge, New Zealand as he explores the subject of “The Gospel – The Message of Reconciliation” and gives practical insight into how to share the essential doctrines of salvation.

This briefing pack contains 2 hours of teaching

© Copyright 2013

 

City Press

 

City Press

 
 

 

Disaster Management News from TerraDaily.com

 

Earth News, Earth Science, Energy Technology, Environment News

 

 

 

NEW DEDICATED PAGE

 

SABC NewsSABC Logo

 

I WILL CURSE THOSE WHO

 

 CURSE THEE'

 

 

THE PERFECT STORM

 

 


Koinonia Institute presents its 2014 Strategic Perspectives IX Conference in Coeur d' Alene, Idaho on DVD, intel and insight to understand the times.


DVD Set - 10 discs
Run time approximately 21 Hours
Dr. Chuck Missler: The Spiritual Entrepreneur
L.A. Marzulli: On the Trail of the Nephilim
Bill Salus: Nuclear Showdown in Iran: Revealing the Ancient Prophecy of Elam
Mark Biltz: The Blood Moons
Joseph Farah: ISIS SHMISIS: God's Mideast Peace Plan
Bob Cornuke: Amazing New Discoveries that Change Everything about the Location of Solomon's Temple
Louis Powell: China - The Sleeping Dragon
Ron Matsen: The Re-emergence of Assyria


Also featuring: Trevor MacDuff, Chris Corlett, Jeff Altus, Gordon McDonald, William Welty, Avi Lipkin, Dan Stolebarger, Kings Highway/Debbie Holland, Steve Elwart, John Loeffler, and Jay Seegert

 

Price R799.00

 

 

 

Shower Proof

 

Scientists find aggressive strain of HIV in Cuba <http://www.wnd.com/2015/02/scientists-find-aggressive-strain-of-hiv-in-cuba/>

 

 

‎16 ‎February ‎2015, ‏‎07:21:41 PM | -NO AUTHOR-Go to full article <http://www.wnd.com/2015/02/scientists-find-aggressive-strain-of-hiv-in-cuba/>

 

(Fox News) Scientists have found an aggressive strain of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) in Cuba that they say can progress to AIDS so rapidly that patients may not even know they are infected before symptoms appear, Medical News Today reported.

 

The Cuban variant of HIV is categorized as a recombinant version of the virus, which can occur if a person engages in unprotected sex with multiple infected partners and contracts multiple strains of the HIV virus, which later recombine within a person to create a new variant.

 

In a normal HIV infection, the virus attaches to proteins on the membranes of cells known as CCR5 before it is able to penetrate the cell. The HIV-infected patient may experience a number of healthy years before the virus becomes CXCR4, which quickly progresses to AIDS, according to the report.

 

In the new Cuban strain, researchers found that HIV makes the transition to CXCR4 more quickly than in the other strains, resulting in a shorter number of “healthy” years. The new strain can cause AIDS to appear within just three years of infection.

 

Go to commentsComments (0) <http://www.wnd.com/2015/02/scientists-find-aggressive-strain-of-hiv-in-cuba/#comments>

 

Diseases/Conditions News Headlines - Yahoo! News

 

Minnesota finds third bird flu infection in commercial poultry

 
‎28 ‎March ‎2015, ‏‎07:15:35 PMGo to full article
The U.S. Department of Agriculture on Saturday confirmed the third infection of a virulent strain of avian flu in a commercial poultry flock in Minnesota, the nation's top turkey-producing state. A case of H5N2 flu was found in a flock of 39,000 turkeys in Stearns County, which is northwest of Minneapolis, according to a notice from USDA. Recent infections of avian flu in states stretching from Arkansas to Oregon have prompted overseas buyers to limit imports of U.S. poultry from companies such as Tyson Foods Inc, Pilgrim's Pride Corp and Sanderson Farms Inc. The USDA is developing a vaccine to protect poultry from new strains of avian flu, including H5N2, but has no plans to distribute it yet.
 

FDA rejects Adamis injection for treating acute allergies

 
‎28 ‎March ‎2015, ‏‎12:34:06 AMGo to full article
(Reuters) - The United States Food and Drug Administration rejected Adamis Pharmaceuticals Corp's injection for treating severe allergic reactions, the company said. Adamis Pharmaceuticals shares were down 37 percent at $3.40 in after-market trading. The FDA raised questions related to the volume of dose delivered by the pre-filled syringe, Adamis said on Friday. The regulator did not raise any other safety or efficacy issue related to the injection, designed as a low-cost alternative to prevailing auto-injectors.
 

Sanofi to launch Toujeo diabetes drug in U.S. on Monday: source

 
‎27 ‎March ‎2015, ‏‎05:23:33 PMGo to full article
French drugmaker Sanofi plans to launch its new Toujeo insulin for diabetics in the United States on Monday, according to a source familiar with the matter. Toujeo was approved for use in the United States on Feb. 25 and was recommended for approval by European regulators two days later. Sanofi has previously said it planned the launch for the beginning of the second quarter.
 

Europe pushes back verdict on Bristol immune system cancer drug

 
‎27 ‎March ‎2015, ‏‎05:17:28 PMGo to full article
European regulators have postponed a decision on whether to recommend approval of a closely watched Bristol-Myers Squibb drug that helps the immune system fight cancer, officials said on Friday. Nivolumab, which is already approved in the United States under the brand name Opdivo for melanoma and lung cancer, was on the agenda at a monthly meeting of European Medicines Agency (EMA) experts, but no verdict was reached. A Bristol-Myers spokeswoman said the delay was due to the fact that the drugmaker had submitted additional data over the course of the review period. Nivolumab, which is already being reviewed on an accelerated basis at the EMA, could be considered again either in April or at a later date, an agency spokeswoman said.
 

Romania confirms bird flu in dead pelicans: report

 
‎27 ‎March ‎2015, ‏‎03:52:46 PMGo to full article
BUCHAREST (Reuters) - More than 100 dead pelicans in Romania's Danube Delta were found to be infected with H5N1 bird flu virus, Romanian authorities were quoted as saying on Friday by state news agency Agerpres. Bulgaria, Romania's southern neighbor also said it discovered the strain in two dead pelicans near the border. Romanian officials imposed a 10 km (6 miles) monitoring zone around the outbreak. (Reporting by Luiza Ilie; Editing by Matthias Williams)
 

3 Low- or No-Cost Resources to Help Improve Your Mental Health

 
‎26 ‎March ‎2015, ‏‎09:50:05 PMGo to full article
3 Low- or No-Cost Resources to Help Improve Your Mental HealthMany people who struggle with stress, mental illness or sub-optimal mental health lack the time and finances to engage in weekly therapy or ongoing medication management. Other individuals may be interested in trying alternatives prior to starting medications but lack knowledge of available resources. Even those with the best medical insurance,...
 
 

Scientist defends WHO group report linking herbicide to cancer

 
‎26 ‎March ‎2015, ‏‎08:11:14 PMGo to full article
File photo of activists protesting against the production of herbicides and GMO food products outside Monsanto headquarters in Creve CoeurA World Health Organization group's controversial finding that the world's most popular herbicide "probably is carcinogenic to humans" was based on a thorough scientific review and is a key marker in ongoing evaluations of the product, the scientist who led the study said Thursday. There was sufficient evidence in animals, limited evidence in humans and strong supporting evidence showing DNA mutations ... and damaged chromosomes," Aaron Blair, a scientist emeritus at the National Cancer Institute, said in an interview. Blair chaired the 17-member working group of the WHO's International Agency for Research on Cancer (IARC), which rocked the agricultural industry on March 20 by classifying glyphosate as "probably" cancer-causing. Monsanto Co , which has built a $15 billion company on sales of glyphosate-based Roundup herbicide and crops genetically engineered to tolerate being sprayed with Roundup, has demanded a retraction and explanation from WHO.
 
 

Autoimmune Disease: 7 Simple Steps for Healing

 
‎26 ‎March ‎2015, ‏‎06:18:05 PMGo to full article
Autoimmune Disease: 7 Simple Steps for HealingChances are either you or someone you know are part of the estimated 50 million people in America (or 20 percent of the population) with an autoimmune disease.And, if you're like many of them, your symptoms are unrelenting and negatively impacting your life. You're tired, frustrated, and seeking answers.Life feels incomplete and unsatisfying...
 
 

Bulgaria detects bird flu in dead pelicans

 
‎26 ‎March ‎2015, ‏‎05:41:35 PMGo to full article
SOFIA (Reuters) - Bulgaria's authorities said on Friday they had discovered the highly pathogenic H5N1 bird flu virus in two dead pelicans in a nature reserve in northeastern part of the Balkan country, close to neighboring Romania. "Samples were taken from the two birds after 21 Dalmatian pelicans were found dead and both are positive," the Bulgarian Food Safety Agency said in a statement. The agency said it had imposed a 3 km protection zone around the outbreak, which included a nearby village with back-yard farms and a poultry farm, which however did not have stock at the moment. ...
 

TV documentary probes mysteries, treatments, advances in cancer

 
‎26 ‎March ‎2015, ‏‎04:24:42 PMGo to full article
Documentary filmmaker Burns speaks about his film, The Central Park Five, at the National Press Club in WashingtonBy Patricia Reaney NEW YORK (Reuters) - For documentary maker Ken Burns the film "Cancer: The Emperor of All Maladies" has a special significance because the multiple Emmy award-winner's mother died of the disease when he was a boy. Burns was 11 years old when she lost her battle with cancer, an event he said robbed him of his childhood. Directed by Barak Goodman ("Scottsboro: An American Tragedy") and based on the Pulitzer Prize-winning book "The Emperor of All Maladies: A Biography of Cancer" by Indian-born American scientist Siddhartha Mukherjee, the documentary will begin airing on PBS on Monday. Part scientific and investigative report, the series chronicles the history of cancer, early misconceptions, discoveries into its causes, the development of chemotherapy and targeted therapies and the latest advances in immunotherapy.
 
 

Cholera will plague Haiti until water, sanitation crisis solved: experts

 
‎26 ‎March ‎2015, ‏‎05:51:26 AMGo to full article
By Anastasia Moloney BOGOTA (Thomson Reuters Foundation) - Cholera will continue to kill and infect Haitians as long as they lack access to clean water and sanitation, with a thousand new cases reported each week, health experts say. Cholera, a water-borne disease caught by drinking and using contaminated water, has killed nearly 9,000 Haitians and infected 732,000 since it broke out in the country in late 2010. With the lowest levels of access to drinking water and sanitation in the Americas, Haiti is struggling to stamp out cholera, which resurged between October and December last year, said the Pan American Health Organization (PAHO). During the first two months of this year, cholera cases totaled 7,225, including 86 deaths - higher than recorded during the same period in 2012 and 2014, said PAHO, the regional arm of the World Health Organization.
 

Even interrupting sitting time may improve health in type 2 diabetes

 
‎25 ‎March ‎2015, ‏‎10:48:06 PMGo to full article
By Janice Neumann (Reuters Health) - - People with Type 2 diabetes could trim down and improve their metabolic health by replacing long periods of sitting with periodic standing, taking the stairs or even just changing the television station manually, a new study suggests. “It is important to stress that physical activity incorporates all different forms of movement and that people do not have to participate in structured exercise to be sufficiently active,” said Catherine Falconer, who led the study. “Whatever you can do to increase the amount of physical activity you do and reduce the length of time sitting will have an impact on your diabetes and general health,” she wrote in an email. Previous research has shown that increasing physical activity can help people with type 2 diabetes better handle their weight, glucose and lipid levels, Falconer and her team point out in Medicine and Science in Sports and Exercise.
 

Science, patients driving rare disease drug research surge

 
‎25 ‎March ‎2015, ‏‎07:14:28 PMGo to full article
In this Feb. 21, 2015 photo, Cara O'Neill, left, gives a kiss to her daughter, Eliza, 5, at their home in Columbia, S.C. Glenn and Cara O'Neill started the Cure Sanfilippo Foundation in hopes of saving Eliza, who suffers from the rare disease and is beginning to lose her ability to speak. The disease kills brain cells, causing hyperactivity and autistic-like behavior, then seizures, loss of ability to walk and usually death by the mid-teens. "The next six or seven years will be horrible for her, and then she'll die," her father said. (AP Photo/Rainier Ehrhardt)TRENTON, N.J. (AP) — The global pharmaceutical industry is pouring billions of dollars into developing treatments for rare diseases, which once drew little interest from major drugmakers but now point the way toward a new era of innovative therapies and big profits.
 
 

Depression: My Journey Through the Fog

 
‎25 ‎March ‎2015, ‏‎06:37:06 PMGo to full article
Depression: My Journey Through the FogMy perspective on life has almost always been "the glass is half full" -- even during difficult moments. Therefore, I never thought that depression would be something that might affect me. My limited understanding about depression was that someone felt bad or sad; however, I never really thought about the personal impact of depression. My lack...
 
 

A look at some key statistics on rare diseases in the US

 
‎25 ‎March ‎2015, ‏‎05:09:10 PMGo to full article
The global pharmaceutical industry is make huge investments in treatments for rare diseases, which once drew little interest from major drugmakers. A look at some key statistics on rare diseases:
 

VBL Therapeutics' brain cancer drug succeeds in mid-stage study

 
‎25 ‎March ‎2015, ‏‎02:21:44 PMGo to full article
(Reuters) - Israel-based VBL Therapeutics said a mid-stage study of its experimental brain cancer drug met the main goal of increasing overall survival. The company said its drug, VBL-111, significantly improved overall survival when used in combination with Roche AG's cancer treatment, Avastin. VBL is also testing VBL-111 as a treatment for thyroid cancer and ovarian cancer. VBL Therapeutics is the name Vascular Biogenics Ltd operates under.
 

Lpath's kidney cancer drug fails mid-stage trial

 
‎24 ‎March ‎2015, ‏‎10:36:29 PMGo to full article
(Reuters) - Drug developer Lpath Inc said its experimental drug to treat renal cell carcinoma, the most common form of kidney cancer, failed to meet its main goal in a mid-stage trial. Lpath shares were down 39 percent in extended trading on Tuesday.
 

Oldest evidence of breast cancer found in Egyptian skeleton

 
‎24 ‎March ‎2015, ‏‎10:24:44 PMGo to full article
Handout of part of the skeleton of an Egyptian woman whom Egyptian authorities say shows the world's oldest evidence of breast cancerA team from a Spanish university has discovered what Egyptian authorities are calling the world's oldest evidence of breast cancer in the 4,200-year-old skeleton of an adult woman. Antiquities Minister Mamdouh el-Damaty said the bones of the woman, who lived at the end of the 6th Pharaonic Dynasty, showed "an extraordinary deterioration". "The study of her remains shows the typical destructive damage provoked by the extension of a breast cancer as a metastasis," he said in a statement on Tuesday. Despite being one of the world's leading causes of death today, cancer is virtually absent in archaeological records compared to other diseases - which has given rise to the idea that cancers are mainly attributable to modern lifestyles and to people living for longer.
 
 

Jolie surgery 'dramatically' lowers cancer risk: experts

 
‎24 ‎March ‎2015, ‏‎10:18:07 PMGo to full article
It is a hard personal choice, but removing healthy fallopian tubes and ovaries effectively slashes the cancer odds for women like Angelina Jolie, seen here in London in 2013, who carry a risk-boosting gene mutation, experts saidIt is a hard personal choice, but removing healthy fallopian tubes and ovaries effectively slashes the cancer odds for women like Angelina Jolie who carry a risk-boosting gene mutation, experts said Tuesday. Carriers like the Hollywood star, who has had the surgery two years after a selective double mastectomy, face a "sky-high" risk of developing breast or ovarian cancer, said Per Hall, an oncologist at Sweden's Karolinska Institutet. Carriers of the BRCA1 mutation, which is more dangerous than BRCA2, have a lifetime risk of about 80 percent of developing breast cancer, compared to about 10 percent for women without it. For ovarian cancer, the elevated risk was about 40-50 percent -- compared to about 1.5 percent for the general population.
 
 

More diabetes cases diagnosed after Medicaid expansion

 
‎24 ‎March ‎2015, ‏‎10:16:40 PMGo to full article
By Lisa Rapaport (Reuters Health) – - U.S. states that expanded their Medicaid programs under the Affordable Care Act have seen larger increases in diabetes cases than states that didn’t expand their programs, a new study shows. The findings suggest that expanding Medicaid, the government-run health insurance for the poor, allows people with diabetes to be diagnosed earlier than before, which may improve outcomes later on, the researchers say. "This is important because diabetes is becoming more prevalent as the population gets older,” said Dr. Harvey Kaufman, lead author of the study and senior medical director at Quest Diagnostics, which funded the analysis. If left untreated, diabetes can lead to vision loss, kidney failure, nerve problems and amputations of the legs and feet, according to the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.
 

Cancer experts laud Angelina Jolie's decision to remove ovaries

 
‎24 ‎March ‎2015, ‏‎10:04:23 PMGo to full article
Actress and campaigner Angelina Jolie attends a summit to end sexual violence in conflict, at the Excel centre in LondonTwo years after a double mastectomy, actress Angelina Jolie has had her ovaries and fallopian tubes removed to avoid the risk of ovarian cancer, a move cancer experts described as courageous and influential. The movie director and philanthropist, who is the wife of actor Brad Pitt and the mother of six children, said in an op-ed column in the New York Times on Tuesday that she had the surgery last week after blood tests showed what could have been early signs of the disease. Jolie, 39, carries a mutation in the BRCA1 gene that increases her risk for breast and ovarian cancer. Her mother died of ovarian cancer at the age of 56.
 
 

Monsanto seeks retraction for report linking herbicide to cancer

 
‎24 ‎March ‎2015, ‏‎09:30:01 PMGo to full article
Monsanto Co, maker of the world's most widely used herbicide, Roundup, wants an international health organization to retract a report linking the chief ingredient in Roundup to cancer. The company said on Tuesday that the report, issued on Friday by the World Health Organization's International Agency for Research on Cancer (IARC), was biased and contradicts regulatory findings that the ingredient, glyphosate, is safe when used as labeled. A working group of the IARC, based in Lyon, France, said after reviewing scientific literature it was classifying glyphosate as "probably carcinogenic to humans." "We question the quality of the assessment," Philip Miller, Monsanto vice president of global regulatory affairs, said on Tuesday in an interview.
 

Cancer patients want more info about CT risks

 
‎24 ‎March ‎2015, ‏‎08:17:36 PMGo to full article
By Kathryn Doyle (Reuters Health) – - Some cancer patients would like more information on the health risks of their radiology tests, a new study found. “Before completing this study, I believed I understood what patients may wish to know and how to provide that information to them,” said Dr. Raymond Thornton, the study’s lead author from Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center in New York City. Imaging techniques like X-rays, CT and positron emission tomography (PET) scans expose patients to ionizing radiation, which damages DNA and can lead to cell death or mutations that can increase the risk for later cancers. The benefits will almost always outweigh the risks when an imaging procedure is performed for an appropriate reason, Thornton said.
 

U.S. developing bird flu vaccine, no distribution plans yet

 
‎24 ‎March ‎2015, ‏‎12:49:41 AMGo to full article
By Tom Polansek CHICAGO (Reuters) - The U.S. government is developing a vaccine to protect poultry from new strains of avian flu that have recently killed birds from Arkansas to Washington state. Within two months, scientists at a U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) research lab in Georgia will test the vaccine on chickens to see how well it prevents them from getting sick and dying of the virus, which the government says is spread by wild birds. Progress toward creating a vaccine has not previously been reported. It comes after the H5N8 and H5N2 flu strains have infected commercial poultry operations and backyard flocks in eight states since December.
 

Without symptoms, the value of testing for thyroid disease is unclear

 
‎23 ‎March ‎2015, ‏‎11:16:22 PMGo to full article
By Andrew M. Seaman (Reuters Health) – - There is not enough evidence to recommend for or against testing for thyroid dysfunction in adults without symptoms, according to a U.S. government-backed panel. “We don’t view this as the final word,” Dr. Kirsten Bibbins-Domingo, vice chairperson of the U.S. Preventive Services Task Force (USPSTF). “We view this as a call to the research community to help us provide this evidence,” she said in a phone interview with Reuters Health. If left untreated, thyroid dysfunction may lead to death or a number of conditions, including heart disease and cancer, the USPSTF writes in the Annals of Internal Medicine.
 

Years later, stress training pays off for cancer patients

 
‎23 ‎March ‎2015, ‏‎10:56:16 PMGo to full article
By Kathryn Doyle (Reuters Health) – - Eleven years later, women who took a stress management course after being diagnosed with breast cancer were still reaping the benefits of the training. Depression is common during cancer treatment and afterward, said senior author Michael H. Antoni of the University of Miami, in Coral Gables, Florida. Cognitive behavioral stress management techniques “such as progressive muscle relaxation and deep breathing techniques along with strategies for changing self-defeating and irrational thoughts about life stressors, a procedure called ‘cognitive restructuring,’ can be learned and applied to daily life and breast cancer specific stressors” Antoni told Reuters Health by email. These techniques "have been shown to improve regulation of the adrenal stress hormone cortisol in women under treatment for breast cancer," he added.
 

Tumors grown in dishes could help customize cancer treatment

 
‎23 ‎March ‎2015, ‏‎06:14:02 PMGo to full article
By Ben Gruber Experiments conducted at an underground laboratory at Vanderbilt University could prove vital in the fight against cancer. Alex Walsh, a biomedical researcher, is using a laser to make what she calls organoids glow. The organoid is then dosed with a cocktail of cancer drugs and placed under a microscope at which point it is blasted with a laser. Measuring the variations in the intensity of the resulting fluorescence provides a readout of cellular metabolism which, Walsh says, is an accurate and speedy biomarker of drug response.
 

Learning to Welcome a Bipolar Diagnosis

 
‎23 ‎March ‎2015, ‏‎03:24:11 PMGo to full article
Learning to Welcome a Bipolar DiagnosisIf you're a frequent reader, you may have noticed that I've been posting at a markedly reduced rate. The arrival of spring has, for me, coincided with a new season in life.Frankly, ideas no longer come to me as readily as they did over the last few months. Or if they still still do, then perhaps it's the words I need to convey them that are no...

 

MEI Pharma's cancer drug misses main goals in mid-stage study

 
‎23 ‎March ‎2015, ‏‎01:31:41 PMGo to full article
(Reuters) - MEI Pharma says its cancer drug failed to meet the main goal in a mid-stage study. The drug, pracinostat, in combination with chemotherapy drug azacitidine showed no difference in complete remission in previously untreated patients with myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS) - a type of blood cancer - against azacitidine alone. Complete remission implies the disappearance of all signs of cancer in response to treatment. It does not always constitute a cure. (Reporting by Rosmi Shaji in Bengaluru; Editing by Saumyadeb Chakrabarty)
 

Exclusive: Biogen shortens name, expands ambitions in Alzheimer's, ALS

 
‎23 ‎March ‎2015, ‏‎07:14:09 AMGo to full article
The company's name is displayed on a billboard near the headquarters of Biogen Idec Inc. in CambridgeBiogen Idec Inc has seen its market value quadruple in three years to more than $100 billion on the back of its successful multiple sclerosis drugs. The Massachusetts-based company, which made headlines last week when it announced better-than-expected clinical trial results for its experimental Alzheimer's drug, aducanumab, said that it will drop Idec from its name as of Monday and adopt a new logo. Chief Executive George Scangos says that going forward he will keep Biogen focused on developing drugs for some of the hardest-to-treat diseases. "Five years down the road, with some luck, we'll have an Alzheimer's drug that's getting approved,” Scangos told Reuters.
 
 

Monsanto weed killer can 'probably' cause cancer: World Health Organization

 
‎21 ‎March ‎2015, ‏‎01:31:01 AMGo to full article
The WHO's cancer arm, the International Agency for Research on Cancer (IARC), said glyphosate, the active ingredient in the Monsanto Co herbicide Roundup, was "classified as probably carcinogenic to humans". Monsanto, the world's largest seed company, said scientific data do not support the conclusions and called on the WHO to hold an urgent meeting to explain the findings. "We don't know how IARC could reach a conclusion that is such a dramatic departure from the conclusion reached by all regulatory agencies around the globe," Philip Miller, Monsanto's vice-president of global regulatory affairs, said in a statement.
 

Path to breast cancer care differs by race, ethnicity

 
‎20 ‎March ‎2015, ‏‎10:36:59 PMGo to full article
By Andrew M. Seaman (Reuters Health) – Breast cancer patients of different races and ethnicities may not pick surgeons and hospitals in the same way, a new study suggests. For example, black and Hispanic women with breast cancer were less likely than white women to select surgeons and hospitals based on reputation, researchers found. The differences in how people select healthcare providers may help explain racial differences in use, delivery and quality of medical care, the researchers write in JAMA Oncology. “Disparities in breast cancer and cancer care are very complex,” said Dr. Rachel Freedman, the study’s lead author from the Dana-Farber Cancer Institute in Boston.
 

UN cancer agency sees a risk in Roundup and other pesticides

 
‎20 ‎March ‎2015, ‏‎10:12:04 PMGo to full article
IARC said that three pesticides, including a commonly-used weedkiller, were "probably" carcinogenic and two others, which have already been outlawed or restricted, were "possibly" soThe UN's International Agency for Research on Cancer (IARC) said Friday that three pesticides, including the popular weedkiller Roundup, were "probably" carcinogenic and two others, which have already been outlawed or restricted, were "possibly" so. IARC classified the herbicide glyphosate -- the active ingredient in Roundup -- and the insecticides malathion and diazinon as "probably carcinogenic" on the basis of "limited evidence" of cancer among humans. The insecticides tetrachlorvinphos and parathion were classified as "possibly carcinogenic" in the light of "convincing evidence" from lab animals, it said. The classification, made by an expert panel, is not binding, said IARC, an agency based in Lyon, southeastern France, that comes under the aegis of the World Health Organization (WHO).
 
 

Cattle parasite study points to possible way to fight malaria

 
‎20 ‎March ‎2015, ‏‎08:15:42 PMGo to full article
By Kate Kelland LONDON (Reuters) - Herds of African cattle may hold the secret to new ways of fighting parasitic diseases like malaria, which kills some 600,000 people a year, scientists said on Friday. The researchers from the University of Edinburgh found that cows are protected from a parasite that causes a deadly disease called East Coast Fever if they have previously been infected with a closely-related but milder species of the parasite. "Our results suggest seeking a simple vaccine that could protect cows from East Coast fever by inoculating them with a related but far less harmful parasite," said Mark Woolhouse, who led the study with a team from several other universities and the International Livestock Research Institute. "A similar process might be at work in malaria, where infection with the less harmful Plasmodium vivax parasite may protect people from the Plasmodium falciparum parasite." Like the cattle disease East Coast fever, malaria is caused by a single-celled parasite, Plasmodium, although more than one species of Plasmodium can cause the disease.
 

Biogen's Alzheimer's drug slows mental decline in early study

 
‎20 ‎March ‎2015, ‏‎05:12:57 PMGo to full article
Patients with Alzheimer's and dementia are seen during a therapy session inside the Alzheimer foundation in Mexico CityAn experimental drug from Biogen Idec Inc became the first Alzheimer's treatment to significantly slow cognitive decline and reduce what is believed to be brain-destroying plaque in patients with early and mild forms of the disease, according to a small study likely to reignite hopes of a treatment. There was an even greater reduction in plaque for patients at the 3 mg and 10 mg doses when they were tested at 54 weeks.
 
 

WHO urges mass vaccination against measles, other diseases in Ebola areas

 
‎20 ‎March ‎2015, ‏‎04:19:25 PMGo to full article
The WHO logo is pictured at the entrance of its headquarters in GenevaBy Kate Kelland LONDON (Reuters) - The World Health Organization warned on Friday of a risk of outbreaks of measles, whooping cough and other diseases in West African countries hit by Ebola and urged a rapid intensification of routine immunizations. The Ebola epidemic has killed more than 10,200 people, mostly in Guinea, Liberia and Sierra Leone, and has reduced vaccination coverage as health clinics and healthcare workers focused on fighting the unprecedented outbreak. The epidemic has disrupted delivery of routine childhood vaccines against measles, polio and tuberculosis, and of a combined shot against meningitis, pneumonia, whooping cough, tetanus, hepatitis B and diphtheria.
 
 

Sweden says detects bird flu virus in dead swans

 
‎20 ‎March ‎2015, ‏‎04:01:44 PMGo to full article
Swedish authorities said on Friday they had discovered H5N8 bird flu in two dead swans, the same strain of the virus that has been found in several countries across Europe in recent months. The Swedish Board of Agriculture said it would not raise the bird flu alert level because of the discovery, saying the swans had probably died from other causes even though they carried the virus. The alert level is currently at its lowest in Sweden. Since November, Germany, the Netherlands, Britain and Italy have all been hit by the H5N8 bird flu strain.
 

FDA panel backs Glaxo asthma drug for adults, not adolescents

 
‎20 ‎March ‎2015, ‏‎12:37:11 AMGo to full article
A British Airways airplane flies past a signage for pharmaceutical giant GlaxoSmithKlein in LondonGlaxoSmithKline Plc's drug to treat chronic breathing problems is safe and effective enough for adults with asthma to use but not adolescents, an advisory panel to the U.S. Food and Drug Administration concluded on Thursday. The panel voted 16-4 that Breo Ellipta should be approved for once daily treatment of asthma in adults 18 years and older. The FDA is not obliged to follow the advice of its advisory panels but typically does so.
 
 

Sixth Oregon college student stricken by meningococcal disease

 
‎19 ‎March ‎2015, ‏‎11:08:43 PMGo to full article
By Shelby Sebens PORTLAND, Ore. (Reuters) - A sixth University of Oregon student has contracted the potentially deadly meningococcal disease amid an outbreak that erupted in January, and more cases could emerge, public health officials said on Thursday. Health officials said a 20-year-old college sophomore who lives off campus has been confirmed as having contracted meningococcemia, a bacterial precursor to meningitis that can also lead to damaging blood infections. The student, who has not been named, was in stable condition and was expected to recover, according to Lane County Public Health officer Patrick Luedtke. Five other students have contracted meningococcal disease since January, including an 18-year-old freshman, Lauren Jones, who died.
 

Man Marries Diabetes in Downtown New York City

 
‎19 ‎March ‎2015, ‏‎06:10:03 PMGo to full article
Man Marries Diabetes in Downtown New York CityPhoto credit Michael Dote.The invitation read "Marry the Beast," and more than 100 people were in attendance. The marriage was actually a commitment ceremony. Paul Binder renewed the vows he had made to his Type 2 diabetes when diagnosed 18 years ago. Paul Binder is founder of New York's Big Apple Circus. Yet don't let that make you think this...
 
 

Vietnam reports outbreak of H5N6 bird flu virus: OIE

 
‎19 ‎March ‎2015, ‏‎01:58:11 PMGo to full article
Vietnam reported an outbreak of highly pathogenic H5N6 bird flu virus in a village in the northern province of Thanh Hoa, the World Organisation for Animal Health (OIE) said on Thursday. Over 350 birds were found infected by the virus in a village in Tinh Gia district last week, the Vietnamese agriculture ministry said in a report posted on the OIE website. The outbreak follows a series of cases of highly pathogenic H5N1 virus found in birds in the southern part of the country earlier this year.
 

More evidence for rise, and race difference, in U.S. celiac disease

 
‎18 ‎March ‎2015, ‏‎11:16:32 PMGo to full article
Blood testing in a large sample of people representing the whole U.S. population showed that one percent of non-Hispanic whites had celiac disease – making them about four times more likely than people of either Hispanic or African American descent to have the disorder. Another 1.5 million people without celiac disease nevertheless follow a gluten-free diet, the researchers found, including a larger proportion of blacks than in any other group. Celiac disease has been thought to be more common in whites all along, but the study is the first to examine the prevalence of celiac disease and patterns of eating gluten-free diets by race, according to the authors. “We were able to go back and study trends over time suggesting that celiac disease is increasing in frequency,” Dr. Joseph Murray, the study’s senior author, told Reuters Health.
 

U.S. reports bird flu outbreak in California: OIE

 
‎18 ‎March ‎2015, ‏‎06:31:31 PMGo to full article
The United States has reported a mild form of bird flu on a turkey farm in California, the World Organisation for Animal Health (OIE) said on Wednesday, the latest in a series of outbreaks to hit the U.S. poultry industry in recent months. The U.S. Department of Agriculture said in a report posted on the OIE website that a commercial turkey flock in Merced County, near San Francisco, had been coughing with a slight increase in mortality last week. Follow-up surveillance and testing on 10 associated farms showed negative results for bird flu. The strain discovered differed from the highly pathogenic H5N2 avian flu which has been found recently in other states, notably Arkansas, the heart of America's poultry producing region.
 

India reports outbreak of H5N1 bird flu in Uttar Pradesh: OIE

 
‎18 ‎March ‎2015, ‏‎05:48:40 PMGo to full article
India reported an outbreak of highly pathogenic H5N1 bird flu virus in a village in the northern province of Uttar Pradesh, the World Organisation for Animal Health (OIE) said on Wednesday. Nearly 190 birds died of the virus in a village in Amethi district, the Indian agriculture ministry said in a report posted on the OIE website.
 

AstraZeneca two-in-one drug succeeds in lung disease test

 
‎18 ‎March ‎2015, ‏‎09:29:45 AMGo to full article
A man walks past a sign at an AstraZeneca site in MacclesfieldLONDON (Reuters) - AstraZeneca said on Wednesday its experimental lung drug PT003 for chronic lung disease had proved successful in two final-stage Phase III trials, boosting hopes for the company's respiratory pipeline. The drug, which AstraZeneca acquired after buying Pearl Therapeutics two years ago, combines a long-acting beta-2 agonist (LABA) and a long-acting muscarine antagonist (LAMA). AstraZeneca plans to file PT003 for approval commencing in 2015. ...
 
 

Nektar drug fails late-stage study in breast cancer patients

 
‎18 ‎March ‎2015, ‏‎12:32:55 AMGo to full article
(Reuters) - Nektar Therapeutics said its experimental drug failed to meet the main goal in previously treated patients with advanced breast cancer in a late-stage study. The drug, NKTR-102, provided a 2.1 month improvement in median overall survival over patients on chemotherapy in the trial, but the effect was not statistically significant, the company said. Patients in the study either received the drug or a single chemotherapy agent. It enrolled 852 women with locally recurrent or metastatic breast cancer who previously had been treated with anthracycline, taxane and capecitabine and had progressed following treatment.
 

New cancer fears in France over breast implants

 
‎17 ‎March ‎2015, ‏‎11:55:02 PMGo to full article
The national cancer institute (INCa) said there had been 18 cases of a rare form of cancer, anaplastic large cell lymphoma, since 2011, linked to silicone breast implantsFrance's national cancer institute said on Tuesday there was a "clearly established link" between a rare form of cancer and a certain type of breast implant, as the health minister sought to allay fears. The national cancer institute (INCa) said there had been 18 cases of the rare disease -- anaplastic large cell lymphoma -- since 2011, linked to silicone breast implants. France's health minister immediately sought to calm fears, with memories of faulty breast implants from the French firm PIP still fresh in the memory. "We do not recommend that women carrying these implants have them removed," Marisol Touraine told reporters.
 
 

New market for liver disease spawns race for better testing

 
‎17 ‎March ‎2015, ‏‎10:30:28 PMGo to full article
A handout combination image of MRI scans shows a healthy liver compared with that of an obese 12-year-old suffering from NASH(This March 15 story has been corrects name of the Colorado hospital in 24th paragraph)) By Bill Berkrot NEW YORK (Reuters) - As drugmakers develop new medicines to battle a liver disease epidemic, they have created an urgent need for better diagnostics to select patients for treatment and assess their drugs' effectiveness. About 30 percent of people in the U.S. now suffer from fatty liver diseases, such as NASH (nonalcoholic steatohepatitis), fueled by obesity, diabetes and over-indulgent lifestyles, according to the American Liver Foundation. For now, testing patients in trials of experimental medicines involves a liver biopsy, a painful, expensive and potentially risky test. "It's a pretty nasty test involving a needle five inches long you plunge blindly into a patient's side," said Dr. Scott Friedman, dean of therapeutic discovery at Mt. Sinai Hospital in New York and one of the world's top liver disease experts.
 
 

FDA staff finds no new safety problems with Glaxo's asthma drug

 
‎17 ‎March ‎2015, ‏‎08:02:59 PMGo to full article
The logo of GlaxoSmithKline is seen on its office building in Shanghai(Reuters) - GlaxoSmithKline Plc's respiratory treatment for chronic breathing problems did not show any new safety problems while being tested to treat asthma, a preliminary review by U.S. Food and Drug Administration staff found. The review comes two days ahead of a meeting of FDA advisers to discuss the combination treatment, Breo Ellipta, and recommend whether it should be approved to treat asthma. Vilanterol belongs to a class of compounds called long-acting beta-adrenoceptor agonists (LABA) that have historically been linked to asthma-related deaths. Glaxo licensed vilanterol from Theravance Inc in 2002.
 
 

Aspirin lowers colon cancer risk, but not for all

 
‎17 ‎March ‎2015, ‏‎07:14:53 PMGo to full article
Aspirin lowers colon cancer risk, but not for allTaking aspirin or ibuprofen tends to reduce the risk of getting colon cancer for most people, but it does not work in a minority of people with certain genes, researchers said Tuesday. The findings in the Journal of the American Medical Association (JAMA) are based on an analysis of 10 large studies in Australia, Canada, Germany and the United States. The data confirmed that regular use of aspirin or non-steroid anti-inflammatories (NSAIDs) was linked to a 30 percent lower colorectal cancer risk, for most people. Since aspirin and other anti-inflammatories carry risks, such as internal bleeding, doctors must consult with patients about the potential dangers and benefits, said co-senior author Andrew Chan of the Massachusetts General Hospital Gastroenterology Division and an associate professor of medicine at Harvard Medical School.
 
 

Novo Nordisk CEO apparent sees even more focus on diabetes

 
‎17 ‎March ‎2015, ‏‎06:00:31 PMGo to full article
By Ben Hirschler LONDON (Reuters) - Other big drugmakers may be reshaping their businesses but Novo Nordisk's focus on diabetes will get even bigger in the coming decade, according to the man most likely to be the Danish company's next boss. Kaare Schultz, who was made deputy chief executive in January 2014 and is the frontrunner to eventually succeed 60-year-old Lars Sorensen, said diabetes was likely to account for 80-90 percent of sales in 10 years, up from 79 percent now. The world's No. 1 insulin maker is not running out of ideas when it comes to fighting the global diabetes epidemic. Apart from diabetes, Novo also makes biotech drugs for hemophilia and some other rare conditions.
 

Aspirin lowers colon cancer risk, but not for all

 
‎17 ‎March ‎2015, ‏‎05:42:37 PMGo to full article
The data from 10 large studies in Australia, Canada, Germany and the US confirmed that regular use of aspirin or non-steroid anti-inflammatories (NSAIDs) was linked to a 30 percent lower colorectal cancer risk for most peopleTaking aspirin or ibuprofen tends to reduce the risk of getting colon cancer for most people, but it does not work in a minority of people with certain genes, researchers said Tuesday. The findings in the Journal of the American Medical Association (JAMA) are based on an analysis of 10 large studies in Australia, Canada, Germany and the United States. The data confirmed that regular use of aspirin or non-steroid anti-inflammatories (NSAIDs) was linked to a 30 percent lower colorectal cancer risk, for most people. Since aspirin and other anti-inflammatories carry risks, such as internal bleeding, doctors must consult with patients about the potential dangers and benefits, said co-senior author Andrew Chan of the Massachusetts General Hospital Gastroenterology Division and an associate professor of medicine at Harvard Medical School.
 
 

Aspirin users with common genes may get less colon cancer

 
‎17 ‎March ‎2015, ‏‎05:31:20 PMGo to full article
FILE - This Tuesday, Aug. 11, 2009 file photo shows packages of aspirin on the shelves of a drugstore in Chicago. In results published in the Journal of the American Medical Association on Tuesday, March 17, 2015, aspirin users were less likely than nonusers to get colon or rectal cancer if they had genetic traits found in about 90 percent of the participants. Cancer patients were less likely to have the beneficial traits, and less likely to be frequent aspirin users. (AP Photo/M. Spencer Green)CHICAGO (AP) — Researchers have identified common genetic traits that may explain how aspirin can help protect against colon cancer.
 
 

Early x-rays might not help elderly with new back pain

 
‎17 ‎March ‎2015, ‏‎05:16:55 PMGo to full article
By Kathryn Doyle (Reuters Health) - Older people with a new episode of back pain shouldn’t be sent right away for x-rays or other imaging studies, new research suggests. “We found that they didn’t have worse or better outcomes, and yet they were certainly getting more things done to them downstream,” said Dr. Jeffrey Jarvik, the study’s lead author from the University of Washington in Seattle. Guidelines suggest that young people with new back pain should wait a while before getting X-rays, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) or computed tomography (CT), but the same guidelines make exceptions for older people since there could be more serious underlying conditions. Based on the new results, however, people of every age should not routinely get early imaging studies, the researchers write in JAMA.
 

Aspirin's colon-cancer benefits backfire for some DNA types: study

 
‎17 ‎March ‎2015, ‏‎05:01:20 PMGo to full article
By Sharon Begley NEW YORK (Reuters) - Although numerous studies have shown that regular use of aspirin or related drugs can reduce the risk of colorectal cancer by about 30 percent, scientists have found an important exception: The medicines can actually increase the risk in people with certain genetic variants, new research shows. The result, published on Tuesday, is yet another step on the road to "precision medicine," which aims to match treatments to patients' genetic make-up. If confirmed, it could alter recommendations for preventing colorectal cancer, which is projected to kill 49,700 people in the United States this year. In an editorial accompanying a paper in the Journal of the American Medical Association, Dr. Richard Wender of the American Cancer Society and Thomas Jefferson University called the discovery "scientifically noteworthy." "I anticipate the time when genome sequencing to determine a lifelong (colorectal-cancer) prevention and screening strategy is a reality, although it's some time off," he said in an interview.
 

FDA staff finds no new safety problems with Glaxo's asthma drug

 
‎17 ‎March ‎2015, ‏‎04:31:24 PMGo to full article
The logo of GlaxoSmithKline is seen on its office building in Shanghai(Reuters) - GlaxoSmithKline Plc's respiratory treatment for chronic breathing problems did not show any new safety problems while being tested to treat asthma, a preliminary review by U.S. Food and Drug Administration staff found. The review comes two days ahead of a meeting of FDA advisers to discuss the combination treatment, Breo Ellipta, and recommend whether or not it should be approved to treat asthma. Breo Ellipta is a combination of a corticosteroid as well as vilanterol, a compound that dilates airways, but has historically been linked to asthma-related deaths. The FDA staff said on Tuesday there were no asthma-related deaths in Breo Ellipta studies it reviewed and that data on asthma-related hospitalizations were not observed uniformly in the 23 studies that Glaxo conducted.

 

Pharmacyclics cancer drug successful as combination therapy: independent panel

 
‎16 ‎March ‎2015, ‏‎11:09:18 PMGo to full article
(Reuters) - An independent panel recommended unblinding a late-stage study testing Pharmacyclics Inc and Johnson & Johnson's Imbruvica, after the treatment was successful against two similar forms of cancer in combination with other drugs. Pharmacyclics, which recently agreed to be acquired by AbbVie Inc for about $21 billion, said Imbruvica showed a statistically significant improvement in survival without disease progression, the study's main goal. Pharmacyclics' shares closed up about 0.7 percent on Monday, while AbbVie's stock closed up about 2 percent. Imbruvica, which is co-marketed by Pharmacyclics and J&J, is already approved for four cancer indications in the United States.
 

U.S. may impose tougher curbs to contain bird flu in Arkansas

 
‎16 ‎March ‎2015, ‏‎08:04:10 PMGo to full article
Canada geese take off from a farmers field near Oak Hammock, ManitobaBy Tom Polansek CHICAGO (Reuters) - U.S. authorities are considering imposing tougher restrictions in Arkansas to contain a virulent strain of avian flu in the heart of America's poultry region in a bid to minimize international trade disruptions and contain the virus. The H5N2 flu discovered in Arkansas last week is the state's first case of a strain that causes massive internal hemorrhaging in poultry, can kill nearly every bird in an infected flock within 48 hours, and is prone to mutate. Such strains are sometimes called "chicken Ebola." In response, Arkansas is working with the U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) to create new rules for commercial poultry producers and owners of backyard flocks alike, Reuters has learned. The rules will spell out how often poultry within a quarantine zone must test negative for bird flu before the quarantine can be lifted, Brandon Doss, Arkansas’ assistant state veterinarian, said.
 
 

Feared plant disease found on Australian banana farm

 
‎16 ‎March ‎2015, ‏‎08:15:42 AMGo to full article
By Colin Packham SYDNEY (Reuters) - An outbreak of a feared disease affecting banana plants has been confirmed on an Australian farm, raising worries over the outlook for the country's A$550 million ($420 million) industry. The so-called Tropical Race 4 strain of Panama disease was confirmed at a farm in Tully in the country's northeast after tests last week, said the government of Queensland. "These positive test results remove any doubt that we are dealing with Queensland's first case of Panama disease Tropical Race 4 on a banana farm," said Dr Jim Thompson, chief biosecurity officer in the state's agriculture department. Panama disease hits banana plant roots, with Race 4 considered particularly destructive.
 

New market for liver disease spawns race for better testing

 
‎15 ‎March ‎2015, ‏‎02:32:46 PMGo to full article
A handout combination image of MRI scans shows a healthy liver compared with that of an obese 12-year-old suffering from NASHBy Bill Berkrot NEW YORK (Reuters) - As drugmakers develop new medicines to battle a liver disease epidemic, they have created an urgent need for better diagnostics to select patients for treatment and assess their drugs' effectiveness. About 30 percent of people in the U.S. now suffer from fatty liver diseases, such as NASH (nonalcoholic steatohepatitis), fueled by obesity, diabetes and over-indulgent lifestyles, according to the American Liver Foundation. For now, testing patients in trials of experimental medicines involves a liver biopsy, a painful, expensive and potentially risky test. "It's a pretty nasty test involving a needle five inches long you plunge blindly into a patient's side," said Dr. Scott Friedman, dean of therapeutic discovery at Mt. Sinai Hospital in New York and one of the world's top liver disease experts. "We don't like to do them.
 
 

USDA reports virulent strain of avian flu in Kansas poultry

 
‎14 ‎March ‎2015, ‏‎07:43:39 PMGo to full article
By Tom Polansek CHICAGO (Reuters) - The U.S. Department of Agriculture has identified the first infection of a virulent strain of avian flu in poultry in Kansas, confirming the virus has spread into a migratory bird route that runs through the center of the country. The discovery of the H5N2 flu strain in a backyard chicken and duck flock in a county just outside Kansas City, Kan., is certain to lead to expanded restrictions on U.S. poultry exports from top trading partners like Mexico and Canada. The infection, confirmed on Friday by the U.S. Department of Agriculture, was the first case in an established migratory bird route, known as the central flyway, that stretches roughly north-south from Montana to Texas. Kansas officials quarantined the infected property in Leavenworth County, and birds there will be culled to prevent the spread of the disease.
 

U.S. bird experts mystified by Midwest avian flu spread

 
‎13 ‎March ‎2015, ‏‎10:27:17 PMGo to full article
By Tom Polansek CHICAGO (Reuters) - A virulent strain of avian flu that has killed turkeys in the heart of the nation's poultry region has been found through molecular testing to be nearly identical to viruses isolated in migratory ducks. A top investigator from the U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) says that testing performed by the government supports a conclusion that the virus is being carried by waterfowl along an established migratory route that stretches south from Minnesota to the Gulf of Mexico.
 

India, U.S. researchers clash over swine flu strain mutation

 
‎13 ‎March ‎2015, ‏‎09:34:35 AMGo to full article
A street dweller cooks in front of graffiti against the H1N1 influenza, at a streetside wall in MumbaiBy Aditya Kalra NEW DELHI (Reuters) - India has disputed U.S. scientists' findings that the deadly swine flu virus has acquired more virulent mutations in the South Asian country and rejected their concerns over how authorities are monitoring an outbreak of the disease. H1N1 influenza, also known as swine flu, has killed more than 1,500 people in India this year, compared with 218 in 2014. India says the strain is the same as the one that killed an estimated 284,000 people in the global pandemic of 2009-10. Researchers from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) said in an article on Wednesday that the genetic information of two Indian strains, deposited in public databases in the past two years, revealed new mutations that could make the virus more deadly.
 
 

Kansas quarantines two counties due to Missouri bird flu

 
‎13 ‎March ‎2015, ‏‎12:32:52 AMGo to full article
Kansas on Thursday said it was prohibiting the movement of poultry into or out of two counties in a bid to protect its livestock from bird flu found in neighboring Missouri. The quarantines in Cherokee and Crawford countries, which are on the Missouri border, will last until further notice and at least 30 days, according to a statement from the Kansas Department of Agriculture. Earlier on Thursday, Mexico, the biggest importer of U.S. chicken, and other buyers imposed new import restrictions following confirmation on Wednesday of a virulent form of bird flu in Arkansas, in the heart of America’s poultry producing region. The U.S. government on Tuesday confirmed the presence of the virus in two separate commercial turkey flocks in Missouri.
 

My Journey Into Cancer and Introducing Big Nasty

 
‎12 ‎March ‎2015, ‏‎10:00:09 PMGo to full article
My Journey Into Cancer and Introducing Big NastyPreface: As I prepare to write this piece, I want to be clear about my motives with you, the reader. My intention is to tell my story so that others might learn from it and avoid the fix that I am in. Grandstanding and beating my chest about stage IV cancer (aka, Big Nasty) is not something I am interested in at all. But, if I can change the...
 
 

Two-thirds in U.S. with invasive cancer live five or more years: study

 
‎12 ‎March ‎2015, ‏‎09:34:28 PMGo to full article
Two out of three people in the United States with cancer that has spread to nearby tissue live at least five years after they are diagnosed, according to a federal study released on Thursday. The U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention tracked patients diagnosed from 2003 to 2010 and found that the overall five-year survival rate for invasive cancer was 65 percent. Five-year survival rates were highest for patients aged 45 and younger at 81 percent and for those with prostate cancer, 97 percent, or female breast cancer, 88 percent. Invasive lung cancer, which often spreads to the brain or bones, had the lowest rate at 18 percent.
 

Move From Cope to Hope: How Connecting to Others Supports Mind-Body Healing for Cancer Patients

 
‎12 ‎March ‎2015, ‏‎06:53:30 PMGo to full article
Move From Cope to Hope: How Connecting to Others Supports Mind-Body Healing for Cancer PatientsA cancer diagnosis can trigger a range of emotions, including sadness, fear, and loneliness. Processing these emotions during treatment and beyond can offer hope.Loneliness understandably has a big impact on psychological health. Research now shows it is also linked to negative changes in physical health, including suppression of the immune...
 
 

'Low risk' bird flu outbreak at Dutch farm: official

 
‎12 ‎March ‎2015, ‏‎05:35:20 PMGo to full article
Dutch authorities have identified an outbreak of avian flu in chickens at a farm in the centre of the country that is likely a "low risk" strainDutch authorities have identified an outbreak of avian flu in chickens at a farm in the centre of the country that is likely a "low risk" strain, officials said Thursday. "Bird flu has been identified at an egg farm in Barneveld with around 30,000 chickens," the economics ministry said in a statement. A three-week ban on transporting poultry has been implemented within a one-kilometre (just over half a mile) radius around the farm, where 17 other poultry farms are being tested.
 
 

Chickens destroyed after bird flu found at Dutch farm

 
‎12 ‎March ‎2015, ‏‎04:32:40 PMGo to full article
The Dutch government said on Thursday that 30,000 chickens had been destroyed after bird flu was identified at a free-range farm near the eastern town of Barneveld.

 

Ultrasound against Alzheimer's shows promise in lab animals

 
‎12 ‎March ‎2015, ‏‎10:55:26 AMGo to full article
Ultrasound against Alzheimer's shows promise in lab animalsAn experimental, non-invasive technique using targeted ultrasound has shown promise in lab animals toward eliminating the brain plaques that cause Alzheimer's disease, an incurable form of dementia, researchers said Wednesday. Tests on mice showed the approach -- using sound waves to penetrate tissue much the same way as ultrasounds are used to detect fetal shape and movement in pregnant women -- eliminated almost all amyloid plaque in 75 percent of the animals studied, without damaging brain tissue, according to the study in the US journal Science Translational Medicine. The therapy was delivered to the animals with a mouse version of Alzheimer's disease over the course of several weeks.
 
 

Highly pathogenic bird flu confirmed in Arkansas turkeys: USDA

 
‎12 ‎March ‎2015, ‏‎10:52:11 AMGo to full article
The U.S. Department of Agriculture on Wednesday confirmed the discovery of highly pathogenic avian influenza in a commercial turkey flock in Arkansas, the third-largest U.S. turkey producer and home to Tyson Foods Inc, the nation's biggest chicken company. Shares of Tyson and other poultry companies, including Pilgrim's Pride Corp and Sanderson Farms Inc, tumbled on concerns the discovery will further limit U.S. trade with Asia and Latin America. The infected flock of 40,020 turkeys in Boone County, Arkansas, is located within the Mississippi flyway, a migratory route along which the same strain of H5N2 bird flu was previously identified in Minnesota and Missouri. Arkansas officials quarantined the affected premises and birds on the property will be culled to prevent the spread of the disease, according to USDA.
 

U.S. exports at risk as bird flu enters heart of poultry country

 
‎12 ‎March ‎2015, ‏‎08:38:00 AMGo to full article
By Tom Polansek and P.J. Huffstutter CHICAGO (Reuters) - A case of bird flu confirmed Wednesday in the heart of America's poultry region, is certain to mean more export restrictions, increasing U.S. supply and likely forcing the world's biggest poultry companies to trim prices. The U.S. government announced the infection of highly pathogenic H5N2 avian flu in turkeys in Arkansas -- home to Tyson Foods Inc, the world's biggest chicken company. The virus is unlikely to kill enough U.S. birds to offset the drop in overseas demand, however. Shares in producers Tyson, Pilgrim's Pride Corp and Sanderson Farms Inc tumbled on Wednesday, with Tyson's stock price hitting its lowest point in five months and the stock price for JBS SA unit Pilgrim's Pride dropping as much as 9 percent.
 

Ultrasound against Alzheimer's shows promise in lab animals

 
‎12 ‎March ‎2015, ‏‎03:20:05 AMGo to full article
An experimental, non-invasive technique using targeted ultrasound has shown promise in lab animals toward eliminating the brain plaques that cause Alzheimer's disease, an incurable form of dementia, researchers sayAn experimental, non-invasive technique using targeted ultrasound has shown promise in lab animals towards eliminating brain plaques that cause Alzheimer's disease, an incurable form of dementia, researchers said. Tests on mice showed the approach -- using sound waves to penetrate tissue much the same way as ultrasounds are used to detect fetal shape and movement in pregnant women -- eliminated almost all amyloid plaque in 75 percent of the animals studied, without damaging brain tissue, according to the study in the US journal Science Translational Medicine. The therapy was delivered to the animals with a mouse version of Alzheimer's disease over the course of several weeks.
 
 

Online offers of personalized cancer medicine may not be trustworthy

 
‎12 ‎March ‎2015, ‏‎12:03:00 AMGo to full article
By Janice Neumann (Reuters Health) - Tumor tests, genetic risk analyses and other products or services sold online as personalized cancer medicine are often not backed by evidence, according to a new U.S. study. “It’s hard to know which are which.” Gray, who is also an assistant professor of medicine at Harvard Medical School, said she and a coauthor had noticed that many of their patients asked questions about information they found on cancer care web sites. “Studies over the last few years have shown in other contexts, not cancer, exaggerated claims that don’t match scientific evidence, so we wanted to evaluate what kinds of things are being marketed in cancer.” So-called personal cancer medicine on the Internet includes analysis of tumor tissues, help interpreting tumor data or advice on the best treatments for an individual’s tumor, as well as testing for cancer risk.
 

Samantha Harris's Battle With Breast Cancer: Know Your Body, Protect Your Health

 
‎11 ‎March ‎2015, ‏‎10:42:24 PMGo to full article
World Champion tennis player and female athletics pioneer Billy Jean King said, "Self-awareness is probably the most important thing towards being a champion." The idea of a champion can change day to day. Sometimes it's quite literal -- you win or you lose. But sometimes it's more abstract -- when we are a champion in our own life, when we...
 

Study: Tetanus shot may aid treatment of deadly brain cancer

 
‎11 ‎March ‎2015, ‏‎08:40:08 PMGo to full article
Sandy Hillburn poses for a photo in her apartment in Fort Lee, N.J., on Tuesday, March 10, 2015. In April 2006, when she was diagnosed with glioblastoma, the most common and deadly kind of brain tumor, she recalled, "I was told I had two to three months to live." But she was offered a slot in an experimental study involving adding the tetanus-diphtheria vaccine to an experimental treatment for glioblastoma. (AP Photo/Seth Wenig)NEW YORK (AP) — Can a tetanus shot help treat brain cancer? A small study hints that it might.
 
 

Experts sound warning over flu dangers in China, India

 
‎11 ‎March ‎2015, ‏‎08:35:31 PMGo to full article
People wearing a mask in Beijing, China, on January 15, 2015Scientists sounded warnings Wednesday over H7N9 bird flu in China and the H1N1 strain of swine flu in India that have jointly claimed more than 1,700 lives. H7N9 virus presents a high risk of becoming pandemic if China fails to close loopholes in its live poultry trade, researchers reported in the journal Nature. A different team, writing in the US journal Cell Host and Microbe, said a strain of H1N1 "swine" flu in India may have acquired mutations enabling it to spread more readily. Looking at H7N9, epidemiologists led by Yi Guan at the University of Hong Kong sought to understand why this dangerous strain emerged in China in 2013, faded away and then rebounded in 2014.
 
 

Mutating H7N9 bird flu may pose pandemic threat, scientists warn

 
‎11 ‎March ‎2015, ‏‎08:31:17 PMGo to full article
By Kate Kelland LONDON (Reuters) - A wave of H7N9 bird flu in China that has spread into people may have the potential to emerge as a pandemic strain in humans, scientists said on Wednesday. The H7N9 virus, one of several strains of bird flu known to be able to infect humans, has persisted, diversified and spread in chickens across China, the researchers said, fuelling a resurgence of infections in people and posing a wider threat. "The expansion of genetic diversity and geographical spread indicates that, unless effective control measures are in place, H7N9 could be expected to persist and spread beyond the region," they said in a study published in the journal Nature. The H7N9 bird flu virus emerged in humans in March 2013 and has since then infected at least 571 people in China, Taipei, Hong Kong, Malaysia and Canada, killing 212 of them, according to February data from the World Health Organization (WHO).
 

Can ultrasound fight Alzheimer's? Mice study hints at new weapon

 
‎11 ‎March ‎2015, ‏‎08:27:55 PMGo to full article
By Ben Hirschler LONDON (Reuters) - Scientists believe they may have found a new weapon in the fight against Alzheimer's disease -- not in the form of a drug but in focused beams of ultrasound. In the past, high-energy ultrasound has been combined with injected microbubbles, which vibrate in response to sound waves, to get drugs across the so-called blood brain barrier. "Our research was very exploratory and we really didn't expect to see such a massive effect," Juergen Goetz of the University of Queensland in Brisbane, one of study authors, told Reuters. "I'm really excited by this." After several weeks of treating mice that had been genetically altered to produce amyloid plaques, the scientists found the ultrasound almost completely cleared the plaques in 75 percent of the animals, without apparent damage to brain tissue.
 

Mutating H7N9 bird flu may pose pandemic threat, scientists warn

 
‎11 ‎March ‎2015, ‏‎08:00:00 PMGo to full article
By Kate Kelland LONDON, March 11 (Reuters) - A wave of H7N9 bird flu in China that has spread into people may have the potential to emerge as a pandemic strain in humans, scientists said on Wednesday. The H7N9 virus, one of several strains of bird flu known to be able to infect humans, has persisted, diversified and spread in chickens across China, the researchers said, fuelling a resurgence of infections in people and posing a wider threat. "The expansion of genetic diversity and geographical spread indicates that, unless effective control measures are in place, H7N9 could be expected to persist and spread beyond the region," they said in a study published in the journal Nature. The H7N9 bird flu virus emerged in humans in March 2013 and has since then infected at least 571 people in China, Taipei, Hong Kong, Malaysia and Canada, killing 212 of them, according to February data from the World Health Organization (WHO).
 

Highly pathogenic bird flu confirmed in Arkansas turkeys: USDA

 
‎11 ‎March ‎2015, ‏‎07:54:28 PMGo to full article
The U.S. Department of Agriculture on Wednesday confirmed the discovery of highly pathogenic avian influenza in a commercial turkey flock in Arkansas, the third-largest U.S. turkey producer and home to Tyson Foods Inc, the nation's biggest chicken company. Shares of Tyson and other poultry companies, including Pilgrim's Pride Corp and Sanderson Farms Inc, tumbled on concerns the discovery will further limit U.S. trade with Asia and Latin America. Countries like Taiwan, Singapore and Nicaragua have already restricted poultry exports from states that have suffered bird flu outbreaks, including Minnesota, Missouri, California and Oregon. Pilgrim's Pride shares sank 7.3 percent, and Sanderson Farms shares lost 5.4 percent.
 

A space-age way to screen for skin cancer in the future?

 
‎11 ‎March ‎2015, ‏‎07:19:17 PMGo to full article
This technology could soon play a major role in keeping us healthy.The European Space Agency announced this week that a high-speed camera used to monitor vegetation from space is being tweaked to discern abnormalities in human skin cells in the early stages. Called, Proba-V, the camera wouldn't perform this duty from outer space, but rather it would be mounted on a standard medical scanner. Previous Earth missions that the Proba-V has successfully completed include helping improve the quality of solar cells being constructed and spotting deficiencies in items on production lines.
 
 

A step towards curing asthma?

 
‎11 ‎March ‎2015, ‏‎06:01:51 PMGo to full article
Scientists have identified a lead for a possible cure for asthma.Scientists have targeted a recently discovered type of cell that causes asthma, which could lead to curing the chronic respiratory disease that affects 235 million people around the world, according to the World Health Organization (WHO). Currently, there is no known cure, and causes are unknown, yet the type 2 innate lymphoid cells (ILC2s) that were discovered are a subset of immune cells that trigger the symptoms of asthma, say the researchers from California in the US. "If we can target ILC2s, we might be able to cure asthma or exacerbations caused by these particular cells," says principal investigator Dr. Omid Akbari, an associate professor of molecular and cellular immunology at the University of Southern California. Dr. Akbari and his team discovered molecules that are key in maintaining the vitality of ILC2s and they believe targeting them would snuff out ILC2s, ridding the patient of his asthma.
 
 

Screening men with ED for heart disease could save money, lives

 
‎11 ‎March ‎2015, ‏‎05:57:37 PMGo to full article
By Kathryn Doyle (Reuters Health) - If every man with erectile dysfunction were screened for heart disease, more than a million events like heart attack or stroke could be avoided over 20 years and more than $21 billion saved, according to a new estimate. Treating erectile dysfunction itself would save additional money, adding up to more than $28 billion in savings, the authors project. Erectile dysfunction (ED) has been tied to heart disease because the risk of both rises with high blood pressure, high cholesterol, diabetes, obesity and smoking, they write in the Journal of Sexual Medicine. Not all men with ED have ED caused by vascular disease, but some do, said lead author Dr. Alexander W. Pastuszak of Baylor College of Medicine in Houston, Texas.
 

Suspected bird flu in Arkansas poultry threatens exports

 
‎11 ‎March ‎2015, ‏‎05:14:52 PMGo to full article
By Tom Polansek and P.J. Huffstutter CHICAGO (Reuters) - A suspected case of avian influenza has been identified in poultry in Arkansas, the third-largest U.S. turkey producer and home to Tyson Foods Inc, the nation's biggest chicken company, the U.S. Department of Agriculture said on Tuesday. The infection, if confirmed, threatens to widen trading restrictions from countries such as Taiwan, Singapore and Nicaragua that have already limited U.S. poultry exports due to bird flu outbreaks in states ranging from Minnesota and Missouri to California. "There is a suspect case in Arkansas, but testing is ongoing," USDA spokeswoman Lyndsay Cole said. Arkansas producers have been on alert for the virus since Minnesota and Missouri confirmed cases of highly pathogenic H5N2 bird flu in the past week.
 

Merck cancer drug is first approved under UK early access scheme

 
‎11 ‎March ‎2015, ‏‎09:51:06 AMGo to full article
Merck & Co's cancer drug Keytruda, which works by boosting the immune system but has yet to be licensed in Europe, is the first medicine to be made available to patients in Britain under a new early access scheme. The Medicines and Healthcare Products Regulatory Agency said on Wednesday that the treatment had been cleared to treat adults and children from 12 years of age with advanced melanoma, the deadliest form of skin cancer, after other drugs had failed. It had already received a "promising innovative medicine" designation in Britain in October 2014. The British initiative, which has similarities with a U.S. scheme that has accelerated the development of so-called "breakthrough" medicines, follows criticism that Britain's state-run healthcare system is too slow to adopt new treatments.
 

Suspected bird flu in Arkansas poultry threatens exports

 
‎11 ‎March ‎2015, ‏‎01:31:45 AMGo to full article
By Tom Polansek and P.J. Huffstutter CHICAGO (Reuters) - A suspected case of avian influenza has been identified in poultry in Arkansas, the third-largest U.S. turkey producer and home to Tyson Foods Inc, the nation's biggest chicken company, the U.S. Department of Agriculture said on Tuesday. The infection, if confirmed, threatens to widen trading bans from countries such as Taiwan, Singapore and Nicaragua that have already restricted U.S. poultry exports due to bird flu outbreaks in states ranging from Minnesota and Missouri to California. "There is a suspect case in Arkansas, but testing is ongoing," USDA spokeswoman Lyndsay Cole said. Arkansas producers have been on alert for the virus since Minnesota and Missouri confirmed cases of highly pathogenic H5N2 bird flu during the past week.
 

Stress, depression boost risks for heart patients

 
‎11 ‎March ‎2015, ‏‎12:38:36 AMGo to full article
By Kathryn Doyle (Reuters Health) - For people with heart disease, high levels of stress coupled with depression increase the risk of heart attack and death, according to a new study. “We found that the combination of high stress and high depression symptoms was particularly harmful for adults with heart disease during an early vulnerability period,” said lead author Carmela Alcantara of Columbia University Medical Center in New York City. Alcantara and colleagues followed more than 4,400 people age 45 and older with coronary heart disease, a buildup of plaque in the arteries which is the most common form of heart disease. Between 2003 and 2007, participants had in-home examinations and completed stress and depression questionnaires.
 

More evidence breast cancer and prostate cancer cluster in families

 
‎10 ‎March ‎2015, ‏‎09:39:37 PMGo to full article
(In para 15 (3rd para from bottom), corrects attribution of quote by changing "she said" to "Beebe-Dimmer said".) By Kathryn Doyle (Reuters Health) - Women with close male relatives with prostate cancer are more likely to be diagnosed with breast cancer, a new study confirms. These findings, from the large Women's Health Initiative, reinforce the results of a 1994 study in the Journal of the National Cancer Institute, the authors write. “This is not the first study to examine this relationship, but it is one of the larger to date, if not the largest study,” said lead author Jennifer L. Beebe-Dimmer of Karmanos Cancer Institute in Detroit. Cancer is a disease of the DNA, she said, and family clustering indicates that breast and prostate cancers may have genes in common, Beebe-Dimmer and her colleagues used data for more than 78,000 women in the Women’s Health Initiative who were over age 50 and cancer-free when the study began in 1993.
 

FDA approves United Therapeutics' drug for treating cancer in children

 
‎10 ‎March ‎2015, ‏‎06:51:56 PMGo to full article
(Reuters) - The Food and Drug Administration said it approved United Therapeutics Corp's drug to treat neuroblastoma, a rare cancer that typically occurs in children below 5 years. Unituxin is the first drug approved to treat high-risk neuroblastoma patients who have a greater chance of tumors recurring or progressing after chemotherapy.
 

China on brink of heart disease 'epidemic': study

 
‎10 ‎March ‎2015, ‏‎12:37:52 PMGo to full article
Overweight people checking their weights after their acupuncture and exercise treatment at the Aimin (Love the People) Fat Reduction Hospital in TianjinUnhealthy eating, smoking and obesity are threatening a heart disease epidemic in China, where three out of four people are in poor cardiovascular shape, said a study on Monday. The findings published in the Journal of the American College of Cardiology are based on data from 96,000 men and women in the general Chinese population. Health was classified as ideal, intermediate or poor according to seven behaviors and lifestyle factors set out by the American Heart Association: smoking status, body mass index, physical activity, diet, untreated total cholesterol, untreated blood pressure, and untreated fasting plasma glucose levels. Just 0.2 percent of men and women in world's most populous country were found to be in "ideal" cardiovascular health, the study found.
 
 

Got diabetes? There's an app for that

 
‎10 ‎March ‎2015, ‏‎12:42:01 AMGo to full article
A general view of an Apple store in the Manhattan borough of New YorkBy Julie Steenhuysen CHICAGO (Reuters) - U.S. health researchers said on Monday they are targeting millions of smartphone users with Apple Inc's new software tool, hoping to collect an unprecedented amount of data on major diseases by tracking their behaviors via iPhone. The ResearchKit software tool, an open source platform, allows researchers to design applications that use built-in sensors on the iPhone along with data from other wearable devices to gather real-time health data. Scientists from Stanford University School of Medicine and Weill Cornell Medical College are among the first to offer apps for diseases like diabetes and heart disease. For example, Massachusetts General Hospital's GlucoSuccess app allows diabetics to participate in a research study that gives feedback on how their diet and exercise patterns impact daily glucose readings.
 
 

China on brink of heart disease 'epidemic'

 
‎10 ‎March ‎2015, ‏‎12:38:24 AMGo to full article
Unhealthy eating, smoking and obesity are threatening a heart disease epidemic in China, where three out of four people are in poor cardiovascular shapeUnhealthy eating, smoking and obesity are threatening a heart disease epidemic in China, where three out of four people are in poor cardiovascular shape, said a study on Monday. The findings published in the Journal of the American College of Cardiology are based on data from 96,000 men and women in the general Chinese population. Health was classified as ideal, intermediate or poor according to seven behaviors and lifestyle factors set out by the American Heart Association: smoking status, body mass index, physical activity, diet, untreated total cholesterol, untreated blood pressure, and untreated fasting plasma glucose levels. Just 0.2 percent of men and women in world's most populous country were found to be in "ideal" cardiovascular health, the study found.
 
 

Cancer is in remission for teen forced to undergo chemo

 
‎09 ‎March ‎2015, ‏‎11:56:46 PMGo to full article
This January 2015 photo provided by Cassandra C., shows Cassandra, a teen who does not give her last name, confined in a room at Connecticut Children's Medical Center in Hartford, Conn., where she is being forced to undergo chemotherapy. The Connecticut Supreme Court ruled Thursday, Jan. 8, 2015, that state officials are not violating the rights of the 17-year-old by forcing her to undergo cancer chemotherapy she does not want. (AP Photo/Cassandra C.)HARTFORD, Conn. (AP) — A 17-year-old Connecticut girl who was forced to undergo chemotherapy by the state after she and her mother refused treatment is happy her cancer is in remission but still upset she had no choice in the matter.
 
 

Promising celiac disease therapies on the horizon

 
‎09 ‎March ‎2015, ‏‎08:33:21 PMGo to full article
By Kathryn Doyle (Reuters Health) - Currently, a gluten free diet is the only way to manage celiac disease. These options are still years from commercial availability, but early results have been encouraging, according to a review of the drug pipeline in Gastroenterology Report. “Based on data on ClinicalTrials.gov, there are two investigational products we are aware of which may enter large confirmatory trials in the not too distant future,” said lead author Dr. Klaus Gottlieb, senior medical director of the immunology and internal medicine department for Quintiles, a company that provides bio-pharmaceutical development services and consulting in Durham, North Carolina. “One of them is an enzyme that splits the molecule in wheat that causes celiac disease, gluten, into smaller harmless products and another one promises to make the gut less leaky and thus prevent potentially toxic substances (from) reaching deeper layers where they may cause inflammation,” Gottlieb said.
 

More evidence breast cancer and prostate cancer cluster in families

 
‎09 ‎March ‎2015, ‏‎06:57:55 PMGo to full article
By Kathryn Doyle (Reuters Health) - Women with close male relatives with prostate cancer are more likely to be diagnosed with breast cancer, a new study confirms. These findings, from the large Women's Health Initiative, reinforce the results of a 1994 study in the Journal of the National Cancer Institute, the authors write. “This is not the first study to examine this relationship, but it is one of the larger to date, if not the largest study,” said lead author Jennifer L. Beebe-Dimmer of Karmanos Cancer Institute in Detroit. Cancer is a disease of the DNA, she said, and family clustering indicates that breast and prostate cancers may have genes in common, Beebe-Dimmer and her colleagues used data for more than 78,000 women in the Women’s Health Initiative who were over age 50 and cancer-free when the study began in 1993.
 

CTI BioPharma blood cancer drug meets study goal

 
‎09 ‎March ‎2015, ‏‎06:50:57 PMGo to full article
CTI BioPharma Corp's experimental blood cancer drug achieved the main goal of a late-stage study, but at least two analysts said the pill would not directly compete with Incyte Corp's treatment. CTI BioPharma said on Monday its pacritinib significantly reduced the size of the spleen in patient's suffering from myelofibrosis, a form of blood cancer that makes the bone marrow produce too much of any type of blood cell. "... we could see pacritinib ultimately finding a niche in the (myelofibrosis) market among low platelet patients and perhaps taking incremental share away from Incyte," Wells Fargo Securities analysts wrote in a note.
 

Plant-based diet, with fish, may lower risk of colorectal cancer

 
‎09 ‎March ‎2015, ‏‎05:52:35 PMGo to full article
By Lisa Rapaport (Reuters Health) - A plant-based diet may lower the risk of colorectal cancers, particularly if it includes seafood and fish, a large U.S. study finds. The current study, published in JAMA Internal Medicine, offers fresh insight into the health benefits of different types of plant-based diets. "We were surprised to find that pescovegetarians had a significantly lower risk of colorectal cancers than people on other vegetarian diets," said lead study author Dr. Michael Orlich, an assistant professor in medicine and public health at Loma Linda University in California. Orlich and colleagues used dietary questionnaires, medical records, and cancer registries to examine the link between eating habits and cancer prevalence in a nationwide sample of 77,659 Seventh-Day Adventists, a religion that encourages a healthy lifestyle and abstinence from smoking and drinking.
 

Childhood diabetes on the rise in England and Wales

 
‎09 ‎March ‎2015, ‏‎02:12:19 AMGo to full article
A registered nurse teaches a diabetic patient how to draw their own insulin injectionsA growing number of children in England and Wales are being diagnosed with diabetes, with many showing signs of potentially serious health problems, auditors revealed Monday. The National Paediatric Diabetes Audit report showed that 26,867 children and young people aged from 0-25 years were registered with diabetes in 2013/2014, compared to 25,221 the previous year. The report said a "worryingly high" number of patients aged 12 and over were showing early signs of potentially serious complications including kidney disease and blindness. While quality of care for young people with diabetes was found to be improving, there remains "significant variation" across different regions, auditors added.
 
 

Former Vice President Walter Mondale hospitalized with flu: newspaper

 
‎07 ‎March ‎2015, ‏‎07:31:25 AMGo to full article
Former U.S. Vice President Walter Mondale arrives to witness the first day of the 114th Congress on Capitol Hill in Washington(Reuters) - Former U.S. Vice President Walter Mondale has been hospitalized with the flu, the Minneapolis Star-Tribune newspaper reported citing former President Jimmy Carter. Carter was speaking at the Nobel Peace Prize Forum in Minneapolis when he announced that Mondale had told him by phone that he was at the Mayo Clinic in Rochester, Minnesota, the Tribune reported. The Tribune reported that Mondale, 87, underwent heart surgery last year, just days after his wife, Joan Mondale, died at the age of 83.
 
 

Ohio State football player showed no signs of a brain disease - coroner

 
‎06 ‎March ‎2015, ‏‎11:39:42 PMGo to full article
An Ohio State football player who committed suicide last year did not show signs of chronic traumatic encephalopathy, a degenerative brain disease sometimes found in athletes with repetitive brain trauma, a coroner's report said on Friday. Kosta Karageorge, 22, a non-scholarship reserve defensive lineman in his first year on the football team, had been reported missing several days before he was found dead in Columbus, Ohio, with a gunshot wound to the head in late November. "There is no evidence of chronic traumatic encephalopathy but there are nonspecific findings consistent with subacute to remote prior concussive injury," the Franklin County Coroner's office said in a statement. His mother had told police Karageorge, who also wrestled for Ohio State, suffered several concussions and had been confused at times.
 

What kills more women than AIDS and breast cancer? Dirty water

 
‎06 ‎March ‎2015, ‏‎09:39:39 PMGo to full article
By Maria Caspani NEW YORK (Thomson Reuters Foundation) - Diseases spread through dirty water and poor sanitation are the fifth biggest killer of women worldwide, causing more deaths than AIDS, diabetes or breast cancer, researchers say. Nearly 800,000 women die every year because they lack access to safe toilets and clean water, said the development organization WaterAid, which analyzed data from the Seattle-based Institute of Health Metrics research center. "This completely unacceptable situation affects women and girls' education, their health, their dignity and ultimately, in too many cases, results in an early and needless death," WaterAid CEO Barbara Frost said in a statement. The only conditions more fatal for women than the lack of decent sanitation are heart disease, stroke, lower respiratory infections and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, according to the report.
 

Prenatal blood tests detect cancer signal in some women

 
‎05 ‎March ‎2015, ‏‎11:09:01 PMGo to full article
By Julie Steenhuysen LA JOLLA, Calif. (Reuters) - A new genetic test that sequences the blood of pregnant women for signs of diseases such as Down Syndrome in their fetuses are turning up unexpected results: a diagnosis of cancer in the mother. In as many as 40 cases, women who took Sequenom Inc's MaterniT21 test, which scans their genetic code and that of their fetus, had abnormal changes that could signify cancer. Such tests from Sequenom and other companies, sequence the mother's blood, which includes both the mother's DNA and fetal DNA from the placenta. Dr. Eunice Lee, 40, a San Francisco anesthesiologist, was one of those women.
 

AbbVie boosts cancer drug pipeline with $21 billion Pharmacyclics deal

 
‎05 ‎March ‎2015, ‏‎09:15:10 PMGo to full article
A screen displays the share price for pharmaceutical maker AbbVie on the floor of the New York Stock ExchangeAbbVie Inc is to buy Pharmacyclics Inc for about $21 billion, giving it access to what is expected to be one of the world's top-selling cancer drugs and expanding its reach in the profitable oncology field. The deal -- the latest example of a big drugmaker swooping on a biotech firm to refill its medicine pipeline -- confounds expectations that Pharmacyclics would sell out to Johnson & Johnson . AbbVie will pay $261.25 per share in cash and stock, a 13 percent premium to Pharmacyclics stock's closing price on Wednesday. AbbVie failed last October to buy Dublin-based Shire Plc for $55 billion after the United States took steps to deter such tax-lowering deals.
 
 

How to Solve Big Problems: Lessons Learned From Cancer Scientists

 
‎05 ‎March ‎2015, ‏‎08:31:13 PMGo to full article
How to Solve Big Problems: Lessons Learned From Cancer ScientistsIn late November of 1991, a 3-year-old girl was diagnosed with leukemia. There was a 30 percent chance she would die.In the coming months, she would receive a long list of chemotherapy drugs: 6MP, asparaginase, methotrexate, prednisone, and vincrinstine. The miracle was not only that these drugs could potentially cure her, but that they existed...
 
 

Dentists might be able to screen for diabetes

 
‎05 ‎March ‎2015, ‏‎07:04:53 PMGo to full article
Man receives dental care from volunteer dentist during free medical clinic organized by non-profit group Remote Area Medical at O.Co ColiseumBy Lisa Rapaport (Reuters Health) - Dentists may be able to screen patients for diabetes while cleaning their teeth, a small study suggests. Researchers found that testing for diabetes using blood that appears on the gums during a routine oral cleaning might be just as accurate as a standard screening that gets a blood sample by pricking the finger with a tiny needle. "There are more than 8 million people in this country who have diabetes and don't know it, and many of these people see a dentist much more regularly than they see a primary care provider," said lead study author Sheila Strauss. "If dentists can screen for diabetes, it may help people get treated sooner when we can get better results managing their disease," said Strauss, an associate professor of nursing and co-director of the Statistics and Data Management Core for New York University's colleges of nursing and dentistry.
 
 

Wear blue on Friday to raise colon cancer awareness

 
‎05 ‎March ‎2015, ‏‎05:35:45 PMGo to full article
By Daniel Gaitan (Reuters Health) - Advocates hope that people with colorectal cancer and their caregivers will dress in blue on Friday to raise awareness about the disease, which is the second-leading cancer-related cause of death in the U.S. Each year on the first Friday in March, supporters hold “Dress in Blue Day” to encourage more Americans to be tested for the disease. In 2000, President Clinton designated March as National Colon Cancer Awareness Month. “You need to be screened, and Dress in Blue Day is about getting people to recognize that,” said Eric Hargis, CEO of Colon Cancer Alliance, a Washington, D.C.-based nonprofit patient advocacy organization. Andrea Shepherd, executive director of the Colon Cancer Prevention Project, a Kentucky-based nonprofit working to eliminate preventable colon cancer death, hopes that all health care organizations participate in the day.
 

Bayer says won't get results from Stivarga trial in bowel cancer

 
‎05 ‎March ‎2015, ‏‎10:24:18 AMGo to full article
German drugmaker Bayer said it would not get any relevant results from a Phase III trial of regorafenib, a drug also known as Stivarga, for the treatment of colorectal cancer, because it failed to recruit a sufficient number of participants. The study in the third and last phase required for regulatory approval was designed to evaluate regorafenib as an additional treatment of colorectal cancer following surgical removal of liver metastases with curative intent. Importantly, there were no new safety signals from the study," Bayer said in a statement. Bayer will continue to evaluate regorafenib in a number of tumor types, including colorectal cancer, it added.
 

J&J nearing deal to buy cancer drug maker Pharmacyclics: FT

 
‎05 ‎March ‎2015, ‏‎01:31:30 AMGo to full article
Products made by Johnson & Johnson for sale on a store shelf in WestminsterJohnson & Johnson is close to buying cancer drug maker Pharmacyclics Inc in the coming days, the Financial Times reported, citing sources. A bid from J&J is expected to value Pharmacyclics near its $17.5 billion market value or at a premium, FT said on Wednesday, citing people familiar with the matter. Shares of Pharmacyclics, which markets blood cancer drug Imbruvica with J&J's Janssen unit, rose about 3 percent in extended trading. Sales of Imbruvica, which has U.S. approvals for four forms of blood cancer, are expected to touch $1 billion in the United States this year, Pharmacyclics has said earlier.
 
 

Head of U.S. National Cancer Institute to step down

 
‎05 ‎March ‎2015, ‏‎12:37:27 AMGo to full article
The director of the U.S. National Cancer Institute will step down later this month after nearly five years at the helm of the agency that supports basic research on cancer in academia, industry, and its own labs, the National Institutes of Health announced on Wednesday. Dr. Harold Varmus's resignation will be effective on March 31. Dr. Douglas Lowy, currently the deputy director, will become acting director on April 1. During his tenure, Varmus created NCI's Center for Global Health, launched an initiative to find drugs that target a particular biochemical pathway involved in cancer, and led the cancer component of the Precision Medicine Initiative announced last month by President Barack Obama.
 

Flu winds down as FDA aims for better vaccine next winter

 
‎05 ‎March ‎2015, ‏‎12:23:26 AMGo to full article
FILE - In this Sept. 18, 2104 file photo, a flu shot is given at the National Press Club in Washington. The miserable flu season is winding down but not quite over yet, health officials said Wednesday, even as the government picked what they hoped would be a better vaccine recipe for next fall and winter. If it seems early to worry about the next flu season, well, producing 140 million doses of vaccine requires starting months in advance. (AP Photo/J. David Ake, File)WASHINGTON (AP) — The miserable flu season is winding down but not quite over yet, health officials said Wednesday, even as the government picked what it hoped would be a better vaccine recipe for next fall and winter.
 
 

Treatment for prostate cancer varies by area of U.S

 
‎04 ‎March ‎2015, ‏‎11:58:26 PMGo to full article
By Kathryn Doyle (Reuters Health) - A new study of Medicare and private insurance claims confirms that treatment trends for localized prostate cancer differ by U.S. region, by state and even from county to county. “There are several treatment options for men with localized prostate cancer,” said lead author Dr. K. Clinton Cary of the urology department at Indiana University School of Medicine in Indianapolis. Nonetheless, he said, “It is interesting to see how treatment of the same condition varies depending on your geographic location.” The researchers used data on more than 77,000 men in a Medicare database who were diagnosed with prostate cancer between 1998 and 2006 in addition to more than 63,000 in a private claims database between 2002 and 2006. Radical prostatectomy, surgery to remove the prostate gland and some surrounding tissue, held steady at 12 percent of patients over time in the Medicare group, but increased from 33 to 48 percent by 2006 in the privately insured group.
 

U.S. FDA approves Bristol-Myers immunotherapy for lung cancer

 
‎04 ‎March ‎2015, ‏‎10:06:37 PMGo to full article
U.S. health regulators on Wednesday swiftly approved a Bristol-Myers Squibb Co drug that helps the immune system fight the most common form of lung cancer, sending the company's shares up more than 5 percent to a multi-year high. The eagerly anticipated Food and Drug Administration approval of the drug known as Opdivo came only about three months after Bristol provided trial results showing that the medicine extended survival in non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC), one of the biggest markets in oncology. "This approval will provide patients and health care providers knowledge of the survival advantage associated with Opdivo and will help guide patient care and future lung cancer trials," Richard Pazdur, the FDA's head of hematology and oncology product evaluation, said in a statement. Opdivo, known chemically as nivolumab, was approved to treat non-small cell lung cancer after the disease has progressed following platinum-based chemotherapy, typically the first-line treatment against the disease.
 

Over 30? Flu less frequent: study

 
‎04 ‎March ‎2015, ‏‎03:39:44 PMGo to full article
Coming down with the flu is never pleasant, but the good news is it happens only twice a decade after age 30, according to recent research.Many pathogens can cause influenza, according to the London-based research team, which has made it difficult to assess how often people come down with it. In the study, the team analyzed blood samples from volunteers in Southern China and counted antibodies that came from an array of nine flu strains that had passed through the area between 1968 and 2009. Flu symptoms are sometimes caused by common cold viruses including rhinovirus and coronavirus, says author Dr. Adam Kucharski of Imperial College London, and some never know they caught the flu because they show no symptoms. "In childhood and adolescence, it's much more common, possibly because we mix more with other people," says Dr. Kucharski.

 

Bristol's $1 billion Bavarian deal may signal cancer vaccine revival

 
‎04 ‎March ‎2015, ‏‎05:45:30 PMGo to full article
By Ben Hirschler LONDON (Reuters) - The idea of using vaccines to fight cancer has received a shot in the arm from a $1 billion deal between Bristol-Myers Squibb and Bavarian Nordic. The agreement gives the U.S. drugmaker an exclusive option to the Danish biotech firm's therapeutic prostate cancer vaccine Prostvac and signals that such shots may have a bright future when combined with so-called checkpoint inhibitor drugs. Shares in Bavarian Nordic surged 35 percent on Wednesday on news of the Bristol-Myers tie-up, under which it could receive up to $975 million, including an upfront payment of $60 million. Unlike traditional preventative vaccines, therapeutic ones are designed for people with established disease and the aim is to boost the patient's immune system to keep tumors at bay.
 

Adults only catch flu around twice a decade, study finds

 
‎04 ‎March ‎2015, ‏‎03:40:34 PMGo to full article
Adults only get flu twice a decade on average, scientists have found, suggesting that most of the coughs and colds that keep millions of people off work every year are down to other bugs. In childhood and adolescence, it's much more common, possibly because we mix more with other people," said Steven Riley of Imperial College London, who worked on the research. The team analyzed blood samples from volunteers in Southern China, looking at antibody levels against nine different flu strains that circulated from 1968 to 2009. They found that while children get flu on average every other year, flu infections became less frequent with age.
 

Large breakfast, small dinner tied to better diabetes blood sugar

 
‎04 ‎March ‎2015, ‏‎01:47:46 AMGo to full article
By Shereen Lehman (Reuters Health) - Big breakfasts and small dinners might be a healthier way to eat for people with type 2 diabetes, according to a small new study. Diabetics in the study who ate big breakfasts and small dinners had fewer episodes of high blood sugar than those who ate small breakfasts and large dinners, researchers found. Blood sugar – also known as blood glucose – is controlled by the body’s internal clock, with larger blood sugar peaks after evening meals, Dr. Daniela Jakubowicz told Reuters Health in an email. People with type 2 diabetes often time their meals in opposition to their internal clock, said Jakubowicz, a researcher at Tel Aviv University’s Wolfson Medical Center in Israel.
 

Cancer risk above 50 percent for Brits born in 1960

 
‎04 ‎March ‎2015, ‏‎01:07:43 AMGo to full article
By Kathryn Doyle (Reuters Health) - More than half of people born after 1960 in the U.K. may be diagnosed with some form of cancer in their lifetimes, a new estimate suggests. “Everyone has to die of something and the longer people live the more likely that they will have previously been treated for a serious illness,” wrote Peter Sasieni, the study’s senior researcher from Queen Mary University of London, in an email to Reuters Health. As reported in the British Journal of Cancer, he and his coauthors estimated the lifetime risk of cancer, excluding non-melanoma skin cancer, in Britain for men and women born from 1930 to 1960. They used data on all causes of death in the UK from 1951 through 2012 and projected causes of death from 2013 to 2060, as well as data on the number of cancer diagnoses and cancer deaths from 1971 to 2009.
 

Harvard prevention trial studies tau, Alzheimer's other protein

 
‎03 ‎March ‎2015, ‏‎08:01:57 AMGo to full article
By Julie Steenhuysen CHICAGO (Reuters) - Alzheimer's researchers at Harvard for the first time are scanning the brains of healthy patients for the presence of a hallmark protein called tau, which forms toxic tangles of nerve fibers associated with the fatal disease. The new scans are part of a large clinical trial called Anti-Amyloid Treatment in Asymptomatic Alzheimer's or A4, the first designed to identify and treat patients in the earliest stages of Alzheimer's, before memory loss begins. Patients accepted into the A4 trial already have deposits of beta amyloid, the other protein associated with Alzheimer's. The addition of the tau scan will allow scientists to get a much clearer picture of the events that lead to Alzheimer's. The disease affects 5 million Americans, and 16 million are projected to be afflicted by 2050. Dr. Reisa Sperling of Massachusetts General Hospital in Boston, who is leading the 1,000-patient trial, said tau is commonly found in small amounts in healthy people over age 70, but it is generally confined to an area of the brain called the medial temporal lobe.
 

Two Ways Yoga Can Help Benefit Multiple Sclerosis

 
‎02 ‎March ‎2015, ‏‎11:35:32 PMGo to full article
March has been proclaimed Multiple Sclerosis Awareness Month, spotlighting MS awareness, support and resources. Multiple sclerosis (MS) is a chronic disease of the nervous system that affects different parts of the brain and spinal cord.In honor of Multiple Sclerosis Awareness Month, here are two ways that yoga can help benefit people with...
 

Peanuts may reduce risk of death, heart disease

 
‎02 ‎March ‎2015, ‏‎11:15:59 PMGo to full article
Eating peanuts, in small amounts, may reduce the risk of mortality, especially death from cardiovascular disease, a new study Monday showedEating peanuts, in small amounts, may reduce the risk of mortality, especially death from cardiovascular disease, a new study Monday showed. Researchers found that consuming peanuts regularly reduced mortality among men and women from all groups, and suggests that eating the nuts -- which are relatively affordable -- can be an inexpensive and nutritious way to reduce mortality and cardiovascular disease around the world. "We found that peanut consumption was associated with reduced total mortality and cardiovascular disease mortality in a predominantly low-income black and white population in the US, and among Chinese men and women living in Shanghai," said senior author Xiao-Ou Shu, associate director for Global Health at the Vanderbilt-Ingram Cancer Center (VICC). The risk of death from cardiovascular disease was slashed by between 23 and 38 percent.
 
 

Is Bipolar Disorder Really the Cause of Your Mood Swings?

 
‎02 ‎March ‎2015, ‏‎09:51:52 PMGo to full article
Is Bipolar Disorder Really the Cause of Your Mood Swings?I believe the public has a major misconception regarding which symptoms are consistent with bipolar disorder and which are not. It is evident when patients present for an initial psychiatric evaluation because they (or their family and friends) are worried that they are "bipolar." However, in many cases, the symptoms they report are often...
 
 

High school athletes need more help with mental health issues

 
‎02 ‎March ‎2015, ‏‎08:32:28 PMGo to full article
By Lisa Rapaport While concussions and physical injuries in high school sports are commanding more attention, young athletes still aren't getting enough help with mental health issues such as depression, bullying, substance abuse, and eating disorders, experts say. New guidelines released this morning at the sixth Youth Sports Safety Summit in Dallas, hosted by the National Athletic Trainers’ Association and the Youth Sports Safety Alliance, urge coaches and parents to be more vigilant in watching for signs of mental distress. "Concussions are a big issue and deserve to be taken seriously, but in my 35 years practicing as an athletic trainer you had four to five times more athletes requiring mental health care than trying to recover from concussions," said Timothy Neal, chair of the task force that wrote the recommendations for handling psychological problems among high school athletes.
 

Peanuts may lower risk of death from heart disease

 
‎02 ‎March ‎2015, ‏‎06:22:37 PMGo to full article
A woman arranges peanuts at the main markets in HoniaraBy Lisa Rapaport (Reuters Health) - Peanuts may reduce the risk of death from heart disease, a large study found, suggesting that the health benefits of this low-cost nut may be similar to pricier options like almonds and pistachios. While previous studies have linked nut consumption to a lower risk of heart disease, diabetes, and high blood pressure, the earlier research focused mostly on wealthier white people in the U.S. and Europe. "We can now tell people that peanuts are just as good as more expensive tree nuts, and that the benefit isn't just for white, upper class people, it's for everybody," said senior study author Dr. Xiao-Ou Shu, a professor of epidemiology at Vanderbilt University School of Medicine in Nashville, in a phone interview. They looked at how many grams of peanuts (including peanut butter) and other nuts participants ate on an average day and sorted them into five groups ranging from a low of less than 0.95 grams to a high of at least 18.45 grams.
 
 

Young girl's story may lead Idaho to approve marijuana oil

 
‎01 ‎March ‎2015, ‏‎09:15:24 PMGo to full article
Alexis Carey, left, 10, sits with her mother Clare Carey, center, and her sister Alanis Carey, right, 5, on Friday, Feb. 27, 2015, in Boise, Idaho. Alexis has a rare form of epilepsy, however, her family is hoping the Idaho Legislature will decriminalize marijuana extract oil to help reduce her seizures. The family began lobbying lawmakers to decriminalize the oil almost two years ago. Now, they’ve got some legislative backers and an upcoming hearing, as Idaho joins a larger movement to loosen laws to allow the use of marijuana extract oil. (AP Photo/Kimberlee Kruesi)BOISE, Idaho (AP) — Ten-year-old Alexis Carey has a rare but intractable form of epilepsy, Dravet Syndrome. The genetic disease causes severe and multiple seizures, which often leave parents guessing if the terror of watching their child seize up will pass or turn fatal.
 
 

Terminal cancer care should do more to treat depression

 
‎01 ‎March ‎2015, ‏‎07:21:10 PMGo to full article
By Janice Neumann (Reuters Health) - (Corrects in paragraphs 1 and 7 of Feb 26, 2015 story , that the doctors surveyed for the study were in The Netherlands, not Norway.) Depression could be clouding the last 24 hours of life for a significant number of people with advanced cancer, pointing to a need for better – and earlier - psychological help, according to a large study in The Netherlands. Although it’s challenging to tease apart depression symptoms from the pain, fatigue and cognitive problems associated with end-stage cancer, more can be done to alleviate depression and anxiety, researchers said. “Health care providers may think this is a normal part of the dying process,” said lead author Dr. Elene Janberidze from the European Palliative Care Research Center at the Norwegian University of Science and Technology in Trondheim. “However, some patients experiencing depressive symptoms and/or depression can be treated and thus both the patients and their families may have a better quality of life,” Janberidze told Reuters Health in an email.

 

Younger men more bothered after prostate cancer treatment

 
‎28 ‎February ‎2015, ‏‎12:04:35 AMGo to full article
By Shereen Lehman After treatment for localized prostate cancer, changes in quality of life will vary by age, as will men’s reactions to those changes, according to a new study. “While older and younger men start with different baseline quality of life function, older men may be less bothered by certain declines that may affect younger patients more,” Dr. Lindsay Hampson told Reuters Health in an email. Prostate cancer is the most common malignancy in men of all ages in the U.S. Almost 60 percent of new cases are diagnosed in men over the age of 65, and the average age is 66. Older men are often diagnosed with more aggressive disease and are less likely to get treatment, in part because they worry about the impact on their sexual and urinary function, Hampson and her colleagues write in European Urology.
 

Watch out for nasty global flu surprises, WHO warns

 
‎27 ‎February ‎2015, ‏‎08:37:42 PMGo to full article
By Kate and Kelland LONDON, Feb 27 - The world remains highly vulnerable to a possible severe flu pandemic and governments should increase surveillance, vigilance and preparedness, the World Health Organization (WHO) said on Friday. It said the world was fortunate that the last flu pandemic, caused by H1N1 swine flu in 2009/2010, was relatively mild, but added: "Such good fortune is no precedent". In a seven-page report on flu, WHO said that on many levels, the world is better prepared now than ever before for a flu pandemic. The level of alert is high, it said, and there is better surveillance of flu viruses in both animals and humans.
 

Roche says EU agency recommends Avastin for cervical cancer

 
‎27 ‎February ‎2015, ‏‎06:49:16 PMGo to full article
ZURICH (Reuters) - Roche said on Friday that European regulators had recommended approval of its drug Avastin in combination with chemotherapy as a treatment for women with an advanced form of cancer of the cervix. Avastin, which is already approved in Europe to treat advanced stages of breast cancer, colorectal cancer, non-small cell lung cancer, kidney cancer and ovarian cancer, was the Basel-based drugmaker's biggest seller last year with sales of 6.42 billion Swiss francs ($6.76 billion). (Reporting By Zurich Slot; Editing by David Goodman)
 

You Know Everything About Nutrition. So Why Are You Still Overeating?

 
‎27 ‎February ‎2015, ‏‎05:39:32 PMGo to full article
You Know Everything About Nutrition. So Why Are You Still Overeating?You know the nutritional value of almost everything at the supermarket. You could recite the calories in a slice of pizza, list the things you "should" buy at the grocery store, recount the types of grains for easy digestion, and write out all of the most nutrient dense super-foods. But despite the fact that you know everything about nutrition...
 
 

Sanofi diabetes drug Toujeo wins EU green light, pricing in focus

 
‎27 ‎February ‎2015, ‏‎03:10:23 PMGo to full article
French drugs firm Sanofi's logo is pictured inside the company's headquarters during the company's 2014 annual results presentation in ParisBy Ben Hirschler LONDON (Reuters) - French drugmaker Sanofi's new Toujeo diabetes drug has been recommended for approval in Europe, two days after being cleared for sale in the United States, regulators said on Friday. The positive decision from experts at the European Medicines Agency (EMA) had been expected and paves the way for the long-lasting insulin product to be marketed soon in Sanofi's chosen first European markets, Germany and Britain. Recommendations for marketing approval by the agency's Committee for Medicinal Products for Human Use (CHMP) are normally endorsed by the European Commission within a couple of months. Significantly, the EMA highlighted the benefits of Toujeo in reducing the risk of hypoglycemia, or dangerously low blood sugar levels, compared to Lantus.
 
 

Novartis lung cancer drug gets EU recommendation

 
‎27 ‎February ‎2015, ‏‎02:31:59 PMGo to full article
Swiss drugmaker Novartis' logo is seen at the company's plant in the northern Swiss town of SteinEuropean health regulators said on Friday they had recommended approval of a drug for advanced lung cancer developed by Swiss drugmaker Novartis that is intended to treat patients with a specific genetic mutation. It is designed for use in non-small cell lung cancer patients who have previously been treated with Pfizer's Xalkori, another ALK inhibitor. Between 2 and 7 percent of non-small cell lung cancer patients have the specific mutation of the ALK (anaplastic lymphoma kinase) protein for which such treatment is targeted.
 
 

Heat blamed for spray vaccine's failure against swine flu

 
‎27 ‎February ‎2015, ‏‎01:43:21 AMGo to full article
FILE- In this Oct. 4, 2005, file photo, Danielle Holland reacts as she is given a FluMist influenza vaccination in St. Leonard, Md. The makers of AstraZeneca FluMist spray version of the flu vaccine say now they know why it has failed to protect young U.S. children against swine flu — fragile doses got too warm. The vaccine works well for most flu strains, but small studies found it didn't work very well against the swine flu bug that first emerged in 2009. Swine flu has returned each year since but wasn't a big player this flu season. At a medical meeting Thursday, Feb. 26, 2015, company officials said they investigated and concluded that the swine flu part of the vaccine is unusually sensitive to heat. (AP Photo/Chris Gardner, File)ATLANTA (AP) — The makers of the nasal spray version of the flu vaccine say now they know why it has failed to protect young U.S. children against swine flu — fragile doses got too warm.
 
 

Sanofi's diabetes drug Toujeo gets U.S. approval, label disappoints

 
‎27 ‎February ‎2015, ‏‎01:37:30 AMGo to full article
French drugmaker Sanofi SA's new Toujeo diabetes drug won U.S. regulatory approval, but with wording on its prescribing label that analysts say could make marketing difficult. Toujeo is a more potent follow-up to the drugmaker's top-selling Lantus insulin product, which accounts for a fifth of Sanofi sales. Sanofi is hoping to convert patients to Toujeo as Lantus is due to lose its U.S. patent protection this month. The U.S. Food and Drug Administration late Wednesday approved the once daily, long-acting basal insulin to treat type 1 and the far more prevalent type 2 diabetes.
 

Drinking coffee may lower risk of multiple sclerosis

 
‎26 ‎February ‎2015, ‏‎11:12:04 PMGo to full article
People who drink four to six cups of coffee daily may be less likely to get multiple sclerosis, according to international research out ThursdayPeople who drink four to six cups of coffee daily may be less likely to get multiple sclerosis, according to international research out Thursday. "Caffeine intake has been associated with a reduced risk of Parkinson's and Alzheimer's diseases," said lead author Ellen Mowry of the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine in Baltimore, Maryland. "Our study shows that coffee intake may also protect against MS, supporting the idea that the drug may have protective effects for the brain," she added. The findings of a US and Swedish study -- released ahead of the American Academy of Neurology annual meeting in Washington -- each compared more than 1,000 MS patients to a similar number of healthy people.
 
 

Nasal flu vaccines may be safe for kids with egg allergies

 
‎26 ‎February ‎2015, ‏‎09:07:53 PMGo to full article
By Shereen Lehman (Reuters Health) - Nasal-spray flu vaccines appear to be safe for children over age two who have egg allergies or asthma, say UK researchers. No systemic or severe allergic reactions were seen among 282 egg-allergic children who received the vaccine. Nasal-spray vaccines containing live but disabled influenza virus, known as live attenuated influenza vaccine (LAIV), are cultured in chicken eggs and contain traces of egg proteins. “On the basis of this data, we do think the intranasal flu vaccine (LAIV) is safe in children with egg allergy,” said Paul Turner, who led the new study, in an email.
 

Terminal cancer care should do more to treat depression

 
‎26 ‎February ‎2015, ‏‎06:20:53 PMGo to full article
By Janice Neumann Reuters Health - Depression could be clouding the last 24 hours of life for a significant number of people with advanced cancer, pointing to a need for better – and earlier - psychological help, according to a large study from Norway. Although it’s challenging to tease apart depression symptoms from the pain, fatigue and cognitive problems associated with end-stage cancer, more can be done to alleviate depression and anxiety, researchers said. “Health care providers may think this is a normal part of the dying process,” said lead author Dr. Elene Janberidze from the European Palliative Care Research Center at the Norwegian University of Science and Technology in Trondheim. “However, some patients experiencing depressive symptoms and/or depression can be treated and thus both the patients and their families may have a better quality of life,” Janberidze told Reuters Health in an email.
 

Sanofi diabetes drug awaits imminent EU green light

 
‎26 ‎February ‎2015, ‏‎05:50:33 PMGo to full article
By Ben Hirschler LONDON (Reuters) - Sanofi's new Toujeo diabetes drug is on track to receive a potential green light from European regulators this week, building on a U.S. regulatory approval awarded on Wednesday. Toujeo is a more potent follow-up to the French drugmaker's top-selling Lantus insulin product, which accounts for a fifth of group sales, and the new drug is pivotal to Sanofi's diabetes business as Lantus faces loss of patent protection. A committee of experts at the European Medicines Agency is considering whether to recommend Toujeo at a regular monthly meeting in London, according to the agency's website. Assuming Toujeo gets a positive opinion, it is likely to be formally approved by the European Commission a couple of months later, allowing Sanofi to launch in its chosen first European markets of Germany and Britain.
 

Former Utah Senator Bob Bennett diagnosed with pancreatic cancer

 
‎26 ‎February ‎2015, ‏‎05:01:57 AMGo to full article
(Reuters) - Former U.S. Senator Bob Bennett, the Utah Republican who was one of the first, high-profile political casualties of a 2010 Tea Party insurgency, has been diagnosed with pancreatic cancer and will begin treatment later this week, Utah media reported on Wednesday. Bennett, 81, said in a statement quoted by the Salt Lake Tribune that doctors were hopeful that a "combination of chemotherapy and radiation can shrink the tumor to a point where it will become operable." The Utah Deseret News further quoted the former senator as saying there was "no firm prognosis" for him at this point. Both newspapers said he planned to begin treatment on Friday at Johns Hopkins University in Baltimore. Bennett's bid for a fourth Senate term in 2010 foundered on a conservative backlash over the healthcare overhaul pushed through Congress by President Barack Obama, leading to a revolt against the Republican Party establishment by state Tea Party activists.
 

FDA approves Sanofi's diabetes drug Toujeo

 
‎26 ‎February ‎2015, ‏‎03:54:44 AMGo to full article
U.S. health regulators on Wednesday approved Sanofi's diabetes drug Toujeo, a more potent follow-up to the French drugmaker's top-selling insulin product Lantus. The Food and Drug Administration approved the once daily, long-acting basal insulin to treat adults with both type 1 and the far more prevalent type 2 diabetes. The medicine is considered among the most important in Sanofi's pipeline. Sanofi bought some time with a patent infringement lawsuit filed last year against Eli Lilly and Co that would keep a cheaper Lantus generic off the market for 30 months.
 

Study links common food additives to Crohn's disease, colitis

 
‎25 ‎February ‎2015, ‏‎09:18:11 PMGo to full article
An ice cream cone is held against a blue sky in BlackpoolBy Will Dunham WASHINGTON (Reuters) - Common additives in ice cream, margarine, packaged bread and many processed foods may promote the inflammatory bowel diseases ulcerative colitis and Crohn's disease as well as a group of obesity-related conditions, scientists said on Wednesday. The researchers focused on emulsifiers, chemicals added to many food products to improve texture and extend shelf life. In mouse experiments, they found emulsifiers can change the species composition of gut bacteria and induce intestinal inflammation.
 
 

Enough Distractions: Let's Address the Real Causes of Diet-Related Diseases

 
‎25 ‎February ‎2015, ‏‎06:15:06 PMGo to full article
By Adriana Selwyn and Derek YachThe low-carbohydrate diet phenomenon is the latest in a long line of diets claiming to be the solution to rapidly rising rates of lifestyle-related chronic diseases. It comes as no surprise then that on Feb. 19-22, the world's first International Low Carb High Fat Health Summit will take place in Cape Town, South...
 

Skin test could help diagnose Alzheimer's

 
‎25 ‎February ‎2015, ‏‎01:58:07 PMGo to full article
A skin test could help identify Alzheimer's and Parkinson's diseases.Skin biopsies could help reveal information about Alzheimer's and Parkinson's diseases, according to a new study. The biopsies can detect elevated levels of abnormal proteins associated with the diseases. For the study, researchers took biopsies from 20 people with Alzheimer's disease, 16 with Parkinson's and 17 with dementia caused by other conditions and compared them to 12 healthy people of about the same age.
 
 

AstraZeneca taps biotech firm Orca for autoimmune disease drugs

 
‎25 ‎February ‎2015, ‏‎09:23:58 AMGo to full article
A sign is seen at an AstraZeneca site in MacclesfieldLONDON (Reuters) - AstraZeneca has boosted its early-stage research in autoimmune disease by signing a three-year research deal with start-up firm Orca Pharmaceuticals, a small British biotech company formed in 2013, on a new class of drugs. Orca will receive an upfront payment and further fees from AstraZeneca with a potential total value of $122.5 million, the companies said on Wednesday. Final payments will depend on the success of Orca's so-called retinoic acid–related orphan nuclear receptor gamma inhibitors. (Reporting by Ben Hirschler; editing by David Clarke)
 
 

Phone support can help ease postpartum depression

 
‎25 ‎February ‎2015, ‏‎12:11:35 AMGo to full article
In the study, women with postpartum depression received telephone counseling from other women who had previously suffered from the disorder and recovered. “Postpartum depression is a problem for one in seven women, and many of them don’t get help because there’s a stigma and they don’t have time and it’s expensive,” said study leader Dr. Nicole Letourneau, a professor and research chair in parent-infant mental health at the University of Calgary. “Training peer counselors to do phone counseling is an effective, low-cost and non-stigmatizing way for new moms to get the help they need.” Particularly for first-time mothers, postpartum depression can be hard to distinguish from the stress and fatigue that come with caring for a new infant around the clock, Letourneau said.
 

Bavarian Nordic vaccine helps prolong life in prostate cancer trial

 
‎24 ‎February ‎2015, ‏‎09:42:56 PMGo to full article
An experimental therapeutic vaccine from Danish drugmaker Bavarian Nordic helped significantly extend survival in patients with advanced prostate cancer, according to results of a small early-stage trial conducted by the U.S. National Cancer Institute. Shares of Bavarian Nordic closed up almost 12 percent in Copenhagen after the company released the data on Tuesday. The study involved 30 patients with prostate cancer that had failed to benefit from standard treatments that reduce levels of testosterone, the male hormone that fuels the cancer. Patients were treated with the company's Prostvac vaccine, in addition to escalating doses of Bristol-Myers Squibb Co's Yervoy, an approved injectable treatment for advanced melanoma that works by taking the brakes off the body's immune system.
 

Cholera feared in Syria due to dirty water, WHO warns

 
‎24 ‎February ‎2015, ‏‎07:31:26 PMGo to full article
Children remove trash blocking the drains in the Al Inzarat district in AleppoBy Stephanie Nebehay GENEVA (Reuters) - A cholera outbreak is feared in coming months in Syria, where other water-borne diseases such as hepatitis A and typhoid are on the rise due to poor sanitation, the World Health Organization (WHO) warned on Tuesday. Safe drinking water is available at about one-third of the level it was before the conflict erupted nearly five years ago, and supplies are cut-off to punish civilians at times, it said. Some 31,460 cases of hepatitis A were reported in Syria last year and more than 1,000 cases have been recorded per week since January, said Dr. Elizabeth Hoff, WHO representative in Syria. "Water has been used for political dividends and has been turned off to certain areas and that leads people to drink water from unsafe areas," Cholera, an intestinal infection often linked to contaminated drinking water, causes severe diarrhea and vomiting, leaving small children especially vulnerable to death from dehydration, according to the U.N. health agency.
 
 

Indian city bans gatherings over swine flu outbreak

 
‎24 ‎February ‎2015, ‏‎04:48:58 PMGo to full article
India has detected more than 3,000 cases of swine flu as this medic prepares to treat a patient in AhmedabadAn Indian city has banned public gatherings to contain the spread of deadly swine flu after thousands were infected with the virus, officials said Tuesday. Authorities in Ahmedabad, the largest city in western Gujarat state, said 219 people had died of swine flu since the start of the year, with more than 3,300 cases detected so far. "We have issued a notification prohibiting any kind of public gathering in the district," said senior city administrator Rajkumar Beniwal, adding only weddings and funerals would be exempt. The decision came after Gujarat's junior health minister tested positive for swine flu Monday, just a day after the state assembly speaker was diagnosed with the virus.
 
 

Smokers at higher risk of depression, says British study

 
‎24 ‎February ‎2015, ‏‎12:14:58 PMGo to full article
Smokers have a 70 percent greater risk of anxiety and depression than non-smokers, a British Heart Foundation study showsSmokers are 70 percent more likely to suffer from anxiety and depression than non-smokers, despite the widespread view that lighting up is a stress reliever, says a study published on Tuesday. The British Heart Foundation (BHF) report -- issued ahead of No Smoking Day on March 11 -- says quitting smoking could improve mental health. The study of nearly 6,500 people over the age of 40 found that 18.3 percent of smokers reported suffering depression and anxiety compared with 10 percent of non-smokers and 11.3 percent of ex-smokers. This goes against the perception of more than a third (36 percent) of UK smokers who told researchers they believe the habit helps relieve stress, BHF said.
 
 

Novartis blood cancer drug wins U.S. OK after setback

 
‎23 ‎February ‎2015, ‏‎11:59:26 PMGo to full article
Swiss drugmaker Novartis' logo is seen at the company's plant in the northern Swiss town of Stein(Reuters) - The U.S. Food and Drug Administration on Monday approved Novartis AG's drug to treat patients who have relapsed after earlier therapies for multiple myeloma, an aggressive blood cancer, even though an advisory panel in November recommended against approval. The drug, Farydak, in clinical trials almost doubled to 10.6 months the amount of time it took for the disease to progress, compared with standard treatment. Farydak was approved for use in combination with Takeda Pharmaceutical Co Ltd's Velcade and the anti-inflammatory drug dexamethasone once a patient has received at least two prior treatment regimens. Prior treatments would include Velcade and an immunomodulatory drug, such as Celgene Corp's Revlimid.
 
 

Early exposure to peanuts helps prevent allergies in kids

 
‎23 ‎February ‎2015, ‏‎11:56:19 PMGo to full article
This Feb. 20, 2015, photo shows an arrangement of peanuts in New York. For years, parents of babies who seem likely to develop a peanut allergy have gone to extremes to keep them away from peanut-based foods. Now, a major study suggests that is exactly the wrong thing to do. (AP Photo/Patrick Sison)For years, parents of babies who seem likely to develop a peanut allergy have gone to extremes to keep them away from peanut-based foods. Now a major study suggests that is exactly the wrong thing to do.
 
 

What to know about new research on babies, peanut allergies

 
‎23 ‎February ‎2015, ‏‎11:43:56 PMGo to full article
This Feb. 20, 2015, photo shows an arrangement of peanuts in New York. For years, parents of babies who seem likely to develop a peanut allergy have gone to extremes to keep them away from peanut-based foods. Now, a major study suggests that is exactly the wrong thing to do. (AP Photo/Patrick Sison)Children at high risk of developing peanut allergies are far less likely to do so if they are given peanut-containing foods before they turn 1, finds a major study that is expected to quickly change dietary advice to many parents.
 
 

Washing dishes by hand linked to fewer allergies in kids

 
‎23 ‎February ‎2015, ‏‎11:38:19 PMGo to full article
By Andrew M. Seaman (Reuters Health) - Parents who wash dishes by hand, instead of in a dishwasher, are less likely to have kids with allergies, according to a new study from Sweden. While the researchers can’t say avoiding dishwashing machines prevents childhood allergies, they suggest that bacteria left on hand-washed plates may teach the body to tolerate its environment. Other studies have suggested that growing up on farms and living in developing countries reduce a child’s risk of allergies, the researchers wrote February 23 in the journal Pediatrics. The study’s lead author told Reuters Health by email that while those earlier findings are interesting, they can’t realistically be used to reduce allergies among children.
 

WHO calls for 'smart' syringes to stem deadly diseases

 
‎23 ‎February ‎2015, ‏‎08:13:23 PMGo to full article
The World Health Organization has called on healthcare providers around the globe to switch to syringes that can only be used onceThe World Health Organization has called on healthcare providers around the globe to switch to syringes that can only be used once in order to better battle deadly diseases spread by needle sharing. The new "smart" syringes recommended by the WHO include features that prevent them from being used a second time. Others have metal clips that prevent the plunger from being pulled back after it is used and another type has a needle that retracts into the syringe after a shot. "Adoption of safety-engineered syringes is absolutely critical to protecting people worldwide from becoming infected with HIV, hepatitis and other diseases," said Gottfried Hirnschall, head of WHO's HIV/AIDS Department.
 
 

Novartis AG wins approval to buy GSK cancer drugs, with conditions

 
‎23 ‎February ‎2015, ‏‎07:36:21 PMGo to full article
Swiss drugmaker Novartis' logo is seen at the company's plant in the northern Swiss town of SteinNovartis AG has won U.S. antitrust approval to buy GlaxoSmithKline’s oncology drugs, with conditions, the U.S. Federal Trade Commission said on Monday. To win U.S. approval for the $16 billion deal, Novartis agreed to divest assets related to its BRAF and MEK inhibitor drugs, now in development to fight melanoma, the FTC said. The deal is one of three related transactions announced in April 2014 in which GlaxoSmithKline would buy Novartis' global vaccine business, except for flu vaccines, Novartis would buy Glaxo's cancer drugs and the two companies would combine to create a consumer healthcare business.
 
 

Final frontier for school nutrition: Bake sales

 
‎23 ‎February ‎2015, ‏‎06:43:50 PMGo to full article
By Kathryn Doyle (Reuters Health) - In a new policy statement, the American Academy of Pediatrics says school nutrition has made incredible strides over the last two decades, but high-calorie, low quality foods are still available from informal sources like bake sales, birthday parties, and other events for which students, parents and staff bring treats from home. “Great things have happened in terms of sweetened beverages, school meals, snacks and vended foods in schools,” said Dr. Robert Murray, professor of nutrition at The Ohio State University in Columbus and one of the two lead authors of the policy statement.
 

Washing dishes by hand could keep allergies at bay

 
‎23 ‎February ‎2015, ‏‎04:21:29 PMGo to full article
The way you wash your dishes could have an effect on your children's health.A study released in the journal Pediatrics reveals that kids living in households in which dishes are washed by hand may experience fewer allergy-related illnesses. The Swedish questionnaire-based study looked at 1,029 kids aged 7 and 8 in two areas of Sweden and included questions on asthma, eczema and rhinoconjunctivitis taken from the International Study of Asthma and Allergies in Childhood questionnaire.
 
 

Lilly delays submission to market once-daily diabetes drug

 
‎23 ‎February ‎2015, ‏‎04:10:24 PMGo to full article
(Reuters) - Eli Lilly and Co said it would delay its application to market its once-daily diabetes treatment, basal insulin peglispro, beyond the current quarter. The delay stems from a need to generate additional data to evaluate any potential effects on liver fat related to the treatment in late-stage trials, Lilly said. The company said it could not determine the length of the delay until trial plans were developed, but it would likely submit marketing applications for the drug with U.S. and European regulators after 2016. (Reporting by Natalie Grover in Bengaluru; Editing by Joyjeet Das)
 

Novo Nordisk has positive trial results for oral diabetes drug, shares jump

 
‎20 ‎February ‎2015, ‏‎04:56:02 PMGo to full article
Danish drugmaker Novo Nordisk, the world's biggest insulin maker, said on Friday it had received positive results from a Phase II trial of an oral version of a long-acting GLP-1 drug for treatment of people with type 2 diabetes. The process could take a year or more to complete, but promises to bring forward the treatment of diabetes by pills rather than injections, long considered an important step for the Danish company as well as for diabetes sufferers. Sydbank analyst Soren Lontoft noted the trial success moved Novo a step closer to tapping into what could be a 100 billion Danish crown ($15 billion) market for oral type 2 diabetes treatments. Tim Race, analysts with Deutsche Bank, said should Novo proceed with developing the drug, he expected a launch no earlier than in 2020.
 

Indian health authorizes say 700 have died in flu outbreak

 
‎20 ‎February ‎2015, ‏‎02:35:26 PMGo to full article
NEW DELHI (AP) — Health authorities were working to ensure remote hospitals in northern and western India had adequate medical supplies for a flu outbreak that has claimed more than 700 lives in 10 weeks.
 

Bayer diabetes business sale not imminent: sources

 
‎20 ‎February ‎2015, ‏‎01:40:13 PMGo to full article
Logo of German drugmaker Bayer is seen in LeverkusenBy Ludwig Burger and Arno Schuetze FRANKFURT (Reuters) - German drugmaker Bayer is in talks to sell its diabetes devices division but a sale is not imminent, two sources with knowledge of the matter told Reuters. Bayer is making a second attempt to sell the Contour blood glucose-meter business, which had annual sales of 722 million euros ($819 million) in 2013, as it overhauls its business to focus on margin-rich healthcare sectors. KKR-backed Panasonic Healthcare Holdings has been in talks with Bayer over the diabetes devices division for some time, but final bids are some weeks off, one source with direct knowledge of the matter said. The U.S. private equity firm owns 80 percent of Panasonic Healthcare and Panasonic Corp owns 20 percent.
 
 

Renowned Neurologist Oliver Sacks Announces He Has Terminal Cancer

 
‎20 ‎February ‎2015, ‏‎07:11:00 AMGo to full article
Renowned Neurologist Oliver Sacks Announces He Has Terminal CancerRenowned neurologist and author of "Awakenings" Oliver Sacks announced today that he has terminal cancer. Sacks, a professor of neurology at New York University School of Medicine, said in a New York Times article that cancer had been found in his liver nine years after he was first diagnosed with a rare ocular tumor. Sacks, 81, is best known for his writing on neurological case histories including "The Man Who Mistook His Wife for a Hat" and an "An Anthropologist on Mars." His book "Awakenings," based on his work in the 1960s with patients who were unable to initiate movement, was turned into an Oscar-nominated movie of the same name starring Robin Williams and Robert De Niro.
 
 

FDA eases access to DNA screening for inherited diseases

 
‎20 ‎February ‎2015, ‏‎03:44:51 AMGo to full article
WASHINGTON (AP) — Federal health officials are easing access to DNA tests used to screen parents for devastating genetic disorders that can be passed on to their children. The surprise announcement offers a path forward for Google-backed genetic testing firm 23andMe, which previously clashed with regulators over its direct-to-consumer technology.
 

Drug-resistant malaria parasite spreading

 
‎20 ‎February ‎2015, ‏‎02:12:36 AMGo to full article
A Thai Health official holds blood test slides at a Malaria clinic in Kanchanaburi province near the Thai-Myanmar border on October 26, 2012Parasites resistant to the frontline malaria drug have spread westward from southeast Asia to just short of the Indian border -- a gateway to Africa, researchers warned Friday. A spread into India "would pose a serious threat to the global control and eradication of malaria," said a statement that accompanied the study published in The Lancet Infectious Diseases. "If drug resistance spreads from Asia to the African sub-continent, or emerges in Africa independently as we've seen several times before, millions of lives will be at risk." Since the Plasmodium parasite developed resistance to other drug types, artemisinin is the best and safest medicine to treat the estimated 198 million malaria infections that occurred worldwide in 2013. There were about 584,000 deaths, according to the UN's World Health Organization (WHO) -- 90 percent of them in Africa.
 
 

Drug-resistant malaria found close to Myanmar border with India

 
‎20 ‎February ‎2015, ‏‎02:04:44 AMGo to full article
A government health worker takes a blood sample to be tested for malaria in Ta Gay Laung village hall in Hpa-An district in Kayin state, south-eastern MyanmarBy Kate Kelland LONDON (Reuters) - Malaria with total resistance to the antimalarial drug artemisinin has taken hold in Myanmar and spread close to the border with India, threatening to repeat history and render crucial medicines useless, scientists said on Friday. If the spread of artemisinin-resistant malaria parasites were to reach into India, they said, that would pose a serious threat to the chances of global control and eradication of the killer mosquito-borne disease. "Myanmar is considered the front line in the battle against artemisinin resistance as it forms a gateway for resistance to spread to the rest of the world," said Charles Woodrow of the Mahidol-Oxford tropical medicine research unit, who led the study at Oxford University.
 
 

Why Getting Arthritis at 28 Wasn't the Worst Thing

 
‎19 ‎February ‎2015, ‏‎10:05:33 PMGo to full article
Why Getting Arthritis at 28 Wasn't the Worst ThingIt started with a bump on the inside of my palm underneath my ring finger. A week or so later, that same bump appeared underneath my other ring finger. I kept thinking that the bumps were actually calluses, since I had been lifting weights more often. That was almost 17 years ago. At the time, I had a 2-year-old and a sometimes-colicky...
 
 

Black women less likely to take breast cancer hormone therapy

 
‎19 ‎February ‎2015, ‏‎09:49:18 PMGo to full article
By Kathryn Doyle (Reuters Health) – Among early-stage breast cancer patients in the U.S., black women are less likely than white women to take their prescribed hormone medications, according to a new study that partly - but not entirely - blames economic disparities between races. Black women are less likely to be diagnosed with breast cancer than white women, but more likely to die from it, a disparity that emerged in the 1980s and has widened ever since, the authors note in the introduction. When it comes to hormone prescriptions, women with fewer financial resources and higher prescription drug co-pays, which are more common for black women, are less likely to stick to the therapy, according to the new study that was led by Dr. Dawn L. Hershman of Herbert Irving Comprehensive Cancer Center at Columbia University in New York. For the study, Hershman's team used an insurance claims database including more than 10,000 women over age 50 who were diagnosed with early-stage breast cancer between 2007 and 2011 and given a prescription for aromatase inhibitors or tamoxifen, both hormonal therapies.
 

U.S. cancer survival rates improving

 
‎19 ‎February ‎2015, ‏‎09:07:46 PMGo to full article
By Andrew M. Seaman (Reuters Health) – The proportion of people surviving years after a cancer diagnosis is improving, according to a new analysis. Men and women ages 50 to 64, who were diagnosed in 2005 to 2009 with a variety of cancer types, were 39 to 68 percent more likely to be alive five years later, compared to people of the same age diagnosed in 1990 to 1994, researchers found. “Pretty much all populations improved their cancer survival over time,” said Dr. Wei Zheng, the study’s senior author from Vanderbilt University in Nashville. As reported in JAMA Oncology, he and his colleagues analyzed data from a national sample of more than 1 million people who were diagnosed with cancer of the colon or rectum, breast, prostate, lung, liver, pancreas or ovary between 1990 and 2010.

 

 
 
http://www.enca.com/coverage/deadly-spread-ebola-virus

 

 

 

Ebola nurse treated in London as Sierra Leone rate rises

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Nigeria awaits Ebola update

 

 

 

Weathering the Coming Storm


 

 

 

Price R399.00

 

 


 

Description

Dr. Chuck Missler, an internationally known business executive, outlines our current economic predicament and defensive steps you can take to lessen the impact of the impending economic crisis. As a Bible teacher for over 30 years with a ministry reaching over 40 countries, Chuck shares some key strategies to prepare yourself spiritually and practically.

Is the World facing another major economic upheaval?

What is the best strategy to protect your family in times of economic uncertainty?

The Church has enjoyed a relatively peaceful existence in the West for a few centuries but the with the coming persecution, how do we go about organizing home study and home-church?

Soul Survival – Keeping your “lamp full” during the hard times ahead.

Join Dr. Chuck Missler and Ron Matsen in the Executive Brie fing Room of
The River Lodge, New Zealand, in an intensive summary outlining what lies
ahead and how we can prepare for the coming storm.

Runtime: Approx. 5 hours

© 2012 Koinonia House Inc.

Available in the following formats:

 

DVD:

•3 Disks
•5 M4A Files
•1 PDF Notes File
•Color, 16:9, Dolby Digital 2.0 stereo, Region encoding (This DVD will be viewable in other countries WITH the proper DVD player and television set.)


 


On this Day

 

December Wrap Up!

 

Expectations

 of the

 Antichrist

 

 

Dr. Chuck Missler and Ron Matsen

 

Price R 499.00

 

There are many diverse anticipations concerning the Coming World Leader, commonly referred to as “The Antichrist.” This study will explore the Biblical descriptions with the specific expectations of the globalists, Islam, the Vatican, Freemasonry, and others.
• Will he be a Nephilim?
• Why is the Vatican openly preparing to receive an “alien” visitor?
• Will he be a resurrection of Nimrod? Is his DNA a factor?
• What are the expectations of transhumanist technologists in this regard?
Clearly, the Bible has much more to illuminate this issue far beyond the popular conceptions; and yet the composite perspective will astonish most. Furthermore, is there a climactic cosmic deception being prepared that, if it were possible, “it would deceive the very elect”? Jesus commanded us, “Be not deceived.” But, how?
How close are these events to our current horizon?
Join Dr. Chuck Missler and Ron Matsen in an intensive summary of some of the Strategic Trends that will impact all of us.
Available in the following formats:

DVD:
•3 Discs
•6 M4A Files
•1 PDF Notes File
•Color, Fullscreen 16:9, Dolby Digital 2.0 stereo, Region  encoding ( This DVD will be viewable in other countries WITH the proper DVD player and television set.)


 

 

 

Feed image

Featured Video

End the Shame. End the Isolation. End Fistula.

 

 

 

 

***Brand New Release***

 

Beginning of Wisdom

by

 Dr. Chuck Missler


“The fear of God is the beginning of wisdom.” Proverbs 9:10

But how do we balance the awesome majesty due to the Creator and Ruler of the universe with the gracious family intimacy that is now available to us through the completed work of Christ?

What does His Holiness demand of us, personally?

What are the hazards of failing to render the Almighty His due, while availing ourselves the riches committed to us of the precious promises in His Word?

How do we deal with these paramount issues facing us daily in practical challenges?

Chuck Missler grapples with these wildly misunderstood tensions with down-to-earth frankness and Biblically-based candor.
 

Price R 179

 
 

 

Hal Lindsey Report:

 

THE REAL ISSUE

SAME SEX MARRIAGE

 

Genetically Modified Food & People.

 

 

 

Go Live           Link

 

*** New Release ***

 Angels, Volume III:

The Denizens of the Metacosm

 

DVD

 

 

Price R 179.00

 

Angels, Volume III: The Denizens of the Metacosm

 

DVD

by Dr. Chuck Missler

 

Description

Volumes 1 & 2 of this series explored the finite limits and boundaries of our physical reality. After probing the limits of both the Macrocosm and the Microcosm, we discovered that our reality is but a shadow of larger reality, the Metacosm, a domain of extra-dimensional transfers and other paradoxical phenomena.

 

Volume 3 explores the contradictory behavior of UFOs and other demonic deceptions characteristic of the End Times. Explore these topics in more detail in either this two-hour briefing, Angels Vol 3: The Denizens of the Metacosm or our six-hour extensive study, Expectations of the Antichrist.

 

 

• Are they real?

• Why do UFOs enjoy a military classification higher than our most sensitive weapons systems?

• Why are the events which occurred in Roswell New Mexico still classified after 66 years?

• Why is the Vatican openly preparing to receive an Alien Visitor?

• How should a Christian deal with the occurrences of Alien abductions?

• Jesus admonished us to “Be not deceived.” How?

• How do we prepare for the deception which, “if it were possible, would deceive the very elect”?

 

Join Dr. Chuck Missler in the Executive Briefing Room of the River Lodge, New Zealand, exploring the misinformation, (and deliberate disinformation) about the various “denizens of the Metacosm” and other insights of the invisible war unfolding on our near horizon.

 

This briefing pack contains 2 hours of teaching

 

Available in the following formats

 

DVD:

•1 Disc

•2 M4A Files

•Color, Fullscreen 16:9, Dolby Digital 2.0 stereo, Region. This DVD will be viewable in other countries WITH the proper DVD player and television set.)

 

DVD

PRICE  R 159.00

DVD

PRICE R 159.00

 

DVD

Price  R 159.00

 

DVD

Price R 159.00

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


Global Events Disaster Site


Extreme Weather, Epidemic, Terror Attack, Biological Hazard,

Volcano Eruption, Earthquake, Incidents at Sea

 

 

"In seasons of severe trial, the Christian has nothing on earth that he can trust to, and is therefore compelled to cast himself on God alone. When no human deliverance can avail, he must simply and entirely trust himself to the providence and care of God. Happy storm that wrecks a man on such a rock as this! O blessed hurricane that drives the soul to God--and God alone!"
- Spurgeon

 

 

 

***SPECIAL OFFER ***

The Hybrid Age  

BUY THE DVD

&

GET THE BOOK

 

ONLY

PRICE R199.00

THIS LINK ONLY

 

 

The Hybrid Age  


by Tom Horn and Chuck Missler

 
 
 
Price R 159.00
 
 

***In Stock ***

Forbidden Gates: How Genetics, Robotics, Artificial Intelligence, Synthetic Biology, Nanotechnology, and Human Enhancement Herald The Dawn Of TechnoDimensional Spiritual Warfare.
THE BOOK

 

Price R179.00

 

 

Book

While Forbidden Gates includes fresh insights for traditional, tried and true methods of overcoming darkness, it also unveils for the first time how breakthrough advances in science, technology, and philosophy—including cybernetics, bio-engineering, nanotechnology, machine intelligence, synthetic biology, and transhumanism—will combine to create mind-boggling game-changes to everything you have ever known about spiritual warfare.

In recent years, astonishing technological developments have pushed the frontiers of humanity toward far-reaching morphological transformation that promises in the very near future to redefine what it means to be human. An international, intellectual and fast-growing cultural movement known as transhumanism intends the use of genetics, robotics, artificial intelligence and nanotechnology (GRIN technologies) as tools that will radically redesign our minds, our memories, our physiology, our offspring, and even perhaps, as Joel Garreau in his bestselling book Radical Evolution claims, our very souls. The technological, cultural, and metaphysical shift now under way unapologetically forecasts a future dominated by this new species of unrecognizably superior humans, and applications under study now to make this dream reality are being funded by thousands of government and private research facilities around the world. As the reader will learn, this includes among other things rewriting human DNA and combining men with beasts, a fact that some university studies and transhumanists believe will not only alter our bodies and souls but could ultimately open a door to contact with unseen intelligence.

As a result, new modes of perception between things visible and invisible are expected to challenge the Church in ways that are historically and theologically unprecedented. Without comprehending what is quickly approaching in related disciplines of research and development, vast numbers of believers could be paralyzed by the most fantastic—and most far reaching—supernatural implications. The destiny of each individual—as well as the future of their family—will depend on their knowledge of the new paradigm and their preparedness to face it head on.

303 Pages


 

 

 

 

 

+27 11 969 0086


frosty@khouseafrica.com   

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


Bible

DVD

+

MP3 on CD-ROM
Featured Commentaries

Learn the Bible

 in 24 hours



Old Testament


Genesis

Exodus

Leviticus

Numbers

Deuteronomy

Joshua and The Twelve Tribes

Judges

Ruth and Esther

I and II Samuel

I and II Kings

I and II Chronicles

Ezra & Nehemiah

Job

Psalms

Proverbs

Ecclesiastes

Song of Songs

Isaiah

Jeremiah

/Lamentations

Ezekiel

Daniel

Hosea

Joel and Amos

Jonah, Nahum & Obadiah

Micah

Zechariah

The Minor

Prophets

 



New Testament


Matthew

Mark

Luke

John

Acts

Romans

I & II Corinthians

Galatians

Ephesians

Philippians

Colossians and Philemon

I and II

Thessalonians

Timothy/

Titus/Philemon

Hebrews

James

I and II Peter

I, II, and III John

Jude

Revelation