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Monitor The Strategic Trends

Biotech & Global Pestilence Introduction:

 

The threat of germ warfare has brought to the forefront long-forgotten diseases like plague, anthrax, and smallpox. Recent television news programs have highlighted secret projects in the former Soviet Union to develop antibiotic-resistant strains of genetically engineered viruses and bacteria.


[READ THE FULL INTRODUCTION]

 

 


 
 

Human Nature

Speakers:

Ron Matsen

R179.00

 

 

 

About available formats

Description: 

What does it mean to be human? Philosophers, theologians, sociologists and psychologists have attempted to understand the nature of mankind for ages. Their conclusions often contradict each other which lead to confusion rather than clarification. Clearly Man is a very complicated social being. The Bible tells us that man is “fearfully and wonderfully made.”
  • How do we understand our makeup and does it make a difference?
  • What is the meaning of being “created in the image of God?”
  • What causes our natural responses and can we change this behaviour?

Join Ron Matsen from the Executive Briefing Room of the River Lodge, New Zealand as he explores the subject of our “Human Nature” and gives insight into the architecture and accountability of all mankind.

This briefing pack contains approx. 2 hours of teaching.

  • DVD discs
  • M4A files
  • PDF Notes file
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Dedicated Page

 

 

 

Price R 179

 

 

 

 

Beginning of Wisdom

 

by

 Dr. Chuck Missler

“The fear of God is the beginning of wisdom.” Proverbs 9:10

But how do we balance the awesome majesty due to the Creator and Ruler of the universe with the gracious family intimacy that is now available to us through the completed work of Christ?

What does His Holiness demand of us, personally?

What are the hazards of failing to render the Almighty His due, while availing ourselves the riches committed to us of the precious promises in His Word?

How do we deal with these paramount issues facing us daily in practical challenges?

Chuck Missler grapples with these wildly misunderstood tensions with down-to-earth frankness and Biblically-based candor.

 


 

 

Price R 179.00

 

 

The Gospel: The Message of Reconciliation

DVD

by Ron Matsen 

 

 

 

Price R 179.00

 

 

 

Description

One of the last instructions given by Jesus to the Church was, “Go into all the world and preach the gospel.” (Mark 16:15)

The fact is most Christians don’t know how to share their faith effectively. Sadly, many of the people they know in the world today are wandering around, lost and without hope, having never heard the wonderful Message of Reconciliation.

How would you answer the question, “What must I do to be saved?”

What are the essential facts, demands and promises of the Gospel?

Why are we told to evangelize?

Join Ron Matsen in the Executive Briefing Room of the River Lodge, New Zealand as he explores the subject of “The Gospel – The Message of Reconciliation” and gives practical insight into how to share the essential doctrines of salvation.

This briefing pack contains 2 hours of teaching

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Koinonia Institute presents its 2014 Strategic Perspectives IX Conference in Coeur d' Alene, Idaho on DVD, intel and insight to understand the times.


DVD Set - 10 discs
Run time approximately 21 Hours
Dr. Chuck Missler: The Spiritual Entrepreneur
L.A. Marzulli: On the Trail of the Nephilim
Bill Salus: Nuclear Showdown in Iran: Revealing the Ancient Prophecy of Elam
Mark Biltz: The Blood Moons
Joseph Farah: ISIS SHMISIS: God's Mideast Peace Plan
Bob Cornuke: Amazing New Discoveries that Change Everything about the Location of Solomon's Temple
Louis Powell: China - The Sleeping Dragon
Ron Matsen: The Re-emergence of Assyria


Also featuring: Trevor MacDuff, Chris Corlett, Jeff Altus, Gordon McDonald, William Welty, Avi Lipkin, Dan Stolebarger, Kings Highway/Debbie Holland, Steve Elwart, John Loeffler, and Jay Seegert

 

Price R799.00

 

 

 
Diseases/Conditions News Headlines - Yahoo! News

 

Use sunscreen urges actor Hugh Jackman after cancer removed

 
‎09 ‎February ‎2016, ‏‎08:37:40 AMGo to full article
Use sunscreen urges actor Hugh Jackman after cancer removedAustralian movie star Hugh Jackman has again undergone treatment for skin cancer, urging people Tuesday to wear sunscreen and have regular check-ups. The 47-year-old first had a basal cell carcinoma removed in 2013 after his wife Deborra-Lee Furness told him to get a mark on his nose checked. "An example of what happens when you don't wear sunscreen," he tweeted, alongside a photo of himself with a plaster over his nose.
 
 

U.S. panel reaffirms depression screening for adolescents

 
‎09 ‎February ‎2016, ‏‎02:17:20 AMGo to full article
By Andrew M. Seaman (Reuters Health) - Adolescents between 12 and 18 years old in the U.S. should be screened for depression, according to guidelines reaffirmed by a government-backed panel of prevention experts. "From a parent's perspective, I think it’s important for them to know that depression can be relatively common in adolescence and we have ways to treat it," said Dr. Alex Krist, a member of the U.S. Preventive Services Task Force (USPSTF) and professor at Virginia Commonwealth University in Richmond. The USPSTF says about 8 percent of U.S. adolescents experience major depression each year.
 

U.S. researchers find new bacteria that causes Lyme disease

 
‎08 ‎February ‎2016, ‏‎11:38:25 PMGo to full article
A deer tick, or blacklegged tick, Ixodes scapularis, is seen on a blade of grass in this undated picture from the Centers for Disease Control and PreventionBy David Beasley ATLANTA (Reuters) - Researchers have discovered a new bacteria that causes Lyme disease in humans, a U.S. health agency said Monday. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, working with the Mayo Clinic and health officials from Minnesota, Wisconsin and North Dakota, discovered the new bacteria, called Borrelia mayonii, the CDC said in a statement. Previously, only one bacteria, Borrelia burgdorferi, was believed to cause human Lyme disease, which is transmitted through bites from by the blacklegged "deer" tick, the CDC statement said.
 
 

Hugh Jackman has another skin cancer growth removed

 
‎08 ‎February ‎2016, ‏‎09:31:40 PMGo to full article
Australian actor Hugh Jackman arrives at the "Tai Hang Fire Dragon Dance" event to celebrate Mid-Autumn Festival during a trip to promote his latest film "Pan" in Hong Kong, China(Reuters) - "X-Men" star Hugh Jackman said on Monday he had another skin cancer growth removed from his nose, and urged people to wear sunscreen. Jackman, 47, posted a photo on his Instagram account, showing a bandage across his nose. It was the Australian actor's 5th known basal cell carcinoma removal since 2013.
 
 

The Cancer Moonshot Could Depend Most on You

 
‎08 ‎February ‎2016, ‏‎08:45:18 PMGo to full article
The Cancer Moonshot Could Depend Most on YouIn his State of the Union address, President Barack Obama announced that Vice President Joe Biden would lead an effort toward a "moonshot" cure for cancer. More recently, Vice President Biden met with health care leaders at the World Economic Forum in Davos to build momentum for the initiative, and later will meet with agency officials and...
 
 

Bananas may help detect, cure skin cancer: study

 
‎08 ‎February ‎2016, ‏‎08:28:10 PMGo to full article
Scientists find that the black spots on old banana peels may unlock a faster, easier diagnosis of human skin cancerThe black spots on old banana peels may unlock a faster, easier diagnosis of human skin cancer, boosting survival chances, scientists said Monday. When bananas ripen, their skin is covered in small, round black spots caused by an enzyme known as tyrosinase. The same enzyme is present in human skin, and in greater quantities in people suffering from melanoma -- a potentially deadly form of skin cancer.
 
 

5 Foods That May Help Lower Your Cancer Risk

 
‎08 ‎February ‎2016, ‏‎06:32:44 PMGo to full article
Also on HuffPost:
 

Drop in prostate cancer screening reveals split among doctors

 
‎08 ‎February ‎2016, ‏‎06:12:17 PMGo to full article
By Lisa Rapaport (Reuters Health) - - After U.S. guidelines advised against routine tests, declines in prostate cancer screening have been sharper among primary care doctors than urologists, according to a new study that suggests the medical community remains divided over the best way to look for these tumors. The next year, testing rates for prostate cancer among men aged 50 to 74 years old dropped to about 16 percent among primary care physicians, from roughly 37 percent in 2010 before new guidelines took effect. “There is much evidence that men with limited life expectancy do not benefit from PSA testing, and I think experts can agree on that,” said senior study author Dr. Quoc-Dien Trinh, a urologist at Brigham and Women’s Hospital in Boston.
 

Some Australian asylum seekers to be deported have cancer, terminal illnesses

 
‎08 ‎February ‎2016, ‏‎11:45:39 AMGo to full article
Michael Pezzullo, Secretary of the department of immigration and border protection, is spoken to by a department officer during his appearance at an Australian Senate Estimates Committee in Parliament House, CanberraBy Matt Siegel SYDNEY (Reuters) - Some of the 267 asylum seekers Australia wants to deport to an offshore immigration center following a court ruling are suffering from cancer and other terminal illnesses, a senior government official said on Monday. Australia's High Court last week upheld the government's right to deport detained asylum seekers to the tiny South Pacific island of Nauru, about 3,000 km (1,800 miles) northeast of Australia. The decision provoked criticism from the United Nations and sparked protest, with church leaders offering asylum seekers sanctuary.
 
 

Duchess of Cambridge: Support children's mental health

 
‎08 ‎February ‎2016, ‏‎02:02:45 AMGo to full article
Britain's Kate, the Duchess of Cambridge smiles as she attends a service at RAF church St Clement Danes, to mark the 75th anniversary year of the RAF Air Cadets, in London, Sunday, Feb. 7, 2016. (Eddie Mulholland/Pool Photo via AP)LONDON (AP) — The Duchess of Cambridge says in a new video that she and Prince William want all children to get support during difficult times to help them overcome mental health challenges.

 

 

Supernus beats Allergan over epilepsy drug patents

 
‎05 ‎February ‎2016, ‏‎10:43:01 PMGo to full article
The Allergan logo is seen in this photo illustration in Singapore(Reuters) - A federal judge on Friday said Allergan Plc's plan to sell a generic version of a drug meant to treat epilepsy infringed patents belonging to Supernus Pharmaceuticals Inc. Supernus shares rose as much as 44 percent. In a 136-page decision, U.S. District Judge Renée Marie Bumb in Camden, New Jersey said the proposed generic version of Oxtellar XR infringed two of three Supernus patents in question. Oxtellar XR is a tablet used to treat partial epilepsy seizures in adults and children over the age of six.
 
 

What It's Like When a Dermatologist Gets Skin Cancer

 
‎05 ‎February ‎2016, ‏‎07:44:00 PMGo to full article
Vivian Bucay is a dermatologist in San Antonio and a melanoma survivor whose disease progressed from stage 3 to stage 4 in a matter of months. Here, she shares her story.As told to Elizabeth Siegel, AllureVivan Bucay photographed by Marie LangmoreThe possibility of cancer wasn't on my radar. Ironic, I know, since I'm a dermatologist. But when I...
 

Behavioral factors linked to half of postmenopausal breast cancer cases, study finds

 
‎05 ‎February ‎2016, ‏‎06:12:40 PMGo to full article
Over half of breast cancer cases (53.5%) diagnosed after the menopause could be avoided though appropriate changes in behavior.A French study carried out at the Insistut Gustave Roussy in Villejuif and published in the International Journal of Cancer has found that half of postmenopausal breast cancer cases can be attributed to behavioral factors such as poor diet, alcohol consumption and being overweight. The research showed that more than half (53.5%) of breast cancer cases diagnosed after menopause could have been avoided through changes in behavior at this stage of life. Postmenopausal women could reduce the risk of developing breast cancer by 50% by eating a healthy, balanced diet, limiting alcohol to one glass per day and maintaining a healthy weight (a body mass index equal to or lower than 25kg/ sq m), a new study has found.
 
 

Michigan emails show officials knew of Flint water disease risk

 
‎05 ‎February ‎2016, ‏‎02:35:21 AMGo to full article
The front of the Flint Water Plant is seen in Flint,(Reuters) - Emails between high-ranking Michigan state officials show they knew about an uptick in Legionnaires' disease and it could be linked to problems with Flint water long before Governor Rick Snyder said he got information on the outbreak. A spokesman for Snyder rejected the report by the liberal group Progress Michigan on Thursday. Emails obtained by the group show Snyder's principal aide, Harvey Hollins, was made aware of the outbreak and a possible link to the use of Flint River water last March.
 
 

Many cancer survivors face increased risk of heart disease

 
‎04 ‎February ‎2016, ‏‎09:56:04 PMGo to full article
By Lisa Rapaport (Reuters Health) - Many adult cancer survivors face an increased risk of heart disease, worsening their long-term survival odds beyond the effect of tumors alone, a U.S. study suggests. In a study of about 110,000 people, survivors of certain cancers – including tumors in the lung, ovaries, bone marrow and lymph system – had a significantly higher risk of cardiovascular disease than individuals with no history of malignancies, the study found. Among the 36,000 cancer survivors in the study, just 60 percent of the those who developed cardiovascular disease survived after eight years, compared with 81 percent of cancer patients without heart problems.
 

What One Woman Learned About Life From Her Cancer Diagnosis

 
‎04 ‎February ‎2016, ‏‎09:23:01 PMGo to full article
What do people learn about life after being diagnosed with cancer? originally appeared on Quora - the knowledge sharing network where compelling questions are answered by people with unique insights. Answer by Katherine Killoran, M.D., physician, cancer survivor, on Quora.I found the lump. I was not looking for it, but I knew something was...
 

Johnson & Johnson, ViaCyte testing possible diabetes cure

 
‎04 ‎February ‎2016, ‏‎10:25:48 AMGo to full article
This photo provided by ViaCyte shows the Encaptra delivery system, placed next to a quarter to give a size perspective. Johnson & Johnson, continuing its long quest for a type 1 diabetes cure, has agreed that biotech company ViaCyte can acquire BetaLogics' assets to speed development of the first cell treatment that could fix the life-threatening disorder. The Encaptra delivery system contains precursor pancreatic cells that are implanted under the skin and mature into insulin-producing cells. (ViaCyte via AP)Johnson & Johnson, continuing its long quest for a Type 1 diabetes cure, is joining forces with biotech company ViaCyte to speed development of the first stem cell treatment that could fix the life-threatening hormonal disorder.
 

 

 

Parents' depression may affect kids' school performance

 
‎04 ‎February ‎2016, ‏‎01:06:21 AMGo to full article
By Andrew M. Seaman (Reuters Health) - Children perform worse in school when their parents are diagnosed with depression, suggests a study from Sweden. The study found a significant negative link between parents' depression and kids' school performance, said senior author Brian Lee, of the Drexel University School of Public Health in Philadelphia. "We obviously know that depression is a bad thing like any other mental health outcome," Lee said.
 

Natural Happiness: The Truth About Exercise and Depression

 
‎03 ‎February ‎2016, ‏‎11:19:23 PMGo to full article
Natural Happiness: The Truth About Exercise and DepressionWe all want to be happy.But is there anything you can actually do to feel happier more often? Or at the very least... can you limit the likelihood that you'll feel sad and depressed?There isn't a single perfect answer, of course, but research is starting to reveal the incredible connection between our physical actions and our mental health. In...
 
 

What You Ate In High School Could Affect Your Breast Cancer Risk Level

 
‎03 ‎February ‎2016, ‏‎09:49:42 PMGo to full article
What You Ate In High School Could Affect Your Breast Cancer Risk LevelBy Alison Feller for Well+GOODRemember the high school cafeteria, where lunch was a rotation of cafeteria pizza (ick) and Lunchables (double ick), served alongside the latest gossip? While we can barely remember what we ate last week--let alone a decade ago--let's hope our brown-bagged school meals came with a side of bran, broccoli, beans, or...
 
 

Artificial pancreas works for teens with type 1 diabetes

 
‎03 ‎February ‎2016, ‏‎08:42:45 PMGo to full article
By Lisa Rapaport (Reuters Health) - An experimental “artificial pancreas” that pairs with a smartphone to monitor blood sugar and automatically deliver insulin may work better for teens with type 1 diabetes than using separate products already on the market, a small study suggests. Researchers tested the artificial pancreas, formally known as a closed-loop insulin delivery system, in a group of 12 young diabetics around the clock for a week and then compared how well it worked relative to another week when they used separate devices to monitor glucose and pump insulin. With the artificial pancreas, the teens had significantly lower average blood sugar levels of 8.7 mmol/liter (about 157 mg/deciliter), compared to 10.1 mmol/L (182 mg/dl) with the separate devices.
 

Higher temperatures make Zika mosquito spread disease more

 
‎03 ‎February ‎2016, ‏‎08:04:05 PMGo to full article
FILE - In this Jan. 28, 2016, file photo, three-month-old Daniel, who was born with microcephaly, undergoes physical therapy at the Altino Ventura foundation in Recife, Brazil. The mosquito behind the Zika virus seems to operate like a heat-driven missile of disease. Scientists say the hotter it gets, the better the mosquito that carries Zika virus is at transmitting a variety of dangerous illnesses. (AP Photo/Felipe Dana, File)WASHINGTON (AP) — In its brief lifespan, the mosquito that carries the Zika virus is caught in a race: Will it pass the disease to humans before it dies?
 
 

World Cancer Day: Foods to add to your diet to boost prevention efforts

 
‎03 ‎February ‎2016, ‏‎06:10:34 PMGo to full article
World Cancer Day: Foods to add to your diet to boost prevention effortsMany recent studies have shown the important role our diet plays in everyday health, and in the prevention of cancer. A large study published last month which looked at over 90,000 women found that eating a high-fiber diet in early adulthood, which included plenty of fruit and vegetables, could lower the risk of breast cancer in later life by 12 to 19% compared to those who ate much less or no dietary fiber at all. A 2015 American study also found that fiber can be beneficial, with the study's results suggesting that prostate cancer patients can improve their chances of survival by following a Mediterranean-style diet full of fruit, vegetables and fiber.
 
 

Brain scans to catch depression before it starts

 
‎03 ‎February ‎2016, ‏‎05:06:52 PMGo to full article
According to the World Health Organization an estimated 350 million people of all ages suffer from depression. The study involved two groups of children, one at high risk of depression due to family history and a control group with kids at low risk.  Kids from both groups were scanned to map the network pathways in their brains. The question was if the researchers could find differences in brain activity that would be an indicator for a higher risk of depression.    "They answer is there are very great differences.
 

Sedentary time increases the risk of developing type 2 diabetes

 
‎03 ‎February ‎2016, ‏‎01:55:59 PMGo to full article
Sedentary time increases the risk of developing type 2 diabetesA Dutch study has found that for each hour spent sitting down, the risk of developing Type 2 diabetes increases by 22%. To assess for diabetes and normal and impaired glucose metabolism, participants took an oral glucose tolerance test. Of the 2497 participants, 1,395 (56%) participants had a normal glucose metabolism, 388 (15%) had an impaired glucose metabolism and 714 (29%) had type 2 diabetes.
 
 

Less than half of U.S. kids under age two fully vaccinated against flu

 
‎03 ‎February ‎2016, ‏‎12:01:02 AMGo to full article
By Lisa Rapaport (Reuters Health) - Less than half of children under age 2 years are fully vaccinated against influenza despite a dramatic surge in immunization rates over the past decade, a U.S. study finds. Among infants aged 6 to 23 months, 45 percent were fully vaccinated in the 2011-2012 flu season. While that far exceeds the 5 percent vaccination rate in the 2002-2003 season, it still leaves many infants and toddlers exposed to a virus that can lead to hospitalizations, pneumonia and even death.
 

Fertility issues for cancer patients can also bring legal headaches

 
‎02 ‎February ‎2016, ‏‎09:53:05 PMGo to full article
By Lisa Rapaport (Reuters Health) - Reproductive technology has made it easier for cancer survivors to start families despite being infertile after treatment, but some patients may still find their future parenthood plans dashed by legal complications, says a group of U.S. doctors and lawyers. Some tumors, and many types of chemotherapy and radiation, can leave cancer patients infertile. Often, patients can postpone initial cancer treatments for a few weeks to pursue fertility preservation efforts, which might include egg or embryo freezing for women and sperm banking for men.

 

Sanofi launches hunt for Zika vaccine as disease fears grow

 
‎02 ‎February ‎2016, ‏‎10:42:30 AMGo to full article
The Sanofi logo is seen at the company's Sanofi Pasteur headquarters in LyonBy Dominique Vidalon and Ben Hirschler PARIS/LONDON (Reuters) - Sanofi has launched a project to develop a vaccine against the Zika virus in the most decisive commitment yet by a major vaccine producer to fight the disease linked to multiple birth defects in Brazil. The French drugmaker said on Tuesday its Sanofi Pasteur vaccines division would use its expertise in developing vaccines for similar viruses such as yellow fever, Japanese encephalitis and, most recently, dengue. The move comes a day after the World Health Organization declared the mosquito-borne Zika virus to be an international public health emergency due to its link to underdeveloped brains in some babies.
 
 

Price tag for Biden cancer 'moonshot' at $1B in Obama budget

 
‎02 ‎February ‎2016, ‏‎02:42:02 AMGo to full article
WASHINGTON (AP) — President Barack Obama will ask Congress for $755 million for cancer research in his upcoming budget, the White House said Monday, bringing the total price tag for Vice President Joe Biden's cancer "moonshot" to $1 billion.
 

Health workers sent to north Uganda as malaria epidemic kills over 650

 
‎02 ‎February ‎2016, ‏‎02:15:16 AMGo to full article
By Evelyn Lirri KAMPALA (Thomson Reuters Foundation) - Uganda dispatched a team of more than 370 health workers to the northern part of the country on Monday where a malaria epidemic ravaging the region since July has killed about 658 people. Uganda reported an unusual outbreak of malaria in the north of the country in July, which health officials say has affected one million people from a population of about 39 million. Uganda has one of the highest rates of malaria in Africa, with some 100,000 deaths, mostly pregnant women and children under five, and 16 million cases a year, according to the country's Ministry of Health.
 

Dietary fiber in teen years may lower later breast cancer risk

 
‎02 ‎February ‎2016, ‏‎12:03:38 AMGo to full article
By Kathryn Doyle (Reuters Health) - For girls and young women, getting a lot of fiber could pay off decades later with lowered risk of developing breast cancer, according to a large U.S. study. Researchers analyzed data on more than 44,000 women participating in a long-term study and found those who ate the most fiber during high school and early adulthood were about 20 percent less likely to develop breast cancer by middle age than those who ate the least fiber in their youth. There’s reason to believe that dietary fiber could affect developing breasts in ways that impact long-term cancer risk, but no one has ever followed-up over such a long period, the authors note in the journal Pediatrics.
 

Colombia fears 'explosion' of nerve disease from Zika

 
‎01 ‎February ‎2016, ‏‎08:41:22 PMGo to full article
Health Secretariat workers fumigate against the Aedes Aegypti mosquito, which transmits the Zika virus, in Cucuta, Colombia, on January 30, 2016Colombia fears an explosion in cases of the potentially paralyzing nervous disorder Guillain-Barre syndrome, linked to the mosquito-borne Zika virus that is devastating Latin America, the government said Monday. Health Minister Alejandro Gaviria said he expected more than 1,500 cases of Guillain-Barre in the South American country, one of the worst hit by Zika. Scientists suspect Guillain-Barre is linked to Zika, which is also blamed for brain damage in newborn babies, though the World Health Organization says neither link has yet been proven.
 
 

White House wants $1 billion to fund cancer 'moonshot'

 
‎01 ‎February ‎2016, ‏‎07:56:26 PMGo to full article
"We're calling it a 'Moonshot,' and that's because I believe that this effort, like president Kennedy's call to land on the moon 55 years ago, is truly a call to humankind -- to be bold and do big things," Biden said in a statement about the White House task force to end cancerThe White House said Monday it wants $1 billion to "jump-start" a new task force to end cancer, known as the Moonshot initiative headed by Vice President Joe Biden. Already $195 million has been allocated to the National Institutes of Health so that work on new cancer research can begin immediately, a senior administration official told reporters. President Barack Obama's proposal for the fiscal year 2017 budget, being released February 9, will seek to add another $755 million for new cancer research at the NIH and US Food and Drug Administration.
 
 

Obama to seek $755 million for cancer 'moonshot': White House

 
‎01 ‎February ‎2016, ‏‎07:33:26 PMGo to full article
Obama speaks at the Lilly Ledbetter Fair Pay Act event in WashingtonBy Roberta Rampton WASHINGTON (Reuters) - President Barack Obama will ask Congress for $755 million in his budget next week to jumpstart cancer research in a "moonshot" push to find cancer cures and treatments, the White House said on Monday. Vice President Joe Biden, whose son Beau died from brain cancer last year, is leading a push to bring together private and public researchers to accelerate their work on cancer, which will kill an estimated 600,000 Americans this year. "With something as big of cancer, we have to think big.
 
 

New $65 million anti-malaria push to protect 50 million through affordable home spray

 
‎01 ‎February ‎2016, ‏‎03:37:49 PMGo to full article
A new $65 million initiative to boost malaria control and combat resistance to insecticides by improving access to new, low-cost anti-mosquito sprays across Africa was announced on Monday. The initiative by the health agency UNITAID and non-profit group IVCC will be rolled out over four years with a goal of protecting as many as 50 million people in 16 African countries. Although effective in fighting malaria, the indoor spraying of walls has fallen by 40 percent in the past four years due to increased resistance to older products and high cost of new alternatives, UNITAID and IVCC said.

 

 

Tendon pain linked to type 2 diabetes

 
‎29 ‎January ‎2016, ‏‎11:07:43 PMGo to full article
By Shereen Lehman (Reuters Health) - Exercise is important to managing type 2 diabetes, but the condition may also make a person prone to tendon pain, which can interfere with exercise, researchers say. Based on an analysis of past studies, researchers found that people with type 2 diabetes are more than three times as likely as those without the disease to have tendon pain, known as tendinopathy. “People with diabetes are more likely to develop tendinopathy, but the opposite is also true - people with tendinopathy are more likely to have undiagnozed diabetes,” Jamie Gaida told Reuters Health in an email.
 

Express Scripts drops coverage of Valeant diabetes drug Glumetza

 
‎29 ‎January ‎2016, ‏‎10:50:27 PMGo to full article
Express Scripts Holding Co, the U.S. No. 1 pharmacy benefits manager, said on Friday it would stop covering Glumetza, a diabetes drug made by Valeant Pharmaceuticals International Inc, after a generic competitor enters the market on Feb. 1. Express Scripts, which will exclude about 80 drugs from its list of covered medicines in 2016, made the addition in an announcement on its website. Valeant signed a deal with Walgreens Boots Alliance Inc late last year to sell its drugs directly to patients.
 

A single cell's change gives insight on cancer's origin

 
‎29 ‎January ‎2016, ‏‎09:54:17 PMGo to full article
Researchers have for the first time witnessed how a single cell can change and give rise to cancer, raising hopes that scientists may discover a way to stop tumors before they startResearchers have for the first time witnessed how a single cell can change and give rise to cancer, raising hopes that scientists may discover a way to stop tumors before they start. Described Friday in the journal Science, the study was led by doctors at Boston Children's Hospital and is based on zebrafish that developed melanoma. When a cell reverted to a stem-cell state and began dividing, it became cancer, researchers found.
 
 

How Zika Reveals Our Vulnerability To Many Diseases

 
‎29 ‎January ‎2016, ‏‎06:56:53 PMGo to full article
How Zika Reveals Our Vulnerability To Many DiseasesLike everyone else who has heard the news about it, I find the rapid spread of the Zika virus extremely alarming. The newly recognized capacity of this virus, which historically has caused mild, self-limited infections in adults, to induce microcephaly, a terrible birth defect, is nothing less than devastating. To date, Brazil has borne the...
 
 

FDA approves Eisai's drug Halaven for type of soft tissue cancer

 
‎29 ‎January ‎2016, ‏‎06:19:01 PMGo to full article
(Reuters) - The U.S. Food and Drug Administration approved Eisai Co Ltd's drug derived from sea sponge for a rare type of soft tissue cancer. The drug, Halaven, was approved for use in patients who have undergone chemotherapy with drugs derived from a type of bacteria, the FDA said on Thursday. Halaven, derived from a marine sponge called Halichondria okadai, was approved in 2010 for treating advanced breast cancer.
 

Maternal obesity, diabetes tied to increased autism risk in kids

 
‎29 ‎January ‎2016, ‏‎07:20:30 AMGo to full article
By Lisa Rapaport (Reuters Health) - Mothers who are obese during pregnancy have almost twice the odds of having a child with autism as women who weigh less, a U.S. study suggests. When women are both obese and have diabetes, the autism risk for their child is at least quadrupled, researchers report in the journal Pediatrics. “In terms of absolute risk, compared to common pediatric diseases such as obesity and asthma, the rate of autism spectrum disorder (ASD) in the U.S. population is relatively low, however, the personal, family and societal impact of ASD is enormous,” said senior study author Dr. Xiaobin Wang, a public health and pediatrics researcher at Johns Hopkins University in Baltimore.
 

DuPont faces 40 trials a year over cancer tied to Teflon chemical

 
‎29 ‎January ‎2016, ‏‎01:18:30 AMGo to full article
The Dupont logo is displayed on a board above the floor of the New York Stock Exchange shortly after the opening bell in New YorkBy Jessica Dye NEW YORK (Reuters) - Chemical maker DuPont will face 40 trials a year starting April 2017 involving plaintiffs who say they developed cancer from a toxic chemical used to make Teflon that leaked from one of the company’s plants in West Virginia. The schedule laid out by U.S. District Judge Edmund Sargus in the Southern District of Ohio during a hearing Wednesday is aimed at pushing the parties closer to resolving more than 3,550 lawsuits. The outcome could have a material impact on Chemours Co , since liability for litigation connected with the chemical C-8 was passed on to the firm spun-off by DuPont in 2015.
 
 

U.S. on high alert for bird flu after Indiana poultry outbreak

 
‎28 ‎January ‎2016, ‏‎10:23:03 PMGo to full article
Undated USDA handout photo of avian influenza virus being harvested from a chicken egg as part of a diagnostic processIn the two weeks since bird flu reappeared in Indiana, U.S. veterinarians have swabbed the mouths of chickens and turkeys across the country, racing to uncover any more infections and contain the virus before it causes mass death and damage like last year. Biologists also are running tests on feces collected from wild birds, which are suspected of spreading the disease to farms. The U.S. Department of Agriculture confirmed on Jan. 15 that a turkey flock in Dubois County, Indiana, was infected with the H7N8 strain of the virus.
 
 

Turning Breast Cancer Into a Beautiful Detour: A Bold Survivor's Story

 
‎28 ‎January ‎2016, ‏‎09:45:10 PMGo to full article
Sometimes all it takes is a story to let us know we're capable of turning our lives around. Perhaps we just need to get over that hump, or we're craving that tender nudge that pushes us in the right direction, even if it's headed uphill. When I was going through ten years of trauma, I was in isolation. I bounced from surgery to surgery, and...
 

Roche expects cancer treatments to be spared U.S. pricing curbs

 
‎28 ‎January ‎2016, ‏‎04:59:42 PMGo to full article
Swiss drugmaker Roche's logo is seen at their headquarters in BaselBy John Miller BASEL, Switzerland (Reuters) - The U.S. Congress may intervene on how much companies can charge for some drugs following a move last year by Turing Pharmaceuticals to ratchet up the price of a treatment for deadly parasite infections by 5,000 percent, Roche's head of pharmaceuticals said. Roche's Dan O'Day is convinced the oncology portfolio at the world's biggest maker of cancer drugs will not be affected, arguing it offers innovative treatments for diseases with few other options. O'Day acknowledged Turing's price hike for Daraprim had galvanized U.S. public concern as well as political will to tackle drugmakers who are perceived as abusing pricing power to gouge patients.

 

 

Incyte stops tests on Jakafi to treat colorectal cancer

 
‎28 ‎January ‎2016, ‏‎12:54:07 AMGo to full article
(Reuters) - Incyte Corp said on Wednesday that it would stop a mid-stage study on its combination treatment after it failed to prove to be sufficiently effective to treat metastatic colorectal cancer. The results cast a shadow on the prospects of the drug, Jakafi, which is also being studied in a late-stage trial to treat advanced pancreatic cancer. Incyte's shares fell nearly 12 percent to $65.50 in extended trading.
 

Adding behavioral therapy to meds reduces depression long-term

 
‎27 ‎January ‎2016, ‏‎10:01:47 PMGo to full article
By Kathryn Doyle (Reuters Health) - When depression does not respond to antidepressant medication, replacing it with cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) or adding CBT to treatment may be effective and last for several years, according to a trial in the U.K. Three to five years after having up to 18 CBT sessions, trial participants were less depressed than those who didn’t get the added behavioral therapy, suggesting a long-term benefit that makes CBT cost-effective, the authors conclude. “Antidepressants are often prescribed for people with depression but we know that many people do not respond fully to such treatment,” said lead author Nicola J. Wiles of the Center for Academic Mental Health at the University of Bristol.
 

Double flu blow forces Saint Petersburg school closures

 
‎27 ‎January ‎2016, ‏‎07:45:55 PMGo to full article
A woman wears a face mask while riding inside a train coach in the Moscow Metro, on January 27, 2016An outbreak of swine flu has claimed some 22 lives in Russia's second city Saint Petersburg and combined with high rates of seasonal flu to force authorities to close schools and send residents flocking to pharmacies. Saint Petersburg has recorded the highest number of swine flu deaths in an outbreak that has claimed some 80 victims nationwide since the start of the winter, according to AFP calculations based on statements by regional officials. Authorities say there are treating some 12,000 people with flu symptoms every day and up to 80 percent of these cases could be swine flu, also known as the H1N1 virus.
 
 

Former Giants safety suffered from brain disease: report

 
‎27 ‎January ‎2016, ‏‎03:59:57 AMGo to full article
(Reuters) - Tyler Sash, who was cut by the New York Giants after several concussions and died of an accidental overdose of pain medications, suffered from the degenerative brain disease CTE, the New York Times reported on Tuesday. Sash, who was 27 when he died last September, is the latest in a tragic list of former NFL players found to have suffered from chronic traumatic encephalopathy, or CTE, which is linked to repeated head trauma. A sixth-round draft pick of the Giants in 2011, Sash was primarily a reserve for the team during two seasons with the club, including the Super Bowl-winning campaign in the NFL's 2011 campaign.
 

What Cancer Taught Me About Business

 
‎26 ‎January ‎2016, ‏‎10:24:33 PMGo to full article
What Cancer Taught Me About BusinessAbout 16 years ago I was lying under a bench press in the basement gym of my parent's home when I felt a lump about the size of a golf ball. I was not the least bit alarmed - lumps are normal when living a very active lifestyle. It wasn't until about six months later when I was in Houston, Texas having a completely unrelated surgery that I...
 
 

Cancer kills 7,500 daily in China

 
‎26 ‎January ‎2016, ‏‎10:18:07 PMGo to full article
Lung cancer is the leading cause of cancer death in China, said the report published in CA: A Cancer Journal for CliniciansChronic infections, smoking and pollution have contributed to skyrocketing cases of cancer in China, with an estimated 4.3 million new diagnoses last year and 2.8 million deaths, researchers said Tuesday. Lung cancer is the leading cause of cancer death in China, said the report published in CA: A Cancer Journal for Clinicians and led by Wanqing Chen of the National Cancer Center in Beijing. The report described cancer as a major public health problem in China, where the population is about 1.37 billion.
 
 

Taking older drivers off the road tied to increased depression risk

 
‎26 ‎January ‎2016, ‏‎09:20:14 PMGo to full article
By Lisa Rapaport (Reuters Health) - When older drivers stop getting behind the wheel, they may be more likely to feel depressed and to develop other health problems than their peers who remain on the road, a research review suggests. Giving up the car keys was linked to an almost doubled risk of depression, the analysis found, a connection the researchers believe might be at least partly due to the social isolation or lack of independence that can ensue when elderly people can no longer get around by car. “The decision to stop driving is not trivial but has significant implications for the patient’s health, well-being and life expectancy,” said senior study author Dr. Guohua Li of the Mailman School of Public Health at Columbia University in New York City.
 

US urges screening adults for depression, including pregnant women

 
‎26 ‎January ‎2016, ‏‎07:35:30 PMGo to full article
US Preventive Services Task Force called for all adults to be screened for depression, including women during and after pregnancyAn influential US panel on Tuesday called for all adults to be screened for depression, including women during and after pregnancy, marking the first time it has urged a focus on maternal mental health. The non-binding call was issued by the US Preventive Services Task Force, an independent, volunteer panel of experts that makes recommendations about the effectiveness of various health and counseling services. "The USPSTF found convincing evidence that screening improves the accurate identification of adult patients with depression in primary care settings, including pregnant and postpartum women," said the statement in the Journal of the American Medical Association.
 
 

Panel recommends depression screening for adults

 
‎26 ‎January ‎2016, ‏‎06:45:02 PMGo to full article
By Andrew M. Seaman (Reuters Health) - U.S. adults should be screened for depression, says an influential panel of government-backed experts. Screening for depression can ultimately help reduce or stop depression symptoms from coming back, lessen other healthcare needs and improve the health of pregnant or postpartum women with depression, according to the U.S. Preventive Services Task Force (USPSTF). After reviewing previous studies, the panel found that "if you just wait for patients to say they’re depressed, you miss a significant number of people who are depressed and would benefit from treatment," said Dr. Michael Pignone, a USPSTF member and professor at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill.
 

Task force urges doctors to screen all adults for depression

 
‎26 ‎January ‎2016, ‏‎06:38:52 PMGo to full article
WASHINGTON (AP) — All adults, including pregnant women and new mothers, should be screened for depression as a routine part of health care, a government advisory group recommended Tuesday.
 

At least 50 deadly swine flu cases reported in Russia

 
‎26 ‎January ‎2016, ‏‎08:59:50 AMGo to full article
A laboratory worker handles a vial containing swine flu virus in St. PetersburgAt least 50 people have died of swine flu in Russia since last month, according to AFP calculations based on data from regional health authorities, as the virus seems to gain ground in the country. Health authorities in the southern region of Rostov told RIA Novosti state news agency on Monday that an additional two people had succumbed to the virus, bringing the region's swine flu death toll to eight. Officials in the nearby Volgograd region meanwhile have said that at least 11 people have died of swine flu.
 
 

Nano-thin pressure sensor could aid breast cancer exams: study

 
‎25 ‎January ‎2016, ‏‎10:20:57 PMGo to full article
Pressure Sensor - University of Tokyo"Healthcare practitioners may one day be able to physically screen for breast cancer using pressure-sensitive rubber gloves to detect tumours," the researchers said in a statement before the publication. The sheet is so flexible it can detect pressure changes accurately even when twisted like cloth -- a development claimed as a global first. Many researchers are developing flexible pressure sensors but they are vulnerable when bent and twisted, which makes it difficult to detect pressure changes accurately, the Tokyo University and Harvard researchers say.
 
 

Healthcare IT firm Cerner's CEO diagnosed with cancer

 
‎25 ‎January ‎2016, ‏‎09:13:18 PMGo to full article
There was no evidence of the cancer elsewhere in his body, Patterson said in a note to shareholders on Monday. The Kansas City, Missouri-based company's shares were down about 1.27 percent at $56.65 on Monday. Goldman Sachs Group Inc Chief Executive Lloyd Blankfein disclosed in September that he had a "highly curable" form of cancer and would be able to work mostly as normal during treatment.
 

How Having Cancer Made Me Realize That Wellbeing Is About More Than Just My Physical Health

 
‎25 ‎January ‎2016, ‏‎06:53:20 PMGo to full article
How Having Cancer Made Me Realize That Wellbeing Is About More Than Just My Physical HealthPeople always ask me, "So how did you get into all this wellbeing stuff?"When I was 5 years old, I was diagnosed with Stage 3 Non-Hodgkin's Lymphoma. It was around Thanksgiving time. I was losing my appetite and losing weight. I started wheezing a lot and it was hard to breathe. I went from being a highly energetic kid, to asking my dad to...
 
 

Independent experts cast doubt on OncoMed's cancer drug

 
‎25 ‎January ‎2016, ‏‎05:41:40 PMGo to full article
OncoMed Pharmaceuticals Inc lost nearly half its market value after independent investigators informed the company that its pancreatic cancer drug was unlikely to meet the main goal in a mid-stage study. The investigators told OncoMed that while the drug, tarextumab, had a clean safety profile, they had observed worsening response rates in patients taking the treatment. The setback sent the company's shares down by as much 46 percent to a record-low of $9.45 on Monday.
 

Case seeking cancer screenings for smokers heads to trial

 
‎25 ‎January ‎2016, ‏‎04:23:41 PMGo to full article
BOSTON (AP) — A decade after a group of smokers from Massachusetts sued Philip Morris USA to try to force the cigarette maker to pay for lung cancer screenings, the case will finally be heard by a jury.
 

Britain and Bill Gates pledge 3 billion pounds to fight malaria

 
‎25 ‎January ‎2016, ‏‎12:42:16 PMGo to full article
Microsoft co-founder Bill Gates speaks as he sits with Britain's Chancellor George Osborne during a visit to the Liverpool School of Tropical Medicine in LiverpoolBritain will spend 500 million pounds ($700 million) per year for the next five years to try and end deaths caused by malaria, the government said on Monday, announcing a partnership with Microsoft founder Bill Gates worth a total of 3 billion pounds. Finance minister George Osborne announced the spending, which will be funded from the country's overseas aid budget, at an event with billionaire Gates, whose Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation will also contribute around $200 million per year to the package. "Across the globe over a billion people are infected with malaria and it's a cause of both untold misery and lost economic potential," Osborne said in a statement.

 

 

Britain and Bill Gates announce £3 billion to eradicate malaria

 
‎25 ‎January ‎2016, ‏‎08:35:41 AMGo to full article
There were 438,000 malaria deaths in 2015, most of them of children aged under five, and the majority of them in Africa, according to the World Health OrganizationBritain's finance minister and tech billionaire Bill Gates unveiled Monday a plan to spend billions to eradicate "the world's deadliest killer" malaria. Chancellor George Osborne and Gates announced £3 billion ($4.28 billion, 4 billion euros) in funding over the next five years for research and to support efforts to eliminate the mosquito-borne disease, in a joint article in The Times. The fund would be made up of £500 million a year from Britain's overseas aid budget for the next five years, as well as $200 million this year from The Gates Foundation, with more donations to follow.
 
 

FDA gives full approval to Amgen blood cancer drug

 
‎22 ‎January ‎2016, ‏‎12:30:06 AMGo to full article
An Amgen sign is seen at the company's office in South San Francisco(Reuters) - The U.S. Food and Drug Administration said on Thursday it has approved Amgen Inc's cancer drug Kyprolis in combination with certain other therapies to treat patients with multiple myeloma. The agency also approved the drug as a single agent for patients with relapsed or refractory multiple myeloma who have received one or more previous treatments. The decision converts to full approval an initial accelerated approval given to the drug in 2012 as a single agent, Amgen said.
 
 

Film gives look at Gleason's life with Lou Gehrig's disease

 
‎22 ‎January ‎2016, ‏‎12:29:14 AMGo to full article
In this Monday, Jan. 18, 2016, photo, former New Orleans Saints NFL football player Steve Gleason uses eye-tracking technology to communicate an answer during an interview in New Orleans. “GLEASON,” a feature-length documentary that gives an unfiltered look at his life with ALS premieres at the Sundance Film Festival on Saturday. (AP Photo/Jonathan Bachman)NEW ORLEANS (AP) — Former New Orleans Saints player Steve Gleason was never going to turn a film documenting his life with Lou Gehrig's disease into a sanitized, feel-good story of triumph in the face of tragedy.
 
 

Some older patients get unnecessary cancer screenings

 
‎21 ‎January ‎2016, ‏‎10:43:02 PMGo to full article
By Lisa Rapaport Some older patients may receive screening for breast or prostate cancer even though the tests aren’t recommended because they aren’t expected to live long enough to benefit from treatment, a U.S. study suggests. Screening isn’t advised for patients with a life expectancy of less than 10 years because even if tests find cancer, it probably won’t grow fast enough to kill them before something else like heart disease or diabetes does. “Evidence suggests that detection and treatment of early-stage tumors may reduce cancer mortality, but despite this potential benefit, screening programs also cause harm,” said lead study author Dr. Firas Abdollah of the Henry Ford Hospital in Detroit.
 

Targeted school closures might help fight pandemic flu

 
‎21 ‎January ‎2016, ‏‎09:10:39 PMGo to full article
By Lisa Rapaport In the event of another influenza pandemic, closing select schools or even just certain classrooms might limit social costs while slowing down spread of the disease more effectively than a nationwide shutdown, a new study estimates. Out of all the options explored, a nationwide school shutdown appeared to be the least effective response to pandemic influenza because it didn’t curb the rate of new cases more than targeted closures that start with just a classroom, grade level, single school or single county school system, the analysis found. “Our results show that targeted school closures can reduce the overall number of cases in the population, decrease the peak number of cases – which is the moment of maximum stress for the healthcare system during an epidemic – and postpone the epidemic peak – thus gaining time, for example, for producing and delivering a vaccine,” said lead study author Dr. Laura Fumanelli of the Bruno Kessler Foundation in Trento, Italy.
 

Alkermes depression drug fails, shares plunge

 
‎21 ‎January ‎2016, ‏‎07:51:58 PMGo to full article
Alkermes Plc's depression drug failed in two late-stage studies, underlining the challenges drugmakers face in developing treatments for the condition that affects nearly 17 million Americans. Alkermes shares fell as much as 42.8 percent on Thursday, wiping $3.88 billion from the company's market value. Drugmakers including Eli Lilly and Co and AstraZeneca Plc have struggled to develop a successful treatment for clinical depression, a condition with symptoms such as loss of interest in daily activities for at least two weeks.
 

Aerobic exercise could help slow the progression of Parkinson’s disease

 
‎21 ‎January ‎2016, ‏‎05:12:39 PMGo to full article
Vigorous aerobic exercise helps maintain brain connections and counters brain shrinkage and aging.A recent study led by Dr J. Eric Ahlskog, a neurobiologist at Mayo Clinic, USA, has found that aerobic exercise such as using an elliptical trainer or brisk walking may slow the progression of Parkinson's disease. In an editorial in the JAMA Neurology journal, American researchers recommend including vigorous aerobic fitness training as part of treatment for Parkinson's disease, a progressive disorder of the nervous system. Dr J. Eric Ahlskog, neurobiologist and author of "The New Parkinson's Disease Treatment Book," found that a level of exercise that makes patients hot, sweaty and tired boosts factors that may have a protective effect on the brain.
 
 

H1N1 swine flu kills 18 in Armenia, three in Georgia: officials

 
‎21 ‎January ‎2016, ‏‎11:49:11 AMGo to full article
Eighteen people have died from H1N1 swine flu in Armenia in the last two months, the country's health ministry said on Thursday, but it said there was no risk of a mass outbreak. It said on Jan. 13 that 10 people had died of swine flu in the same period, but on Thursday said the toll had now risen to 18. Separately, neighboring Georgia said on Thursday that swine flu had killed three people so far this year.
 

Lack of resilience as a teen tied to higher diabetes risk as an adult

 
‎20 ‎January ‎2016, ‏‎10:25:32 PMGo to full article
By Kathryn Doyle (Reuters Health) - Men who have low resistance to psychological stress at age 18 may face considerably higher risk for type 2 diabetes in adulthood compared to those better able to handle stress, according to new research. “Other studies have found that stressful life experiences in mid-adulthood are linked with a higher risk of developing diabetes,” said lead author Dr. Casey Crump of the Mount Sinai School of Medicine in New York. “Stress resilience refers to the ability to properly adapt to or cope with stress and adversity,” Crump, who was at Stanford University in California when he worked on the study, told Reuters Health by email.
 

Heart Failure Is the "Cancer" of Cardiovascular Disease

 
‎20 ‎January ‎2016, ‏‎09:48:27 PMGo to full article
Heart Failure Is the "Cancer" of Cardiovascular DiseaseAt a clinic I was working in last year, a patient of mine came in very short of breath. On asking her some question, examining her, and reviewing her file, it was clear she had heart failure. She had never really heard of heart failure and exclaimed, "at least it is not cancer." She desperately wanted to get better so she could go to her...
 
 

Heath Care vs. Disease Care

 
‎20 ‎January ‎2016, ‏‎09:09:07 PMGo to full article
Heath Care vs. Disease CareIn medicine, we don't tell you what is about to happen because we don't know. We react to illness and injury. We make diagnoses of diseases after they affect you, and treat injuries after you suffer from them. But what if a significant portion of our work was focused on testing you before you got sick or injured? We might develop exquisite...
 
 

Skin cancer more deadly when caught during pregnancy

 
‎20 ‎January ‎2016, ‏‎09:00:35 PMGo to full article
File photo of a woman holding her stomach at the last stages of her pregnancy in BordeauxBy Lisa Rapaport (Reuters Health) - Melanoma may be even more dangerous when it’s diagnosed in women during pregnancy or within a year of giving birth, a U.S. study suggests. Among women under 50 with malignant melanoma, those diagnosed during or soon after pregnancy were significantly more likely to have tumors spread to other organs and tissues, and were also much more likely to have the cancer recur after treatment, the study found. Women diagnosed around the time of pregnancy were also more likely to die, though the risk increase wasn’t big enough to rule out the possibility it was due to chance.
 
 

Director of Johns Hopkins Kimmel Cancer Center Explains What Makes Cancer So Hard To Cure

 
‎20 ‎January ‎2016, ‏‎08:23:07 PMGo to full article
Director of Johns Hopkins Kimmel Cancer Center Explains What Makes Cancer So Hard To CureThese Questions originally appeared on Quora - the knowledge sharing network where compelling questions are answered by people with unique insights. Answers by William G. Nelson, M.D., Ph.D., Director of the Johns Hopkins Kimmel Cancer Center, on Quora.Q: What makes cancer so hard to solve?A: Cancer is a collection of many diseases...

 

 

Biden pledges faster U.S. approval for cancer drug cocktails

 
‎19 ‎January ‎2016, ‏‎08:47:24 PMGo to full article
US Vice President Biden addresses the session "Cancer Moonshot: A Call to Action" during the annual meeting 2016 of the WEF in DavosBy Ben Hirschler DAVOS, Switzerland (Reuters) - U.S. Vice President Joe Biden said on Tuesday that the United States would speed up the approval of promising new drug combinations in his government's newly announced drive to cure cancer "once and for all". Biden, who lost his 46-year-old son Beau to brain cancer last year, set out his plans at a World Economic Forum meeting of international cancer experts in Davos, a week after being appointed to lead the initiative by President Barack Obama. Biden said he had hosted a meeting at his home with three unnamed large drug companies and the head of the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) at which both sides had pledged to do more to get novel cancer drug cocktails to patients.
 
 

Families happier with less aggressive end-of-life cancer care

 
‎19 ‎January ‎2016, ‏‎07:18:07 PMGo to full article
By Lisa Rapaport (Reuters Health) - Families may be more satisfied with end-of-life care for loved ones dying of cancer when treatment is focused on comfort rather than aggressive treatment and provided outside of a hospital, a U.S. study suggests. When patients received at least three days of hospice care focused on comfort and quality of life, 59 percent of their loved ones thought their treatment was excellent, compared with just 43 percent when patients received little or no hospice care, the study found. At the same time, family members of cancer patients admitted to an intensive care unit (ICU) in the last month of life reported excellent care just 45 percent of the time, compared with 52 percent when patients didn’t receive this type of aggressive treatment.
 

5 of the Most Critical Tips for Alzheimer's Caregivers

 
‎19 ‎January ‎2016, ‏‎06:24:14 PMGo to full article
5 of the Most Critical Tips for Alzheimer's CaregiversAround the country, millions of people are acting as Alzheimer's caregivers to special loved ones in their lives. This is a big responsibility, and a difficult undertaking for any individual. Unfortunately, so many people acting as caregivers to Alzheimer's patients have no formal caregiver training and they must sit and watch their loved one...
 
 

At least 17 deadly swine flu cases reported in Russia

 
‎19 ‎January ‎2016, ‏‎04:35:06 PMGo to full article
A swine flu outbreak which began in 2009 went on to kill some 18,500 people in 214 countries before the World Health Organisation declared the pandemic over in August 2010At least 17 people have died of swine flu in Russia since last month, according to AFP calculations based on statements from regional health authorities, as the virus appears to gain ground in the country. "Five people have died from the H1N1 virus in Saint Petersburg," the spokeswoman for local health authorities, Maria Khitarishvili, told AFP on Tuesday. Local authorities in Russia's second-largest city said that 313 people had been hospitalised with the virus in the last 10 days.
 
 

Study quantifies faulty gene's role in ovary cancer risk

 
‎19 ‎January ‎2016, ‏‎10:55:01 AMGo to full article
Study quantifies faulty gene's role in ovary cancer riskWomen who carry an inherited fault in the BRIP1 gene are three times more likely to develop ovarian cancer than those without it, researchers said Tuesday. The gene variant had already been linked to cancer of the ovaries, but the size of the additional risk has now been quantified in a study in the Journal of the US National Cancer Institute. The fault inhibited tissue cells from properly repairing their own DNA, causing genetic damage to build up over time, and leading to cancer, said the team.
 
 

Effort to curb overuse of antibiotics amid cold, flu seasons

 
‎19 ‎January ‎2016, ‏‎05:35:28 AMGo to full article
FILE - In this Oct. 8, 2013, file photo, a sign marks the entrance to the federal Centers for Disease Control and Prevention in Atlanta. Guidelines released Monday, Jan. 18, 2016, from CDC and the American College of Physicians, move beyond simple statements that antibiotics don't work for viruses like the common cold or the flu. They lay out how doctors begin deciding if antibiotics are warranted for some other common respiratory complaints, explain that decision to patients and offer guidance on symptom relief. (AP Photo/David Goldman, File)WASHINGTON (AP) — It's cold season, and the miserable continue to trudge in, seeking antibiotics because of mucus turned green, or a cough that has nagged for weeks.
 
 

Sleeping in on weekends may help reduce diabetes risk

 
‎18 ‎January ‎2016, ‏‎11:48:28 PMGo to full article
By Lisa Rapaport (Reuters Health) - Getting too little sleep during the week can increase some risk factors for diabetes, but sleeping late on weekends might help improve the picture, a small U.S. study suggests. Researchers conducted a sleep experiment with 19 healthy young men and found just four nights of sleep deprivation were linked to changes in their blood suggesting their bodies weren’t handling sugar as well as usual. “It gives us some hope that if there is no way to extend sleep during the week, people should try very hard to protect their sleep when they do get an opportunity to sleep in and sleep as much as possible to pay back the sleep debt,” said lead study author Josaine Broussard of the University of Colorado Boulder.
 

Ticks carrying Lyme disease in almost half of U.S. counties

 
‎18 ‎January ‎2016, ‏‎08:25:59 PMGo to full article
By Lisa Rapaport (Reuters Health) - Ticks that can spread Lyme disease now live in almost half of U.S. counties, according to a new study from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Varieties of the blacklegged tick that may carry bacteria responsible for Lyme disease are present in 45 percent of counties nationwide, compared with just 30 percent in 1998, researchers found. “It’s important for people to be aware that there may be ticks in areas where they haven’t seen them previously so that they can take steps to help protect themselves and their families,” lead study author Rebecca Eisen, a research biologist at the CDC, said by email.
 

U.S. deploys newly minted bird flu plan to protect humans, poultry

 
‎18 ‎January ‎2016, ‏‎03:29:24 PMGo to full article
By Tom Polansek and Julie Steenhuysen CHICAGO (Reuters) - U.S. farm and health officials are racing to assess the threat that a type of bird flu never before seen in the country poses to humans and poultry, employing emergency plans drawn up in the wake of a devastating outbreak in birds last year. The federal government sprang into action on Friday after confirmation overnight that the virus had hit an Indiana turkey farm, alerting other states to the danger and putting workers who might have been exposed to the virus under surveillance. Strains similar to the new virus, known as H7N8, have on rare occasions made people ill and the U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA), U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) and state officials aim to reduce the risk of human infection.
 

Cancer doctor thanks Bowie for helping people face death

 
‎18 ‎January ‎2016, ‏‎01:41:56 PMGo to full article
In this Tuesday, Jan. 12, 2016 photo, Rene Rivo, a Filipino David Bowie fan, plays a picture disc of Bowie's Hunky Dory on a turntable at his shop in suburban Paranaque, south of Manila, Philippines. Bowie, the chameleon-like star who transformed the sound - and the look - of rock with his audacious creativity and his sexually ambiguous makeup and costumes, died of cancer Sunday, Jan. 10. (AP Photo/Aaron Favila, File)LONDON (AP) — A British doctor who works with terminally ill people has thanked David Bowie for helping open up a conversation about death.
 

 

 

Launching cancer moonshot, Biden says politics impeding cure

 
‎16 ‎January ‎2016, ‏‎06:12:11 AMGo to full article
U.S. Vice President Joe Biden, right, speaks during a meeting with Guatemala's president-elect Jimmy Morales in Guatemala City, Thursday, Jan 14, 2016. Biden is on a one day trip to attend Morales' presidential inauguration. (AP Photo/Moises Castillo)PHILADELPHIA (AP) — Vice President Joe Biden launched a "moonshot" initiative Friday to hasten a cure for cancer, aiming to use his final year in office to break down barriers in the medical world he says are holding back progress on eradicating the dreaded disease.
 
 

Singer Celine Dion's husband, René Angélil, dies after cancer battle

 
‎16 ‎January ‎2016, ‏‎04:16:48 AMGo to full article
By Allison Lampert MONTREAL (Reuters) - René Angélil, the husband of award-winning Canadian singer Celine Dion, died on Thursday at the age of 73 after a long battle with cancer, Dion announced. "It's with profound sadness that we are announcing that René Angélil, 73, died this morning at his Las Vegas home after a courageous battle with cancer. "Other information will be provided in the next few days." The Canadian entertainment manager, who discovered Dion, 47, when she was 12-years-old and drove her career to stardom, married her in 1994 at a lavish wedding in Montreal's Notre Dame Basilica.
 

CDC says closely monitoring outbreak of new bird flu strain

 
‎15 ‎January ‎2016, ‏‎09:38:45 PMGo to full article
The U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention is closely monitoring individuals who may have been exposed to the new strain of bird flu that has been found in a flock of turkeys in Indiana, a CDC health official said on Friday. Dr. Michael Jhung, a medical officer at the CDC, said there is no evidence of human infection related to the new bird flu strain known as H7N8, but the agency and local health officials are not taking any chances. "There's always the possibility of implications to human health when you see a new flu virus in animals, like we're seeing now in turkeys," Jhung told Reuters in an interview.
 

U.S. finds first case of deadly bird flu in poultry since June

 
‎15 ‎January ‎2016, ‏‎06:48:17 PMGo to full article
By Tom Polansek CHICAGO (Reuters) - An Indiana turkey flock has been infected with a deadly type of bird flu in the first new case of the disease in U.S. poultry since June, the U.S. Department of Agriculture said on Friday. The flock in Dubois County, Indiana, was infected with a strain known as H7N8, which is different from strains that caused more than 48 million chickens and turkeys to die last year, according to the USDA. Indiana officials quarantined the farm with the infected turkeys and the birds are being killed to prevent the spread of the disease, the USDA said.
 

Study links food allergies to hyperactive immune system at birth

 
‎15 ‎January ‎2016, ‏‎02:14:01 PMGo to full article
The prevalence of food allergies has increased greatly over the last ten years.An Australian study, published this week in Science Translational Medicine, establishes a link between food allergies and an overactive immune system at birth. Food shopping can be a real headache for parents whose children who are allergic to milk, eggs, nuts or wheat. The causes of food allergies remain unknown and, for the time being, the medical profession has no means of preventing allergic reactions.
 
 

Sierra Leone Ebola victim exposed 27 others to disease: NGO report

 
‎15 ‎January ‎2016, ‏‎01:44:39 PMGo to full article
FREETOWN (Reuters) - A woman who died of Ebola this week in Sierra Leone potentially exposed at least 27 other people to the disease, raising the possibility of further transmission as a regional epidemic appeared nearly over, according to an aid agency report. The victim, a 22-year-old female student from Tonkolili district named Mariatu Jalloh, became ill at the beginning the year and died on Jan. 12 while living in a house with 22 people. She had sought medical attention at a local hospital but was treated as an outpatient. ...
 

Could it be possible to detect the onset of Alzheimer's by smell?

 
‎15 ‎January ‎2016, ‏‎11:52:12 AMGo to full article
Could it be possible to detect the onset of Alzheimer's by smell?A new study by a team of US researchers points to a possible new, non-invasive method for detecting the onset of Alzheimer's that uses smell. In the study, carried out by the Monell Center and the US Department of Agriculture as well as other collaborating institutions, the team of researchers studied three separate mice models, known as APP mice, which mimic Alzheimer's disease. Because Alzheimer's is a disease unique to humans, the mouse models are created to study the disease further.
 
 

Cancer 'moonshot' aims to speed fight against No. 2 killer

 
‎15 ‎January ‎2016, ‏‎10:38:38 AMGo to full article
FILE - In this Jan. 12, 2016 file-pool photo, Vice President Joe Biden points at President Barack Obama during the president's State of the Union address to a joint session of Congress on Capitol Hill in Washington. Harking back to America's triumphant race into space, the Obama administration is launching what it calls a "moonshot" effort to cure cancer. Don’t expect miracles in the president's last months, but there has been striking progress in recent years. (AP Photo/Evan Vucci, Pool, File)WASHINGTON (AP) — Harking back to America's triumphant race into space, the Obama administration is launching what it calls a "moonshot" effort to cure cancer.
 
 

Utility understated levels of cancer-causing chemical

 
‎15 ‎January ‎2016, ‏‎07:04:53 AMGo to full article
FILE - In this Jan. 7, 2016, file photo, a sign declares the boundary line of the Southern California Gas Co. gas fields where a gas well has been leaking methane daily near the community of Porter Ranch in Los Angeles. In trying to reassure the public there's no long-term health risk from the leak, Southern California Gas Co. has said in news releases and FAQs on its website that since the crisis began, just two air samples briefly showed elevated concentrations of the substance. But a closer look at the online data by The Associated Press and outside experts actually shows that a dozen samples from the Porter Ranch community contained at least twice the amount of benzene that Southern California air regulators consider the normal background level. (AP Photo/Michael Owen Baker, File)LOS ANGELES (AP) — The utility whose leaking natural gas well has driven thousands of Los Angeles residents from their homes acknowledged Thursday that it understated the number of times airborne levels of the cancer-causing chemical benzene have spiked during the crisis.
 
 

Q&A: Legionnaires' disease adds to water concerns in Flint

 
‎15 ‎January ‎2016, ‏‎05:07:03 AMGo to full article
DETROIT (AP) — A water crisis in Flint has focused mostly on the impact of drinking supplies containing lead that had leached from old plumbing after the city switched sources to save money. But Michigan officials stunned the community this week when they also reported an increase in Legionnaires' disease cases over the past two years in Genesee County, where Flint is located.
 

Delayed deaths declining among pediatric cancer survivors

 
‎15 ‎January ‎2016, ‏‎01:48:26 AMGo to full article
Sequera looks out the window while receiving chemotherapy treatment at a paediatric hospital in MaracaiboBy Gene Emery It's long been known that cancer survivors -- people alive five years after diagnosis -- face a higher risk of premature death, and doctors have made efforts over the decades to reduce those deaths. A new study of childhood cancer cases suggests that the effort has been successful, at least to some degree. Most people "kind of assume that if you hit the five-year time point, you've beaten your cancer and the story's over," chief author Dr. Gregory Armstrong of St. Jude Children's Research Hospital in Memphis told Reuters Health by phone.
 
 

Workouts focused on motor skills may help ease lower back pain

 
‎14 ‎January ‎2016, ‏‎11:48:30 PMGo to full article
A man jogs during a warm day in Central Park, New YorkBy Lisa Rapaport Reuters Health - Exercise focused on improving motor skills may work as well for easing lower back pain as other types of physical activity, a recent research review suggests. “The choice of exercise should be based on patient or therapist preferences and costs, as the current evidence suggests that there is no difference among the types of exercises,” said lead study author Bruno Saragiotto of the George Institute for Global Health at Sydney Medical School in Australia. Lower back pain is one of the leading causes of disability and doctor visits for adults worldwide, and the condition also has a significant economic impact in lost wages and productivity.
 
 

French duck, geese farmers to delay rearing due to bird flu

 
‎14 ‎January ‎2016, ‏‎11:17:47 PMGo to full article
A French farmer looks at ducks at a poultry farm in DoazitBy Sybille de La Hamaide PARIS (Reuters) - French poultry producers will halt new duck and goose production for several months to contain a bird flu virus outbreak that has spread in the southwest of the country, the farm ministry said. The highly pathogenic virus was found this week at a farm located outside a broad restriction zone set up last month to stop the spread of the disease that led a growing number of countries to ban French poultry products.
 
 

Poultry farming frozen for bird flu cleanup in French SW

 
‎14 ‎January ‎2016, ‏‎10:55:21 PMGo to full article
Poultry farmers in southwestern France have been ordered to freeze production of geese and ducks at least until late May 2016 as part of efforts to eradicate bird flu, the agriculture ministry saidPoultry farmers in southwestern France have been ordered to freeze production of geese and ducks at least until late May as part of efforts to eradicate bird flu, the agriculture ministry said Thursday. The highly virulent H5N1 strain of the virus was identified at a chicken farm in Dordogne in November, prompting several countries including Japan and China to ban French poultry imports. In late November, Japan also stopped importing French foie gras, a luxury food prized for festive celebrations but controversial because its production requires force-feeding the birds.
 
 

Spike in Legionnaire's disease in Michigan, amid water crisis

 
‎14 ‎January ‎2016, ‏‎04:51:45 PMGo to full article
Flint, Michigan residents get bottled water, water testing kits, and water filters at a Flint Fire Station January 13, 2016An outbreak of Legionnaires' disease over the past 18 months has killed 10 people in the US state of Michigan, where officials are dealing with a major health crisis over lead-contaminated water. "The state of Michigan is treating this situation with the same urgency and transparency as the lead response in the city of Flint," the health department said in a statement on the spike in Legionnaires' disease. Officials said that since June 2014, there have been 87 confirmed cases of Legionnaires' disease, a severe type of pneumonia caused by bacteria, resulting in 10 deaths.
 
 

Ukrainian health official says 25 people killed by swine flu

 
‎14 ‎January ‎2016, ‏‎01:32:49 PMGo to full article
KIEV (Reuters) - Twenty-five people have died from swine flu in Ukraine since the start of the flu season, Tetyana Dykhanovska, the director of the state flu center, told Reuters by phone on Thursday. She did not say when exactly the season started. On Wednesday, Health Minister Alexander Kvitashvili said the flu outbreak was not yet widespread enough to be considered an epidemic. Armenia also reported a swine flu outbreak this week. (Reporting by Pavel Polityuk; Writing by Alessandra Prentice; editing by Matthias Williams)
 

Pfizer says its CAR T cancer therapy could outshine rivals

 
‎14 ‎January ‎2016, ‏‎12:46:41 AMGo to full article
The Pfizer logo is pictured on the company's World Headquarters building in the Manhattan borough of New YorkBy Ransdell Pierson NEW YORK (Reuters) - Pfizer Inc aims to drive profits in coming years with more-responsive and easier-to-manufacture new cancer treatments. With its French partner Cellectis, Pfizer is in the early stages of developing new cancer treatments called CAR T cells it says has major medical and manufacturing advantages over similar cell therapies being developed by others. The treatments are T-cells, white blood cells that act as soldiers against foreign invaders, that have been genetically altered to make them better able to spot and attack cancer.
 
 

Hens culled after bird flu strain found on Scottish farm

 
‎13 ‎January ‎2016, ‏‎10:40:36 PMGo to full article
Hens are seen in cages at a state poultry farm on the outskirts of MinskThe Scottish government has ordered a cull of tens of thousands of hens after a mild strain of H5N1, or bird flu, was identified on a farm in Fife, it said on Wednesday. "Laboratory tests have identified a very mild strain of the H5N1 virus and a humane cull of almost 40,000 birds has now begun," a statement said.
 
 

The decades-long quest to cure cancer

 
‎13 ‎January ‎2016, ‏‎07:28:05 PMGo to full article
The decades-long quest to cure cancerUS President Barack Obama's announcement of a "moonshot" bid to cure cancer, continues a centuries-long quest to defeat a disease which kills over eight million people every year. There are more than 100 types of cancer, each with its own diagnosis and treatment. Surgery became common only in the 19th century with the advent of anaesthesia, and is still the standard cancer treatment today, often followed by radio- or chemotherapy to kill any remaining cancer cells.
 
 

Morphine for back pain tied to rapid changes in brain

 
‎13 ‎January ‎2016, ‏‎07:24:20 PMGo to full article
By Lisa Rapaport (Reuters Health) - Patients who take morphine pills for lower back pain may experience changes in the volume of the brain's gray matter in as little as a month, a small study suggests. In the 30-day experiment, researchers gave 11 patients daily morphine pills and 10 people placebos and then took magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scans to see if treatment impacted the brain. The morphine group had gray matter volume declines of about 3 percent in regions of the brain thought to regulate emotions, cravings and responses to pain and volume increases in areas believed to be responsible for learning, memory and executive function.

 

 

The decades-long quest to cure cancer

 
‎13 ‎January ‎2016, ‏‎06:02:33 PMGo to full article
Cancer treatments have developed with fits and starts since the disease -- which causes abnormal cells to multiply and spread, killing healthy ones -- was first identified more than 5,000 years agoUS President Barack Obama's announcement of a "moonshot" bid to cure cancer, continues a centuries-long quest to defeat a disease which kills over eight million people every year. There are more than 100 types of cancer, each with its own diagnosis and treatment. Surgery became common only in the 19th century with the advent of anaesthesia, and is still the standard cancer treatment today, often followed by radio- or chemotherapy to kill any remaining cancer cells.
 
 

Armenia says 10 people died from H1N1 swine flu

 
‎13 ‎January ‎2016, ‏‎04:42:47 PMGo to full article
YEREVAN (Reuters) - Ten people have died from H1N1 swine flu in Armenia in the last two months but there is no danger of a mass outbreak, a spokeswoman for the country's health ministry said on Wednesday. "Seven people died this year from H1N1 swine flu," Anahit Haytayan, the spokeswoman said. "Three more died at the end of last year." She said the deaths did not amount to an epidemic. (Reporting by Hasmik Mkrtchyan; Writing by Margarita Antidze; Editing by Andrew Osborn)
 

Bird flu outbreak found outside French restriction zone

 
‎13 ‎January ‎2016, ‏‎03:45:50 PMGo to full article
An avian flu outbreak has been identified in a town located outside a restriction zone the French farm ministry established last month in an effort to contain the highly infectious disease as a rising number of countries banned French poultry products. There have been 69 outbreaks of highly pathogenic bird flu found in eight administrative districts since Nov. 24 in southwestern France. "One new case was found in Haute-Garonne," a farm ministry official said, adding that France would therefore widen the restriction zone.
 

Obama launches mission to cure cancer 'once and for all'

 
‎13 ‎January ‎2016, ‏‎01:26:52 PMGo to full article
By Ayesha Rascoe WASHINGTON (Reuters) - U.S. President Barack Obama on Tuesday pledged to undertake a historic push to develop a cure for cancer, tapping Vice President Joe Biden to lead the effort. Obama, in the last State of the Union address of his presidency, said America must use its spirit of innovation to help tackle the challenge of cancer. "For the loved ones we've all lost, for the family we can still save, let's make America the country that cures cancer once and for all," Obama said.
 

Eating taters pre-pregnancy may boost diabetes risk

 
‎13 ‎January ‎2016, ‏‎01:41:25 AMGo to full article
Eating taters pre-pregnancy may boost diabetes riskEating lots of potatoes – especially chips or crisps – is linked to a higher risk for women of developing a type of diabetes that occurs during pregnancy, a study said Wednesday. Generally speaking, diabetes occurs when the body is no longer able to make enough insulin, a hormone that prompts cells in the body to absorb sugar from the blood for energy and storage. Up to now, the possible association between gestational diabetes and eating spuds had not been investigated.
 
 

Taking drugs for depression linked to better diabetes control

 
‎13 ‎January ‎2016, ‏‎12:30:49 AMGo to full article
By Lisa Rapaport (Reuters Health) - People who have both diabetes and depression may have an easier time keeping their blood sugar levels under control if they also take medication to address their mental health symptoms, a U.S. study suggests. Diabetics can be more prone to depression and stress than other individuals, and these mental health problems are linked to increased risks of dangerously high blood sugar levels and other serious complications, previous research has found. When diabetics do get depressed, however, taking antidepressants is linked to 95 percent higher odds that their blood sugar will be well controlled, the current study found.
 

Are You Making Any of These 4 Common Nutrition Mistakes?

 
‎12 ‎January ‎2016, ‏‎09:18:48 PMGo to full article
Are You Making Any of These 4 Common Nutrition Mistakes?Nutrition: One of the most confusing topics in today's generation.With different diets and fads coming out every other day, it can be hard to differentiate the truth from the myths.Regardless, here are four common nutrition mistakes that I have seen in my fitness career!
 
 

An interest in the arts can boost mental health

 
‎12 ‎January ‎2016, ‏‎07:19:53 PMGo to full article
An interest in the arts can boost mental healthIn a recent study, a team of researchers from The University of Western Australia have found that participating in the arts for just two hours a week can improve mental health and wellbeing. The participants were asked to complete a 15-minute telephone survey about their engagement in the arts, their mental wellbeing, and also their demographics such as sex, age, education level, and income.
 
 

Implanted coils help some lung disease patients, study says

 
‎12 ‎January ‎2016, ‏‎07:03:07 PMGo to full article
This undated photo provided by BTG PLC shows a rendering of the PneumRx Endobronchial Coil. A novel, minimally invasive way to treat severe breathing problems caused by lung disease showed modest but promising benefits in a small French study. The technique involves inserting several small metal alloy coils through a scope into the lungs, aiming to tighten diseased tissue and open up healthy airways. (BTG PLC via AP)CHICAGO (AP) — A novel, minimally invasive way to treat severe breathing problems caused by lung disease showed modest but promising benefits in a small French study.
 
 

Exercise helps prevent low back pain

 
‎12 ‎January ‎2016, ‏‎06:13:33 PMGo to full article
By Kathryn Doyle (Reuters Health) - Back pain is common and difficult to treat, but one effective strategy to help prevent it is exercise, according to a new review. “At present, a variety of interventions, such as exercise, education, back belts and shoe insoles, are commonly prescribed to prevent an episode of low back pain,” said lead author Daniel Steffens of the University of Sydney in Australia. The researchers reviewed 23 published reports of prevention strategies for nonspecific low back pain, including 21 randomized controlled trials.
 

Merck, BioLineRX to study drug combo to fight pancreatic cancer

 
‎12 ‎January ‎2016, ‏‎03:36:13 PMGo to full article
Israeli biopharmaceutical company BioLineRX Ltd said on Tuesday it would collaborate with U.S. industry heavyweight Merck to test a combination of drugs for the treatment of pancreatic cancer. The companies will partner in a mid-stage study to evaluate the safety and efficacy of the combination of BioLineRx's BL-8040 and Merck's Keytruda in patients with metastatic pancreatic adenocarcinoma. "Because certain tumors exhibit only a modest response to existing immunotherapies, we are increasingly seeing clinical studies involving combinations of immuno-oncology agents with other classes of drugs," said Kinneret Savitsky, BioLineRx's chief executive.
 

US guidelines urge breast cancer screening from age 50

 
‎12 ‎January ‎2016, ‏‎10:55:14 AMGo to full article
US guidelines urge breast cancer screening from age 50Women 50 and older should get a mammogram to screen for breast cancer every two years, while women in their 40s should decide with their doctors, said US guidelines Monday. The newest recommendations by the US Preventive Services Task Force stoked new controversy over what is best for women, who not long ago were urged to get a mammogram every year starting at age 40. The guidelines are based on findings from six independent research teams, which crafted "simulation models to analyze 10 different digital breast cancer screening strategies for the average-risk US female population," said a description of the work in the Annals of Internal Medicine.
 
 

U.S. panel finalizes breast cancer screening recommendations

 
‎12 ‎January ‎2016, ‏‎12:27:16 AMGo to full article
A monitor shows the image of a breast cancer at a centre run by the "Reto" Group for Full Recovery of Breast Cancer in Mexico CityUnder the U.S. Preventive Services Task Force guidelines, mammogram screening every two years for women 50 to 74 got a grade of "B", meaning doctors should offer the service. The society released new breast cancer screening guidelines in October pushing back the starting age for screening mammograms to 45 from 40, and recommending that younger women should have the choice to start screening as early as 40.
 
 

Why Are We Ignoring Diabetes Education?

 
‎11 ‎January ‎2016, ‏‎11:53:57 PMGo to full article
Why Are We Ignoring Diabetes Education?Diabetes is a self-managed condition. That means the person with diabetes must take care of it each and every day --- and know how to do so.There's an infinite amount of things they must know including how foods impact blood sugar, blood pressure and kidney health. The benefits of exercise and when it's dangerous to exercise. The importance of...
 
 

Celiac Disease Community: Looking to Go Beyond

 
‎11 ‎January ‎2016, ‏‎11:05:10 PMGo to full article
3 Psychological Factors That Directly Impact Online SalesA dear friend of mine watches her daughter battle cancer. Each day, she fears that she will do what every parent dreads most -- bury her child. But before her daughter had cancer, she had celiac disease. Their family has plenty of access to health care and excellent doctors, but they didn't know that there's a connection between celiac disease...
 
 

Take Action Against Lung Cancer

 
‎11 ‎January ‎2016, ‏‎07:18:50 PMGo to full article
3 Psychological Factors That Directly Impact Online SalesAs an actor, I know how to transform myself into a character onscreen that is vastly different from the person I am off-screen. Earlier this year, in partnership with Bristol-Myers Squibb, I took on a new leading role as part of a campaign to help increase public awareness around lung cancer -- the leading cause of cancer death worldwide and...
 
 

Heartburn pills linked to increased risk of kidney disease

 
‎11 ‎January ‎2016, ‏‎06:30:55 PMGo to full article
By Lisa Rapaport (Reuters Health) - People who take popular heartburn pills known as proton pump inhibitors (PPIs) may be more likely to develop chronic kidney disease than individuals who don’t use these drugs, a study suggests. The side effect is rare, and the study doesn't prove the drugs cause kidney failure. “There appears to be mounting observational evidence that PPIs – historically a class thought to be extremely safe – have some adverse effects,” said lead author Dr. Morgan Grams of Johns Hopkins University in Baltimore.
 

After Ebola, two other tropical diseases pose new threats

 
‎11 ‎January ‎2016, ‏‎04:09:02 PMGo to full article
Health workers wearing protective clothing prepare to carry an abandoned dead body presenting with Ebola symptoms at Duwala market in MonroviaBy Kate Kelland LONDON (Reuters) - A little-known bacterial disease may be killing as many people worldwide as measles, scientists said on Monday, while a mosquito-borne virus known as Zika is also raising global alarm. The spread of Ebola in West Africa last year shows how poorly-understood diseases can emerge and grow rapidly while researchers race to design and conduct the scientific studies needed to combat them. Researchers in the journal Nature Microbiology called for a bacterial infection called meliodosis, which is resistant to a wide range of antibiotics, to be given a higher priority by international health organizations and policy makers.
 
 

Suspected case of low risk bird flu found at Scottish farm

 
‎11 ‎January ‎2016, ‏‎12:10:51 PMGo to full article
A suspected case of avian flu has been discovered at a Scottish farm, Scotland's government said on Monday, adding it was believed to be a low risk form of the virus. A temporary 1 km (0.6 mile) control zone has been put in place around the farm in Fife north of the Scottish capital Edinburgh after a strain of H5 avian influenza was detected, the government said. "We have taken immediate action to contain this case as part of our robust procedures for dealing swiftly with avian flu," Scotland's Chief Veterinary Officer Sheila Voas said in a statement.

 

 

Sanofi deepens cancer drive with $1.2 bln of deals, Innate jumps

 
‎11 ‎January ‎2016, ‏‎10:27:28 AMGo to full article
The Sanofi logo is seen at the company's Sanofi Pasteur headquarters in LyonSanofi boosted its presence in cancer research on Monday by signing two deals with biotech companies worth up to $1.2 billion, as the French drugmaker plays catch-up with rivals in the hot research field. Shares in French biotech group Innate Pharma, one of the partners, jumped 15 percent on the news. Switzerland's Novartis also announced a deal with U.S.-based Surface Oncology to increase its immuno-oncology portfolio, although it did not give financial terms.
 
 

Illumina, partners make $100 million bet to detect cancer via blood test

 
‎11 ‎January ‎2016, ‏‎03:14:28 AMGo to full article
File photo of a nurse testing a blood sample during a free HIV test at a blood tests party in BangkokBy Julie Steenhuysen CHICAGO (Reuters) - Gene sequencing company Illumina Inc is going after the next big advance in cancer detection, working to develop a universal blood test to identify early-stage cancers in people with no symptoms of the disease. On Sunday, San Diego-based Illumina said it would form a new company, called Grail, with more than $100 million in Series A financing. Illumina will be the majority owner.
 
 

Emotions Impact Your Work -- So Why Don't Companies Take Mental Health Seriously?

 
‎10 ‎January ‎2016, ‏‎04:39:42 PMGo to full article
Emotions Impact Your Work -- So Why Don't Companies Take Mental Health Seriously?This story is part of our monthlong “Work Well” initiative, which focuses on thriving in the workplace. You can find more stories from this project here.One somewhat unfortunate reality of living in the United States is that health care is inexorably tied up with employment, for better or for worse.On the plus side, employers generally...
 
 

Iraq bans poultry imports from 24 countries over avian flu threat

 
‎10 ‎January ‎2016, ‏‎01:01:50 PMGo to full article
Workers from the Animal Protection Ministry cull chicks to contain an outbreak of bird flu, at a farm in the village of ModesteIraq has extended a ban on imports of frozen and live poultry products to cover two dozen countries, including China and South Africa, the government said on Sunday. Baghdad last month restricted poultry imports from France, where an outbreak of avian flu has been reported. The agriculture ministry could not be contacted for immediate comment, but a ministry spokesman previously said that the ban on French poultry was because of avian flu.

 

Exercise prescriptions important for type 2 diabetes

 
‎09 ‎January ‎2016, ‏‎01:42:19 AMGo to full article
Jogger runs along a snow covered path through Tiergarten after heavy snowfall in BerlinBy Kathryn Doyle Patients with type 2 diabetes should be given exercise “prescriptions” that specify the type, duration, intensity and frequency of workouts, adapted to the individual, according to a new review. Although exercise improves blood sugar control, insulin sensitivity, blood pressure and cholesterol levels, most people with diabetes do not engage in regular exercise, the authors write. “Exercise and physical activity can help to control type 2 diabetes,” said lead author Dr. Romeu Mendes of the Public Health Unit, ACES Douro I—Marao e Douro Norte in Vila Real, Portugal.
 
 

New U.S. cancer cases holding steady, deaths declining

 
‎09 ‎January ‎2016, ‏‎01:08:16 AMGo to full article
To match feature WITNESS-CANCER/DIAGNOSISBy Andrew M. Seaman The number of new cancer diagnoses in the U.S. is largely steady while the number of cancer deaths continues to decline, according to a new report from the nation's leading cancer advocacy group. This year, the U.S. will see nearly 1.7 million new cancer cases and nearly 600,000 cancer deaths, according to American Cancer Society projections published in CA: A Cancer Journal for Clinicians. The report's authors point out that cancer continues to be a leading cause of death in the U.S., however, and new diagnoses for some cancers are increasing.
 
 

Natalie Cole's death due to rare lung disease, heart failure

 
‎08 ‎January ‎2016, ‏‎09:51:50 PMGo to full article
Singer Natalie Cole sings at "An Evening of SeriousFun Celebrating the Legacy of Paul Newman" event in New York(Reuters) - Singer Natalie Cole died of a rare lung disease that was first diagnosed five years ago and led to heart failure, her family said. In the first official news on her cause of death on Dec. 31, the family of the Grammy-winning jazz, pop and soul singer said that Cole was diagnosed with idiopathic pulmonary arterial hypertension after a successful kidney transplant in 2009. "She responded well to pulmonary arterial hypertension specific agents over many years, during which she performed many concerts worldwide, but eventually succumbed to intractable right heart failure, an outcome that unfortunately commonly occurs in this progressive disorder," her family said in a statement on Friday.
 
 

WHO approves S. Korean producer to double cholera vaccine supply

 
‎08 ‎January ‎2016, ‏‎09:44:08 PMGo to full article
An Iraqi girl receives a dose of cholera vaccine at a camp in Basra on November 1, 2015The World Health Organization said Friday it had approved a South Korean company as the third producer of an oral vaccine against cholera, in a bid to double global stockpiles and address dire shortages. The oral vaccine used to fight epidemics of the acute diarrhoeal infection, which can kill within hours due to rapid dehydration, is scarce and until now only used in rare cases to urgently stop the spread of the disease. WHO said it had approved South Korean biopharmaceutical firm EUBiologics to make the vaccine, implying "a potential doubling of the available vaccine for this year," to six million doses, Stephen Martin of WHO's epidemic diseases unit told reporters in Geneva.
 
 

Q&A on UK's new drinking guidelines, alcohol link to cancer

 
‎08 ‎January ‎2016, ‏‎08:45:06 PMGo to full article
FILE - In this Monday, March 16, 2009 file photo, a man walks by a wines and spirits shop in central London. British health officials say that drinking any alcohol regularly increases the risk of cancer, in tough new guidelines that could be hard to swallow for a nation where having a pint is a hallowed tradition. In recommendations released on Friday, Jan. 8, 2016, Britain’s Chief Medical Officer advised both men and women not to drink any more than 14 units of alcohol, or about six pints of beer a week _ that still carries a low risk of liver disease or cancer. (AP Photo/Sang Tan, File)LONDON (AP) — British health officials say drinking alcohol regularly increases the risk of cancer. And they've issued tough new guidelines that could prove hard to swallow in a nation where having a pint is a hallowed tradition.
 
 

Exercise may improve quality of life for some cancer patients

 
‎08 ‎January ‎2016, ‏‎07:55:54 PMGo to full article
By Lisa Rapaport (Reuters Health) - Exercise may help improve quality of life for some cancer patients during treatment as well as afterward, a new analysis of previous research suggests. “Most patients, oncologists and surgical oncologists assume that patients with cancer should rest, especially if they are treated with chemotherapy,” said study co-author Dr. Arnaud Vincent, a neurosurgeon at Erasmus MC in Rotterdam, The Netherlands. “However, exercise has a lot of beneficial effects in healthy people as we know by now, so why not for patients treated for cancer?
 

WHO approves third cholera vaccine producer

 
‎08 ‎January ‎2016, ‏‎12:38:18 PMGo to full article
A third producer of oral cholera vaccine has been approved that is expected to provide 3 million doses in 2016, the World Health Organization said on Friday, doubling the world's stockpile against a disease that can kill within hours. EuBiologics, a South Korea-based producer, joins Shantha Biotechnics of Sanofi Pasteur as a pre-qualified supplier, WHO expert Stephen Martin told a news briefing. The third producer, which currently does not have doses in the stockpile, is Sweden's Crucell, he said.
 

Roche says encouraged by cancer drug atezolizumab study

 
‎08 ‎January ‎2016, ‏‎08:58:39 AMGo to full article
Swiss drugmaker Roche's logo is seen at their headquarters in Basel, SwitzerlandSwiss drugmaker Roche Holding released on Friday what it called encouraging results from a study of its closely watched cancer immunotherapy atezolizumab. Roche, the world's biggest maker of cancer drugs, said a mid-stage trial of atezolizumab in people with locally advanced or metastatic urothelial carcinoma (mUC), showed median overall survival of 11.4 months in people with higher levels of PD-L1 expression and 7.9 months in the overall study population. It showed that 84 percent of people who responded to atezolizumab continued to respond regardless of their PD-L1 status when the results were assessed with longer median follow-up of 11.7 months.
 
 

Malaria treatment fails in Cambodia because of drug resistance: researchers

 
‎08 ‎January ‎2016, ‏‎01:36:39 AMGo to full article
An Anopheles stephensi mosquito obtains a blood meal from a human host through its pointed proboscis in this handout photoBy Alex Whiting LONDON (Thomson Reuters Foundation) - Malaria-carrying parasites in parts of Cambodia have developed resistance to a major drug used to treat the disease in Southeast Asia, according to research published on Thursday in The Lancet Infectious Diseases journal. The drug piperaquine, used in combination with the drug artemisinin, has been the main form of malaria treatment in Cambodia since 2008. The combination is also one of the few treatments still effective against multi drug-resistant malaria which has emerged in Southeast Asia in recent years, and which experts fear may spread to other parts of the world.
 
 

Cancer now No. 1 killer in 22 states, ahead of heart disease

 
‎07 ‎January ‎2016, ‏‎05:44:46 PMGo to full article
FILE - In this Tuesday, Aug. 4, 2015 file photo, a nurse places a patient's chemotherapy medication on an intravenous stand at a hospital in Philadelphia. A report released on Thursday, Jan. 7, 2016 says cancer is the second leading cause of death nationally, after heart disease. Cancer death rates have been falling for nearly 25 years, but heart disease death rates have been falling at a steeper rate. (AP Photo/Matt Rourke, File)NEW YORK (AP) — Cancer is becoming the No. 1 killer in more and more states as deaths from heart disease have declined, new health statistics show.
 
 

Does cancer screening save lives? Unclear, researchers say

 
‎07 ‎January ‎2016, ‏‎05:36:41 PMGo to full article
A monitor shows the image of a breast cancer at a centre run by the "Reto" Group for Full Recovery of Breast Cancer in Mexico CityBy Lisa Rapaport Reuters Health - Bigger studies are needed to tell whether cancer screening really saves lives, according to a new analysis. While cancer screening may be linked to fewer deaths from tumors, finding cancers doesn't necessarily save lives when fatalities from all causes are taken into account, the authors point out. It’s also possible that any reduction in cancer deaths due to screening may be offset by fatalities connected to harmful effects of the tests themselves or of unnecessary treatments.
 
 

6 Ways To Fight The Flu You Probably Overlooked

 
‎07 ‎January ‎2016, ‏‎04:42:38 PMGo to full article
If you could avoid the misery of the flu -- the fever, the aches, the knives in your throat -- wouldn't you? Wouldn't anyone? Yet most of us don't take the proper precautions. In fact, nearly 60 percent of American adults fail to get their annual flu shot. If you're one of them, please take care of it now! And don't stop there—consider...
 

Shortage of malaria drug points to better tool vs Ebola

 
‎07 ‎January ‎2016, ‏‎01:17:35 AMGo to full article
A medical worker relays Ebola patient details and updates to a colleague at an MSF facility in Kailahun, on August 15, 2014As doctors struggled to treat growing numbers of patients during the Ebola crisis in West Africa, the shortage of one helpful drug may have led to the discovery of a better one. The results of a study published Wednesday in the New England Journal of Medicine show that Ebola patients given an anti-malarial drug called artesunate–amodiaquine (ASAQ) had a 31 percent lower risk of dying than those given the standard treatment for the mosquito-borne disease. The study came about when a treatment center run by Doctors Without Borders in Foya, Liberia, "ran out of its supply of artemether–lumefantrine (AL) after a sudden spike in admissions to the center" in August 2014, said the report.
 
 

Wage gap could drive women's depression, anxiety, study finds

 
‎07 ‎January ‎2016, ‏‎12:54:03 AMGo to full article
By Sebastien Malo NEW YORK (Thomson Reuters Foundation) - The U.S. wage gap could be making women ill, says a new study showing women with lower incomes than their male counterparts are more likely to suffer from depression and anxiety. The risk of women who make less money than men developing an anxiety disorder is more than four times higher, said the study by researchers at New York's Columbia University who compared women and men with matching education and work experiences. Women earning less than their male counterparts faced odds of diagnosed depression nearly 2.5 times higher, said the study, published in the journal Social Science & Medicine.
 

H1N1 flu virus kills 14 in Costa Rica

 
‎06 ‎January ‎2016, ‏‎11:21:12 PMGo to full article
Costa Rica has purchased 950,000 vaccine doses against the H1N1 virus and will start injecting them from AprilSan José (AFP) - The H1N1 flu virus killed at least 14 people in Costa Rica over the past month, health authorities said Wednesday, but reassured that they did not see the illness causing a public emergency. "There are 14 confirmed cases given by the influenza laboratory" in the University of Costa Rica's health research institute, Health Minister Fernando Llorca told a news conference. The head of the country's social security agency, Rocio Saenz, said the virus -- also known as "swine flu" -- appeared to be propagating normally and there was no cause for alarm.
 
 

Overweight young adults can reduce diabetes risk if they lose weight early enough: study

 
‎06 ‎January ‎2016, ‏‎07:25:21 PMGo to full article
Overweight young adults can reduce diabetes risk if they lose weight early enough: studyNew research has found that the risk of diabetes associated with obesity can be reversed if obese young people make efforts to lose weight before middle-age. The team of researchers from St George's University of London wanted to look at the effect of BMI in earlier life on the risk of heart attack, stroke or diabetes in later life, three major diseases in which obesity is an established risk factor. To look at a possible link the team measured the body mass index (BMI) of 7735 middle-aged men between 40 and 59 years of age.
 
 

Hong Kong on holiday health alert after China bird flu death

 
‎06 ‎January ‎2016, ‏‎09:47:28 AMGo to full article
A farmer walks past baskets of newly hatched ducklings in a hatch room at a poultry egg trading market in WuzhenA woman in the southern Chinese city of Shenzhen has died after being infected with the highly contagious H5N6 bird flu virus, days after she was admitted to hospital, Hong Kong's Health Department said on Wednesday. All border check points between Shenzhen and Hong Kong, and the airport, had already introduced disease prevention measures with thermal imaging systems in place, a department spokesman said. Hong Kong culled thousands of chickens and suspended imports of live poultry from mainland China in December 2014 after a H7 bird flu strain was discovered in live chickens.
 
 

What Obama's Executive Action Means for Mental Health Funding

 
‎06 ‎January ‎2016, ‏‎04:20:00 AMGo to full article
What Obama's Executive Action Means for Mental Health FundingThe president announced today that he is proposing new steps that he says will help decrease injuries and deaths related to gun violence, including new proposals to bolster access to mental health care. President Obama, speaking to reporters at the White House this afternoon, described how his proposals would work. "For every family who never imagined that their loved one would be taken by a bullet from a gun, every time I think about those kids it gets me mad,” Obama said.
 
 

Eli Lilly's diabetes pill takes market share from J&J, Astra

 
‎06 ‎January ‎2016, ‏‎01:37:09 AMGo to full article
Eli Lilly and Co's new Jardiance diabetes treatment has begun stealing market share from rival drugs in its class, the company said on Tuesday, bolstered by clinical trial data showing it slashed deaths by 32 percent in patients with Type 2 diabetes. In a three-year study whose results were released last summer, Jardiance became the first diabetes therapy to show robust ability to reduce cardiovascular death. Jardiance, which won U.S. approval last year, belongs to a new family of treatments called SGLT2 inhibitors that include Johnson & Johnson's $1.3 billion-a-year Invokana and AstraZeneca Plc's Farxiga.
 

For working-age cancer survivors, debt and bankruptcy are common

 
‎05 ‎January ‎2016, ‏‎11:19:51 PMGo to full article
By Kathryn Doyle (Reuters Health) - One third of working-age cancer survivors go into debt, and 3 percent file for bankruptcy, according to a new study. Cancer care costs have increased two to three times faster than other healthcare expenses in recent years in the U.S., the authors wrote. The average monthly cost of a new cancer therapy agent is now $10,000 and can be as high as $60,000.
 

Study shows higher cancer risk among twins, siblings

 
‎05 ‎January ‎2016, ‏‎10:33:14 PMGo to full article
Study shows higher cancer risk among twins, siblingsTwins share the same genes, and when one gets cancer, the other faces a higher risk of getting sick too, according to a study Tuesday that included 200,000 people. In fact, the amount of increased risk of cancer was just 14 percent higher in identical pairs in which one twin was diagnosed with cancer. Identical twins develop from the same egg and share the exact same genetic material.
 
 

Cancer study shows higher risk among twins, siblings

 
‎05 ‎January ‎2016, ‏‎06:58:20 PMGo to full article
The amount of increased risk of cancer was just 14 percent higher in identical pairs in which one twin was diagnosed with cancer, the study published in the American Medical Association (JAMA) saidTwins share the same genes, and when one gets cancer, the other faces a higher risk of getting sick too, according to a study Tuesday that included 200,000 people. In fact, the amount of increased risk of cancer was just 14 percent higher in identical pairs in which one twin was diagnosed with cancer. Identical twins develop from the same egg and share the exact same genetic material.
 
 

The Italian Mob Is To Blame For Naples' High Cancer Rates

 
‎05 ‎January ‎2016, ‏‎06:26:00 PMGo to full article
The Italian Mob Is To Blame For Naples' High Cancer RatesROME (AP) -- An Italian parliament-mandated health survey has confirmed higher-than-normal incidents of death and cancer among residents in and around Naples, thanks to decades of toxic waste dumping by the local Camorra mob.The report by the National Institute of Health said it was "critical" to address the rates of babies in the provinces of...
 
 

5 Old-Time Diseases That Are Making a Comeback

 
‎05 ‎January ‎2016, ‏‎12:36:07 AMGo to full article
5 Old-Time Diseases That Are Making a ComebackBy Michael GollustMeasles, tuberculosis... bubonic plague?! If headlines about old-time diseases on the comeback have you worried, you're not alone. Here's what you need to know to stay safe (and sane) amid recent outbreaks.PlagueThink this notorious killer died with the Middle Ages? The disease actually persists in parts of Africa, Asia, and...
 
 

Risk of heart damage follows some childhood cancer survivors

 
‎05 ‎January ‎2016, ‏‎12:13:47 AMGo to full article
A young cancer patient plays at the opening of a summer camp outside the King Hussein Cancer center in AmmanBy Lisa Rapaport (Reuters Health) - Childhood cancer survivors may face an increased risk of heart damage after exposure to certain chemotherapy and radiation treatments, a U.S. analysis suggests. Previous research has linked cancer drugs known as anthracyclines to weakening of the heart muscle. Research has also tied some radiation therapy to cardiac rhythm disorders and structural damage in arteries and valves.

 

 

Sugar in Western diets can increase the risk of cancer according to new study

 
‎04 ‎January ‎2016, ‏‎01:21:03 PMGo to full article
Sugar in Western diets can increase the risk of cancer according to new studyA new U.S. study has found that the high levels of sugar in the typical Western diet could increase the risk and spread of breast cancer. In the study, funded by the National Institutes of Health, the breast cancer animal models were mice that had been genetically modified for breast cancer research, before being randomly placed into 4 different groups. Each group was then fed a different diet with varying levels of sugar until the mice reached 6 months of age.
 
 

Italy confirms higher cancer, death rates from mob dumping

 
‎02 ‎January ‎2016, ‏‎08:42:06 PMGo to full article
FILE -- In this Nov. 18, 2013 photo, rubbish is piled up on the edge of cultivated land near Caivano, in the surroundings of Naples, southern Italy. An Italian parliament-mandated health survey has confirmed higher-than-normal incidents of death and cancer among residents in and around Naples, thanks to decades of toxic waste dumping by the local Camorra mob. The report by the National Institute of Health said it was "critical" to address the rates babies in the provinces of Naples and Caserta being hospitalized in the first year of life for "excessive" instances of tumors, especially brain tumors. (AP Photo/Salvatore Laporta)ROME (AP) — An Italian parliament-mandated health survey has confirmed higher-than-normal incidents of death and cancer among residents in and around Naples, thanks to decades of toxic waste dumping by the local Camorra mob.
 

 

 

 

Weathering the Coming Storm


 

 

 

Price R399.00

 

 


 

Description

Dr. Chuck Missler, an internationally known business executive, outlines our current economic predicament and defensive steps you can take to lessen the impact of the impending economic crisis. As a Bible teacher for over 30 years with a ministry reaching over 40 countries, Chuck shares some key strategies to prepare yourself spiritually and practically.

Is the World facing another major economic upheaval?

What is the best strategy to protect your family in times of economic uncertainty?

The Church has enjoyed a relatively peaceful existence in the West for a few centuries but the with the coming persecution, how do we go about organizing home study and home-church?

Soul Survival – Keeping your “lamp full” during the hard times ahead.

Join Dr. Chuck Missler and Ron Matsen in the Executive Brie fing Room of
The River Lodge, New Zealand, in an intensive summary outlining what lies
ahead and how we can prepare for the coming storm.

Runtime: Approx. 5 hours

© 2012 Koinonia House Inc.

Available in the following formats:

 

DVD:

•3 Disks
•5 M4A Files
•1 PDF Notes File
•Color, 16:9, Dolby Digital 2.0 stereo, Region encoding (This DVD will be viewable in other countries WITH the proper DVD player and television set.)


 
 

Expectations

 of the

 Antichrist

 

 

Dr. Chuck Missler and Ron Matsen

 

Price R 499.00

 

There are many diverse anticipations concerning the Coming World Leader, commonly referred to as “The Antichrist.” This study will explore the Biblical descriptions with the specific expectations of the globalists, Islam, the Vatican, Freemasonry, and others.
• Will he be a Nephilim?
• Why is the Vatican openly preparing to receive an “alien” visitor?
• Will he be a resurrection of Nimrod? Is his DNA a factor?
• What are the expectations of transhumanist technologists in this regard?
Clearly, the Bible has much more to illuminate this issue far beyond the popular conceptions; and yet the composite perspective will astonish most. Furthermore, is there a climactic cosmic deception being prepared that, if it were possible, “it would deceive the very elect”? Jesus commanded us, “Be not deceived.” But, how?
How close are these events to our current horizon?
Join Dr. Chuck Missler and Ron Matsen in an intensive summary of some of the Strategic Trends that will impact all of us.
Available in the following formats:

DVD:
•3 Discs
•6 M4A Files
•1 PDF Notes File
•Color, Fullscreen 16:9, Dolby Digital 2.0 stereo, Region  encoding ( This DVD will be viewable in other countries WITH the proper DVD player and television set.)


 

 

 

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Featured Video

End the Shame. End the Isolation. End Fistula.

 

 

 

 

 
 

 

Genetically Modified Food & People.

 

 

 

 Angels, Volume III:

The Denizens of the Metacosm

 

DVD

 

 

Price R 179.00

 

Angels, Volume III: The Denizens of the Metacosm

 

DVD

by Dr. Chuck Missler

 

Description

Volumes 1 & 2 of this series explored the finite limits and boundaries of our physical reality. After probing the limits of both the Macrocosm and the Microcosm, we discovered that our reality is but a shadow of larger reality, the Metacosm, a domain of extra-dimensional transfers and other paradoxical phenomena.

 

Volume 3 explores the contradictory behavior of UFOs and other demonic deceptions characteristic of the End Times. Explore these topics in more detail in either this two-hour briefing, Angels Vol 3: The Denizens of the Metacosm or our six-hour extensive study, Expectations of the Antichrist.

 

 

• Are they real?

• Why do UFOs enjoy a military classification higher than our most sensitive weapons systems?

• Why are the events which occurred in Roswell New Mexico still classified after 66 years?

• Why is the Vatican openly preparing to receive an Alien Visitor?

• How should a Christian deal with the occurrences of Alien abductions?

• Jesus admonished us to “Be not deceived.” How?

• How do we prepare for the deception which, “if it were possible, would deceive the very elect”?

 

Join Dr. Chuck Missler in the Executive Briefing Room of the River Lodge, New Zealand, exploring the misinformation, (and deliberate disinformation) about the various “denizens of the Metacosm” and other insights of the invisible war unfolding on our near horizon.

 

This briefing pack contains 2 hours of teaching

 

Available in the following formats

 

DVD:

•1 Disc

•2 M4A Files

•Color, Fullscreen 16:9, Dolby Digital 2.0 stereo, Region. This DVD will be viewable in other countries WITH the proper DVD player and television set.)

 

DVD

PRICE  R 159.00

DVD

PRICE R 159.00

 

DVD

Price  R 159.00

 

DVD

Price R 159.00

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


Global Events Disaster Site


Extreme Weather, Epidemic, Terror Attack, Biological Hazard,

Volcano Eruption, Earthquake, Incidents at Sea

 

 

"In seasons of severe trial, the Christian has nothing on earth that he can trust to, and is therefore compelled to cast himself on God alone. When no human deliverance can avail, he must simply and entirely trust himself to the providence and care of God. Happy storm that wrecks a man on such a rock as this! O blessed hurricane that drives the soul to God--and God alone!"
- Spurgeon

 

 

 

 

+27 11 969 0086


frosty@khouseafrica.com   

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


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Learn the Bible

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